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Somewhere Over the Rainbow, I've Lost My Damn Mind: A Manic's Mood Chart

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I figure that if I have to endure the worst parts of bipolar disorder, like psychosis, I get to laugh as much as possible along the way. Somewhere Over the Rainbow, I've Lost My Damn Mind: A Manic's Mood Chart is the story of one Millennial's bipolar life, with moments ranging from the ridiculous to the terrifying to the hilarious. Blending pop culture references and cyber I figure that if I have to endure the worst parts of bipolar disorder, like psychosis, I get to laugh as much as possible along the way. Somewhere Over the Rainbow, I've Lost My Damn Mind: A Manic's Mood Chart is the story of one Millennial's bipolar life, with moments ranging from the ridiculous to the terrifying to the hilarious. Blending pop culture references and cyberspeak with psychiatric terms, it combines the funny, conversational tone of Sh*t My Dad Says with a nonlinear narrative structure similar to that of Manic. The book began as a blog: if you had a delusional relationship with Britney Spears, wouldn't you brag about it to the entire world? To create the book, I organized the blog entries like a mood chart, a therapeutic tool which assigns colors of the rainbow to states of mind. The entries are divided into three sections, Depressed, Normal and Elevated, and cover the past three years: my psych ward getaways, my vision of fighting alongside Jesus at Armageddon, my attempts to find a woman who accepts that I sometimes lose my mind. Therapy "sessions" with a fictional psychiatrist provide my present-day reflections on each entry. (I had to create my ideal shrink because I tend to fight with the real ones.) Somewhere Over the Rainbow will be the first humorous memoir about bipolar by a member of the Millennial Generation-today's young adults. Because it doesn't follow the usual narrative format, the reader can flip through at random or take the traditional cover-to-cover route. My book's humor, pop culture references and Internet origins will appeal to Millennials, now entering their twenties and thirties, as well as younger Gen Xers. More than an account of coming to terms with a mental health condition, it's a story of being young and feeling lost, dealing with heartbreak and still finding plenty to laugh about, no matter what happens.


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I figure that if I have to endure the worst parts of bipolar disorder, like psychosis, I get to laugh as much as possible along the way. Somewhere Over the Rainbow, I've Lost My Damn Mind: A Manic's Mood Chart is the story of one Millennial's bipolar life, with moments ranging from the ridiculous to the terrifying to the hilarious. Blending pop culture references and cyber I figure that if I have to endure the worst parts of bipolar disorder, like psychosis, I get to laugh as much as possible along the way. Somewhere Over the Rainbow, I've Lost My Damn Mind: A Manic's Mood Chart is the story of one Millennial's bipolar life, with moments ranging from the ridiculous to the terrifying to the hilarious. Blending pop culture references and cyberspeak with psychiatric terms, it combines the funny, conversational tone of Sh*t My Dad Says with a nonlinear narrative structure similar to that of Manic. The book began as a blog: if you had a delusional relationship with Britney Spears, wouldn't you brag about it to the entire world? To create the book, I organized the blog entries like a mood chart, a therapeutic tool which assigns colors of the rainbow to states of mind. The entries are divided into three sections, Depressed, Normal and Elevated, and cover the past three years: my psych ward getaways, my vision of fighting alongside Jesus at Armageddon, my attempts to find a woman who accepts that I sometimes lose my mind. Therapy "sessions" with a fictional psychiatrist provide my present-day reflections on each entry. (I had to create my ideal shrink because I tend to fight with the real ones.) Somewhere Over the Rainbow will be the first humorous memoir about bipolar by a member of the Millennial Generation-today's young adults. Because it doesn't follow the usual narrative format, the reader can flip through at random or take the traditional cover-to-cover route. My book's humor, pop culture references and Internet origins will appeal to Millennials, now entering their twenties and thirties, as well as younger Gen Xers. More than an account of coming to terms with a mental health condition, it's a story of being young and feeling lost, dealing with heartbreak and still finding plenty to laugh about, no matter what happens.

