web site hit counter Howard Zinn Speaks: Collected Speeches 1963-2009 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Howard Zinn Speaks: Collected Speeches 1963-2009

Availability: Ready to download

Howard Zinn has illuminated our history like no other US historian. This collection of his speeches on protest movements, racism, war, and US history, many never before published, covers more than four decades of his active engagement with the audiences he inspired with his humor, insight, and clarity. “Reading Howard’s spoken words, I feel that I am almost hearing his voic Howard Zinn has illuminated our history like no other US historian. This collection of his speeches on protest movements, racism, war, and US history, many never before published, covers more than four decades of his active engagement with the audiences he inspired with his humor, insight, and clarity. “Reading Howard’s spoken words, I feel that I am almost hearing his voice again—his stunning pitch-perfect ability to capture the moment and the concerns and needs of the audience, whoever they may be, always enlightening, often stirring, an amalgam of insight, critical history, wit, blended with charm and appeal.” —NOAM CHOMSKY “With ferocious moral clarity and mischievous humor, Howard turned routine antiwar rallies into profound explorations of state violence and staid academic conferences into revival meetings for social change. Collected here for the first time, Howard’s speeches—spanning an extraordinary life of passion and principle—come to us at the moment when we need them most: just as a global network of popular uprisings searches for what comes next. We could ask for no wiser a guide than Howard Zinn.” —NAOMI KLEIN “To hear [Howard] speak was like listening to music that you loved—lyrical, uplifting, honest. . . . I know he would love it for each of you to find your voice and to be heard. This book will provide you with some inspiration.” —MICHAEL MOORE “To read this book is to hear Howard Zinn speak again, inspiring us for the struggles from below that are our only hope for any future at all.” —FRANCES FOX PIVEN Howard Zinn wrote the classic A People's History of the United States. The book, which has sold more than two million copies, has been featured in the film Good Will Hunting, and has appeared multiple times on The New York Times best-seller list. Anthony Arnove wrote, directed, and produced The People Speak with Howard Zinn, Chris Moore, Josh Brolin, and Matt Damon, and co-edited, with Howard Zinn, Voices of a People's History of the United States.


Compare

Howard Zinn has illuminated our history like no other US historian. This collection of his speeches on protest movements, racism, war, and US history, many never before published, covers more than four decades of his active engagement with the audiences he inspired with his humor, insight, and clarity. “Reading Howard’s spoken words, I feel that I am almost hearing his voic Howard Zinn has illuminated our history like no other US historian. This collection of his speeches on protest movements, racism, war, and US history, many never before published, covers more than four decades of his active engagement with the audiences he inspired with his humor, insight, and clarity. “Reading Howard’s spoken words, I feel that I am almost hearing his voice again—his stunning pitch-perfect ability to capture the moment and the concerns and needs of the audience, whoever they may be, always enlightening, often stirring, an amalgam of insight, critical history, wit, blended with charm and appeal.” —NOAM CHOMSKY “With ferocious moral clarity and mischievous humor, Howard turned routine antiwar rallies into profound explorations of state violence and staid academic conferences into revival meetings for social change. Collected here for the first time, Howard’s speeches—spanning an extraordinary life of passion and principle—come to us at the moment when we need them most: just as a global network of popular uprisings searches for what comes next. We could ask for no wiser a guide than Howard Zinn.” —NAOMI KLEIN “To hear [Howard] speak was like listening to music that you loved—lyrical, uplifting, honest. . . . I know he would love it for each of you to find your voice and to be heard. This book will provide you with some inspiration.” —MICHAEL MOORE “To read this book is to hear Howard Zinn speak again, inspiring us for the struggles from below that are our only hope for any future at all.” —FRANCES FOX PIVEN Howard Zinn wrote the classic A People's History of the United States. The book, which has sold more than two million copies, has been featured in the film Good Will Hunting, and has appeared multiple times on The New York Times best-seller list. Anthony Arnove wrote, directed, and produced The People Speak with Howard Zinn, Chris Moore, Josh Brolin, and Matt Damon, and co-edited, with Howard Zinn, Voices of a People's History of the United States.

