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This best-selling classic tells the story of one of world's greatest scientific adventuresses. Jane Goodall was a young secretarial school graduate when the legendary Louis Leakey chose her to undertake a landmark study of chimpanzees in the world. This paperback edition contains 80 photographs and in introduction by Stephen Jay Gould. This best-selling classic tells the story of one of world's greatest scientific adventuresses. Jane Goodall was a young secretarial school graduate when the legendary Louis Leakey chose her to undertake a landmark study of chimpanzees in the world. This paperback edition contains 80 photographs and in introduction by Stephen Jay Gould.


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This best-selling classic tells the story of one of world's greatest scientific adventuresses. Jane Goodall was a young secretarial school graduate when the legendary Louis Leakey chose her to undertake a landmark study of chimpanzees in the world. This paperback edition contains 80 photographs and in introduction by Stephen Jay Gould. This best-selling classic tells the story of one of world's greatest scientific adventuresses. Jane Goodall was a young secretarial school graduate when the legendary Louis Leakey chose her to undertake a landmark study of chimpanzees in the world. This paperback edition contains 80 photographs and in introduction by Stephen Jay Gould.

30 review for In the Shadow of Man

  1. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    My tattered and beloved copy of this book now bears the inscription: Denise Follow Your Heart Jane Goodall I read this book about ten years ago, and to this day it remains one of my favorites. Jane Goodall had gone to secretary school and just happened to have a connection to the Leakey family, whose discoveries have shaped our view of evolution today. A young woman with no prior knowledge about chimpanzees finds herself in the middle of the Gombe, following chimps as they go about their daily busi My tattered and beloved copy of this book now bears the inscription: Denise Follow Your Heart Jane Goodall I read this book about ten years ago, and to this day it remains one of my favorites. Jane Goodall had gone to secretary school and just happened to have a connection to the Leakey family, whose discoveries have shaped our view of evolution today. A young woman with no prior knowledge about chimpanzees finds herself in the middle of the Gombe, following chimps as they go about their daily business. Ultimately, these close cousins to our own species became her passion. This book is so touching and wonderful. I was completely captivated by the stories of David and Goliath, Fanny, Flo, and the rest of the gang. Once you've read it, you'll never look at chimps the same way again.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Roy Lotz