30 review for Somewhere Over the Rainbow, I've Lost My Damn Mind: A Manic's Mood Chart

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ryelor

    First of all, Thanks to Derek (the author) and Goodreads for the copy they sent me. Derek personalized my copy, which was a pretty cool surprise. (If you're reading this, Derek, I'm not sure if I know your cousin but all say "hi" to all the Thompson's I know.) This book seemed very interesting as I read the description and entered the give-away. I'm glad I won it. The book was EXTREMELY interesting and very insightful. Hopefully this review will help other goodreaders to pick up a copy, read it, First of all, Thanks to Derek (the author) and Goodreads for the copy they sent me. Derek personalized my copy, which was a pretty cool surprise. (If you're reading this, Derek, I'm not sure if I know your cousin but all say "hi" to all the Thompson's I know.) This book seemed very interesting as I read the description and entered the give-away. I'm glad I won it. The book was EXTREMELY interesting and very insightful. Hopefully this review will help other goodreaders to pick up a copy, read it, and then share it with others. "Somewhere Over the Rainbow, I've Lost My Damn Mind" is a glimpse into the thoughts and life of a man who suffers from bipolar mood disorder (BMD) classified by psychosis and hallucinations. When reading that you may think, "Wow, this guy must permanently live in the psych ward of his local hospital." But the truth is, Derek is a guy who you or I might know, might share a seat with on the bus, might walk past in a grocery store. He loves sports, girls, a good laugh, drinking with his buddies, and spending time with his family—he's doing his best to live a normal life. Mixed between the normalcy are moments of difficulty, just like anyone else. The only difference is instead of dealing with anger, sadness, work issues, family struggles, financial worries—things all of us deal with—he has an additional problem, one that defines and at times consumes him. The book is a compilation of blog entries Derek has written throughout the last few years, categorized by seven colors ranging from violet to red, representing the varying degrees of severity between depression and mania. The book starts at violet, or severely depressed. Through the pages working your way to red, or severely manic, you get to know Derek, his likes, dreams, hopes, aspirations. You learn that he is a a regular guy, doing his best to learn how to live with his BMD, one day at a time. You go through all the ups and downs of the rollercoaster ride that is his emotions. I found his narrative engaging. There is a raw truthfulness to what he writes—a mixture of joviality and pain, fun and frustration. Between the lightheartedness, irreverent humor and silly prose, Derek bears his soul in such an open manner that his vulnerability endears you to him. You see his heart, feel the weight of his worries, pull for him, cry for him, laugh and hope with him. While you accompany him on his journey, you learn about BMD—not so much in a "textbook" sort of way, but in a "been there done that" kind of way. I used to work with a woman who was diagnosed with BMD. I remember a lot of the other employees talking about her behind her back, calling her "crazy," "nuts," and all the other insensitive synonyms we use for mental illnesses. I liked her—thought she was nice. A little erratic at times, but she was fun, witty, and very creative. Come to fund out that people with BMD are generally very creative people—in fact, many famous composers, poets, and artists have been diagnosed as bipolar. Derek added a few poems he'd written into the text. The poems are simple, but . . . beautiful. While his prose is far from perfect, it is very inviting, colloquial, full of anecdotes and inside jokes—some you get and some you don't. By the end, however, you feel like you've made friends with Derek; you sympathize with him and hope that the final chapter—the one he has yet to write—will be as full of hope and faith as this book. I hope Derek never gives up his fight against bipolar mood disorder and that through this book he'll be able to raise awareness about BMD and possibly help others who are affected by it. Derek: If you read this, thank you for the book. I thoroughly enjoyed it. And as you wrote, I hope you are able to keep "coming correct."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ira Therebel