59 review for Howard Zinn Speaks: Collected Speeches 1963-2009

  1. 4 out of 5

    dan

    4.5 stars, really. There’s a Naomi Klein blurb on the back jacket that reads, “We could ask for no wiser guide than Howard Zinn.” This is true. I came to this book already a student of Zinn’s teachings. The events and conditions Zinn covers in these pages are important reminders and left me with some sense of hope, a salve for the current dark times. He reminds us that governments are “artificial constellations” and that the Declaration of Independence calls for their abolishment when they do no 4.5 stars, really. There’s a Naomi Klein blurb on the back jacket that reads, “We could ask for no wiser guide than Howard Zinn.” This is true. I came to this book already a student of Zinn’s teachings. The events and conditions Zinn covers in these pages are important reminders and left me with some sense of hope, a salve for the current dark times. He reminds us that governments are “artificial constellations” and that the Declaration of Independence calls for their abolishment when they do not serve the people. He also reminds us that any progressive legislation passed by Congress comes not from its largesse or enlightenment, but from the pressure of ordinary folx agitating for change: abolishing slavery, the eight-hour work day, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, etc. Where I found myself self slightly frustrated or at odds with Zinn is on the subject of “just” wars (what he describes “holy” or “sacrosanct” in mainstream public consciousness). He outlines how war corrupts all participants— the good guys fight long enough to see themselves become the villains and highlights how innocent civilians die at increasing proportions as the technology of war becomes more advanced and more deadly. He pulls from his own experience as a bombardier during World War II, a war he holds as the ultimate “good war” in most people’s minds. Essentially, his argument is that the means never do wind up justifying the end. World War II did not bring an end to fascism, it did not bring an end to war, and in fact created the conditions for the Cold War and the nuclear age. He posits that there is always an alternative choice to the false binary of doing nothing in the face of evil and all out war, yet, and this is where I was frustrated, he never so much as hints at what stopping Nazi advancement even looks like without confronting them head on. Lastly, Arnove, a close and longtime collaborator of Zinn, is guilty of some lackluster editing in this collection of speeches. There was no need to put them in chronological order and the edition is left with one speech from the sixties, two or three from the seventies, eighties, and nineties, and then a bunch of nearly identical speeches from the aughts. (Zinn gives practically same speech in Cambridge, Mass. in 2005 that he gives in Athens, Greece in 2009. And he uses certain stumps/touchstones/anchors in his speech. If I had to read about Shay’s Rellion of 1786 one more time...) All that to say, Arnove could have easily mixed things up for us and cut three to five essays without sacrificing one iota of Zinn’s message. This collection is most interesting when we’re getting Zinn’s telling of Sacco and Vanzetti, or Emma Goldman, or his brief, but cogent stance to abolish the death penalty. His attack of the notion of American exceptionalism is an important one, but takes on the quality of regurgitation due to poor editing. Nonetheless, Zinn’s knowledge and contributions are invaluable, and his message will always be important to any student of history.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ollie