    Shortly before or after (I don't remember) I studied abroad in Kenya with Richard and Meave Leakey, I decided to read the books by 'Leakey's angels': Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Birute Galdikas. These three are known for their pioneering field studies of the three great apes—chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans, respectively. I thought that In the Shadow of Man was a far better read than Gorillas in the Mist. I never did get around to Galdikas's book... When I read this book, I loved it. I su Shortly before or after (I don't remember) I studied abroad in Kenya with Richard and Meave Leakey, I decided to read the books by 'Leakey's angels': Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Birute Galdikas. These three are known for their pioneering field studies of the three great apes—chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans, respectively. I thought that In the Shadow of Man was a far better read than Gorillas in the Mist. I never did get around to Galdikas's book... When I read this book, I loved it. I suspect I would like it less if I read it today, but that's probably because I've become more of a snob. It should be said, however, that many of her methods were questionable. This is largely because she had no formal training, and Louis Leakey found it gratifying to send wide-eyed young women out into the field. From the standpoint of research, the most egregious thing that Goodall did was use bananas to lure the chimps into her camp. Leakey was furious about this, and it is, indeed, a frightful bit of scholarship. Nonetheless, it was entertaining to read about. Goodall may not be a genius scientist, but she is certainly a passionate storyteller. It is incredible how effectively she pulled me in to the personal lives of her chimps. Aggression displays, rain dances, pregnancies, estrus cycles, and struggles for dominance play out like a soap opera. Chimps are fascinating. In some ways, they seem so human: they tickle, play, make tools, smile, shake hands, and even appear to love one another. In retrospect, I suspect that she was doing a bit of anthropomorphizing in her account. But many intelligent people have been led astray by this almost-human quality of our nearest relative (the best example of this can be found in the fascinating documentary Project Nim), so I'm willing to forgive her. If someone were to ask me about the fundamentals of human behavior, this would be one of the first books I would direct them to. It is impossible to forget our intimate connection with our close relatives, and the significance of our evolutionary past, when we acquaint ourselves with ape behavior. Although we like to flatter ourselves with notions of our own uniqueness, we are not so different. It is a great irony that we have made an apocalyptic film entitled The Planet of the Apes. We are living on the Planet of the Apes, and we should be careful to remember it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    Louis and Mary Leakey were ground breaking British paleoanthropologists and archaeologists whose work importantly demonstrated that humans evolved in Africa. Coming along behind them in the the field of study regarding primates were three others who had worked with them: Biruté M.F. Galdikas, living alongside orangutans, Diane Fossey studying mountain gorillas, and Jane Goodall working with chimpanzees. These three leading female primatologists formed a group of what Louis Leakey (presumably ton Louis and Mary Leakey were ground breaking British paleoanthropologists and archaeologists whose work importantly demonstrated that humans evolved in Africa. Coming along behind them in the the field of study regarding primates were three others who had worked with them: Biruté M.F. Galdikas, living alongside orangutans, Diane Fossey studying mountain gorillas, and Jane Goodall working with chimpanzees. These three leading female primatologists formed a group of what Louis Leakey (presumably tongue-in-cheek) called “Trimates”. In 1960, when she was just 26, Jane Goodall travelled from England to what is now Tanzania and ventured into the little-known world of wild chimpanzees. Her task was to observe and record their behaviour in the wild and densely forested mountainside of Gombe, above the lake. For three months she only caught distant glimpses of them, but finally they came to accept her almost as one of themselves. This book is the first edition of In the Shadow of Man, published in 1971 when Jane Goodall published her works as “Jane van Lawick-Goodall”. It is beautifully illustrated with photographs on glossy paper, taken by her husband Hugo van Lawick. Most are full page, but sometimes there are two to a page. They are in groups throughout the book, sometimes one page and sometimes several, in both colour and black and white. Hugo van Lawick had filmed the TV series “On Safari” for Armand and Michaela Denis, as well as his freelance wildlife photography. He was regarded as one of the best wildlife photographers in the world.Inside the covers, front and back are family trees: the dynasties of the six chimpanzees which form the study. Chimpanzees are human's nearest relative. Jane Goodall studied their families life and social hierarchies, their loyalties - and also their various vendettas, their sexual behaviour, their treatment of both young and old. All have similarities and are relevant to the human condition. Interestingly Jane Goodall applied some of the principles she learned on bringing up her own child, also called Hugo or “Grublin”, who was born in 1967. I shall leave this edition at my default rating of three stars, as I shall be reading the text on kindle.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Nearly 50 years after being published , In the Shadow of Man by Jane Goodall is still a fascinating read. This is one of those special books where after reading, I wished for the existence of time machines. I wanted to be there with the author as she conducted her ground breaking research in the Gombe area, not seeing chimpanzees in a zoo. The content, covering the ground breaking research amidst the close contact with the chimpanzees, is itself enough reason to read this book. But the story is a Nearly 50 years after being published , In the Shadow of Man by Jane Goodall is still a fascinating read. This is one of those special books where after reading, I wished for the existence of time machines. I wanted to be there with the author as she conducted her ground breaking research in the Gombe area, not seeing chimpanzees in a zoo. The content, covering the ground breaking research amidst the close contact with the chimpanzees, is itself enough reason to read this book. But the story is also very well written. Not too clinical but still science based with a fair amount of humanity around the simian cast of characters. In the Shadow of Man may not quite achieve the same level of scientific wonder conveyed by say Carl Sagan or Rachel Carson’s writings but it is very close. Jane Goodall is truly a treasure. My daughter went to see her lecture last year and was amazed at the vitality and passion of this woman now in her 80’s. Five stars

