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Poetry. Nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and Georgia Author of the Year, Clifford Brooks's first book of poetry captures the southern experience with poems that Dinty Moore calls "a jazzy, aromatic, and spirited poetic mandala." "Like Samuel Taylor Coleridge's mariner, we are in a maelstrom of many names. Cliff Brooks calls this maddening place Ignoracium and in THE DRAW OF Poetry. Nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and Georgia Author of the Year, Clifford Brooks's first book of poetry captures the southern experience with poems that Dinty Moore calls "a jazzy, aromatic, and spirited poetic mandala." "Like Samuel Taylor Coleridge's mariner, we are in a maelstrom of many names. Cliff Brooks calls this maddening place Ignoracium and in THE DRAW OF BROKEN EYES AND WHIRLING METAPHYSICS he gives us both a lexicon for exploring and finding a way out. The spirits of Allen Ginsberg and Lawrence Ferlinghetti are alive and restless here." James Morrow"


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Poetry. Nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and Georgia Author of the Year, Clifford Brooks's first book of poetry captures the southern experience with poems that Dinty Moore calls "a jazzy, aromatic, and spirited poetic mandala." "Like Samuel Taylor Coleridge's mariner, we are in a maelstrom of many names. Cliff Brooks calls this maddening place Ignoracium and in THE DRAW OF Poetry. Nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and Georgia Author of the Year, Clifford Brooks's first book of poetry captures the southern experience with poems that Dinty Moore calls "a jazzy, aromatic, and spirited poetic mandala." "Like Samuel Taylor Coleridge's mariner, we are in a maelstrom of many names. Cliff Brooks calls this maddening place Ignoracium and in THE DRAW OF BROKEN EYES AND WHIRLING METAPHYSICS he gives us both a lexicon for exploring and finding a way out. The spirits of Allen Ginsberg and Lawrence Ferlinghetti are alive and restless here." James Morrow"

30 review for The Draw of Broken Eyes and Whirling Metaphysics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ozma

