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Assassin's Creed: Forsaken is the latest thrilling novelisation by Oliver Bowden based on the phenomenally successful game series. 'I am an expert swordsman. And I am skilled in the business of death. I take no pleasure in my skill. Simply, I am good at it.' 1735 - London. Haytham Kenway has been taught to use a sword from the age he was able to hold one. When his family's Assassin's Creed: Forsaken is the latest thrilling novelisation by Oliver Bowden based on the phenomenally successful game series. 'I am an expert swordsman. And I am skilled in the business of death. I take no pleasure in my skill. Simply, I am good at it.' 1735 - London. Haytham Kenway has been taught to use a sword from the age he was able to hold one. When his family's house is attacked - his father murdered and his sister taken by armed men - Haytham defends his home the only way he can: he kills. With no family, he is taken in by a mysterious tutor who trains him to become a deadly killer. Consumed by his thirst for revenge Haytham begins a quest for retribution, trusting no one and questioning everything he has ever known. Conspiracy and betrayal surround him as he is drawn into the centuries old battle between the Assassins and the Templars. The world of the Assassin's has become far more lethal than ever before.


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Assassin's Creed: Forsaken is the latest thrilling novelisation by Oliver Bowden based on the phenomenally successful game series. 'I am an expert swordsman. And I am skilled in the business of death. I take no pleasure in my skill. Simply, I am good at it.' 1735 - London. Haytham Kenway has been taught to use a sword from the age he was able to hold one. When his family's Assassin's Creed: Forsaken is the latest thrilling novelisation by Oliver Bowden based on the phenomenally successful game series. 'I am an expert swordsman. And I am skilled in the business of death. I take no pleasure in my skill. Simply, I am good at it.' 1735 - London. Haytham Kenway has been taught to use a sword from the age he was able to hold one. When his family's house is attacked - his father murdered and his sister taken by armed men - Haytham defends his home the only way he can: he kills. With no family, he is taken in by a mysterious tutor who trains him to become a deadly killer. Consumed by his thirst for revenge Haytham begins a quest for retribution, trusting no one and questioning everything he has ever known. Conspiracy and betrayal surround him as he is drawn into the centuries old battle between the Assassins and the Templars. The world of the Assassin's has become far more lethal than ever before.

30 review for Assassin's Creed: Forsaken

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Forsaken (Assassin's Creed, #5), Oliver Bowden 'I am an expert swordsman. And I am skilled in the business of death. I take no pleasure in my skill. Simply, I am good at it.' 1735 - London. Haytham Kenway has been taught to use a sword from the age he was able to hold one. When his family's house is attacked - his father murdered and his sister taken by armed men - Haytham defends his home the only way he can: he kills. With no family, he is taken in by a mysterious tutor who trains him to become Forsaken (Assassin's Creed, #5), Oliver Bowden 'I am an expert swordsman. And I am skilled in the business of death. I take no pleasure in my skill. Simply, I am good at it.' 1735 - London. Haytham Kenway has been taught to use a sword from the age he was able to hold one. When his family's house is attacked - his father murdered and his sister taken by armed men - Haytham defends his home the only way he can: he kills. With no family, he is taken in by a mysterious tutor who trains him to become a deadly killer. Consumed by his thirst for revenge Haytham begins a quest for retribution, trusting no one and questioning everything he has ever known. Conspiracy and betrayal surround him as he is drawn into the centuries old battle between the Assassins and the Templars. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و دوم ماه ژوئن سال 2017 میلادی عنوان: فرقه اسسین ها کتاب پنجم: جدا شده؛ نویسنده: اولیور باودن؛ مترجم: بهنام حاجی زاده؛ تهران، آذرباد، 1393، در 448 ص؛ شابک: 9786006225609؛ عنوان کتاب در کتابخانه ملی را «اساسین ها»؛ بنوشته اند؛ جلد یکم: رنسانس؛ جلد دوم: پیمان برادری؛ مترجمین امیر قربان‌، فرزین لازمی‌زاده، کیانا حاج‌ دولت؛ جلد سوم: نهضت مخفی، ترجمه بهنام حاجی‌ زاده؛ جلد چهارم: مکاشفات؛ ترجمه بهنام حاجی‌زاده؛ جلد پنجم: جدا شده، ترجمه بهنام حاجی‌زاده؛ جلد ششم: پرچم سیاه، ترجمه محمدرضا قاسمی‏؛ جلد هفتم: وحدت؛ مترجم: محمدرضا قاسمی٬ بهزاد ناصرفلاح‬؛ جلد هشتم: دنیای تبهکاران، مترجم: محمدرضا قاسمی؛ جلد نهم: دنیای ارتداد، مترجم: محمدرضا قاسمی نقل از پشت جلد: «هیچوقت واقعا او را نشناختم. گمان میکردم میشناسم. اما تا زمان خواندن دفتر یادداشتش متوجه نشده بودم که اصلا او را نمیشناسم. دیگر هم خیلی دیر شده بود به او بگویم درباره اش اشتباه قضاوت کردم. خیلی دیر شده بود که به او بگویم متاسفم. سال 1735 میلادی، لندن. هیثم تا چند روز پیش از تولد هشت سالگی اش، یک زندگی عادی داشت: پدری که شمشیرزنی یادش میداد؛ مادری که دوستش داشت و یک خواهر. اما با یورش شبانه به عمارت کنوی، وضع دگرگون میشود و حالا این هیثم است که باید از خانواده اش به تنها شکلی که میتواند دفاع کند: با کشتن. و در همانحال که توطئه و خیانت دورش را گرفته، وارد جنگی باستانی میان اسسینها و شوالیه های معبد میشود، در حالیکه خودش عضو هر دو فرقه است و عضو هیچکدام نیست…»؛ پایان نقل. ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    I picked this book up for one reason and one reason only: the charismatic, complex and compelling character of Haytham Kenway, who is both the deuteragonist and secondary antagonist of Assassin's Creed III by video game developers Ubisoft. I have never read anything by Oliver Bowden previously, nor indeed have I read any other tie-in novel for a video game before, but Haytham ranks amongst my top three favourite fictional characters of all time and so naturally I was drawn to this companion nove I picked this book up for one reason and one reason only: the charismatic, complex and compelling character of Haytham Kenway, who is both the deuteragonist and secondary antagonist of Assassin's Creed III by video game developers Ubisoft. I have never read anything by Oliver Bowden previously, nor indeed have I read any other tie-in novel for a video game before, but Haytham ranks amongst my top three favourite fictional characters of all time and so naturally I was drawn to this companion novel to the game in which he so heavily features, which is said to flesh out Haytham's character and give explanations as to his motives and why he is the way he is. To be perfectly honest, I don't think I needed to read this book, and I do not personally consider the events that take place to be 'canon'. Haytham is so well-written by lead script writer Corey May and acted so superbly by Adrian Hough within the game itself -- all his thoughts, feelings and complexities gently bubbling below the surface whilst at the same time being overtly obvious -- that having everything laid out and explained so thoroughly actually serves to ruin the ambiguity of Haytham's character. What's more, I do not think Bowden writes as wittily and as quickly as Haytham's character demands; Haytham in the video game is far more sassy and cutting than he appears in this book, and on these pages he also comes across as overly sentimental. Perhaps this has something to do with the epistolary format and the use of a fallible narrator, but mostly I think it has to do with Bowden's writing style and the restrictions of a video-game tie-in novel... One thing I did like about this book though was that it helped me to understand Connor a little better. Weirdly, seeing him through his father's eyes and witnessing all the misplaced passion and naivety of youth really helped to put Connor's character into perspective, and I warmed to him a little more. I rely heavily upon comparing the video game to this book because I do not believe this book stands apart from the video game it is based in; only fans of Assassin's Creed and die-hard Haytham fans will enjoy or understand this book. Ultimately this was an enjoyable romp, but little else. I shall now wipe it from memory, and stick with the Haytham I know and love from the video game.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ken Hammond