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rossdavidh

    I had previously read another book by Jane Goodall (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...), which was in fact written after this one, so much of the chimpanzee-related content was not new to me. It was, nonetheless, still fascinating to read about. But what was new to me, was her description of how she got started on the project which became her life's work. Jane Goodall did not naturally get set onto a scientist's path, and I had to wonder whether it would be possible for someone like her to I had previously read another book by Jane Goodall (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...), which was in fact written after this one, so much of the chimpanzee-related content was not new to me. It was, nonetheless, still fascinating to read about. But what was new to me, was her description of how she got started on the project which became her life's work. Jane Goodall did not naturally get set onto a scientist's path, and I had to wonder whether it would be possible for someone like her to achieve such status now. She had to go to secretarial school and take a succession of office jobs, before eventually getting the opportunity to visit a friend in Kenya. From there she managed to meet Louis Leakey, and it was his sponsorship of her that allowed her to embark on the extraordinarily productive scientific career that she has had. There are talented young would-be scientists now, with Ph.D.'s, who are unable to find a way to make it a career. No doubt the difference is in part due to Goodall's extraordinary interest, enthusiasm, keen intellect, and winning personality, but I have to think also that some of it was that it was the mid-20th century and not the early 21st. My impression is that most fields in modern science are rather more closed off to the talented amateur, which Goodall most certainly was when she began. In her first year, in order to get permission from the local government authorities to go to Gombe (where she found the chimpanzees which made her and her work famous), she had to bring her mother along. I am picturing the response if my daughter asked my wife to go with her to a remote part of the world, without electricity or plumbing. Jane Goodall must have had an extraordinary mother as well. The other part of this book which I don't recall being discussed in as much detail in "The Chimpanzees of Gombe: Patterns of Behavior", is her early attempts to figure out how to study such a reclusive species. Inevitably, they involved some learning, as for example when they found that feeding them bananas would help to bring them out where they could be seen interacting with one another, but then later realizing that too many and too frequent feedings were resulting in an excessive number of confrontations. More formal scientific papers all too often leave out the early mistakes and false starts, and present only the final process which was arrived at. During the course of the time narrated in this book, Goodall met and married a National Geographic photographer Hugo van Lawick, and the book has several dozen pictures by him of chimpanzees (and a few of other primates, such as baboons or humans). The decision by Goodall to name, rather than number, the chimpanzees she was studying, was allegedly controversial at the time, because it was thought to endanger one's scientific objectivity. I have no doubt that Goodall's decision was the correct one, but I can understand the motivation behind the aversion to it. Chimpanzees are, when viewed as humanlike, a bewildering mix of affection and kindness and horrible cruelty. Every species of animal which is not wholly vegetarian (and many that are) is capable of barbaric cruelty, but chimpanzees are so close to human in their appearance and behavior that it makes it difficult to avoid an emotional response when even just reading about, for example, their penchant for settling all disputes with either violence or the threat of it. It's not that one literally expects them to have been able to "talk things out", but so much of the rest of their behavior has echoes in that of humans, that there is a visceral revulsion to the treatment of females by males, for example. On the other hand, that even the young, overactive and confrontational new alpha male will tolerate being climbed on or pestered by very young chimpanzees who he may not be related to, is rather endearing. Reading about chimpanzees is not for the faint of heart, or those who wish to believe that all our more brutish instincts are a result of the ills of civilization, but it is a fascinating glimpse at what our ancestors might have resembled; this book also gives us a fascinating glimpse of the extraordinary scientist who has taught us so much about them.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    I really enjoyed this book. Normally I don't read science books, but kind of made an exception with this one because I admire Jane Goodall and her work with the chimpanzees. Thankfully for me, this book wasn't over my head and didn't use huge scientific words that I wouldn't know because I'm not a scientist. Goodall is a good writer. She picks out her words carefully for non-scientist to understand. She wants everyone to understand animals as much as she does and this book does that perfectly. Mo I really enjoyed this book. Normally I don't read science books, but kind of made an exception with this one because I admire Jane Goodall and her work with the chimpanzees. Thankfully for me, this book wasn't over my head and didn't use huge scientific words that I wouldn't know because I'm not a scientist. Goodall is a good writer. She picks out her words carefully for non-scientist to understand. She wants everyone to understand animals as much as she does and this book does that perfectly. Most of this book doesn't read like a science book, which is one reason I enjoyed it so much. It's written like a memoir of Goodall's famous accounts with the chimps. There are a ton of various stories she tells depending on the topic of the chapter. Part of this remind me of those pulp adventure stories, but Goodall is the real deal. There are a lot of facts she states in this book as well. Some of the facts I knew previously either from other animal books or listening to her on the television. There are also facts that I didn't know of too. I didn't really realize chimps not only ate fruit, but they will attack baboons and eat their meat. I also loved the photos Hugo van Lawick took. Most people just give Goodall credit for all of this and you really can't, she certainly doesn't. The photos in this book are worth the look. All of the photos have emotions attached to them. I think the cover of this edition of the book is the cutest thing ever. Goodall does a great job telling you which chimp is which by giving each one a name, but I think the photos help but faces to them and giving them more personality. The only parts I didn't care for as much was the chimp sex. Remember Far Side? Remember how Gary Larson did a cartoon of a female chimp finding blond hair on a male chimp's back? Well after reading this book I see even more humor with that cartoon than before. I'm glad Goodall thought that was funny as well. You can tell she has a sense of humor in this book at various points too. I just think the chimp sex went on a little too long, but I think those parts were very much needed. She was writing everything she observed. Why leave out anything? As much as I enjoyed this book, I'm not sure I want to read all of Goodall's books. Some of them don't look as interesting to me at least. Maybe I'll pick them up and be surprised? This book does inspire me to go out and observe animals and humans better.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mary La douceur

