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25 chilling short stories by outstanding female writers. Women have always written exceptional stories of horror and the supernatural. This anthology aims to showcase the very best of these, from Amelia B. Edwards's 'The Phantom Coach', published in 1864, through past luminaries such as Edith Wharton and Mary Elizabeth Braddon, to modern talents including Muriel Gray, Sara 25 chilling short stories by outstanding female writers. Women have always written exceptional stories of horror and the supernatural. This anthology aims to showcase the very best of these, from Amelia B. Edwards's 'The Phantom Coach', published in 1864, through past luminaries such as Edith Wharton and Mary Elizabeth Braddon, to modern talents including Muriel Gray, Sarah Pinborough and Lilith Saintcrow. From tales of ghostly children to visitations by departed loved ones, and from heart-rending stories to the profoundly unsettling depiction of extreme malevolence, what each of these stories has in common is the effect of a slight chilling of the skin, a feeling of something not quite present, but nevertheless there. If anything, this showcase anthology proves that sometimes the female of the species can also be the most terrifying . . .


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25 chilling short stories by outstanding female writers. Women have always written exceptional stories of horror and the supernatural. This anthology aims to showcase the very best of these, from Amelia B. Edwards's 'The Phantom Coach', published in 1864, through past luminaries such as Edith Wharton and Mary Elizabeth Braddon, to modern talents including Muriel Gray, Sara 25 chilling short stories by outstanding female writers. Women have always written exceptional stories of horror and the supernatural. This anthology aims to showcase the very best of these, from Amelia B. Edwards's 'The Phantom Coach', published in 1864, through past luminaries such as Edith Wharton and Mary Elizabeth Braddon, to modern talents including Muriel Gray, Sarah Pinborough and Lilith Saintcrow. From tales of ghostly children to visitations by departed loved ones, and from heart-rending stories to the profoundly unsettling depiction of extreme malevolence, what each of these stories has in common is the effect of a slight chilling of the skin, a feeling of something not quite present, but nevertheless there. If anything, this showcase anthology proves that sometimes the female of the species can also be the most terrifying . . .

30 review for The Mammoth Book of Ghost Stories by Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amalia Gkavea

    ''Although the stories vary from tales of ghostly children to those of lost pets, from murder to accidental death, from rage to sorrow and back again, one thing is central to all: a slight chilling of the skin as you read. A feeling of something being not quite there but rather just behind you, ready to make itself known, and leaving you reluctant to turn out the light.'' Marie O'Regan Continuing with appropriate autumn reads, in mood for this year's Halloween, I chose a collection that has l ''Although the stories vary from tales of ghostly children to those of lost pets, from murder to accidental death, from rage to sorrow and back again, one thing is central to all: a slight chilling of the skin as you read. A feeling of something being not quite there but rather just behind you, ready to make itself known, and leaving you reluctant to turn out the light.'' Marie O'Regan Continuing with appropriate autumn reads, in mood for this year's Halloween, I chose a collection that has long been on my TBR. A volume containing 25 ghostly tales, written by women, populated with sad ghosts, spirits looking for retribution, Gothic mansions, abandoned chapels, specters of a life forgotten. These are my personal favourites: ''Cathedral was the Lord's House, he told himself. It was not to be slighted by spirits. A cold wind blew in from the direction of the altar. The stonemasons would later tell their families it was a change in the air which first alerted them to the mummers' presence. Hanging off precipices many fett up, the men detected a country aroma. Their minds turned to hay ricks, windfalls, smoking jam kettles and bonfires.'' Field of the Dead by Kim Lakin-Smith: A story with all the quintessential characteristics of British Gothic. A haunted Cathedral, a haunted inn, a confused young priest, a summer Autumn Eve, children's ghosts, poltergeists. Imagine The Sixth Sense, The Woman In Black, The Conjuring and Supernatural combined in a story. This is perfection. ''It was a dull grey evening, early in November; the student's reading-lamp was lighted, but the shutters were not yet shut, not the curtains drawn. He could see the leaden sky outside his window, the fir-tree tops tossing in the angry wind. He could hear the wintry blast whistling amidst the gables before it rushed off seaward with a savage haul.'' The Shadow In The Corner by Mary Elizabeth Braddon: A young woman finds herself in a scholar's estate and has to put up with a strange presence and an even more frightening and infinitely cruel old man. A very atmospheric and very sad story. ''She had an especial liking for yellow roses, and for mulled cider, as well, and late autumn, and the inscriptions she finds carved on slate headstones when she walks between the rows of Copp's Hill.'' The Madam of the Narrow Houses by Caitlin R. Kiernan: A haunting, sensual story of a woman who has the gift (or the curse) to converse with ghosts. The Lost Ghost by Mary E. Wilkins-Freeman: A sad story of a young girl who is looking for a mother and three brave women. The Ninth Witch by Sarah Langan: A visceral story about a witch, her daughters and the cruelty of men, set in pagan times. Outstanding is too weak a word for this one. ''Don't fight, they told her. The alternative is almost always worse than what you already have.'' ... ''Sister, Shhh...'' by Elizabeth Massie: A girl who tries to escape a community where polygamy = rape are practiced and a young who had an abortion meet in a hotel room. A story of injustice, cruelty and revenge. ''Before the last echoes of the bell had faded, music began to play from somewhere within the house. Softly at first, and muffled, as if coming to her through a dense fog, so that Chloe had to strain to hear it, but gradually becoming louder and clearer until each sad, sweet not was crystal perfect. It was the aria from the second act of Giselle when the grief-stricken duke mourns at the tomb of the girl he has himself driven to madness and death.'' ''On one occasion, on the exact stroke of midnight, Chloe looked from one of the windows and saw white shapes flitting between the trees at the end of the garden, She was certain they were wilis- the female spirits described in the ballet as risen from their graves at night, to seek revenge upon men by dancing them to death.'' The Fifth Bedroom by Alex Bell: This is how stories on haunted houses should be written. This is how you depict the bond between two women that are divided by decades and united in injustice and cruelty. This is how you create an atmosphere of dread and sadness. Seeing Nancy by Nina Allan: I don't know what to say about this story...It goes beyond everything we know about hauntings, restless souls and past crimes. Nina Allan is an extraordinary writer and this tale is among the jewels of the collection. Return by Yvonne Navaro: A dead girl returns to a family full of perversion, selfishness, and utter cruelty. A raw story full of trigger warnings (rape, substance use, and psychological extortion). Forget Us Not by Nancy Kilpatrick: A winter's tale of a love that has died and a strange cat, set in Montreal. God Grant That She Lye Still by Cynthia Asquith: An old-fashioned story of past lives and loves, with a distinctive Gothic feel and a few well-placed traces of Wuthering Heights. The Phantom Coach by Amelia B. Edwards: A haunting, darkly picturesque story of the Dead Cart, set in the moors. The Old Nurse's Story by Elizabeth Gaskell: A foreboding estate full of spirits and secrets in a classic Gothic story. Among the Shoals Forever by Gail Z.Martin: Pirates, necromancers, vampires, beautiful ghosts, powerful cameos in a story set in Charleston. Afterword by Edith Wharton: How far would you go to have your very own ghost? Most collections of this genre are a mixed bag and this is no exception. There are a few true gems, many atmospheric stories and a couple that belonged to the trash bin, unworthy to be found in a collection that includes Wharton and Gaskell. However, every reader and lover of ghost stories will find many things to appreciate here and this is a volume that definitely deserves a spot among our Halloween reads. My reviews can also be found on https://theopinionatedreaderblog.word...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