    Howard Zinn's death is one of the greatest losses in our lifetime for no other reason than one could always count on him to give consistently lucid and truthful perspective in times of uncertainty. And there are really not that many writers I can say that about. If that were not enough, he has the great advantage of being able to deliver these perspectives in very direct and plain language. While that’s a great testament to Zinn’s abilities, this book Howard Zinn Speaks Collected Speeches 1963-2 Howard Zinn's death is one of the greatest losses in our lifetime for no other reason than one could always count on him to give consistently lucid and truthful perspective in times of uncertainty. And there are really not that many writers I can say that about. If that were not enough, he has the great advantage of being able to deliver these perspectives in very direct and plain language. While that’s a great testament to Zinn’s abilities, this book Howard Zinn Speaks Collected Speeches 1963-2009 is also a great example of how long Zinn had been an advocate for the powerless. Howard Zinn Speaks collects speeches made on a wide variety of topics such as Southern Influence in National Politics, the Vietnam War, Emma Goldman, the case of Sacco and Vanzetti, the importance of civil disobedience in the US’s history, and the importance of studying history. As I said, Zinn’s brilliance lies in his ability to speak plainly without jargon about the most important topics, and this definitely reflects in these speeches. Each speech is excellently crafted and a delight to read. With Arnove’s editng, one also picks up Zinn’s attempt also to engage his audience, asking them questions, and gauging their temperature as he delivers these speeches which is a fantastic touch for those of us who will never hear him speak. In addition, it’s interesting to note how Zinn often uses his favorite examples when making a point in his speeches (such as Emma Goldman being radicalized by the Haymarket Affair and General Knox writing to Washington influencing the creation of an authoritarian Constitution). As with any good book, one comes away from reading Howard Zinn Speaks feeling more enlightened and knowledgeable about the world around us, and also sad that we have lost such a great man.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    Although Howard Zinn’s teachings may not be found in the average history textbook, his speeches are perfect for anyone looking to discover many long-forgotten stories of the past. The Zinn ethos challenges what many know to be true, and this collection will act as either the perfect introduction or the needed return to the impact Zinn left on audiences for over half a century. Howard Zinn Speaks includes 20 prominent speeches shared with audiences around the world. It’s clear from the first spee Although Howard Zinn’s teachings may not be found in the average history textbook, his speeches are perfect for anyone looking to discover many long-forgotten stories of the past. The Zinn ethos challenges what many know to be true, and this collection will act as either the perfect introduction or the needed return to the impact Zinn left on audiences for over half a century. Howard Zinn Speaks includes 20 prominent speeches shared with audiences around the world. It’s clear from the first speech, entitled “Southern Influence in National Politics” and addressed to the Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee conference in Atlanta, Georgia in 1963, that Zinn prioritizes improvisation and the current state of affairs above all else. He says, “Maybe at some point in this talk...there will be some relationship between what I say and the title ‘Southern Influence in National Politics.’ If so, it will be an accident…what I really want to talk about is just politics.” Humor and sober understanding permeate Zinn’s words, creating an engaging collection readers will devour. Reading these speeches is like sitting in a classroom with Zinn himself; he is the teacher, and this book’s readers, the students. The speeches take place at high points in history from 1963 to 2009. Zinn dives into his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement while working at Spelman College in Atlanta. He discusses his service as a bombardier in World War II and his deep-seated pacifism thereafter. Readers hear about the Vietnam War protests during a number of Zinn’s speeches, with some taking place in the ‘70s and others in the ‘00s, when he compares and contrasts the Vietnam War with the war in Iraq. No matter what side of history readers fall on, there is no denying this book covers quite a bit of ground in the modern recollection of the twentieth century. Arnove’s only kryptonite in editing this collection is including too many speeches similar in nature. It’s clear Zinn does not believe history should be taught objectively—in fact, he believes the complete opposite—and his views are thoroughly informed by the history he has spent most of his life studying. Therefore, when sharing these views, Zinn can sound repetitive when his speeches are queued up back-to-back. He constantly revisits the needlessness of war and the importance of civil involvement; both are extremely important, but when illustrated by the same examples, they lose their punch after the third or fourth occurrence. But perhaps it’s never a bad thing to have too many reminders. Zinn’s approach to history is nothing if not provocative. Regardless of whether or not history buffs or curious citizens agree with his perspectives, Zinn’s message in Howard Zinn Speaks is clear for the masses: “When you start talking the way I have been talking, criticizing what the government does and being skeptical, you are accused of being unpatriotic...patriotism does not mean supporting the government. Patriotism means supporting the principles for which the government is supposed to stand.” Therefore, take action. Criticize freely. And we’ll all be better because of it. Howard Zinn Speaks: Collected Speeches 1963-2009

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael Duane Robbins

    Very early on there was a section in the first speech presented that really struck me, in part because this observation was made in April, 1963, but also because of its relevance: “Forty million people, under $2,000 a year…Look at the concentration of wealth, on the other hand. One percent of the population, 700,000 families, own 25 percent of all the money, stocks, bonds, real estate, all the tangible assets, in the country. And furthermore, this hasn’t changed much over the years. “ This shoul Very early on there was a section in the first speech presented that really struck me, in part because this observation was made in April, 1963, but also because of its relevance: “Forty million people, under $2,000 a year…Look at the concentration of wealth, on the other hand. One percent of the population, 700,000 families, own 25 percent of all the money, stocks, bonds, real estate, all the tangible assets, in the country. And furthermore, this hasn’t changed much over the years. “ This should be required reading; we should bind every nativist ignoramus in this country to a chair and force-feed them these speeches. Again & again over the year, Zinn reminds us that change never comes from the top down, never at the pleasure of our Congress. It has to happen when a mass movement of people become too large a body to ignore; when the people say, ‘Enough, we’re done waiting for you to change’. These are the words of a man who fought for his country, who found reason to question our rationales of war, and found them wanting. Words that’ll remind us that we can love your country while remaining critical of our government. Not that his reasoning is always perfect; in his frequent nods to the passage of the 13th,14th & 15th Amendments to the Constitution, Zinn forgets to mention that without the Confederate states to block them, passage of those Amendments became a surer deal; in fact, those Southern states were not allowed back into the Union until they ratified them. Finally, we should take to heart his reminder that all governments rely on the obedience of their people; that once the people withdraw that obedience,, once they start defying bad laws like the Fugitive Slave Law, once soldiers refuse to fight in unjust wars, that government stands on very shaky ground.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ronnie