    Highly recommend this read for both the scientific research and the delightful observations of Jane Goodall. Did you know her efforts lead to so many concepts about animals that we now take for granted? For example, that they have feelings, develop bonds and demonstrate some degree of grief when a family member dies. This has lead to research in dogs, birds and cats with similar insights!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sanhita

    Bought the book on a whim and kept it sealed for a month since there were various functions being held at home. Once that got over, I started reading the book and was hooked from the word go, right in the introduction by Jane Goodall. It was a strange situation! I wanted to read the book in one go, I wanted to savour the book bit by bit like a delicacy. Despite stopping to think over what I read and deliberately keeping the book away, I finished reading it in 6 days. It's very rarely that a book Bought the book on a whim and kept it sealed for a month since there were various functions being held at home. Once that got over, I started reading the book and was hooked from the word go, right in the introduction by Jane Goodall. It was a strange situation! I wanted to read the book in one go, I wanted to savour the book bit by bit like a delicacy. Despite stopping to think over what I read and deliberately keeping the book away, I finished reading it in 6 days. It's very rarely that a book holds my interest from the word go till the last sentence and this is one of them!! I simply loved it. This is supposed to be the documentation of the pathbreaking behavioural study of the Chimpanzees by Jane Goodall, who as a young girl went and stayed in the dense jungles of Africa, for the love of the work she was doing. Her unique way of describing things, with so much of understanding and empathy,is what draws one to the book.It practically reads like a story and draws one unknowingly to the the individual apes who exhibit such distinct characteristics and personality, like their human counterparts. One starts feeling the moods of Flo, Fifi, David, Goliath and others and as the book progresses, one can almost visualise them. Jane Goodall has a wonderful simple way of describing things and makes the reader move with her. The book since it's publication in the '70s, has been read by scores of people and has influenced many. I had seen documentaries made on Jane Goodall but I wonder, how an avid reader like me, missed out on reading the book earlier!! Initially I thought, I liked the book because of my academic background, but then when I suggested and showed the book to two other avid readers in the family, with accounting and IT background, they also fell for the book and I had a tough time rescuing the book from them, for my own reading. So I have no hesitation now, to recommend it to my friends.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    Goodall is a great writer. She loves her work, and she makes readers love it too. She has a great, subtle sense of humor and a beautiful style: as passionate as she is about her work, she does not take herself too seriously.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Udit Nair

    This book has been on the list for quite some time. I am grateful that I took time and completed this book. This book is culmination of years of research done by one of the most beloved primatologist that is Jane Goddall. It's a mixture of both which is the scientific curiosity and compassion. Along with that the incredible insights weaves a great story around the chimpanzees of gombe. When we look back it can be said that jane goddall committed a big mistake by allegedly anthropomorphizing the This book has been on the list for quite some time. I am grateful that I took time and completed this book. This book is culmination of years of research done by one of the most beloved primatologist that is Jane Goddall. It's a mixture of both which is the scientific curiosity and compassion. Along with that the incredible insights weaves a great story around the chimpanzees of gombe. When we look back it can be said that jane goddall committed a big mistake by allegedly anthropomorphizing the chimps and hence deviating from the principles of animal behaviour of that time. But if we take into account all the developments now we do understand that the continuity of biological characters can be applied to cognition and emotional development too. We humans tend not to put any animal close to our cognition fields sheerly because of arrogance and may be the insecurity which stems from the fact that we aren't so unique after all. Something which Jane Goddall wrote towards the end describes perfectly summarises it- "Yes, man definitely overshadows the chimpanzee. The chimpanzee is, nevertheless, a creature of immense significance to the understanding of man. Just as he is overshadowed by us, so the chimpanzee overshadows all other animals. He has the ability to solve quite complex problems, he can use and make tools for a variety of purposes, his social structure and methods of communication with his fellows are elaborate, and he shows the beginnings of Self-awareness. Who knows what the chimpanzee will be like forty million years hence? It should be of concern to us all that we permit him to live, that we at least give him the chance to evolve." Overall it's a delightful read even when one ignores all the scientific aspects of it. One can just sit back and marvel at the world of chimpanzees.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wendelle