    emotionally moving poetry I could not put this book down. The Draw of Broken Eyes and Whirling Metaphysics is by accomplished poet, Clifford Brooks. Published by Gosslee Books, both the digital and trade paperback editions of this title are of the highest quality production. This debut collection of poetry is a double volume, beginning with part one, The Draw of Broken Eyes, followed by the second volume, Whirling Metaphysics. I downloaded the digital version of this book onto my Kindle from Ama emotionally moving poetry I could not put this book down. The Draw of Broken Eyes and Whirling Metaphysics is by accomplished poet, Clifford Brooks. Published by Gosslee Books, both the digital and trade paperback editions of this title are of the highest quality production. This debut collection of poetry is a double volume, beginning with part one, The Draw of Broken Eyes, followed by the second volume, Whirling Metaphysics. I downloaded the digital version of this book onto my Kindle from Amazon. After reading some of the poems over the weekend, I immediately followed up my order with the gorgeous trade paperback to add to my own collection of fine poets—because I love this book so much! There is much praise to be given to this poet’s great gift and his first collection of poetry. Wow! The poems are honest; in many verses, the feelings are raw and dark, though eloquently written. Poet Clifford Brooks knows his literary craft well. There is so much greatness in this book that I am humbled in writing this review. I was pleased by how a wide range of these poems worked so well together in this collection, not only as a whole, but separately. Every day, I opened the book to a random poem; and, in this way, I found each poem read like a mantra. I felt each poem in my heart. In this double volume collection, Brooks masterfully weaves an emotional and spiritual memoir of deep, moving poetry. In the first volume, The Draw of Broken Eyes, the poems include heady images; memories of love and loss; grief, and darkness, and whimsical moments from times past. The first poem in the collection, “Ode to Morning Glories,” is an airy poem, with simply gorgeous words that look lovely on the page—a really beautiful poem to open this collection. I also felt it offered a window of light, a bit of peace for what is to come in the pages ahead. In these poems penned by Brooks, you will find verses about love on the deepest levels; grief and anguish; death and redemption; self-illumination through darkness; and physical pain. His poetry memoir, especially Whirling Metaphysics, oftentimes reads like a kind of dream. While reading verses that journeyed the edges of death itself, I sensed that an immortal muse sat beside this poet. Clifford Brooks has a command of evocative language that grabbed my heart. I reread so many of the poems—all of which have their own unique soul. You get a feeling right away (or at least I did) that the poems are not just personal—though they felt deeply personal for me. Because of the depth of feeling put into them, I felt them in my heart. There is greatness in these pages, in the way these poems are written. They become personal to you as this poet leaves the many interpretations to your own imagination. For the new reader of poetry, the poems are poignant and easy to understand. You feel them in your heart, in your own way. Clifford Brooks invites you into his world, and makes you comfortable with these poems. You live in his vibrant imagery, as he takes you through feelings that invoke your own mysticism. In this way, these poems work on many levels. Nature is a strong theme in these pages. In a sensuous setting steeped in a rich southern flavor and yearning, where flowers, trees, butterflies, and beetles thrive, you are welcomed on this imaginative journey inside the heart and awakening of the soul—through the mind of Cliff Brooks. Surreal and lyrical, this Georgia poet weaves a fusion of sensations that is euphoric and thrilling in the heart. He leaves you feeling pleased and wanting, for such is a theme in his work. As stated in other reviews, Brooks takes you on a southern journey. Georgia is a magic setting, almost gothic—a character in and of itself in this work. There’s a certain music to some of the poems; I can hear them set to hymn, like a gospel song. The darkness in some of the poems is real and unforgiving; the words in some of these verses leave you reeling, your heart aching. They are interesting and philosophical; the myths and wordplay are enjoyable and make you think. The spirit of Dante Alighieri is especially evident in volume two of this collection, Whirling Metaphysics. While I love both volumes in this collection, Metaphysics is my favorite. Clifford Brooks’ epic work goes beyond the physical setting, the spirit of the book; love, loss, religious piety, and real human anguish are the strongest themes, as Brooks is continuously contrasting and weaving elements of life with death, myth, mysticism, and philosophy. Over time, memory becomes like a dream. In Broken Eyes, Brooks explores every feeling of the human heart; and, in Metaphysics, he takes you on a quest of the spirit, exploring a dark universe. This is a major work of deeply moving verses and subjects that are surreal and lyrical, and—at the same time—provocative and haunting. The poems in this collection have universal depth and feeling that will appeal to new readers and all lovers of poetry, and this is what everyone wants. I highly recommend The Draw of Broken Eyes and Whirling Metaphysics by this amazing poet, Clifford Brooks. I feel blessed to have found his poetry and look forward to collecting all of his work—including his upcoming title, Athena Departs. Now, go get The Draw of Broken Eyes and Whirling Metaphysics. You won’t be disappointed.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James

    This book is really two books (The Draw of Broken Eyes and Whirling Metaphysics) published as one and finished with a long poem “The Gateman’s Hymn of Ignoracium.” The poetry is haunted. It’s haunted by the ghosts of lost loves, the South, and a deep love of music. Reading it will break your heart in the best possible way. You’ll hear Robert Johnson, Ella Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, jazz, gospel, Southern blues. These poems remind you that poetry, at its core, is music, and the poems work to This book is really two books (The Draw of Broken Eyes and Whirling Metaphysics) published as one and finished with a long poem “The Gateman’s Hymn of Ignoracium.” The poetry is haunted. It’s haunted by the ghosts of lost loves, the South, and a deep love of music. Reading it will break your heart in the best possible way. You’ll hear Robert Johnson, Ella Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, jazz, gospel, Southern blues. These poems remind you that poetry, at its core, is music, and the poems work to place you in specific times, places, and moments. You feel the warmth of a cafe on a summer’s night, the easy drunkenness of a dive bar on the outskirts of a small town, the mugginess of a deserted swamp. You remember what it’s like to be deeply in love and to be completely devastated by loss, and you’ll remember the song you heard when it happened. Read his poems to be reminded what it’s like to be genuinely alive.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    After I finished The Draw of Broken Eyes & Whirling Metaphysics instead of closing the book, I found myself flipping back through and rereading the poems. Clifford Brooks writes deft words that reveal raw emotions. He has a profound ability to make the everyday sublime and heartache beautiful.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Meyers

    This collection will make you fall in love with poetry again-or for the very first time. Such vivid imagery touches the depths of my soul and I feel like I have stepped into and gotten lost in a private world of beauty. I read this in one sitting and craved more at the end.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elton

    The debut of a new fresh voice in Poetry!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    Perfect.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Angie Dokos