    Spoilers for each story follow, and mentions of sexual violence, abuse and murder. So What's It About?/What I Thought Field of the Dead by Kim Lakin-Smith: A contemporary writer's take on a motley collection of Victorian ghostbusters. I loved the mummers, their performances and hard-scrabble life, and there was a nice little twist at the end. 3/5 stars. Collect Call by Sarah Pinborough: a woman finds herself deserted in an abandoned town and it soon becomes apparent that not all is as it seems. Thi Spoilers for each story follow, and mentions of sexual violence, abuse and murder. So What's It About?/What I Thought Field of the Dead by Kim Lakin-Smith: A contemporary writer's take on a motley collection of Victorian ghostbusters. I loved the mummers, their performances and hard-scrabble life, and there was a nice little twist at the end. 3/5 stars. Collect Call by Sarah Pinborough: a woman finds herself deserted in an abandoned town and it soon becomes apparent that not all is as it seems. This one had some truly chilling touches, from the skittering of claws to the single hand in an abandoned building's window and the wonderful revelation at the end. 4/5 stars. Dead Flowers by a Roadside by Kelley Armstrong: explores the grief of a man who can see the ghosts of everyone but his lost family. This one was a little too short to be satisfying, but I think it did its job. 2/5 stars. The Shadow in the Corner by Mary Elizabeth Braddon: the first old story of the bunch, this one tells the story of a ruthlessly scientific man whose refusal to believe in the supernatural comes that the expense of his servant's life. There is nothing like a Victorian ghost story, is there? This one has the perfect spooky atmosphere of dread. 4/5 stars. The Madam of the Narrow House by Caitlin R Kiernan:  would you fuck a ghost? This one was beautifully written and terribly sad, and made me think about how lonely and starved for connection a ghost could be. I loved it a lot. 5/5 stars. The Lost Ghost by Mary Wilkins-Freeman: another period story, this one about a sweet, harmless and tragic little ghost. This one was much sadder than it was spooky, but I enjoyed it a lot. 4/5 stars. The Ninth Witch by Sarah Langan: a post-apocalyptic ghost story of a woman overcoming the world's horrific violence against women and learning to save herself. This one read like a super bleak, awful fairy tale, and it's easily one of the most unique of the bunch. The "ghost" in this story was easily one of my favorites of the collection. 5/5 stars. Sister, Shhh... by Elizbeth Massie: another take on violence against women, this time in the form of two girls escaping from a hyper-religious cult that practices bigamy.  For reasons that I can't truly put my finger on or articulate this one didn't work for me as well as The Ninth Witch did, and ended up feeling kind of gross. 2/5 stars. The Fifth Bedroom by Alex Bell:  a former model with a "ruined" face retires to the country to sulk after her divorce, and discovers that she is not as alone as she initially thought. This one featured one of the collection's most chilling endings, and I loved it. 4/5 stars. Scairt by Allison Littlewood: a little girl moves to either Ireland or Scotland (can't remember sorry!!!) and is saved from danger by a little boy who was murdered. I do like my vengeful ghosts to be balanced out by sweet, helpful ones! 3/5 stars. Seeing Nancy by Nina Allan: a woman's marriage collapses while she investigates the bloody history of her new house. I think it was going for spooky, but I never really felt it. 2/5 stars. The Third Person by Lisa Tuttle: a woman agrees to let her friend use her apartment for an affair, and soon comes to regret it. There are a few stories that are super sexual in the collection, and this one was my least favorite. 2/5 stars. Freeze Out by Nancy Holder: a story of domestic abuse and a family's deepest secrets. I appreciated the author's decision to write about an abusive woman, which is something that is not very commonly seen at all. 3/5 stars. Return by Yvonne Navarro: a girl returns to her family after death and her return brings up secrets that have long stayed hidden. This one explores sexual violence and dysfunctional family dynamics pretty successfully, I think, and it made me much sadder than I was scared. 3/5 stars. Let Loose by Mary Cholmondeley: another old story, this time about something evil lurking in a church crypt. Listen, I'm just a massive sucker for old-fashioned ghost stories, okay? 4/5 stars. Another One in from the Cold by Marion Arnott: a woman contemplates abortion while growing more and more concerned with the spirit of a relative lost in World War I. This one did a beautiful job of blending the protagonist's real-world concerns with the supernatural elements. My Moira by Lilith Saintcrow: upon a friend's death, a woman is charged with the protection of a mysterious magical amulet. This one was surprisingly funny, and the relationship between the main character and her best friend was my favorite part. 3/5/ stars. Forget Us Not by Nancy Kilpatrick: another lovely story about grief, and this one focused on the relationship between a woman and a pet cat. 3/5 stars. Front Row Rider by Muriel Gray: a lonely woman who has had no life reflects on her one adventure. This is the only story in the collection that I truly actively disliked - it just left me entirely confused. 1/5 stars. God Grant that She Lye Still by Cynthia Asquith: a chilling story of possession with a delightfully charming woman as the victim. 4/5 stars. The Phantom Coach by Amelia B. Edwards: the oldest story of the collection, and another one positively suffused with spooky Victorian atmosphere. 4/5 The Old Nurse's Story by Elizabeth Gaskell: Gaskell is certainly one of the best writers of this collection, and it shows in this story about a family's cruelty being acted out over and over again. 5/5 stars. Among the Shoals Forever by Gail Z Martin: a story of rooting out an evil sorcerer in antebellum Charleston. This one had one of the most interesting settings by far, and a ghost that struck me as one of the most tragic. 4/5 stars. Afterward by Edith Wharton: an American couple moves to England and absolutely insists on an estate with a ghost. The hitch? You only know it's a ghost long after the fact. This was my absolute favorite of the collection. The ghostly part of the story was so clever, and as ever Edith Wharton is an incredible writer. A Silver Music by Gaie Sebold: set in a secondary world with Victorian/steampunk vibes, this one is about a detective investigating an inventor's murder. I liked that this story was both a murder mystery and a ghost story, and the steampunk vibes were fun. The F Word As you can tell, this collection of stories features a lot of violence against women: abuse, controlling relationships, sexual violence, murder and other forms of mistreatment. I don't think I can apply my usual rules to this collection, partially because the short story format gives the authors so much less space to work with. What I will say is what I said in my review of The Woman In Black: I think ghost stories can serve as a commentary on trauma, because their focus is on people who are stuck reliving their worst experiences over and over again, unable to escape the wrongs that have been done to them even after death. It's one of the scariest possibilities I can think of.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Majanka