    I would say this book ranks as one of the most wonderful, most pleasurable, most romantic records of a scientific research-adventure. Dr. Jane Goodall is often referred to as one of 'Leakey's Angels', but it seems more true to say that Dr. Louis Leakey is Dr. Jane Goodall's angel, for he set her on the path of one of the most eventful research lives ever-- from accompaniment of Louis Leakey's team to a paleoanthropological expedition, to a trial run observing vervet monkeys, to establishment of I would say this book ranks as one of the most wonderful, most pleasurable, most romantic records of a scientific research-adventure. Dr. Jane Goodall is often referred to as one of 'Leakey's Angels', but it seems more true to say that Dr. Louis Leakey is Dr. Jane Goodall's angel, for he set her on the path of one of the most eventful research lives ever-- from accompaniment of Louis Leakey's team to a paleoanthropological expedition, to a trial run observing vervet monkeys, to establishment of a successful research camp of chimpanzee studies at Gombe, to worldwide renown, Dr. Jane Goodall has experienced it all and tells it in this book. With this book, Dr. Goodall shares the bountifulness of the explorer- research scientist's life with us-- there are stories of moonlit observations, heavy rains and chimpanzee 'rain dances,' leopard encounters, painfully steep mountain climbs, and walks in the forest where tree trunks and buttresses are metres thick, lianas decorate branches and the forest canopy is a hundred metres above human height. Not everything is endless biologist fun-- Dr. Goodall has been beaten severely on the head by chimpanzees, and showered painfully with twigs before the chimps became habituated to her presence. Dr. Goodall's research career is remarkable because of her output of original discoveries- she confirmed that chimpanzees eat meat, she discovered and proved that chimpanzees hunt their prey, and she discovered and proved that chimps not only use tools, they also make tools, twice, in the form of termite-catching leaf stems and water-catching leaf sponges. She also originated the fruitful convention of naming chimps and regarding them as individuals, with personality characteristics and intentions. Perhaps more importantly, Dr. Goodall initiated a decades-long continuous tracking and study of a chimpanzee group's social relationships, thus bringing to light the social structure of chimpanzees. She revealed and proved the existence of male chimp alliances, the details of infant-rearing, threat displays and grooming activities in the establishment of hierarchy, reversals in domination-submission relationships, female promiscuity and solicitation of sex, and the stages of adolescence and adulthood in chimpanzees. All of these discoveries are included in the book. This book is really interesting because it is a picture of what our own human lineage could have been. By some evolutionary accident, our lineage split from the chimpanzee line, and if this had not been so, each of us right now, could be squatting and pant-hooting in Africa, twirling leaf stems and feasting on juicy termites or ripping hapless red colobus monkeys apart.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Missy J

    3.5* Once again, if it weren't for my book club, I wouldn't have read this book. Who hasn’t heard of Jane Goodall? I was prepared that this memoir would focus on her work with chimpanzees. She began her research in the sixties and started out observing the chimpanzees from a distance with binoculars, gradually getting closer to them and gaining their trust. At the beginning she was faced with a lot of obstacles and she still had to learn about the new terrain around her. I was impressed how she g 3.5* Once again, if it weren't for my book club, I wouldn't have read this book. Who hasn’t heard of Jane Goodall? I was prepared that this memoir would focus on her work with chimpanzees. She began her research in the sixties and started out observing the chimpanzees from a distance with binoculars, gradually getting closer to them and gaining their trust. At the beginning she was faced with a lot of obstacles and she still had to learn about the new terrain around her. I was impressed how she gradually overcame all troubles with such determination and calm. When she began her research, her mother accompanied her to the Gombe Stream Valley. Later she met a photographer Hugo who would become her husband. Goodall gives names to the chimpanzees that she studied in the wild and tells us about their life stories. It was heart-warming but also heart-breaking. I learned some interesting facts about our close relatives: - After giving birth the placenta dangles out of the mother. They don't attempt to cut the umbilical cord. This confirms what I learned from a mid-wife that a lot of essential minerals are still transmitted through the umbilical cord to the baby. As long as the cord doesn't pose any fatal danger to the baby, there's no rush to cut it really. - In the chimpanzee world, there are only single mothers. Males don't play an important role in the baby chimpanzee's life since the mother doesn't even know who really fathered her child. - Unlike bonobos, Goodall didn't observe any homosexuality in chimpanzees. Males will only start touching other males in times of stress. - Smiling doesn't always come from a positive place. Often a smile originates from a nervous and social discomfort, trying to win the favor of the other. A chimpanzee grins as a sign of submission to superiors. - Grooming is an important past time for chimpanzees. It's how they reassure themselves and their relationships that everything is okay. "For those who love to be alone with nature I need add nothing further; for those who do not, no words of mine could ever convey, even in part, the almost mystical awareness of beauty and eternity that accompanies certain treasured moments. And, though the beauty was always there, those moments came upon me unaware: when I was watching the pale flush preceding dawn; or looking up through the rustling leaves of some giant forest tree into the greens and browns and black shadows that occasionally ensnared a bright fleck of the blue sky; or when I stood, as darkness fell, with one hand on the still-warm trunk of a tree and looked at the sparkling of an early moon on the never still, sighing water of the lake."

