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Decision makers in business and government are more reliant than ever on measurements, such as business performance indicators, bond ratings, Six-Sigma indicators, stock ratings, opinion polls, and market research. Yet many popular statistical and business books and courses relating to measurement are based on flawed principles, leading managers to the wrong conclusions--a Decision makers in business and government are more reliant than ever on measurements, such as business performance indicators, bond ratings, Six-Sigma indicators, stock ratings, opinion polls, and market research. Yet many popular statistical and business books and courses relating to measurement are based on flawed principles, leading managers to the wrong conclusions--and ultimately, the wrong decisions. misLeading Indicators: How to Reliably Measure Your Business provides something unique and invaluable: trustworthy tools for judging measurements. Each chapter illustrates the four key principles for reliable measurements: sufficient background information, accuracy and precision, reasonable inferences, and reality checks in different situations. After the three fundamental methods of measuring are defined, the authors expand to the application and interpretation of measurements in specific areas, including business performance, risk management, process, control, finance, and economics. This book supplies essential information for managers in business and government who depend on accurate information to run their organizations, as well as the consultants who advise them.


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Decision makers in business and government are more reliant than ever on measurements, such as business performance indicators, bond ratings, Six-Sigma indicators, stock ratings, opinion polls, and market research. Yet many popular statistical and business books and courses relating to measurement are based on flawed principles, leading managers to the wrong conclusions--a Decision makers in business and government are more reliant than ever on measurements, such as business performance indicators, bond ratings, Six-Sigma indicators, stock ratings, opinion polls, and market research. Yet many popular statistical and business books and courses relating to measurement are based on flawed principles, leading managers to the wrong conclusions--and ultimately, the wrong decisions. misLeading Indicators: How to Reliably Measure Your Business provides something unique and invaluable: trustworthy tools for judging measurements. Each chapter illustrates the four key principles for reliable measurements: sufficient background information, accuracy and precision, reasonable inferences, and reality checks in different situations. After the three fundamental methods of measuring are defined, the authors expand to the application and interpretation of measurements in specific areas, including business performance, risk management, process, control, finance, and economics. This book supplies essential information for managers in business and government who depend on accurate information to run their organizations, as well as the consultants who advise them.

28 review for misLeading Indicators: How to Reliably Measure Your Business

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Micelson

    This book does a great job of explaining why most businesses don't measure things correctly, and don't draw the right conclusions from what they measure, and don't understand how measuring changes the thing being measured. One of the most insightful points it makes is how when you start keeping tabs on people to measure their productivity, their productivity tends to go up because they know they're being measured. (Or maybe it goes down, if they resent being measured!) Another is the distinction This book does a great job of explaining why most businesses don't measure things correctly, and don't draw the right conclusions from what they measure, and don't understand how measuring changes the thing being measured. One of the most insightful points it makes is how when you start keeping tabs on people to measure their productivity, their productivity tends to go up because they know they're being measured. (Or maybe it goes down, if they resent being measured!) Another is the distinction it makes between measurements and ratings - for example, what does it really mean to say that 88% of such and such an insurance company's customers are satisfied? Is that a fact, or a subjective outcome of the way the questions were asked, who was approached for answers, and who agreed to provide an answer? And it covers some of the misunderstandings people have about public opinion polls. For example, if voter intention polls are done by telephone calls to people listed in telephone directories, how does that skew the results by filtering out people with (A) call display who don't pick up calls from unknown callers, or (B) a cell phone that is not a listed number?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alvaro Berrios

    This is a good, practical book for any manager. There are excellent example on how commonly accepted metrics and KPIs do not only not add the kind of value that is expected but are also detrimental in some cases. The reason I'm giving it three stars though as opposed to four is because I wasn't a fan of the author's style of writing. I found it to be very bland and boring. Overall though this isn't a bad book to keep on your shelf to refer to from time to time. This is a good, practical book for any manager. There are excellent example on how commonly accepted metrics and KPIs do not only not add the kind of value that is expected but are also detrimental in some cases. The reason I'm giving it three stars though as opposed to four is because I wasn't a fan of the author's style of writing. I found it to be very bland and boring. Overall though this isn't a bad book to keep on your shelf to refer to from time to time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Philip Green

  4. 5 out of 5

    TheBedouin

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pyang

  6. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Green

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robin Green

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mou

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rich Torr

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christy Bradley

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hunsjie

  12. 5 out of 5

    Enrico Bertini

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nghia Truong

  14. 5 out of 5

    Janice

  15. 5 out of 5

    BrittanyNjoe Moala

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ayush Garg

  17. 5 out of 5

    Roy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Supriya Karnani

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marcell

  20. 5 out of 5

    Liz Mclean-Knight

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sivaraman Sundararaman

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mehdi Bouricha

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rahul Katarey

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chasen Bettinger

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Giordano

  26. 4 out of 5

    Guilherme Campos

  27. 4 out of 5

    Spire Metro

  28. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Tozzo

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