    The Mammoth Book of Ghost Stories by Women is an anthology you have to own. One by one, I found the stories mentioned to be breathtakingly unique, and each of them deal with the subject of ‘ghosts’ in their own, distinct way. Some stories are pure horror, spine-chilling, offering goosebumps. Others are more mundane, and talk about the departure of loved ones. Others are set in a purely fictional world, with necromancers and warlocks. Because of the length and the diversity of this anthology, it’s The Mammoth Book of Ghost Stories by Women is an anthology you have to own. One by one, I found the stories mentioned to be breathtakingly unique, and each of them deal with the subject of ‘ghosts’ in their own, distinct way. Some stories are pure horror, spine-chilling, offering goosebumps. Others are more mundane, and talk about the departure of loved ones. Others are set in a purely fictional world, with necromancers and warlocks. Because of the length and the diversity of this anthology, it’s hard to say something about it as a whole, apart from the fact the editor picked strong, varying stories with interesting premises. The first story is “Field of the Dead”, which talks about a haunted cathedral and a pack of ghost busters trying to exorcise the ghosts and poltergeists. I thought it was an entertaining read with rather prosaic prose, very descriptive as well. “Collect Call” is the next story and one of the best in the anthology. Lee calls collect, and then makes a phone call to his Dad who promises to pick him up. But the call, and the desolate town Lee sees from across the street, may not be what they seem. This was an absolutely wonderful read, one that gave me chills at the end – I love a story that keeps me guessing, and this one definitely succeeded. Next is “Dead Flowers by a Roadside”, by author Kelley Armstrong. It’s a short, but intriguing read. I liked “The Shadow in the Corner” better though. That story definitely had me spooked. It’s about a lonely, middle-aged man living in a large mansion where someone allegedly killed themselves plenty of years ago. When a young new maid comes to work for them, she has to spend the night in the room of the suicide…Deliciously creepy! “The Madam of the Narrow Houses” left me more confused than anything else. It’s about a self-proclaimed medium whose visited by spirits. A nice read, but like I said, it was a bit confusing. “The Lost Ghost” was another awesome, spine-chilling read about a girl who goes to live in a house where a small girl died several years ago. Now the little girl’s spirit inhabits the house. This was my second favorite story in the entire anthology. The writing was not too flowery or descriptive, but it did give off that great, old-fashioned vibe. Next up is “The Ninth Witch”, which was, at least in my opinion not much of a ghost story, but more of a messed up fairytale. A girl is raised in a village where women are considered dirt. All eight of her sisters die, and she’s doomed to die herself, unless she manages to do something about it. It’s all told in a very fairytale-like way, but it’s a dark, wicked story with gore and blood flying off the pages. “Sister, shhh” had a nice twist at the end, and the premise was highly original as well. It’s about a girl who runs away from a cult, to a new, vibrant city, only to be discovered. While that was a good one, the next story, “The Fifth Bedroom” went above and beyond that. Another nail-biting horror story, this tells us about Chloe Benn, retired supermodel and divorced from a billionaire husband who moves into the room of a former prima ballerina who lost her career when she couldn’t walk anymore. Growing into a bitter old woman, the ballerina occupied the fifth bedroom, a mysterious room Chloe can’t seem to find. “Scairt” was a bit confusing, but not a very scary story. It was actually more a sweet story, although I didn’t like the prose that much with the Irish sentences here and there – for a non-native English speaker, those were annoying. “Seeing Nancy” was another shot in the rose for me though. The creepiness sipped in slowly throughout that story, about a house where people got murdered, and an author who sees her family change the longer they spend in the house. “The Third Person” left me wanting to strangle someone. That story just didn’t work for me – what was real? what wasn’t? Usually I’m all for these stories, but at least they have to give me a hint. “Freeze Out” was a lot better – a mother has died, and her family is grieving – especially with the surprise twist at the end, one I didn’t see coming at all. “Return” was an excellent read as well. Not that scary, but touching, heartbreaking. “Let Loose” was nice, but not as good as some of the other stories in the anthology. It was about a guy who went into a crypt, unknowingly releasing an evil into this world. “Another One in from the Cold” had me at the edge of my seat. It was a beautiful, moving story, but deliciously frightening at the same time. “My Moira” was probably my least favorite story in the entire anthology. It was fantasy, and the ghost only played a minor part. “Forget Us Not” was touching, and brought me on the verge of tears. Definitely an excellent short. “Front Row Rider” left me guessing till the very end, which makes me rank it highly in this anthology. It was a mysterious, but well-executed story, with a fast pace and some nice prose. “God Grant That She Lye Still” once again fell in the ‘scary’ category, and it definitely had me spooked. A Doctor meets a woman he might fall for, but she tells him she keeps on losing herself, and she can’t find the “Me” part of her. “The Phantom Coach” reminded me of many old, urban legends I once heard, when people get lost during the night and stumble upon a place where a terrible accident happened many years ago. “The Old Nurse’s Story” was an excellent read. Delightfully frightening, the descriptions were so vivid I could practically imagine the ghosts standing in front of me. “Among the Shoals Forever” didn’t do anything for me though. Once again going on the more fantasy-like tour, I didn’t enjoy this story very much. “Afterward” was a nice read, although I figured out early on – as opposed to afterward – what was happening. Even though “A Silver Music” wasn’t scary at all, I did think it was an original story, with an unique premise, some nice protagonists and well thought-through. All in all, The Mammoth Book of Ghost Stories by Women proved a varying, intriguing read. Of course I liked some stories more than others, but the general quality of stories in this anthology is very high. I recommend it to all ghost stories fans.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    I was surprised to see the start date of reading for this was 2016, 3 years ago. Doesn't seem that long ago that I started, but it obviously has been a while. It's a long book. Almost 500 pages. But an anthology, so it's easy to pick up and read when you can. I enjoyed reading a collection of all-women writers, taking on darker themes. Many are ghost stories, some verge on thriller. Some I skimmed/skipped, some I read closely. Many are set in the UK, which gives you a sort of cozy, Victorian-feel I was surprised to see the start date of reading for this was 2016, 3 years ago. Doesn't seem that long ago that I started, but it obviously has been a while. It's a long book. Almost 500 pages. But an anthology, so it's easy to pick up and read when you can. I enjoyed reading a collection of all-women writers, taking on darker themes. Many are ghost stories, some verge on thriller. Some I skimmed/skipped, some I read closely. Many are set in the UK, which gives you a sort of cozy, Victorian-feel. Like reading Sherlock Holmes. I was surprised at how many women took the male pov. Good for them. Stories that stood out for me: Nancy Kilpatrick, "Forget Us Not": Beautifully written story in 2nd person. Hard to pull off, but she does it well. More contemporary than the rest, and with real emotional impact. Can't discuss or I'll give plot away, but there is a cat involved. Sarah Pinborough, "Collect Call": This story revolves around the old-fashioned phone booth. Well-written with a great twist. Also has emotional resonance. Lilith Saintcrow, "My Moira": Both a ghost story and a demonic story. Graphic images, but great plot that keeps you moving forward. More feminist than many of the other stories, which I liked, plus some very subtle sexual undertones I don't want to give away, that worked well to give this a powerful ending. Kelley Armstrong, "Dead Flowers by a Roadside": One of the more well-known authors in the book, this New York Times-bestselling author wrote perhaps the shortest story in the collection, but it's a powerful examination of grief, using a roadside memorial as its central symbol. *Elizabeth Massie, "Sister, Shhh...": My favorite story. Gripping, gritty, tragic with gorgeous prose. Loved the historical aspect, as well. Deals with a cult and abuse; a tough read, but a well-done ghost story that borders on thriller/crime. Made we want to read a novel version of the backstory. So these are my personal highlights. I do recommend it to ghost story and thriller fans and readers who like to promote women writers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    I'm sad to say it, but this just wasn't very good. A few of the stories are very old (late 1800s, early 1900s) but the rest all seem to be from 2012, which suggests to me that they were commissioned for this collection. I'm afraid that was a mistake in the end. A couple of them were almost enjoyable, in that the writing was good and I started to get involved and then they ended (either weirdly or poorly, in every case), not to mention the fact that so many of them involved rape or abuse or perve I'm sad to say it, but this just wasn't very good. A few of the stories are very old (late 1800s, early 1900s) but the rest all seem to be from 2012, which suggests to me that they were commissioned for this collection. I'm afraid that was a mistake in the end. A couple of them were almost enjoyable, in that the writing was good and I started to get involved and then they ended (either weirdly or poorly, in every case), not to mention the fact that so many of them involved rape or abuse or perversion - why? I'm in no way a prude but in a collection specifically written by women I was genuinely surprised at the prevalence of sexual threat. I thought it might be a reprieve from that, but no. I was also surprised that there's no Shirley Jackson, no Susan Hill, etc, but I suppose it only purports to be a mammoth collection, not a good one. On the whole, really disappointing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Randolph