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jacqui

    I read Jane Goodall's In the Shadow of Man (Houghton Mifflin 1971) years ago as research for a paleo-historic novel I was writing. I needed background on the great apes so I could show them acting appropriately in their primeval setting tens of thousands of years ago. While I did get a marvelous treatise from this book on their wild environ, I also got my first introduction to the concept that they are almost-human, maybe even human cousins. But I digress. Back to Jane Goodall. This is the memoir I read Jane Goodall's In the Shadow of Man (Houghton Mifflin 1971) years ago as research for a paleo-historic novel I was writing. I needed background on the great apes so I could show them acting appropriately in their primeval setting tens of thousands of years ago. While I did get a marvelous treatise from this book on their wild environ, I also got my first introduction to the concept that they are almost-human, maybe even human cousins. But I digress. Back to Jane Goodall. This is the memoir that began her career, that relays her start in the field of anthropology, how she conducted her early studies and the price she paid personally and professionally for her perseverance. She had no formal background in primatology or fieldwork when she began this study. She entered Tanzania with an open mind, a patient attitude and an interest in exploring the adventures of chimpanzees in the wild. From there, she invented everything else that would allow her to investigate these fascinating primates. In the book, she shares every step with readers--how she followed the chimps until they finally accepted her presence without fleeing, how she learned to identify each animal and in that way track their lives, how she learned to understand their verbal and body language, how she learned to be a better mother by watching Flo's parenting skills. At the time she wrote this book, chimpanzees were not considered human--still aren't. Goodall approached her fieldwork expecting to see them fail the tests of human-ness, things like using tools, caring for their families, working as a group, planning their actions. Each hurdle she put in front of them, they lept across, until her work destroyed all the rules about what made you and I human. She did for chimpanzees what Dian Fosse did for the gorillas and Birute Galdikas did for orangutans: she humanized them. By the time I finished this book, I realized that chimpanzees have a good and fulfilling life. They have adapted their lives to suit their environment. They lack man's wanderlust, restricting themselves to smaller and smaller parts of Africa every year, but by Jane Goodall's account, they enjoy their lives. Can we say as much for ourselves?

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kaushik

    The first of Goodall's works, this book details her early, pioneering research on chimpanzees. As Gould said in the introduction, this book is less about sterile experiments in a lab and more on observing the chimps in all their majesty. The light, seemingly effortless style keeps a lay reader engaged throughout. One is taken through the journey of Goodall's entry into this field of research, her early struggles, hardships and failures, and the success is studying chimpanzees in a manner never d The first of Goodall's works, this book details her early, pioneering research on chimpanzees. As Gould said in the introduction, this book is less about sterile experiments in a lab and more on observing the chimps in all their majesty. The light, seemingly effortless style keeps a lay reader engaged throughout. One is taken through the journey of Goodall's entry into this field of research, her early struggles, hardships and failures, and the success is studying chimpanzees in a manner never done before. From providing a deep understanding of the life cycle of chimpanzees to their interpersonal and group dynamics, and tracking deeply endearing histories of several individual chimps, Goodall convinces the reader of the kinship that we share with these magnificent creatures. This is one of the rare science books I have read (the other one from recent memory being "The Invention of Nature") that served not only to educate, but arouse a sense of wonder and mystery in the reader. To appreciate the interconnections and complexities of natural systems, and admire the richness of nature is perhaps what the study of science is truly about. Goodall has done well to induce that sense of wonder and joy. This work is a bravura performance by a scientific legend.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Selaine Henriksen