    Assassin's Creed: Forsaken by Oliver Bowden interesting premise in the start but main character kind of whined to much and didn't have enough swagger in his younger self and abilities. Told from a diary after the fact so killed unexpected present situations. Did redeem itself partly in his debate whethet to assassinate George Washington. The ending left you with thanks its done. Assassin's Creed: Forsaken by Oliver Bowden interesting premise in the start but main character kind of whined to much and didn't have enough swagger in his younger self and abilities. Told from a diary after the fact so killed unexpected present situations. Did redeem itself partly in his debate whethet to assassinate George Washington. The ending left you with thanks its done.

  4. 4 out of 5

    mazohyst

    TL;DR I was disappointed by this novel, not only as a fan but as an "avid" reader as well. For people who aren't fans of the game: You aren't missing out by not reading this novel. As you can probably guess, this novel isn't written for you at all. But if you're really persistent, here's my review for those who haven't played Assassin's Creed III or any Assassin's Creed games for that matter. I'll keep it short. I personally do not like Bowden's narrative style. It's rather dry and he downplays a lo TL;DR I was disappointed by this novel, not only as a fan but as an "avid" reader as well. For people who aren't fans of the game: You aren't missing out by not reading this novel. As you can probably guess, this novel isn't written for you at all. But if you're really persistent, here's my review for those who haven't played Assassin's Creed III or any Assassin's Creed games for that matter. I'll keep it short. I personally do not like Bowden's narrative style. It's rather dry and he downplays a lot of "should have been" big moments in the book. It lacks tension and conflict, which is rather concerning because that time period (American revolution) was full of it. There was so much that could have been done with Haytham's character and the people around him. It was just so boring. It was lifeless. It was just... There. For the fans: Spoiler tag for spoilers and some profanity, sorry, I have a lot of feels. (view spoiler)[Even though I was largely disappointed by this, I did enjoy the parts that were not included in the game such as Jenny's rescue, the death of Holden, Charles Lee's "jealous" side (Charles was so jealous of Ziio, I don't care what you say, it's cannon, I ship it). As soon as I came across the opera scene, though, I got all pumped up. Kinda like, "AWEEEH YEAH SHIT'S GOING TO GO DOWN." But it didn't read as well as playing it did. I took that as a sign and in the end, I was right. Now I'm being really picky. There were some things that were canon in game that were contradicted by this book. I'm not sure if it's canon that Haytham never knew of Ziio's death until Connor did but the his reaction to her death looked so genuine, I almost refuse to believe that he already knew. As for the writing. It was lacking. It was so lacking. Haytham, who is quite possibly the most charming and charismatic man in the whole game (Connor is a different kind of charm and charisma) seemed dull, drab, and boring. He was like a whole different character. Oh well. (hide spoiler)]

  5. 4 out of 5

    Devi

    Now that I'm finished, I'm asking myself why I wanted to read this. I've never wanted to read any of the other AC novelisations, so I'm sure I had a good reason. I think it was because the game made Haytham Kenway, the character that is the focus of this book, possibly one of the most complex and likable antagonists/support characters I've ever seen in any game anywhere. I think it was because I thought the messy, contentious relationship Haytham has with his estranged son would make for incredi Now that I'm finished, I'm asking myself why I wanted to read this. I've never wanted to read any of the other AC novelisations, so I'm sure I had a good reason. I think it was because the game made Haytham Kenway, the character that is the focus of this book, possibly one of the most complex and likable antagonists/support characters I've ever seen in any game anywhere. I think it was because I thought the messy, contentious relationship Haytham has with his estranged son would make for incredibly gripping, heart-wrenching reading, or that, the man being a god damn master spy, the character would have been swashbuckling from front to back cover and up to his eyeballs in plots and politics and assassinations and struggling the whole time with right and wrong and the futility and inevitability of his decisions regardless of what public face he presented... Kudos have to go to Mr Bowden, because it has to take talent to turn all that great potential, all that ready-made narrative tension, into what was instead a fairly remote and bloodless read with very little passion and even less impact. It was, putting it bluntly, pretty bloody boring. I was reading to get it done, not because I was thrilled and fascinated with how the story was developing, and that is, as far as I'm concerned, a sign that something is really, intrinsically wrong. Possibly with me, since I apparently can't just abandon a book no matter how little I'm truly enjoying it. I'm sure the story had it's moments - the attack on Haytham's family perhaps, or the early stages of his friendship with Birch - but honestly I'm having trouble picturing them. If Bowden had perhaps developed his story more there and turned it into a murder mystery or period spy thriller instead of diluting it with stuff from the game that we quite frankly already know and inspired us to read the book in the first place, he might have had a real ripper on his hands. If this is what all game-tie-in books are like, I won't be reading another and consider myself forewarned the next time I think a cool character can be made cooler outside of his home environment.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Colton