    Not bad collection of tales that are fun to read by the wintry fireside. A blend of classic and newer writers. Collection is held back by a few mediocre stories and three stories that in my opinion are just misplaced, didn't belong in this themed anthology. I think the editor was trying to send some message about the potential breadth of the genre and lost track of what it was all about. Especially notable offerings by Sarah Pinborough, Muriel Gray, Nancy Kilpatrick, and Lisa Tuttle. Great cover Not bad collection of tales that are fun to read by the wintry fireside. A blend of classic and newer writers. Collection is held back by a few mediocre stories and three stories that in my opinion are just misplaced, didn't belong in this themed anthology. I think the editor was trying to send some message about the potential breadth of the genre and lost track of what it was all about. Especially notable offerings by Sarah Pinborough, Muriel Gray, Nancy Kilpatrick, and Lisa Tuttle. Great cover.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marie-Therese

    Rating would be 3 1/2 stars if I had the option to give that here on Good Reads. This is a solid collection of ghost stories by American and British women writing in English. Featuring a mix of old and new, thematically there's something for almost everyone, with an especially strong selection of haunted house type tales. I would have liked to see more diversity in setting and some stories by Anglophone authors from outside the US and UK, as well as some translated works if this was really meant Rating would be 3 1/2 stars if I had the option to give that here on Good Reads. This is a solid collection of ghost stories by American and British women writing in English. Featuring a mix of old and new, thematically there's something for almost everyone, with an especially strong selection of haunted house type tales. I would have liked to see more diversity in setting and some stories by Anglophone authors from outside the US and UK, as well as some translated works if this was really meant to an anthology of ghost stories "by women", rather than women writing in English (Anne-Sylvie Salzman's work would have fit in very well-at least as well as Caitlin R. Kiernan's, which is featured here). A few clunkers (including the opening story, the only one I DNFd) mar the book's pacing and weaken the whole, but overall this is a nice addition to the Mammoth Books series and I'd love to see a (slightly more inclusive) second edition of 'Ghost Stories by Women'.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Brown Ash

