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Taxes, the Tea Party, and Those Revolting Rebels: A History in Comics of the American Revolution

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Presenting the American Revolution in a fun, easy-to-understand fashion, Stan Mack’s illustrated rendition makes history entertaining while providing lucid insight into the revolution’s real-life participants, as well as its successes and failures. This graphic account of the birth of the United States stars a chubby, insecure King George III, rebellious and misunderstood Presenting the American Revolution in a fun, easy-to-understand fashion, Stan Mack’s illustrated rendition makes history entertaining while providing lucid insight into the revolution’s real-life participants, as well as its successes and failures. This graphic account of the birth of the United States stars a chubby, insecure King George III, rebellious and misunderstood colonists, and loudmouthed and insensitive aristocrats, providing information about the Boston Tea Party and the revolt against the status quo. Uncannily relevant to today’s world, this whimsical and informative pictorial history tells the story of the original peoples’ insurgence.


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Presenting the American Revolution in a fun, easy-to-understand fashion, Stan Mack’s illustrated rendition makes history entertaining while providing lucid insight into the revolution’s real-life participants, as well as its successes and failures. This graphic account of the birth of the United States stars a chubby, insecure King George III, rebellious and misunderstood Presenting the American Revolution in a fun, easy-to-understand fashion, Stan Mack’s illustrated rendition makes history entertaining while providing lucid insight into the revolution’s real-life participants, as well as its successes and failures. This graphic account of the birth of the United States stars a chubby, insecure King George III, rebellious and misunderstood colonists, and loudmouthed and insensitive aristocrats, providing information about the Boston Tea Party and the revolt against the status quo. Uncannily relevant to today’s world, this whimsical and informative pictorial history tells the story of the original peoples’ insurgence.

30 review for Taxes, the Tea Party, and Those Revolting Rebels: A History in Comics of the American Revolution

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I picked this one up on a whim during a library trip and quite liked it. It was interesting to see how Stan Mack was able to bring the American Revolution alive via a graphic format. Really great overview, quick read and a great way for anyone to better understand that time in American history!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Theodore

    The American Revolution By Theodore J. Cahill In the book Taxes, the Tea Party and the Revolting Rebels by Stan Mack the story of how the American Revolution unfolded is shown in graphic novel form. When England starts taxing the colonies on everyday objects, the people living in the colonies start to stand up for themselves. They demand involvement in the English government, and other simple rights. When Thomas Paine writes a book called Common Sense, people are starting to get angered by taxes, The American Revolution By Theodore J. Cahill In the book Taxes, the Tea Party and the Revolting Rebels by Stan Mack the story of how the American Revolution unfolded is shown in graphic novel form. When England starts taxing the colonies on everyday objects, the people living in the colonies start to stand up for themselves. They demand involvement in the English government, and other simple rights. When Thomas Paine writes a book called Common Sense, people are starting to get angered by taxes, quartering and many other things that the British are taking advantage of. The American colonies create a group of leaders called the Continental Congress. They elect Thomas Jefferson to write a Declaration of Independence. On July 4th, 1776, Thomas Jefferson finishes the document. When England receives this, they declare war on the newly formed United States of America. With General George Washington in charge, and an army of farmers and shopkeepers, the United States is anything but prepared to face the superpower that is Great Britain. SPOILER ALERT!!!!!! George Washington sends some of the best members of the congress to go and request help from the French. With the French already upset with England, they accept. The British suffer defeats to the Americans, being that the British only march in straight lines, they were shocked when the Americans used a new technique called ambushing. Perhaps the most famous battle in the entire war was George Washington’s attack on a German Camp (they were allied with the British) on Christmas day. The Americans end up with a victory over the British, thanks to extensive backup from the French. This revolution inspired other countries, such as France, to break away from their old monarchy and let the people make the decisions. I like this book because it spoke the history of America very well. It gives information that you most likely don’t know already. It shows perspective from both sides. It also made comical remarks at people that made the book entertaining, like Henry Knox being overweight or George Washington having a big nose. I would recommend this book to young readers who like history, but still want entertainment.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael Smith