    I'm a teacher at a learning center for students with learning disabilities. This book was an option for my 10th grade student. He chose this with the agreement that he would read whatever I wanted afterward. This book suffers from an unreliable narrator, a breakneck pace, repetition in the action sequences, and a lack of consistent characters. This book also suffers from having a diary structure, which stifles tension, and the first person point of view offers little to be deemed necessary. Also I'm a teacher at a learning center for students with learning disabilities. This book was an option for my 10th grade student. He chose this with the agreement that he would read whatever I wanted afterward. This book suffers from an unreliable narrator, a breakneck pace, repetition in the action sequences, and a lack of consistent characters. This book also suffers from having a diary structure, which stifles tension, and the first person point of view offers little to be deemed necessary. Also take into account that I have not played the video game series, and I have not read Bowden's previous books in the series, so I'm a little out of touch with the source material and trajectory of an overarching plot. But I don't think either of those points save the rapid changing of minds, (Haytham's view on Reginald's book and the research behind it), Haytham's feeling and lack of feeling (creates a character we do not like), the sameness of the almost one hundred killings (usually by stabbing in the head, often through the jaw, or a slit throat), or the utter confusion caused by characters with little character (try to count all the characters he meets and befriends or betrays or betrays him over the course of the book, and next try to explain their personalities). I understand I might not be the target audience for a young adult book, but there are several other young adult books I can think of offhand that do action and history better than the Assassin's Creed series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hajar Ah

    well written, intriguing and simply hard to put down the characters are well described especially haytham who is quite the interesting articulate character . it's a book that you'd want to add to your personal library, i know i did well written, intriguing and simply hard to put down the characters are well described especially haytham who is quite the interesting articulate character . it's a book that you'd want to add to your personal library, i know i did

  8. 4 out of 5

    Francis Rosario

    I have played Assassin's Creed III and finished it. I must say I enjoyed Haytham's part in the story more. So it made me rather joyous to find that there was a book that takes place on Haytham's side of the story. Gotta say, I rather enjoyed the book. It was written in the style of a journal, so you actually see events from Haytham's point of view. In all honesty, I enjoyed this book a bit more than I enjoyed the game. It put a lot of things into perspective. The game focuses on an Assassin view I have played Assassin's Creed III and finished it. I must say I enjoyed Haytham's part in the story more. So it made me rather joyous to find that there was a book that takes place on Haytham's side of the story. Gotta say, I rather enjoyed the book. It was written in the style of a journal, so you actually see events from Haytham's point of view. In all honesty, I enjoyed this book a bit more than I enjoyed the game. It put a lot of things into perspective. The game focuses on an Assassin viewpoint, while the book focuses on a Templar viewpoint. Both sides believe they are fighting for the right cause, but have different means to do so. I found it rather thought provoking. All in all, I enjoyed the book. Fans of the series would enjoy it as much as I did and people who haven't heard much of the series would enjoy passing some time with it as well. It's a thought provoking piece that made me question if I was fighting for the right cause in the game. However, it's just that. A game tie-in, yet still very enjoyable with great fights, and historical figures. I give this book a 4/5.

  9. 4 out of 5

    C.T. Phipps

    I was a huge-huge fan of Assassin's Creed 3. Of the seven main games in the series, it is my favorite. As much as I loved Ezio, I felt he'd worn out his welcome by Revelations and the cartoonishly evil Borgias were fun to fight but less interesting than the more nuanced antagonists of AC1 and 3. Likewise, I was a huge fan of Connor who I felt to be the most fascinating of the six leads. So, I was rather nonplussed to find out the novelization of Assassin's Creed 3 wasn't going to be a chronicle I was a huge-huge fan of Assassin's Creed 3. Of the seven main games in the series, it is my favorite. As much as I loved Ezio, I felt he'd worn out his welcome by Revelations and the cartoonishly evil Borgias were fun to fight but less interesting than the more nuanced antagonists of AC1 and 3. Likewise, I was a huge fan of Connor who I felt to be the most fascinating of the six leads. So, I was rather nonplussed to find out the novelization of Assassin's Creed 3 wasn't going to be a chronicle of Connor's adventures but from the perspective of Haytham Kenway. The, SPOILER ALERT, Big Bad of AC3. I liked Haytham but found him to be overrated when compared to his son. For those unfamiliar with the Assassin's Creed novelizations, they're actually quite a bit more intricate than just re-tellings of the games themselves. Assassin's Creed: The Secret Crusade, for example, actually expanded on the story of Altair to the point much of the information within was incorporated into Revelations. So, despite the oddball premise, I decided to give Assassin's Creed: Forsaken a try. I'm glad I did. The first half of Forsaken is entirely new material, chronicling the life of Haytham Kenway from the time he's eight years old and the child of notorious pirate Edward Kenway to his recruitment into the Templars to a multi-year quest to avenge the death of his loved ones. Haytham Kenway is a decidedly cultured and erudite figure, even as a boy, which contrasts nicely against the occasionally savage actions he's forced to take part in as an agent of the Templars. For those who are fans of Edward Kenway, the protagonist of Assassin's Creed: Black Flag, this book provides extremely valuable information. His fate after the events of Black Flag is spelled out, right up until the moment of his death. Admittedly, though, readers should be warned it's not the most uplifting of tales. Oliver Bowden presumably didn't know Edward Kenway would eventually be a protagonist so he has a decidedly atypical ending for a hero. This actually increased my enjoyment of the story as not everyone gets to live out their lives in luxury, surrounded by their loved ones, like Altair and Ezio. If a decidedly "downer" ending bothers you, this may not be the book for you. Really, my favorite part of the book was how it expanded on Haytham's goals and the power of the Templars in the early-to-mid 17th century. They're not, apparently, a group with much belief in the power of the Precursors. Instead, they treat the legends of them as myths despite owning several pieces of their technology. Likewise, their power over mortal governments is far less than as usually depicted in the games where they seem ubiquitous. I'm not sure whether this jives with their depiction in Forsaken but I like it. The Templars are akin to the Illuminati but imagining them as just as belabored as the Assassins is rather pleasing. Likewise, we get the sense the Assassins aren't the primary concern of the Templars but a distant annoyance which never stops rearing its ugly head. The later half of the book, covering the events of Assassin's Creed 3, are far less interesting. We get few new insights into Haytham's character and even fewer into Connor. Still, there's a good epilogue to with Connor deciding, despite his many setbacks, he didn't regret his actions as he still believed he helped the world take baby steps towards being a more egalitarian one. This makes up for the ambiguous ending of the game proper, where we're not sure if Connor made the situation worse than better. If nothing else, our hero should have the power of his convictions. In conclusion, I strongly recommend Assassin's Creed: Forsaken. It's an enjoyable novel well worth the expense for the first half and epilogue. Sadly, the second half is only worth skipping if you've played the game. Which, of course, should be played in lieu of reading the book. I look forward to reading the next entry in the series. 8/10