    I may not know for sure how I came to read this book, but I have a pretty good idea that it was likely because one of these speeches was included in "Rants And Incendiary Tracts" by Bob Black and Adam Parfey in 2016, and I am glad I read it. Howard Zinn was a great speaker, and his speeches really leave you with something to think about. I regret deeply that I hadn't heard of or listened to him when he was still alive. Howard Zinn has some incredibly thoughtful critiques of America and war monge I may not know for sure how I came to read this book, but I have a pretty good idea that it was likely because one of these speeches was included in "Rants And Incendiary Tracts" by Bob Black and Adam Parfey in 2016, and I am glad I read it. Howard Zinn was a great speaker, and his speeches really leave you with something to think about. I regret deeply that I hadn't heard of or listened to him when he was still alive. Howard Zinn has some incredibly thoughtful critiques of America and war mongering. I couldn't help but think throughout all of this what he would have said about Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, and the state of America in the present day. I'm sure he would have a lot of really great things to say about it, but I suppose that we'll never really know. The major problem I had with this book is likely a problem I would have with any speech collections. Speeches, by their nature, have to be repetitive. Someone might not have been to Zinn's 20 speeches before the one they came to, so they wouldn't know all he had to say about Emma Goldman or Shay's Rebellion. But including them all in a book like this got to be painfully repetitive. I don't know how that can be fixed, or even if it could be, aside from perhaps choosing different speeches or cutting parts of speeches (which is definitely not something you should do for all sorts of reasons). But even with all that repetition, it was still a great read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nausheen

    "I want to read you something that Vanzetti had in his pocket when he was on that streetcar in Brockton the day he was arrested. What he had in his pocket was a leaflet advertising a meeting where he was going to speak. The leaflet said, 'You have fought all the wars. You have worked for all the capitalists. You have wandered all over the countries. Have you harvested the fruits of your labors, the price of your victories? Does the past comfort you? Does the present smile on you? Does the future "I want to read you something that Vanzetti had in his pocket when he was on that streetcar in Brockton the day he was arrested. What he had in his pocket was a leaflet advertising a meeting where he was going to speak. The leaflet said, 'You have fought all the wars. You have worked for all the capitalists. You have wandered all over the countries. Have you harvested the fruits of your labors, the price of your victories? Does the past comfort you? Does the present smile on you? Does the future promise you anything? Have you found a piece of land where you can live like a human being and die like a human being? On these questions, on this argument and on this theme, the struggle for existence, Bartolomeo Vanzetti will speak.' Of course, he never got to give that speech. But I thought that says it. You don't want to let somebody make a speech like that. If that speech were made often enough, by enough people, to enough people, in a country where for so many people that message resonates, we might have some resounding movement for social change."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ann Douglas

    This was the very first book I read this year, way back in January. (January feels like a long time ago: a lifetime ago, in many ways.) I'm glad I took a lot of notes while I was reading this passionate and thought-provoking collection of speeches because that is making it easier for me to remember all the things I loved about this book, most notably the boldness and urgency of the ideas and the warmth and humanity of the author. This quote from the book seems particularly timely and important: This was the very first book I read this year, way back in January. (January feels like a long time ago: a lifetime ago, in many ways.) I'm glad I took a lot of notes while I was reading this passionate and thought-provoking collection of speeches because that is making it easier for me to remember all the things I loved about this book, most notably the boldness and urgency of the ideas and the warmth and humanity of the author. This quote from the book seems particularly timely and important: "Crisis can cause you to reexamine the premises on which you have operated for a very long time. I do not know if that will happen, but the possibility is there. The other possibility is that we will not take advantage of this moment and we will settle back into cycles in which we go from ordinary misery to extreme misery and back." (From a speech delivered in 2008, during the global financial crisis.)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Goldfinch

    Howard Zinn is always inspirational.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mark Hiser

    A collection of speeches by one of the great dissenters of the late 20th century.