    I can’t help it: I’m always a little suspicious of books that attempt to impart serious nonfictional material to younger readers in a “cartoon” format. It’s so easy to talk down and to err on the side of froth. This survey of the American Revolution, from the early 1760s (when the English finally defeated the French and kicked them off the Atlantic coast) through the war itself and the final adoption of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights in 1789, is both thoughtfully and honestly written an I can’t help it: I’m always a little suspicious of books that attempt to impart serious nonfictional material to younger readers in a “cartoon” format. It’s so easy to talk down and to err on the side of froth. This survey of the American Revolution, from the early 1760s (when the English finally defeated the French and kicked them off the Atlantic coast) through the war itself and the final adoption of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights in 1789, is both thoughtfully and honestly written and also entertainingly and (mostly) realistically drawn. The Founding Fathers are rendered without their pedestals, due time is given to women and to non-white males, and Mack makes it clear that the majority of colonists were interested less in political philosophy than in their pocketbooks. All the important Great Men are included, but so are the farmers and sailors and clerks and shoemakers. And George III doesn’t get much sympathy at all, which is fair. I’m going to be recommending this one to family and friends whose grasp of the founding of this country needs reinforcement.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Edward ott

    if you have a child under 12, this is a great way to introduce them to American revolution.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    This graphic book is a quick read, since it is a skinny comic book with real history. A decent very fast overview of the American Revolution.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This book is about the American Revolution, in graphic novel form. It is very interesting and lays out this portion of history with easy-to-understand scenarios and plenty of humor.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This book provides a good look at "what happened and why" before the war, for certain key battles, and during the postwar period. It covers material that school history classes typically don't, and ties it all together.

  8. 5 out of 5

    John

    This is a great summary of the American Revolution, though I think its audience is teens. It does a great job showing how the Revolution evolved and gained momentum through self-interest of various groups rather than by high-minded idealism of a continent of European colonialists. Mack does a great job showing that people overcame distaste for one another to make common cause against their mutual foes because they were invested in the outcome. Sons of Liberty opposed Shay's Rebellion, not becaus This is a great summary of the American Revolution, though I think its audience is teens. It does a great job showing how the Revolution evolved and gained momentum through self-interest of various groups rather than by high-minded idealism of a continent of European colonialists. Mack does a great job showing that people overcame distaste for one another to make common cause against their mutual foes because they were invested in the outcome. Sons of Liberty opposed Shay's Rebellion, not because they had made ideological reversals, but because the interests that motivated them to fight were reversed between the two conflicts. The art is minimal but functionally entertaining: different people look different and people who reappear look the way they had earlier. The language is straightforward and the explanatory material makes decisions (the good and the bad) comprehensible.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    If you're like me, and don't remember much of the American Revolution outside of the Founding Fathers, then this is the book for you. Or even if you remember everything about it and need a brush up. Or if you're brand new to the subject. ...If you're interested in the American Revolution, I'd highly recommend this book. Rather than repeating the same old mythos about the Founding Fathers, this book is an excellent overview of complicated issues - such as class differences, and effectively gives If you're like me, and don't remember much of the American Revolution outside of the Founding Fathers, then this is the book for you. Or even if you remember everything about it and need a brush up. Or if you're brand new to the subject. ...If you're interested in the American Revolution, I'd highly recommend this book. Rather than repeating the same old mythos about the Founding Fathers, this book is an excellent overview of complicated issues - such as class differences, and effectively gives voice to those who traditionally didn't have one: Africans, Native Americans, women, and the poor. The illustrations are lively (and not what I'd call caricatures), and the pacing is excellent for how much ground this little book carries.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nick Douglas

    I mostly read this to research a sitcom pilot I'm writing that takes place in Revolutionary-era Boston. It's a quick history of the Revolutionary War and early America that focuses on the disputing factions and mistakes on every side of the war, and the caveats to the supposed high principles that led the Patriots to declare independence.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Hey, maybe the people who decided that a bunch of backwater colonists could defeat the greatest army ever really were cartoon characters. Their stories seem far more real in this comic history than they ever did in a textbook.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rock Angel

    973.3 MACK

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    the way I like history best, in cartoon form!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Arianna

    This was the story of the American Revolution told through comics. It was cute accurate and I think would be a good teaching tool for social studies teachers to keep in the classroom.

  15. 5 out of 5

    John

    Smartly critical history.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Kahn

    A short history of the American Revolution done in comic form. I zipped through this book, learned a lot, and enjoyed it the whole time. My only complaint is that I wish it was longer. :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erin M.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

  19. 4 out of 5

    Anil Joseph

  20. 5 out of 5

    Margreet Heer

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lucille

  22. 4 out of 5

    Owen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mrsk33

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Richardson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Reg Wilson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Binky Bowberg

  27. 5 out of 5

    Monica

  28. 4 out of 5

    AmberAlice

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lindy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

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