  10. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    If any video game series deserved a range of spin off novels it was Assassin’s Creed; sometimes the series has seemed in danger of disappearing up its own back-story altogether. I read the first four of Oliver Bowden’s novelisations with slowly diminishing interest; whilst largely well written they were somewhat dry and simple retellings of the game’s plot. The larger brush strokes were there but bogged down by the character doing minor errands for washerwomen, chasing thieves or pickpocketing m If any video game series deserved a range of spin off novels it was Assassin’s Creed; sometimes the series has seemed in danger of disappearing up its own back-story altogether. I read the first four of Oliver Bowden’s novelisations with slowly diminishing interest; whilst largely well written they were somewhat dry and simple retellings of the game’s plot. The larger brush strokes were there but bogged down by the character doing minor errands for washerwomen, chasing thieves or pickpocketing merchants. In the game that’s a good way to pass the time between missions, in print it’s something of a repetitive and arduous slog. Forsaken however is something entirely different. Without wanting to spoil AC3 there is a marvellous twist an hour into the game, that ‘almost’ makes up for the way the game holds your hand through the introductory stages by limiting your movements in an extremely overbearing manor. The author Oliver Bowden makes use of his novel rather than to simply recount the movements of the player but to expand and build on this one brilliant plot contrivance that pits father and son against one another. Whilst the cover clearly depicts Connor and George Washington this is in fact the story of one Haytham Kenway, perhaps the most interesting lead the series has boasted yet. It starts with Haytham as a young boy, trained by his father to become a lethal fighter although he still doesn’t know for what purpose. He recounts his childhood, how his elder sister was jealous of his freedom for simply being a man whilst she was destined to be simply married off and disposed off. However the house is raided, their father killed and the sister taken away by slavers, leaving Haytham in the hands of the Templars. He eventually becomes one of their most senior agents although over several years he begins to suspect that it was in fact the Templars who murdered his father. The ambiguity of the character, torn between his family and his duty, runs through the novel and it is by far the best in this series yet, although far from perfect. The actual events of the game this is based around only start half way through the novel and are barely touched on in any substance, dealing only with the events for which Haytham was personally involved. For fans of this series this is a marked improvement over the previous novels; the repetitive structure of the story is replaced with something slightly bolder and original. It’s still far from being a