    Last week my friend Sandy and I went to see a movie about Jane Goodall's life which she was there to present and then had a Q&A session and signed autographs. She's 77! Sandy said that was definitely one of her items on her bucket list. Whenever Sandy and I get together something strange happens. She ended up with a touch of the flu that struck just as we were leaving and then throwing up outside of the car on the street. I'm sure my neighbors, because natch it was back in the 'hood, thought we' Last week my friend Sandy and I went to see a movie about Jane Goodall's life which she was there to present and then had a Q&A session and signed autographs. She's 77! Sandy said that was definitely one of her items on her bucket list. Whenever Sandy and I get together something strange happens. She ended up with a touch of the flu that struck just as we were leaving and then throwing up outside of the car on the street. I'm sure my neighbors, because natch it was back in the 'hood, thought we'd been out drinking in excess. ( which we have done, too, but not with driving). So- Jane Goodall was marvelous. Her answers to questions showed a sharp intelligence combined with an empathy that was quite moving and inspring. She only briefly, and in response to a question, touched on factory farms but said she gave up eating meat after that because she couldn't bear to eat the fear and pain the meat represented. I felt that And I determined to eat less meat ( I can't say I'll go vegan because I want to eat eggs and cheese.) I was impressed that she didn't attempt to change anyone's mind or eating habits. She just said that if you want to make a difference there then ask your local grocery store to carry cruelty-free or free range foods. I bought her book "In The Shadow of Man". It's her first and probably a tad out of date, judging from the forward. I had it signed. She writes in a very engaging manner, as though she had an eye on keeping the reader amused. Very astute of her. She leads with the tension of whether her program would be allowed and how to despair at the chimps avoiding her, easily. To the wonder of their acceptance to the thrill of the chimps's individual stories, a few of which left me in tears. Particularly the polio epidemic. The scene of the one chimp crawling into camp with a paralysed leg and all the others looking at him with horror and fear and he`s looking over his shoulder to see what they`re scared of is both heart-breaking and hilarious. I think the biggest surprise is that they hunt and eat meat. Not only hunting, but hunting infants of a species they also play with as children themselves. I have to admit to being shocked by that. I`m not sure why. Do I have a rose-coloured lens when looking at animals? No, I'm a trained veterinary technologist and have worked in a number of clinics, including a research facility. I think it's just of all the things I've heard over the years of Jane Goodall's research that had never come up. Perhaps, in the interest of garnering funding for the research, that was one thing that would turn people's emotions against the chimps. I've been interested in her work for ages and never heard of that.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tanja Berg

    Rating 4* out of 5. I've had a fascination with the great apes since National Geographic made a feature of orangutans sometime around 1980. I couldn't read, but I saw the picture of a child about my age sharing a bath with an orangutan baby and crying. I could relate. "Reflections of Eden: My Years with the Orangutans in Borneo" by Birute Galdikas was the first book I read. It was her story in National Geographic too. I read about Dian Fossey's "Gorillas in the mist" (or possibly "Woman in the M Rating 4* out of 5. I've had a fascination with the great apes since National Geographic made a feature of orangutans sometime around 1980. I couldn't read, but I saw the picture of a child about my age sharing a bath with an orangutan baby and crying. I could relate. "Reflections of Eden: My Years with the Orangutans in Borneo" by Birute Galdikas was the first book I read. It was her story in National Geographic too. I read about Dian Fossey's "Gorillas in the mist" (or possibly "Woman in the Mists, I'm not sure - could've been both) and Jane Goodall's "Reason for hope: a spiritual journey" at around the same time, second half of the 90's. I always wanted to read more and the only reason I didn't would have been due to inaccessibility. Still it is strange that it took me so long to get around to "In the Shadow of Man", which I have wanted to read for 18 years! When Jane Goodall first began to study chimpanzees - thanks to Dr. Leakey's foresight - no one had observed chimpanzees in the wild before. Here was a single, young, white woman sent to the darkest depths of Africa to study ferocious mammals. Her persistence and tolerance opened the doors of insight. We now know that chimpanzees use tools, hunt, and that their childhoods are long. There are many similarities between us and our closest cousins, although I am glad evolution took us in a different direction. The chimpanzee society is extremely hierarchical and male-dominant. The females must be submissive and when she's sexually available - displayed by a huge pink rump ten days a month when she's sexually mature, unless she's pregnant or lactating - she must submit to sex or rape with numerous amorous males. No thanks. Jane Goodall only dwells on the chimps. She doesn't mention the hardship of living isolated in the jungle much. Only once in a while there are hints at how difficult it must have been, particularly in the beginning. The animals, the jaguars, the snakes, the flies... And the solitude. Although there must have been many stressors, that sort of life also seems as idyllic and far from the rat race as it's possible to come. Reading this book I was envious and did consider whether my choice to study business economics because I knew it would be easy to get a job really was the best move. Then again, I like modern comforts. Such as a vermin free bed, a warm house, food which I do not have to kill myself and a steady income. Not being chased by wild animals is also definitely a plus. So no. No regrets. Just huge admiration for the amazing Jane Goodall. Read this book!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Really, when I picked up this book, I was not that interested in chimpanzees but interested in Jane Goodall. I wondered how someone with no formal training initially became such an expert and world renowned figure. In her book In The Shadow of Man, readers discover that her early love of animals, taking the initiative to get herself to Africa, and the luck to meet Louis Leaky, who saw her potential, are factors that loom large. But it was her patience, eye for detail, and willingness to live in Really, when I picked up this book, I was not that interested in chimpanzees but interested in Jane Goodall. I wondered how someone with no formal training initially became such an expert and world renowned figure. In her book In The Shadow of Man, readers discover that her early love of animals, taking the initiative to get herself to Africa, and the luck to meet Louis Leaky, who saw her potential, are factors that loom large. But it was her patience, eye for detail, and willingness to live in relatively primitive conditions that help her. Also very early in her career, she entered college to enhance her experiences and expand her knowledge. What makes this book fascinating reading is the way she relates the interactions and lives of the chimpanzees living in the Gombe Preserve. Although criticized for giving the chimps names instead of numbers, it does make it easier for nonscientists readers to appreciate the lives of the chimps reported in her book. Lots to learn from reading this one.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Natasha11