    I think this book just wasn't for me. Obviously judging by getting mainly high ratings most people liked it, while for me it was just ok. Not bad, but not a book i would rate as "i liked it". The topic is of interest to me. I like both memoirs as well as psychology. I guess the way it was presented just wasn't my thing. It isn't just because it was a blog. I knew about it before I got it, and while I am not a big follower of blogs I do think that they can make great books sometimes. There were se I think this book just wasn't for me. Obviously judging by getting mainly high ratings most people liked it, while for me it was just ok. Not bad, but not a book i would rate as "i liked it". The topic is of interest to me. I like both memoirs as well as psychology. I guess the way it was presented just wasn't my thing. It isn't just because it was a blog. I knew about it before I got it, and while I am not a big follower of blogs I do think that they can make great books sometimes. There were several entries which I really enjoyed. The thoughts on music as universal language for example was great. And in several situations I could relate to him, because manic or not we often as people face similar situations. But all in all when I read a non fiction book I at the end ask myself how much did I get out of this book, and in this case it wasn't too much. I didn't feel like I got to know the author nor that I got a better understanding of BMD. I think one of the things was the structure. Instead of going chronologically it is divided by the mood. Of course the entries have their date on them and as it says in the book we can just go by it and read it the way we please. But going through the chapters trying to sort it chronologically would be too much of a task. Would be easier if it was the other way around and one would look for the next entry of the mood color one is reading at the moment. I am sure the author had his own ideas why to sort it this way, but to me it would be better to see the whole roller coaster and see what preceded the different mood changes. Also I was not always sure if he was in this particular mood when it was happening or when he was writing it down. It seemed both possibilities in different cases. I liked the idea of sessions at the end of each entry. But the problem was that most of them were, not to sound harsh, kind of useless. I would not expect some great analysis by a psychologist but it would be nice if there would be a bit of it. Some of the session entries did provide it, others brought some interesting statistics and others just didn't tell me why this particular memory is in any way relevant. I like how the author uses his humor to deal with it. Me and him have different humor, I am more of a Ricky Gervais person. But there is no bad humor, just different one and it will be good for many other readers. I can see this book be especially good for people who deal with the same issue or have relatives who do so they can relate to it more. Based on what is said in some of the entries this is exactly what Derek Thompson would like this book to be for. As for making BMD more understandable for general public, I think it worked for many people based on the reviews that came before mine. And people like me will just get to read something else to find out more. As long as people will keep on sharing their experience it will be out there and get more understanding of it. *I got this book for free through goodreads giveaways*

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    If you enjoy reading Internet Blogs and would like to enter the mind of a person that is living with "Bipolar Manic Depression" disorder, this is the book for you! Whew! Finally finished reading this book I won thru Goodreads contests. Usually I would not read a book such as this. I enjoy reading mysteries/suspense and generally novels with a plot...a beginning & an end. This is not a book I would normally purchase at a book store or online (eBook editions included). This book took me forever If you enjoy reading Internet Blogs and would like to enter the mind of a person that is living with "Bipolar Manic Depression" disorder, this is the book for you! Whew! Finally finished reading this book I won thru Goodreads contests. Usually I would not read a book such as this. I enjoy reading mysteries/suspense and generally novels with a plot...a beginning & an end. This is not a book I would normally purchase at a book store or online (eBook editions included). This book took me forever to read. My mind kept on loosing track of what I was reading and ended up rereading a lot of the paragraphs as I tried to stay focused to what the writer was trying to relay to his readers. The dates of his Blog are clearing marked at each entry, but they are not in chronological order by date but by the level of manic depression the writer was experiencing at the time of his entry to his blog, so it really doesn't "tell" a story as I'm use to reading. I did enjoy "seeing" what goes thru the mind of someone that is bipolar and it did opened up an understanding of the disorder to me as I do know a person with these same manic problems.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ralph Hogan

    I was not sure what to expect when reading this book, especially when I read the intro and fount it to be based on a blog. However, Derek Thompson's book is amazingly humorous and witty. Despite the troubles he faced dealing with being bipolar, Thompson was able to tell his story in a very engaging and relatable way. The added commentary of Dr. John-Paul Heathrow (JP) is just as witty. The books structure was quite interesting. Rather than offering a chronological story, Thompson depicts his sto I was not sure what to expect when reading this book, especially when I read the intro and fount it to be based on a blog. However, Derek Thompson's book is amazingly humorous and witty. Despite the troubles he faced dealing with being bipolar, Thompson was able to tell his story in a very engaging and relatable way. The added commentary of Dr. John-Paul Heathrow (JP) is just as witty. The books structure was quite interesting. Rather than offering a chronological story, Thompson depicts his story through a rainbow mood chart, starting with depression and going through mania. The stories he shares are intriquing and offer glimpse into his personal struggles in recovery from mania and depression and the wild moods that those extremes brought about. Definitely worth the read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Camryn Coughlan