  11. 5 out of 5

    Xime García

    Closer to a 2 star rating, but I must admit I didn't hate it, nor I believe it's as bad as the others - but this is maybe due to the fact that I finally got my hands on an English edition instead of the poor Spanish translations I read before. By this point, it shouldn't come as a surprise that I don't enjoy Bowden's writing. I've read AC Unity, AC Black Flag, AC Underworld and this one, all by the same author, and they all fail miserably at basic storytelling and believable dialogues. And I can Closer to a 2 star rating, but I must admit I didn't hate it, nor I believe it's as bad as the others - but this is maybe due to the fact that I finally got my hands on an English edition instead of the poor Spanish translations I read before. By this point, it shouldn't come as a surprise that I don't enjoy Bowden's writing. I've read AC Unity, AC Black Flag, AC Underworld and this one, all by the same author, and they all fail miserably at basic storytelling and believable dialogues. And I can clearly see that Bowden doesn't enjoy transcribing and translating videogame scenes into written work - because that's where the most issues shine bright: stiff visual descriptions, forced dialogues taken straight out of the game without the proper context, gameplay (!) written (I totally found it odd that Haytham would explain Connor that killing redcoats will draw the Jaegers out - the Jaegers are purely gameplay features and a more challenging type of enemy required for a specific trophy in the PSN/Xbox network... Wtf), and a tremendous lack of style - or more like, amateur writing style, which isn't a style at all but rather a stage, a phase. And it was also pretty obvious to me which scenes were direct written translations from the game and which ones were written entirely by Bowden: because Haytham changed the way he spoke! I think I'm bothered by the tiniest, stupidest things, like Haytham not sounding the same throughout the book. His change of voice was painfully obvious to me. And not only does it change, it crashes in stark contrast, for it's like 'well well well when did this character chANGE SO MUCH', only to return to his 'old Bowden-written self' in a book exclusive part regarding Jenny, his sister, and a new character called Holden, and later return to 'game self' once again since we plunge once more into the events of the game. Haytham constantly changes his morale in this book, which is something that doesn't coincide with the game. In the game he's ruthless, in the book he's always thinking about the innocents and doubts whether to plunge his blade or not. It just doesn't add up when you see him plead for a teenager's life in one page and threaten the life of a kid in another. I gather maybe he was a conflicted man, that he changed his ways many times, but to me is just that Haytham was shown to have mercy and to be cruel only when the plot of the book required it. Also, why is it that always, always, these books speed up the game's events but take years to develop all the new content that Bowden adds? Like I said, it seems to me he doesn't enjoying writing the game parts, and I couldn't blame him, for I find them boring, even more if I'm currently playing the game and re-reading scenes I've watched yesterday, without all the magic of the game and in a barren monotone brought by this man's narration. AC Underworld (Syndicate's adaptation) is, to me, the worst case out of all these I've read, because it adapts the whole game in less than 100 pages. Damn. By the by, I cannot shake off the feeling that Bowden doesn't investigate enough before lunging into these books - at some point Haytham says he's skilled with Spanish and often people confused him with a Spaniard as his accent rings true to them. He then reads a Spanish phrase, which he goes on to translate in his mind - wait, wait, that's not how a bilingual mind works. I'm not translating this in my head as I type, even less I translate sentences mentally as I read a book, because I don't need translation, I understand the language, which is something Haytham had convinced me he was capable of until he failed at it by translating the phrase. I know it was for the sake of the English readers, but then why not just write 'I read this phrase which was written in Spanish and went like this...', it would've been more believable. I can understand that Haytham never once heard Connor's real name, but I cannot accept that a man of his wisdom and talents could think that Ziio chose that name for her son, as he affirms in his journal, since he knows so much of the Mohawk tribe and he spent a considerable amount of time with one to believe that 'Connor' would be a suitable name for a native. At the end, in the list of names, Connor also appears only as Connor. It leads me to believe that no one from the Ubisoft team told Bowden the real name of the character was Ratonhnhaké:ton (wow, I wrote it without looking it up). I still think the Journal structure doesn't fit these books - or any, actually - unless they're written like real journals, not this 'detailed exposition with dialogue transcriptions that is pretty much a novel'. The same happened to me with the Unity adaptation. It's... Not a journal. It's a novel. Some dialogues Connor said them in Mohawk... And I remember because I'm currently playing the game... Yet Haytham narrated that Connor said them in English. Great. Also I noticed some typos and stupid errors like mistaking "through" with "though", like if you read "we walked though the forest" you know something's amiss. Which leaves me with the impression that no editing or correcting was done to this. I'm glad I got to see more of Edward Kenway - I must admit, I come from reading the Black Flag book so it was perfect to continue with this one. I also enjoyed Jenny's presence and I wish I could've seen more of her and her relationship with Haytham. I would've much preferred it than the countless expeditions and game scene transcriptions we received. I'm annoyed beyond anger with the fact that Shay Cormac doesn't appear at all. I know his abscence is remarked upon in Rogue, but it doesn't make it any less of a mistake from a saga that's being crafted as it unfolds and it's too transparent here not to see it. Cormac doesn't appear simply because his game wasn't out yet. And when Haytham sees Achilles for the first time in the book - a character that hadn't appeared previously in his journal - we're told to believe he knew him from before - from when, exactly, Haytham? You left a good chunk of your years out. I'm sorry but this is poor story telling. From the game developers as well. Lastly, I can't believe Connor narrates with the same monotone that Haytham used. For Minerva's sake. One is an English old man, the other is a young native speaking in a language that's not his mother tongue, and yet they sound and write the same. Don't tell me like father like son because I'll riot. This is bad characterization and on Bowden's part. All in all, I know I marked way too many errors - but I enjoyed it more than I enjoyed the previous books I read written by this author, and I gave them all 2 stars, hence my rating now. Again, as I mentioned, it might be due to the fact I don't suffer from poor translation anymore, which I've discovered can completely anhihilate one's experience when reading. Maybe it's because I'm liking the game so much and I love Connor as a protagonist, but I firmly believe this book is only for fans of the franchise, as it's the case with all the other adaptations as well. They lack context, description, immersion, believable dialogues and character development. In short, they lack everything that makes a book good.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Man i LOVE AC3 but I feel ubisoft SCREWED this franchise over so much, and this book is evidence of that. How come every book since AC1 up to Revelation was about the main character of the VG, essentially retelling the game in book form, but whenever AC3 is mentioned everyones like OMG HAYTHAM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! NO. I don't want to hear about Haytham, sorry. This is why this book was so disappointing for me. Plus I feel it paved the way to hyping up Black Flag with the mention of E Man i LOVE AC3 but I feel ubisoft SCREWED this franchise over so much, and this book is evidence of that. How come every book since AC1 up to Revelation was about the main character of the VG, essentially retelling the game in book form, but whenever AC3 is mentioned everyones like OMG HAYTHAM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! NO. I don't want to hear about Haytham, sorry. This is why this book was so disappointing for me. Plus I feel it paved the way to hyping up Black Flag with the mention of Edward, UGHHHHH. The style of writing also mischaracterised Haytham in a way that was too 'childish?' so I don't feel like it was really his story. It almost comes across as if you're meant to feel sorry for Haytham and his life when in reality... man he was a templar out of choice, he was ruthless, he wanted POWER and he killed people. He wasn't someone who wanted to run away into the american forest and live a pure life with Ziio, in fact I'm p sure Ziio didn't want that either. She was an ambiguous character who felt immense responsibility towards her people, and was ruthless in doing anything she could to help them. I did like Haythams response to meeting Connor, but again it was too.... nice? This book was just a big no for me. It was disappointing because I was expecting Connor, just as Ezio and Altair got books, why doesn't Connor deserve one? Also if you're going to write a book about Haytham, at least do it right, bye.

  13. 5 out of 5

    TROLL

    BEWARE OF SPOILERS I have played the games and have thought of them very highly and when my dad showed me this book i thought it looked really cool and got it off my dad as soon as i could. This is my own chioce of book and that is the space on the bingo board that I have chosen to fill in. My favorite quote: "I am an expert swordsman. And I am skilled in the business of death. I take no pleasure in my skill. simply,I am good at it". I like it Because it shows a lot about the story and how its going BEWARE OF SPOILERS I have played the games and have thought of them very highly and when my dad showed me this book i thought it looked really cool and got it off my dad as soon as i could. This is my own chioce of book and that is the space on the bingo board that I have chosen to fill in. My favorite quote: "I am an expert swordsman. And I am skilled in the business of death. I take no pleasure in my skill. simply,I am good at it". I like it Because it shows a lot about the story and how its going to play out. My favorite character was Haytham because he is a bad-ass in this book. He is the main character.He fights for the Templar's and by the end has become the grand master of the order. He has one son which he doesn't find out about until around the end of the book.I chose haytham because he knows what is right and what is wrong even though he is not the best at this sometimes he still knows what he has done wrong and tries to correct it. What i learnt from this book was: Why we should portray mercy to others weather it be a life and death situation or a just in an argument or possibly a fist fight.