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Uneven, though generally it was arranged from the weakest stories to the strongest. The first few stories were so weak that I wondered if this was all that was expected of women. "Field of the Dead" started strong and the action was gripping and fun. The punchline, however, was disappointing at best, and, frankly, a plot hole to my mind. How would the village audience have seen Thom the child mummer given what we discover of him at the end? But I could almost forgive it since the world Kim Lakin Uneven, though generally it was arranged from the weakest stories to the strongest. The first few stories were so weak that I wondered if this was all that was expected of women. "Field of the Dead" started strong and the action was gripping and fun. The punchline, however, was disappointing at best, and, frankly, a plot hole to my mind. How would the village audience have seen Thom the child mummer given what we discover of him at the end? But I could almost forgive it since the world Kim Lakin-Smith had created was vivid. "Collect Call" was so trite it barely merited inclusion, and does not merit comment by me. "Dead Flowers by a Roadside" again was trite, more touching but ultimately didn't take the reader anywhere interesting. "The Shadow in the Corner," written by Mary Elizabeth Braddon (1835-1915) was interesting because it was very vividly a product of the period when the author lived, and the characters were clear and intriguing, but this one also didn't really go anywhere, and especially not with Daniel and Mrs. Skegg, whose reactions to the events of the story would have brought meaning to the tale. "The Madam of the Narrow Houses" was an interesting premise, which contrasted what we think we understand of people with what they actually are. I would have liked to have seen a little more consequence to the story. "The Lost Ghost" was touching, an American story written in roughly the same period as the Braddon tale, a meditation on compassion that endures beyond ordinary bounds. "The Ninth Witch" seemed to have been part of a longer work; I'll check into that and report back in the comments. The premise was interesting, it was the foundation of a myth set in some post-apocalyptic time that the main character doesn't fully understand. This one too has a plot consequence that negates a claim made at the beginning of the story and isn't dealt with. By this time though I was getting a little fatigued by pointlessness of some of these stories so I may not be giving it the credit it deserves. "Sister, Shhh..." was depressing and sad, seemed to have been more toying with the idea of LDS fundamentalism than the characters themselves. And didn't go anywhere I wanted to be taken. "The Fifth Bedroom" was a proper ghost story, with an innocent but embittered young woman, a very bitter and not at all innocent ghost, and a swindle. Maybe not the deepest read in the volume, but a proper ghost story, with atmosphere, beautiful pacing, and a heartbreaking ending that was worth the read. "Scairt" was a parent's worst nightmare with a miraculous ending. "Seeing Nancy" was in the same vein as "Scairt," in some ways; but the protagonist is taken in and the terror of the tale is in many ways set to occur after the story closes. "The Third Person" was a cautionary tale about a woman who loans her flat to an unfaithful wife. It was tremendously vivid with an absolutely terrifying ending. From here the stories started getting a bit stronger, more pointed, with characters who changed and sometimes even grew. If the first half of the volume was a bit of a slog, from here the stories were more interesting, more thought provoking, and harder to put down. "Freeze Out" was a family tale in which all was not as it seemed. "Return" was the tale of a highly dysfunctional family forced to confront their dysfunction in an unconventional way. "Let Loose" by Mary Cholmondeley (1859-1925) was another proper ghost story in which the arrogance of a young architect sets an evil loose on the world. This one was reminiscent of the atmosphere in Bram Stoker's Dracula. "Another One in From the Cold" revisits the bloodbath of the First World War and the ways in which contemporary people romanticize real sacrifice when they fail to understand how real history was to the people who lived it. The situation in which the protagonist is set to bring closure to a lost soldier is perhaps not totally unique, but is told in a way that makes the soldier's situation important, urgent, even; when the story comes to conclusion it is clear that the protagonist is set on a path she wouldn't have chosen on her own, but to which she is committed. This was perhaps one of my three favorite stories in the volume. "My Moira" was a fun read, a contemporary story set up in a time and place that will feel familiar to many readers, but with just enough twist to make it fantastic. Another of my favorites from this volume. "Forget Us Not" was one of my least favorite; in the vein of "Dead Flowers by a Roadside," the protagonist is unable to move forward from a devastating loss until she gets a ghostly visitation. Though both were competently written, the premise just felt stale. "Front Row Rider" had a twist that gave me that little ah moment that George Saunders is necessary to a successful short story, but it did not make my top three; it was competently thought through and executed, it just kind of lacked bite. "God Grant That She Lye Still," by Cynthia Asquith, (1887-1960) covered that charming 1930's or so period that was lacking in the book up to this point, and was very nicely paced. For theme it echoed "The Fifth Bedroom," though the protagonists in these two stories, as in "Forget Us Not" and "Dead Flowers by a Roadside" had different fates. "The Phantom Coach" by Amelia Edwards, 1831-1892, was fun to read but not terribly cohesive. It had a big "so what" in the middle that spoiled the story for me, although the main character's dawning terror and attempt to save himself were nicely drawn. "The Old Nurse's Story" by Elizabeth Gaskell (1810-1865) has everything in it that makes me enjoy Gaskell's novels. She is homely, she values family, she values respectability and moral uprightness. She is plain spoken and her heroines strive to do right in spite of all the many obstacles she throws in their paths. If all of literature were like a Gaskell novel then the word would have a very different meaning, but to sprinkle a little in here and there, like including one of her stories in this volume, is a refreshing breeze that reminds you that not all the world is full of lonely, bitter, cynical people. One of my favorite parts of the story was when the Old Nurse told the children she was speaking to (the offspring of the little girl in the story) that though they were cute, none of them was even remotely as precious as their mother had been as a child. It made me smile, and also it laid the foundation for how devoted the nurse was during the events of the story. The final three stories were all absolutely good, and the two contemporary authors represented here, Gail Z. Martin and Gaie Sebold, created such vivid and intriguing worlds that I'm putting their novels on my to-read list. "Among the Shoals Forever" followed a pirate with magical abilities who is part of a secret organization to protect the world from dark magic objects. In the story he is hunting a powerful necromancer with the assistance of a ghost, a vampire and a voodoo high priestess. The story is set in Charleston (colonial Charleston? Certainly pre-Civil War) and beautifully contrasted the young man's character with the urgency of his mission. I'm hoping that more of Gail Z. Martin's novels follow Dante, Coltt, Evann, and Sorren. "Afterward," by Edith Wharton, was a very fun read. Ned and Mary Boyle buy their dream home in rural England with money from a fortuitous business endeavor, the Blue Star Mine. One of their requirements for the house was that it be haunted, which the friend who helps them find out promises it is -- "Oh, there is one of course, but you'll never know it." When Ned disappears mysteriously mid-way through the story, Mary searches frantically, until she realizes that he is the victim of the haunting they had mocked. Lovely point in the story is when Mary realizes that she had been enjoying the fruits of her husband's work without ever having a clear idea of the means by which he had attained their good fortune. This, to me, was the meat of the story and gave it its power. "A Silver Music" by Gaie Sebold promises a much richer world than just a short story can properly contain, so I hope to find more of it in her novels. A cynical detective investigating a murder finds that what he had thought were two mutually exclusive worlds had come together to create a gifted young man who sparked love in a most unexpected corner. While it might have been a conventional detective story in any other setting, Sebold gave this one a richness and poignancy that really elevated it. So there you have it... Three stars altogether, to balance the ones that weren't worth the time against the ones that are sending me deeper into their authors' canons. Enjoy!

  9. 4 out of 5

    S.M.M. Lindström

    A collection of short stories centered on ghosts, written by women from the 18oos all the way to present time. Now, them being ghost stories does not mean they're all horror stories. Seeing as I was looking for horror stories when I bought this, I must admit I was a little disappointed, but that's not the stories' fault. There are some real gems in here, and I didn't read anything that I didn't enjoy at some level. Just keep in mind that some of these stories will be pure fantasy, or steampunk, A collection of short stories centered on ghosts, written by women from the 18oos all the way to present time. Now, them being ghost stories does not mean they're all horror stories. Seeing as I was looking for horror stories when I bought this, I must admit I was a little disappointed, but that's not the stories' fault. There are some real gems in here, and I didn't read anything that I didn't enjoy at some level. Just keep in mind that some of these stories will be pure fantasy, or steampunk, or just an eerie or melancholy take on what might happen if you met a ghost, instead of stories intended to horrify, and I think you'll enjoy it too.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    I found this really disappointing. Even the stories by authors I usually enjoy were bland and uninspired. I've been reading a lot (like really a lot) of horror this year, and I don't understand why the editor chose these stories, as they're nowhere near the best ghost stories by women out there. I found this really disappointing. Even the stories by authors I usually enjoy were bland and uninspired. I've been reading a lot (like really a lot) of horror this year, and I don't understand why the editor chose these stories, as they're nowhere near the best ghost stories by women out there.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Your Common House Bat