  10. 5 out of 5

    D

    Great collective. Instructive read. Zinn was an early and outspoken opponent of the Vietnam War. His autobiography: You Can’t Be Neutral on a Moving Train Zinn frequently visited Colorado, where he gave talks to colleges and regularly spoke at benefits supporting the work of David Barsamian’s invaluable Alternative Radio program radio station KGNU. One of the things that I got out of reading history was to begin to be disabused of this notion that that’s what democracy is all about. The more histo Great collective. Instructive read. Zinn was an early and outspoken opponent of the Vietnam War. His autobiography: You Can’t Be Neutral on a Moving Train Zinn frequently visited Colorado, where he gave talks to colleges and regularly spoke at benefits supporting the work of David Barsamian’s invaluable Alternative Radio program radio station KGNU. One of the things that I got out of reading history was to begin to be disabused of this notion that that’s what democracy is all about. The more history I read, the more it seemed very clear to me that whatever progress has been made in this country on various issues, whatever things have been done for people, whatever human rights have been gained, have not been gained through the calm deliberations of Congress or the wisdom of presidents or the ingenious decisions of the Supreme Court. Whatever progress has been made in this country has come because of the actions of ordinary people, or citizens, of social movements. Not from the Constitution. You think of whatever progress has been made in this country for economic justice. Obviously, not enough progress has been made for economic justice, looking around at this country. You have to look around. You have to walk through a whole city. If you walk through half a city you’ll be mistaken. You have to walk through a whole city and you see the class structure in the United States, the hidden story of American prosperity. So obviously we haven’t made a lot of progress, but we’ve made some progress. We did get it down to an eight-hour day… Whatever was gained in that way for working people was gained through an enormously rich, complex history of labor struggles in the country. This has been mostly ignored in the history books that have been written. I am not a total pacifist. The ideal of being absolutist in anything does not strike a chord with me. We are citizens. We must not put ourselves in the position of looking at the world from their eyes and say, “Well, we have to compromise, we have to do this for political reasons.” We have to speak our minds. Where progress has been made, wherever any kind of injustice has been overturned, it’s been because people acted as citizens and not as politicians. They didn’t just moan. They worked, they acted, they organized, they rioted, if necessary. War is inevitably -- inevitably -- the indiscriminate, massive killing of huge numbers of people. And children are a good part of those people. Every war is a war against children. So, yes, people have the power. If they begin to organize. If they protest. If they create a strong enough movement, they can changes things. That’s all I wanted to say. Thank you.

  11. 4 out of 5

    David Melbie

    Unapologetic and concise, Howard Zinn was an important voice of the people and, though he is greatly missed, I take comfort in the fact that his published works are available. Every American should read everything he wrote.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alix

    Zinn's wisdom and wit absolutely sparkles in these speeches. His published writing is always entertaining but his wickedly funny sense of humor is such a stand out here to the extent that even among all the terrors of history I laughed out loud at some of his witty asides. Zinn is an author I always recommend to new leftists bc it's so approachable and these were no exception. Again and again he forces his listeners and readers to reconsider things that are ingrained in our culture. He provides Zinn's wisdom and wit absolutely sparkles in these speeches. His published writing is always entertaining but his wickedly funny sense of humor is such a stand out here to the extent that even among all the terrors of history I laughed out loud at some of his witty asides. Zinn is an author I always recommend to new leftists bc it's so approachable and these were no exception. Again and again he forces his listeners and readers to reconsider things that are ingrained in our culture. He provides no easy answers for how to fix things bc there aren't any, but he guides people to ask the types of questions that will eventually find answers, all while maintain his stubborn brand hope, not based in nativity, but based in a knowledge of history. I also think that a lot of this esp. his critiques of Obama and the system that he existed in will become relevant if and when Trump is voted out and we would do well to heed his words and not become complacent just bc someone who isn't Trump (or Bush) is in charge again.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rafa Camacho

  15. 4 out of 5

    Byun Young Ho

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Sadeghzadeh

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matthew M.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  19. 4 out of 5

    C.S. Mize

  20. 4 out of 5

    Derek

  21. 5 out of 5

    Trey Allison

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julia Hodkin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Travis May

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris Campano

  25. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mark McCormick

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Wincek

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cbsd library

  31. 5 out of 5

    Haymarket Books

  32. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  33. 5 out of 5

    Donald

  34. 4 out of 5

    Darren D'arcy

  35. 4 out of 5

    Donald Scott

  36. 4 out of 5

    Brian Beatty

  37. 5 out of 5

    Neil Vandenberge

  38. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

  39. 5 out of 5

    Manish Kaul

  40. 5 out of 5

    Earle Seneres

  41. 4 out of 5

    Bobbi Jo Chavarria

  42. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  43. 5 out of 5

    Antony

  44. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  45. 4 out of 5

    Naum

  46. 4 out of 5

    Macho

  47. 4 out of 5

    Cbsd library

  48. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  49. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  50. 5 out of 5

    Adrián

  51. 4 out of 5

    Carl

  52. 5 out of 5

    Niklas

  53. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  54. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  55. 4 out of 5

    Iver

  56. 5 out of 5

    Haymarket Books

  57. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  58. 5 out of 5

    Pam Bosack

  59. 4 out of 5

    Kia Henderson

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.