  14. 4 out of 5

    ضحى الحداد

    I really liked Haytham, I really did .. he is such a complex character with a grey moral compass .. I liked that he was questioning himself all the time although he was doing what he was told to do .. the beginning of this book was so good and I was interested to know what will happen to Haytham after all that happened to him when he was a child .. but as the events moved on the story became kind of boring .. specially at the end when it was all politics and nearly no fight, we were just being t I really liked Haytham, I really did .. he is such a complex character with a grey moral compass .. I liked that he was questioning himself all the time although he was doing what he was told to do .. the beginning of this book was so good and I was interested to know what will happen to Haytham after all that happened to him when he was a child .. but as the events moved on the story became kind of boring .. specially at the end when it was all politics and nearly no fight, we were just being told of what was happening during the ِِِِِِِAmerican revolution the ending was just MEH .. and it didn't make me feel anything it was an ok read but I expected better

  15. 4 out of 5

    Artzy

    And here you thought that Templars and Creeds ends with Ezio Audiotre la Florence? NUUP! You're quite far off actually... Remember that it is centuries old war. Both fighting for freedom. Both fighting for an Order. This time it's both father and son. I have to admit I was a bit impatient with Haytham. Everything just seemed so obvious but he was oblivious about it, or so I think. Before I spoil any further, give it a read and you will know what I meant. And here you thought that Templars and Creeds ends with Ezio Audiotre la Florence? NUUP! You're quite far off actually... Remember that it is centuries old war. Both fighting for freedom. Both fighting for an Order. This time it's both father and son. I have to admit I was a bit impatient with Haytham. Everything just seemed so obvious but he was oblivious about it, or so I think. Before I spoil any further, give it a read and you will know what I meant.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tasos Karamintzas

    This book is incredible, at first, after that is just the game from the templars perspective and with a few added things in its story. I did however enjoyed it and I'll recommend it to every fan of the Assassin's Creed series especially if you like the character of Haytham Kenway 4/5. This book is incredible, at first, after that is just the game from the templars perspective and with a few added things in its story. I did however enjoyed it and I'll recommend it to every fan of the Assassin's Creed series especially if you like the character of Haytham Kenway 4/5.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hasbiya Asya

    It was good, i fell in love with the Kenway's Story since the third game came out, especially for Haytham. He wanted to unite Assassins and Templar, but he couldn't do it, and this story was kinda enlighten for me as long as i can remember the game story. It was good, i fell in love with the Kenway's Story since the third game came out, especially for Haytham. He wanted to unite Assassins and Templar, but he couldn't do it, and this story was kinda enlighten for me as long as i can remember the game story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    It was OK, the style was a bit bland and the plot slightly predictable but it was a quick and entertaining read that was full of action. Enough said.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Corfy

    This book is great, because the killer is very smart and cunning, I would like be like him.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chris The Lizard from Planet X

    Assassin’s Creed: Forsaken by Oliver Bowden is a prequel video game tie-in to Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed 3. Forsaken shows the back story to the main Templar villain Haytham Kenway. Assassin’s Creed Forsaken has a slightly different spin on it than most Assassin Creed books. Much like his father (Edward Kenway) Haytham finds himself in the middle of the long-raging war between Templars and Assassin’s in a way that would have been totally unexpected. Whereas Edward barged his way in after pretend Assassin’s Creed: Forsaken by Oliver Bowden is a prequel video game tie-in to Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed 3. Forsaken shows the back story to the main Templar villain Haytham Kenway. Assassin’s Creed Forsaken has a slightly different spin on it than most Assassin Creed books. Much like his father (Edward Kenway) Haytham finds himself in the middle of the long-raging war between Templars and Assassin’s in a way that would have been totally unexpected. Whereas Edward barged his way in after pretending to be an assassin, Haytham ends up on the Templar side of things. He’s an intriguing character due to his current station in life being at odds with his family ideals. Reading about a Templar with Assassin ideals is a new experience and enjoyable one. This is not so much based on the events of the game (Assassin’s Creed Three) but a prequel to it. Some of the events to merge later on, but Haytham’s journal leads you right from his childhood up until his final moments and spans everything in-between. The relationships formed don’t have a deep, tear-jerking or meaningful feel to them, but that is mainly due to the morose nature of our protagonist. He is all about the work first and his own pleasure and feelings second, as any good soldier of the cause (from either Assassin’s order or Templar order would be). The bulk of the tale is set in America. The Templars are trying to set up their operations over in the colonies, hoping to discover precursor sites and thus powerful artifacts. Haytham’s personal wars lead him all over the world from England, to Europe and even further afield, but his primary goals are Templar dominance in America. We are even treated to such events as the Boston Tea Party … such a waste of good tea leaves. I found the pacing of this to be fast and, at the same time, it flowed so well. It didn’t feel rushed. The combat was plentiful and very well-written. I could almost hear Haytham’s hidden blade (yes … he uses one despite playing for the other team) unsheathing as he made ready for a kill. As with all Assassin Creed books/games, I love the characters from history appearing. As fun as they are to read and play, it’s a great way of cramming some extra learning in without it feeling like hard work. I thought some of the characters could have done with a bit more fleshing out, yet the ones that were on point were so good. If a character you are attached to in this dies or has something truly grim happen to them … and there are some true grim moments throughout, you feel it as though it were happening to a friend (or at least I did with a couple of the characters). Overall, Assassins Creed: Forsaken does a good job of expanding the back story of Haytham Kenway one my favorite characters from the AC 3 game, and is a solid Read for any fans of Assassins Creed franchise.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Regina