    I won this book as part of the "Good Reads Giveaways" and I must say, I really enjoyed it! "Somewhere Over the Rainbow, I've Lost My Damn Mind" is an entertaining book that tought me about Bipolar Disorder and using comparisons, such as sports injuries, made it that much more relatable and understandable. One thing that I've learned is that not everyone who has bipolar disprder considers it to be an illnes. It doesn't make them "weak" or "sick," it just makes them different people. This book tau I won this book as part of the "Good Reads Giveaways" and I must say, I really enjoyed it! "Somewhere Over the Rainbow, I've Lost My Damn Mind" is an entertaining book that tought me about Bipolar Disorder and using comparisons, such as sports injuries, made it that much more relatable and understandable. One thing that I've learned is that not everyone who has bipolar disprder considers it to be an illnes. It doesn't make them "weak" or "sick," it just makes them different people. This book taught me to look deep at what I value in life, and be grateful for what you have. One of my favourite quotes in the book is on page 26 and it says: "Where I come from may not be perfect, but its home and I've begun to realize that just maybe, it's exactly where I need to be."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

    This is a honest, down to earth, all out reading for those that would be great for families trying to understand mental illness, for learning about bi-polar mental disease. I had family members with such and this writing lets you take a walk in their shoes. There is also a humorous angle and you will feel like you are right there with Derek , the author. This is a honest, down to earth, all out reading for those that would be great for families trying to understand mental illness, for learning about bi-polar mental disease. I had family members with such and this writing lets you take a walk in their shoes. There is also a humorous angle and you will feel like you are right there with Derek , the author.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Monisha

    I feel like I'm the only person that doesn't like this book. Look, the blogs and the setup were not done well. It jumps around way too much to be a cohesive book, something you can sit down and actually enjoy reading. I appreciate the effort to make a memoir (kind of) book different, but it could have been so much better. I get that the way it jumps is accurate in depicting the way one's mind jumps around when manic--trust me, I know--and I think the concept of jumping around and using the mood I feel like I'm the only person that doesn't like this book. Look, the blogs and the setup were not done well. It jumps around way too much to be a cohesive book, something you can sit down and actually enjoy reading. I appreciate the effort to make a memoir (kind of) book different, but it could have been so much better. I get that the way it jumps is accurate in depicting the way one's mind jumps around when manic--trust me, I know--and I think the concept of jumping around and using the mood chart is interesting. In theory. This didn't pull through with that in a way that worked. It was kind of boring and disconnected honestly.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marie (UK)

    to be honest, not a lot. It is less an account of his life and more a hotch potch of anecdotes. I suppose manic depressive illness is like this but the book gave me no real insight into Derek himself. Even some of his entries that were graded as normality seemed far from it and i really don't understand the session notes - statistics and information from the internet. Biiled as describing events from the terrifying to the hilarious it played far below that promise Perhaps someone with bipolar dis to be honest, not a lot. It is less an account of his life and more a hotch potch of anecdotes. I suppose manic depressive illness is like this but the book gave me no real insight into Derek himself. Even some of his entries that were graded as normality seemed far from it and i really don't understand the session notes - statistics and information from the internet. Biiled as describing events from the terrifying to the hilarious it played far below that promise Perhaps someone with bipolar disease might find something to learn from but it was not for me

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cassy

    I received this book as a Goodreads winner. There were parts of this book I really enjoyed but there were also parts where I felt a bit lost. I think the way the book is presented in the different levels of the authors BMD journey is a little hard to follow. I did like getting a glimpse into the life of a person living with this challenge. A funny and inspiring read!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Velvetink

    tubel

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tony Parsons

    1 of my fav types of clients luv 2 win/read this book

  12. 5 out of 5

    Carol-anne

    Waiting for a copy in my local library or a win in the Good reads comp

  13. 4 out of 5

    Roy Wano

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Flo

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jaye

  17. 5 out of 5

    Freedom peace Lover

  18. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emma little

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Tucholski

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christy

  22. 5 out of 5

    ayaz zeynalov

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Cook

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jayden Roberto

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  27. 5 out of 5

    AM WALLEN

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Burke

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

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