    If you enjoy poetry, you'll love this book. You can feel all the emotions while reading these poems. Some of them make you feel like you've moved back home. Very talented author. If you enjoy poetry, you'll love this book. You can feel all the emotions while reading these poems. Some of them make you feel like you've moved back home. Very talented author.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Terence Hawkins

    I'm not a poet. So in some ways I lack the vocabulary to praise Clifford Brooks' The Draw of Broken Eyes and Whirling Metaphysics. But I am a reader, and as a reader I can tell you that this is among the best work of its kind I've read. The book comprises three sections. Thew first two are named in the title; the third is Gateman's Hymn of the Ignoracium. In the first two, Brooks explores the everyday in language that's at once lyrical and lively. There is nothing of the academic in lines like "K I'm not a poet. So in some ways I lack the vocabulary to praise Clifford Brooks' The Draw of Broken Eyes and Whirling Metaphysics. But I am a reader, and as a reader I can tell you that this is among the best work of its kind I've read. The book comprises three sections. Thew first two are named in the title; the third is Gateman's Hymn of the Ignoracium. In the first two, Brooks explores the everyday in language that's at once lyrical and lively. There is nothing of the academic in lines like "Kerouac drank double time/because he was lumped in with junkie friends" or "little towns don't wear time well," but everything of the real. In the third and startlingly brilliant--not to suggest the previous two were anything but--Brooks jumps from the quotidian to the mythic. He takes on the same subject matter as Dante and Milton, the Great War in Heaven and its eternal aftermath. In Gatesman's Hymn, the narrator is a noncombatant--an angel who didn't take sides in Lucifer's Revolt and thus as a neutral sorts out the damned and fits them to apt punishment. In "Soldiers of the Gateman," we see his emissaries, demons from cultures as diverse as the Persian Zoroastrians and the Algonkians; in "Monsters," he catalogues the torments that child molesters have earned. The piece ends with the chilling line, "all your sins are remembered." This is the strongest element of an already sturdy collection. Brooks clearly writes his heart out in every line on every page. We should be grateful that he did.

  9. 4 out of 5

    J.D. Isip

    There's an advantage of stuffing two complete collections and one long poem into one book of poetry - you get to show off your range. Brooks' books could easily stand along on their own, but his decision to pull it all together in this collection was not only genius, but probably not something most poets would or should consider. There is enough of Brooks' voice that carries from the gritty and sweet "The Draw of Broken Eyes" to the "homage to my myths" long poem at the end. Here's one way to se There's an advantage of stuffing two complete collections and one long poem into one book of poetry - you get to show off your range. Brooks' books could easily stand along on their own, but his decision to pull it all together in this collection was not only genius, but probably not something most poets would or should consider. There is enough of Brooks' voice that carries from the gritty and sweet "The Draw of Broken Eyes" to the "homage to my myths" long poem at the end. Here's one way to see how your poetry holds up: have some college juniors who aren't English majors read your work. I shared one of Brooks poems with my class ("Thinking in an Argument") and they made much hay... so I shared another poem and they were asking for more. That's right. They WANTED to read poetry! So I was sold. Well, re-sold. Brooks is an awesome writer who brings all the stylishness and clever of Stevens and the bravura of Kerouac's fictional Dean Moriarty (not the real-life Neal, but the larger-than life "man of men" drunken Beats dream of becoming when they're sober and less sexually immature).

  10. 4 out of 5

    N.W. Harris

    I'm not sure anything goes together better than literature and the South. Maybe sweet tea and fried chicken? Charles' poetry is like the peach cobbler after Sunday dinner, and it takes me back to my childhood growing up in Georgia. This is a must read for anyone who likes poetry and/or literature with that Southern flavor. It is a book that should grace everyone's shelf. I'm not sure anything goes together better than literature and the South. Maybe sweet tea and fried chicken? Charles' poetry is like the peach cobbler after Sunday dinner, and it takes me back to my childhood growing up in Georgia. This is a must read for anyone who likes poetry and/or literature with that Southern flavor. It is a book that should grace everyone's shelf.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jsampersand

  13. 4 out of 5

    Reca

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zach

  15. 5 out of 5

    Fjords Review

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Ogren

  17. 4 out of 5

    Judith Roney

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  19. 5 out of 5

    Darren Mitton

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nik

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aarik Danielsen

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stan

    I liked this overall.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Branden Baxley

  24. 5 out of 5

    Zach Agnew

  25. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Ledford

  26. 4 out of 5

    Krista Ann Peterson

    Magnificent.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Clifford III

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