    I have picked this book up after playing ACIII because i am simply a fan of the kenway Family, especially Haytham and his cool character, but reading this makes me love him more, this book simply suggest that "Don't judge a book by it's cover" because Haytham is Templar in Connor's Eyes, but he is a caring father deep inside (That even connor himself don't know) WARNING FOLKS, THIS MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS A LOT I know this book has a boring part, but to be honest , there are some parts that makes you I have picked this book up after playing ACIII because i am simply a fan of the kenway Family, especially Haytham and his cool character, but reading this makes me love him more, this book simply suggest that "Don't judge a book by it's cover" because Haytham is Templar in Connor's Eyes, but he is a caring father deep inside (That even connor himself don't know) WARNING FOLKS, THIS MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS A LOT I know this book has a boring part, but to be honest , there are some parts that makes you jump a lot because of its excitement, Haytham once again, show his other side in this book, in fact Haytham has three sides at this book , his Templar side, his Father side, and his Mask of sorrow side. As a narrative lover reader, i found Bowden's masterpiece simply poor, especially at the first part, he simply forgot that Haytham at that time was still a kid, and he lacks of Haytham's kid side, i hope that he portray Haytham as a normal kid, or naive like that, but Bowden just forgot his image as a child. As the story goes on, His lack of narrative was also in there, but not as worse as what in the first part have, my favorite narrative part maybe is how did he describe Connor through his eyes. As he went there as good, but aside that, (and the death) everything in the narrative was worse (view spoiler)[I give my deepest respect to Haytham when the trial part (28 June in Haytham's Journal) starts, he risk and sacrifice his position just to save connor, and it leaves him a turmoil that he and his journal only knows. Also my respect gained into 100% when the time period they already meet, he was not afraid to his fate, that he knows Connor will soon kill him <*Sorry, if you play ACIII, you already know about this*> Also, i give my respect to his gentleman, Holden, as how he was very truthful to Haytham, i hate how he and Haytham died(because i felt it was very disgraceful) but i think it was enough for them to show and prove their characters, Holden was one of the best sidekick at AC Tbh (hide spoiler)] Haytham Kenway Deserve a million of Gun salute for being the best AC Character

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sagnik Sengupta

    To be honest, this book has a very complex story structure, different than the others but a very complex one. To sum up, the book is about the story of a guy who is son of an assassin but becomes a templar who is eventually killed by a assassin who is actually his son. But in deeper sense it symbolises one thing that their respective order or creed is bigger than any family ties. Like in the previous books, the main protagonist Haytham Kenway, becomes a member of an order, in this case the Knigh To be honest, this book has a very complex story structure, different than the others but a very complex one. To sum up, the book is about the story of a guy who is son of an assassin but becomes a templar who is eventually killed by a assassin who is actually his son. But in deeper sense it symbolises one thing that their respective order or creed is bigger than any family ties. Like in the previous books, the main protagonist Haytham Kenway, becomes a member of an order, in this case the Knight Templars after he suffers a family disembowelment. Despite a different and complex story line, the book packs action in almost all the chapters, even more than it's predecessors. It also shows the gloomy rivalry between the two groups as Haytham, later a grand master of the Knight Tempalrs, upon learning his true parentage tried to unite the two groups but fate had different plans and was killed in a final fight with his son, assassin. Through the fight, both Haytham and his son Connor, exchanged talks about their respective group's ideologies which rally reflects what the two stand for before their own blood. All in all, a good read. Recommended.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emily DeLisle

    I read this after finishing the game, excited that it was from Haytham's perspective. I thought he was an interesting character in the game, so learning some of his history was intriguing. I was somewhat disappointed when it became apparent around halfway through the book that it would also cover the parts that you play Haytham in AC3, all the way up until the end of the game. The parts before the game and in the intervening years not shown in the game were fresh and interesting, but the parts t I read this after finishing the game, excited that it was from Haytham's perspective. I thought he was an interesting character in the game, so learning some of his history was intriguing. I was somewhat disappointed when it became apparent around halfway through the book that it would also cover the parts that you play Haytham in AC3, all the way up until the end of the game. The parts before the game and in the intervening years not shown in the game were fresh and interesting, but the parts that WERE in the game were dull and strangely paced, as I'd already experienced them. Some bits of dialogue were lifted right from the game's script. Some details were changed, like where a character was when they said something or how a fight played out, and they felt awkward since the rest of the scene was so faithful. I also thought the little epilogue at the end from Connor's perspective was unnecessary. It was a cool read if you liked the game, but parts felt like a slog.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kazuto Kirigaya

    I can only say one thing, Phenomenal! The story had a few moments where I was confused on places, time periods, events, but it was worth it. I am a HUGE fan of the Assassins Creed series and this book bridges the gap between the fourth and third game perfectly. The book actually seems possible and believable. I can only name a few reasons why I enjoyed it so much. 1# You get attached to the story and characters, which made it impossible for me to put down. 2# The foreshadowing and flashbacks blend I can only say one thing, Phenomenal! The story had a few moments where I was confused on places, time periods, events, but it was worth it. I am a HUGE fan of the Assassins Creed series and this book bridges the gap between the fourth and third game perfectly. The book actually seems possible and believable. I can only name a few reasons why I enjoyed it so much. 1# You get attached to the story and characters, which made it impossible for me to put down. 2# The foreshadowing and flashbacks blend into a perfect book where the book asks questions and answers them in just a few pages. 3# The details and emotions force you to read every word to fully understand an event or conversation. Finally, The all around thought of a bunch of rebels sneaking around killing anyone who tries to get in there way is just amazing. In Conclusion, I loved this book and suggest it to anyone who likes historical fiction. Oh, theres even George Washington in it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    Ok. One thing to say that this is a hard book. A harsh and a hard book. There is a lot of things that can be hard to understand, even I was lost in the book. Sometimes I get really excited because here comes the part that when they revealed something that he going to help into the future. The whole story is about a child saw his father death right front of his eyes. Also, his sister was taking away from the templars. Now he lives with revenge with his name. And for that, he is a dangerous man th Ok. One thing to say that this is a hard book. A harsh and a hard book. There is a lot of things that can be hard to understand, even I was lost in the book. Sometimes I get really excited because here comes the part that when they revealed something that he going to help into the future. The whole story is about a child saw his father death right front of his eyes. Also, his sister was taking away from the templars. Now he lives with revenge with his name. And for that, he is a dangerous man that he lives with a quote 'I am an expert swordsman. And I am skilled in the business of death. I take no pleasure in my skill. Simply, I am good at it.' When he found out that his father was an assassin, he become one and fight for the assassin's group. Now he can take revenge.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm not really sure about how I feel know that I've finished this book. I started reading it because I wanted to understand, at least a little, Assassin's Creed. I knew that it wasn't suposed to be a master piece, but a quick diversion. And then I meet Haytham and am presented with a lot of death and blood and parts of the book that could easily be part of a video game. And /then/ Connor came in and things happened and the last pages made me want to cry and punch things and cry and punch things I'm not really sure about how I feel know that I've finished this book. I started reading it because I wanted to understand, at least a little, Assassin's Creed. I knew that it wasn't suposed to be a master piece, but a quick diversion. And then I meet Haytham and am presented with a lot of death and blood and parts of the book that could easily be part of a video game. And /then/ Connor came in and things happened and the last pages made me want to cry and punch things and cry and punch things again. And when I think this is not enough, I re-read the prologue. Forsaken isn't the kind of book you want to read again, but Haytham and Connor made it a nice and quite sad experience.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Clapham