    Story 1; I liked the descriptive language. The way she described the ghosts and the pipe. Loved the setting. Story 2; I loved how in the end both turned out to be ghosts and that the theme of the story was to contact an already dead loved one who would take the narrator to the other side. Loved the Midwest setting and tone/language. Story 3; this one didn’t interest me as much as the first two but it was still good no less. The idea of him trying to harm himself to get the attention of his wife. Story 1; I liked the descriptive language. The way she described the ghosts and the pipe. Loved the setting. Story 2; I loved how in the end both turned out to be ghosts and that the theme of the story was to contact an already dead loved one who would take the narrator to the other side. Loved the Midwest setting and tone/language. Story 3; this one didn’t interest me as much as the first two but it was still good no less. The idea of him trying to harm himself to get the attention of his wife. I particularly enjoyed the part about how the ghosts avoided him beause he wanted something fromthem just as much as they from him. Story 4; What I liked the most about this story was the maid. I thought she was a cute character. Even so I still liked the rather tragic ending and how it worked into the story that had been set up. The setting was also really cool with the mentions of the ocean. Story 5; I enjoyed this one as well, though I found it to be a bit confusing at the end. Even so I lied the seamstress’ instersts in the grave stones. I like how she it was pointed out that she wan’t superstitious but not skeptical either. How she was kind of just indifferent. And the bit about how she wasn’t afraid of the ghosts…they just were. Story 6; what stood out to me here was the fact that the entire story was told by the woman herself in quotations. I loved that crafty point of view. Story 7; this one was one of my favorites of the 25. It was very morbid at times (espically with the fate of the 4th daughter. But that’s why I liked it. The author was very descriptive and crafted an interesting story. Story 8; This one was also pretty cool. The descriptions of the desert were beautiful. The twist (view spoiler)[ that Charity had died and ran into another girl who had also died (hide spoiler)] was also quite intriguing. (view spoiler)[ Moreover the way the second girl died was unsettling in such a way that it made Sister Shhh more appealing. (hide spoiler)] Story 9; This one doesn’t really hold as much appeal to me as the last few did. It was a neat short story and the setting was pretty cool. But it just wasn’t as interesting as the others for me. I felt bad for Chloe, but I didn’t really care for her as a narrator. Story 10; This one also wasn’t as appealing to me as the others. I thought it was kind of a cute story seeing it through the eyes of a child who had to move. And it had a very realistic feeling in that she was trying to make new friends and these new friends showing her the creepy forest. I liked the setting too. But it just wasn’t my cup of tea. Story 11; As an aspiring author, I enjoyed the idea of the writer living in the haunted house. Her story with Roy and how it tied into the house was pretty neat as well. Story 12; This one I had mixed feelings on. It was well written and interesting and I love Lisa Tuttle. But sex just isn’t for me. And this one was all about the sex. Again well written and it had an interesting twist at the end, but I’m not big on sex. Story 13; I loved the icy imagery in this story. The characterization of the old man with dementia was also pretty unique. If I understood right, the dead wife being vengeful and keeping the family cold was also a pretty interesting twist. Story 14; This story was kind of bittersweet. I was a little confused with the time frame though; when did what happen? Was the family yelling at Mara in a flashback or (view spoiler)[ were they yelling at her ghost. (hide spoiler)] Story 15; I liked this one up until the end. It was really captivating. (view spoiler)[ And then the dog died. I cannot stand it when the dog dies dammit! (hide spoiler)] Story 16; In From The Cold is another one of my favorites of the 25 stories in this book. The imagery was stellar from the beautiful to the gory. And the story line of the deceased solider is always an interesting one to take on. Story 17; This is another really good one. Not only do we get ghosts but we also get sorcerers! And there’s a good lot of sass in this one which makes it all the funner. The description words were also really neat epically when Georgia enters Hannigans’ secret lair. The only thing I didn’t like about this one was the overuse of ‘the blood crackled off her hands’, it was cool the first time but then became really overdone. Story 18; Also a really cool one. I adore second person stories. Second person is a hard perspective to work with, you have to do it right to make the story good. Nancy did a phenomenal job; she gave you small details hinting at ‘your’ life and then in a not-just-thrown-in-there way, hands you the big reveal. It was smooth and flowing and easy to follow. On top of that it had a very interesting with the plot line with all of the cat love. (view spoiler)[ I can also hugely relate to it in that I’m 90% sure I’ve seen the ghost of my dead dog. (hide spoiler)] Story 19; This one was kind of a wild ride, pun totally intended. I can’t say much without spoiling it but I enjoyed seeing the story through the eyes of the ghost and the person being haunted per-say. Story 20; I’m going to be honest, this story just didn’t hold my attention. It was pretty cool at first, but I just didn’t seem to pick up. I ended up dropping it. Story 21; The Phantom Coach was really neat. I think I liked the setting in the snowy moors the best. I’ve always been fond of chilly, winter imagery, especially while reading the book on a cold December evening. Story 22; This one was the opposite of story 20, slow in the beginning and then really picked up. I loved Hester as a narrator; her dialect and language gave the story a very realistic feeling. I enjoyed the wintery setting and the idea of the creepy child ghost trying to get inside the house. Story 23; First and foremost I liked how this one had necromancers, pirates and vampires…very interesting combo here. I enjoyed the (what I perceived as) Victorian setting. Add in voodoo and the story was just very creative. I enjoyed the characters a lot too. Story 24; This one was another one that just didn’t hold my attention. The writing style was good but the story line just wasn’t my cup of tea. Admittedly I dropped this one too. Story 25; As they always say, save the best for last. I think this one was my favorite, I truly enjoyed it. I really loved the imagery the description of the silver, glittery cogs. I’ve always been fond of steampunk and fantasy Sebold intertwined the two flawlessly with talk of how the age of machines drove goblins and fey away. Complete that with the ghost being (view spoiler)[ the ghost of an automan (hide spoiler)] that was just creative! Over all one other thing I loved about this anthology as a whole is how it shifted from stories heavy in autumn imagery to stories of wintery imagery in the end. I also loved how it wasn't just limited to one genera; there was a touch of pure horror, some war story references, mystery, steampunk, fantasy, in short it was a wonderful collection.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel

    *** 3.2 *** - "Field of the dead" by Kim Lakin-Smith ---> 3.7 - "Collect call" by Sarah Pinborough ---> 3.0 - "Dead flowers" by the road by Kelly Armstrong ---> 3.2 - "The shadow in the corner" by Mary Elizabeth Braddon ---> 3.0 - "The madam of the narrow houses" by Caitlín R. Kiernan ---> 3.0 - "The lost ghost" Mary E. Wilkins-Freeman - "The ninth witch" by Sarah Langan ---> 3.2 - "Sister, shhh. . ." by Elizabeth Massie ---> 3.0 - "The fith bedroom" by Alex Bell ---> 3.3 - "Scairt" by Alison Littlewood *** 3.2 *** - "Field of the dead" by Kim Lakin-Smith ---> 3.7 - "Collect call" by Sarah Pinborough ---> 3.0 - "Dead flowers" by the road by Kelly Armstrong ---> 3.2 - "The shadow in the corner" by Mary Elizabeth Braddon ---> 3.0 - "The madam of the narrow houses" by Caitlín R. Kiernan ---> 3.0 - "The lost ghost" Mary E. Wilkins-Freeman - "The ninth witch" by Sarah Langan ---> 3.2 - "Sister, shhh. . ." by Elizabeth Massie ---> 3.0 - "The fith bedroom" by Alex Bell ---> 3.3 - "Scairt" by Alison Littlewood ---> 3.5 - "Seeing Nancy" by Nina Allan ---> 4.0 - "The third person" by Lisa Tuttle ---> 3.3 - "Freeze out" by Nancy Holder ---> 3.2 - "Return" by Yvonne Navarro ---> 3 - "Let Loose" by Mary Cholmondeley ---> 3 - "Another one in from the cold" by Marion Arnott ---> 3.2 - "My Moira" by Lilith Saintcrow ---> 3.3 - "Forget us not" by Nancy Kilpatrick ---> 3.3 - "Front row rider" by Muriel Gray ---> 3.0 - "God grant that she lye still" by Cynthia Asquith ---> 3.5 - "The phantom coach" by Amelia B. Edwards ---> 3.2 - "The old nurse's story" by Elizabeth Gaskell ---> 4.0 - "Among the shoals forever" by Gail Z. Martin ---> 3.5 - "Afterward" by Edith Wharton ---> 4.0 - "A silver music" by Gaie Sebold ---> 3.3

  13. 4 out of 5

    Skye

    This is a fantastic collection. One which I thoroughly enjoyed but learnt fairly quickly that I shouldn’t be reading this late at night… after all, some of these ghost stories are actually kind of scary. And reading them late at night with the wind blowing through the house while you’re home alone… not the best decision making of my life. To be fair, it’s also not the worst…. But that’s a whole other story. I love that all of these ghost stories are written by women. I definitely believe that we This is a fantastic collection. One which I thoroughly enjoyed but learnt fairly quickly that I shouldn’t be reading this late at night… after all, some of these ghost stories are actually kind of scary. And reading them late at night with the wind blowing through the house while you’re home alone… not the best decision making of my life. To be fair, it’s also not the worst…. But that’s a whole other story. I love that all of these ghost stories are written by women. I definitely believe that we need a collection of women-only writers more often. Or at least, I need to buy more to put on my shelves… although not all of these stories had strong women as the voice, they still felt more relatable than many of the stories that I read by men. I suppose shared experience and all that nonsense. As a kid, I was never into ghost stories or tales of things that go bump in the night. Although I’ve gotten more into the genre over the past few years, it’s still sometimes not the most powerful driver for me. This collection though is swaying me more and more towards those horror stories. For individual reviews, head to: https://earthandskye.org/the-mammoth-...

  14. 5 out of 5

    James Tidd

    This anthology aims to showcase the very best of Ghost Stories written by women, who have written some exceptional stories. From the Phantom Coach, published in 1864, through writers such as Edith Wharton (Afterward), M E Braddon (the Shadow in the Corner) and Cynthia Asquith (God grant that she lye still), through to modern writers such as Muriel Gray (Front Row Rider), Sarah Pinborough (Collect Call) and Lilith Saintcrow (My Moira). I found the majority of the stories very interesting, but I am This anthology aims to showcase the very best of Ghost Stories written by women, who have written some exceptional stories. From the Phantom Coach, published in 1864, through writers such as Edith Wharton (Afterward), M E Braddon (the Shadow in the Corner) and Cynthia Asquith (God grant that she lye still), through to modern writers such as Muriel Gray (Front Row Rider), Sarah Pinborough (Collect Call) and Lilith Saintcrow (My Moira). I found the majority of the stories very interesting, but I am used to reading Ghost Stories whose authors are male, and it took me a while to get used to reading Ghost Stories written by females. Although I recognised the stories that were done by the historic authors, I hadn't read any of the ones by the modern authors, and I enjoyed some of them, those set in historic places and settings interested me the most.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Júlia

    iffy start to my spooky october... a few of these stories were good, but overall the big majority of them weren't thrilling or chilling or anything that might get one excited to keep reading at all. i'm gonna be honest and say that i skimmed through the last four stories because there was no other way, they were just too damn boring. the only stories that were honestly worth reading here: - the shadow in the corner - the madam of the narrow house - the lost ghost - the fifth bedroom aaaand that's iffy start to my spooky october... a few of these stories were good, but overall the big majority of them weren't thrilling or chilling or anything that might get one excited to keep reading at all. i'm gonna be honest and say that i skimmed through the last four stories because there was no other way, they were just too damn boring. the only stories that were honestly worth reading here: - the shadow in the corner - the madam of the narrow house - the lost ghost - the fifth bedroom aaaand that's really about it, tbh.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Horrorchick

    It's hard to review a book with so many different authors, from various time periods so I'm just going to list my favourite stories from this book: Field of the Dead The Ninth Witch Sister, Shhh... The Fifth Bedroom The Shadow in the Corner Return Front Row Rider Among the Shoals Forever A Silver Music It's hard to review a book with so many different authors, from various time periods so I'm just going to list my favourite stories from this book: Field of the Dead The Ninth Witch Sister, Shhh... The Fifth Bedroom The Shadow in the Corner Return Front Row Rider Among the Shoals Forever A Silver Music

  17. 4 out of 5

    max

    jfc most of these were just awful. can someone tell these writers that sexual violence just makes your horror cheap as hell. thought i’d be safe from that because none of the writers are men lmao anyway the good ones were few and they were “god grant that she lye still,” “afterward,” and “a silver music.” rest were so so terrible and not enough to keep the book for.

  18. 4 out of 5

    R.A. Goli

    Really enjoyed the first half of this book, then it got a little boring about half way through. It was redeemed by a few of the stories in the last quarter. Particularly enjoyed, The Fifth Bedroom, Among the Shoals Forever & A Silver Music. 3 1/2 stars.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emma Joy

    I went into this expecting horror, but it isn't, they're just ghost stories. A bit hit and miss, but overall an enjoyable reading experience. I went into this expecting horror, but it isn't, they're just ghost stories. A bit hit and miss, but overall an enjoyable reading experience.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sana Burton

    Kind of a mixed bag, as anthologies often can be. Overall, it was mostly just okay, but there were definitely some stories that stood out from the rest and made this a book worth reading.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Wallflyer - Joe

    A set of strong stories, all evoke a different tone and atmosphere. Worth reading, or scanning the contents and choosing the titles that leap out at you.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rose Haskins

    Enjoy these stories by women Some were intriguing while others were fun. But one thing you can count on they were all about ghost. Enjoy.