    Assassin's Creed Forsaken takes place in 1735 london as Haythem kenway. Son of Edward Kenway and father of Connor Kenway. The story begin's from the point of veiw of Haythem, who had been able to wield a sword since he could hold one. One night his father is killed and sister held captive causing Haythem to lose everything he holds dear to him. Not long after he is taken in by a mysteriouse character who teaches him how to kill. Later in the book, Haythem takes his thirst for revenge and tries to Assassin's Creed Forsaken takes place in 1735 london as Haythem kenway. Son of Edward Kenway and father of Connor Kenway. The story begin's from the point of veiw of Haythem, who had been able to wield a sword since he could hold one. One night his father is killed and sister held captive causing Haythem to lose everything he holds dear to him. Not long after he is taken in by a mysteriouse character who teaches him how to kill. Later in the book, Haythem takes his thirst for revenge and tries to hunt down the man,and or women who had baught such feelings apon him. Because of this. Haythem is dragged into the centuries war between the assassin's and the Templar's.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Rose

    Despite being a long time player of the excellent Assassin's Creed series, I'd never picked up one of Oliver Bowden's novelisations due to mediocre reviews. However, thanks to the charismatic, snarky and downright wonderful Haytham Kenway in the third game, my interest was peaked when i learned that Bowden's novelisation follows Haytham rather than the eponymous hero - his son Connor - of Assassins Creed 3 (the game on which the book is based). With that in mind, I read Forsaken, hoping to learn Despite being a long time player of the excellent Assassin's Creed series, I'd never picked up one of Oliver Bowden's novelisations due to mediocre reviews. However, thanks to the charismatic, snarky and downright wonderful Haytham Kenway in the third game, my interest was peaked when i learned that Bowden's novelisation follows Haytham rather than the eponymous hero - his son Connor - of Assassins Creed 3 (the game on which the book is based). With that in mind, I read Forsaken, hoping to learn more about Haytham and glean some juicy info on his life both before, during and after the game's setting. In that sense, I wasn't disappointed. Taking on the form of Haytham's personal journal, we learn much about him as a character and this gives his character much more depth and sympathy than was hinted at in the game. His relationship with other characters throughout the game is also expanded on (his interactions with Charles Lee not seen in the game are particularly fine) and we also learn more about his feelings regarding his once lover, Ziio, and their son, Connor. As can be expected from a book that is part of the successful Assassin's Creed franchise, there is a lot of action. The action scenes are reasonably snappy and well written, and a couple of 'missions' as it were had me on the edge of my seat. That said, you certainly get the feeling that you'd rather be playing the book rather than reading it - regardless of writing skill, we're used to manoeuvring these situations on our games consoles, and I wished I could play some of these scenes. There is also a lot of repetition from the game. I understand that in comparison to the previous novelisations, there is a whole lot of original material here. However, when there is repetition it's dull and doesn't feel necessary - we don't gain a whole lot more than we did in the game (except in one memorable circumstance, anyway). Overall, it's a good novelisation and I have a lot of love for how Haytham was handled throughout, but in the end the writing isn't quite sharp enough, and the plotting not tight enough to warrant 4 or 5 stars.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chunky Monkey

    This book is one of my favorite Assassin'screed books because it really shows how Conner and Haytham had their differences even though they were related. I also liked this book because it shows the progression that Conner had made throughout his life. This book is one of my favorite Assassin'screed books because it really shows how Conner and Haytham had their differences even though they were related. I also liked this book because it shows the progression that Conner had made throughout his life.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Akiko Middendorf

    "I am an expert swordsman. And I am skilled in the business of death. I take no pleasure in my skill. simply,I am good at it". This is a quote from one of the characters, main character name Haytham Kenway. Not to spoil the story but in Forsaken Haytham has come from London to find a "key" that gives a certain power to an individual. Later on in the story he meets a Mohawk woman who then births the Assassin, Ratohnhaketon or simply just Connor. The Mohawk village burns down when Connor was young "I am an expert swordsman. And I am skilled in the business of death. I take no pleasure in my skill. simply,I am good at it". This is a quote from one of the characters, main character name Haytham Kenway. Not to spoil the story but in Forsaken Haytham has come from London to find a "key" that gives a certain power to an individual. Later on in the story he meets a Mohawk woman who then births the Assassin, Ratohnhaketon or simply just Connor. The Mohawk village burns down when Connor was young. He was only 6 years old. He had watched his mother die which traumatized him. Haytham was not present the rest of the story and becomes the enemy by the end of the book. Connor is the name that his me mentor gave him. In the story Connor later has the apple of Eden, a magical ball the has unlimited power passed down from the assassin's. This apple of Eden gave Connor a vision which then lead him to become an Assassin, hunt down all of the Templar and bring the American people peace. Connor was a naive character but through out the story he changed in ways you can imagine. He had learnt that though "it is not enough" be came to a conclusion that everything in life is never enough but he had still brought peace to himself. It broke my when his mentor died because he was like a father to Connor, a father he never had. The book to me was amazing and special just the the previous books. All these related assassins have something special to share, a moral and also a balance between life and death.

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