  23. 5 out of 5

    M. Chandler

    awesome find at a book warehouse got it 75% off or something, it was a lot of fun. A summer re-read maybe.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Linnéa

    Some where awesome, some not that much. Like you'd expect from a collection. Some where awesome, some not that much. Like you'd expect from a collection.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maree Kimberley

    A bit of hit and miss collection with some good stories and others that failed to impress. My favourite was Edith Wharton's 1910 story, Afterward. Chilling and creepy, it was the story that really lingered. Others that resonated with me include God Grant that she Lie Still, The Ninth Witch and Sister, Shhh. I really enjoyed the inclusion of he older stories. Although their old fashioned style made them a little difficult to read, it was great to see the roots of ghost story writing and how write A bit of hit and miss collection with some good stories and others that failed to impress. My favourite was Edith Wharton's 1910 story, Afterward. Chilling and creepy, it was the story that really lingered. Others that resonated with me include God Grant that she Lie Still, The Ninth Witch and Sister, Shhh. I really enjoyed the inclusion of he older stories. Although their old fashioned style made them a little difficult to read, it was great to see the roots of ghost story writing and how writers of the past influence what is being written now. Definitely worthwhile if you're interested in ghost stories and horror writing.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Blair

    'Field of the Dead' by Kim Lakin-Smith 'Collect Call' by Sarah Pinborough 'Dead Flowers by a Roadside' by Kelley Armstrong 'The Shadow in the Corner' by Mary Elizabeth Braddon 'The Madam of the Narrow Houses' by Caitlin R. Kiernan 'The Lost Ghost' by Mary E. Wilkins-Freeman 'The Ninth Witch' by Sarah Langan 'Sister, Shhh...' by Elizabeth Massie 'The Fifth Bedroom' by Alex Bell 'Scairt' by Alison Littlewood 'Seeing Nancy' by Nina Allan Excellent, nuanced, tense, human. By no means her best story, but Allan 'Field of the Dead' by Kim Lakin-Smith 'Collect Call' by Sarah Pinborough 'Dead Flowers by a Roadside' by Kelley Armstrong 'The Shadow in the Corner' by Mary Elizabeth Braddon 'The Madam of the Narrow Houses' by Caitlin R. Kiernan 'The Lost Ghost' by Mary E. Wilkins-Freeman 'The Ninth Witch' by Sarah Langan 'Sister, Shhh...' by Elizabeth Massie 'The Fifth Bedroom' by Alex Bell 'Scairt' by Alison Littlewood 'Seeing Nancy' by Nina Allan Excellent, nuanced, tense, human. By no means her best story, but Allan's writing is so effortless, it makes just about everyone else's look dreadful. 'The Third Person' by Lisa Tuttle 'Freeze Out' by Nancy Holder 'Return' by Yvonne Navarro 'Let Loose' by Mary Cholmondeley 'Another One in from the Cold' by Marion Arnott 'My Moira' by Lilith Saintcrow 'Forget Us Not' by Nancy Kilpatrick 'Front Row Rider' by Muriel Gray 'God Grant That She Lye Still' by Cynthia Asquith 'The Phantom Coach' by Amelia Edwards 'The Old Nurse's Story' by Elizabeth Gaskell 'Among the Shoals Forever' by Gail Z. Martin 'Afterward' by Edith Wharton 'A Silver Music' by Gaie Sebold

  27. 5 out of 5

    Catty

    This is an extremely good collection of supernatural stories, and would be ideal for a reader new to this genre. The editor had worked really hard to show a good time span of this genre in particular, and t shows. There are some classic stories here which I always enjoy reading, but the standouts for me within the newer stories were "The Madam Of The Narrow Houses" by Caitlin R Kiernan (just beautifully written and a really interesting subject matter) and "Collect Call" by Sarah Pinborough (a YA This is an extremely good collection of supernatural stories, and would be ideal for a reader new to this genre. The editor had worked really hard to show a good time span of this genre in particular, and t shows. There are some classic stories here which I always enjoy reading, but the standouts for me within the newer stories were "The Madam Of The Narrow Houses" by Caitlin R Kiernan (just beautifully written and a really interesting subject matter) and "Collect Call" by Sarah Pinborough (a YA author - who knew?), although I also enjoyed Lisa Tuttle's "The Third Person" in a twisted sorta way (it's definitely a guilty pleasure in more ways than one!). And of course, the rating on any anthology will automatically go up when my favourite ghost story of all time is in there - Edith Wharton's "Afterward". This one is a must read for any fan of this genre - it's a classic slow burner, which starts out with a bit of fun and gradually builds up to a ending that kicks the reader in the guts - just the way a good ghost story should!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adriana Hardy

    As a ghost stories loving person this book to me was boring. A few stories made me happy to have bought this book but I have to say they were few. If you want a spine chilling book then stick to H.P. Lovecraft or Poe. The only story that I would recommend is Let Loose by Mary Cholmondeley whose writting reminds me of a classic. I recommend you go to a B&N and read a few stories there without buying the book

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    I read this on Kindle on my lunch breaks whenever I got the chance, which is the best way to read short stories I think. Each story is very different from the last and I liked all but two or three of them. Some were supernatural rather than spooky. Others were traditional gothic ghost tales. I especially love haunted houses and ghostly children. This book has plenty of those. I'll probably read it again and just skip over the stories I didn't like. I read this on Kindle on my lunch breaks whenever I got the chance, which is the best way to read short stories I think. Each story is very different from the last and I liked all but two or three of them. Some were supernatural rather than spooky. Others were traditional gothic ghost tales. I especially love haunted houses and ghostly children. This book has plenty of those. I'll probably read it again and just skip over the stories I didn't like.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Deanne

    Some really good stories, some by modern writers and other older more classic victorian stories. Those victorians knew how to set up the scene, but it helps if there's candlelight. However there seem to be a couple of stories where it was difficult to spot the ghost. Read this at the hospital at night, a place where I've heard of quite a few stories, but it's not surprising. Some really good stories, some by modern writers and other older more classic victorian stories. Those victorians knew how to set up the scene, but it helps if there's candlelight. However there seem to be a couple of stories where it was difficult to spot the ghost. Read this at the hospital at night, a place where I've heard of quite a few stories, but it's not surprising.

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