    If I could suggest any one Jane Goodall book, this would be the book. This is where she started. It is emotionally charged and incredibly educational. I cannot think of a better book on Primatology. Bottom line is, Jane Goodall is an amazing person and this book captures that.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ksy9120

    One of my favorite biological/non fiction books!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    Jane Goodall is everything I aspire to be in life, and this book was just amazing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Ginensky

    Okay 30 pages were just up and missing from my copy of this book!! Maybe another star was hidden in there! I think when this book came out 60(!!!) years ago it was much more revolutionary. It read like a novel and you get to know the individual chimps which is fun. But, I wanted something more form it? I think is she had talked more about the social context of her research or maybe what she was really doing with it that’d be better. She talked about getting her PhD but not ever the topic. Someti Okay 30 pages were just up and missing from my copy of this book!! Maybe another star was hidden in there! I think when this book came out 60(!!!) years ago it was much more revolutionary. It read like a novel and you get to know the individual chimps which is fun. But, I wanted something more form it? I think is she had talked more about the social context of her research or maybe what she was really doing with it that’d be better. She talked about getting her PhD but not ever the topic. Sometimes she’ll tell you why she thinks this one chimp behavior is important. Mostly, this is just an account of her first few years at the Gombe research center and her personal journey through that time. The pictures rock

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vicky Hunt

    Monkey Business A descriptive and practical study of chimps in Tanzania, In the Shadow of Man functions much like a practicum course undertaken by Elementary School teachers in college. Concurrently with every course, students are assigned to a nearby school classroom where they sit, observe, and take notes on exactly what is happening in the classroom. This often involves the details of instruction, and learning. But, in one particular psychology course, our assignment was the campus daycare, wh Monkey Business A descriptive and practical study of chimps in Tanzania, In the Shadow of Man functions much like a practicum course undertaken by Elementary School teachers in college. Concurrently with every course, students are assigned to a nearby school classroom where they sit, observe, and take notes on exactly what is happening in the classroom. This often involves the details of instruction, and learning. But, in one particular psychology course, our assignment was the campus daycare, where we sat in a closeted room with a two-way mirror. We could see the children, but they could not see us, or even know for sure that students were in the building, since we had a separate entrance into the room. This course was one of the more interesting, since our goal was to observe the interpersonal relationships and psychological attitudes and behaviors of children. "I was, of course,  completely unqualified to undertake a scientific study of animal behaviour." P. 19 "Excited as I was I could not help feeling disappointed for, although the chimpanzees remained for two hours in the tree, I saw little except an occasional glimpse of a black arm reaching out from the foliage and pulling bunches of fruit out of sight.  And then, one after the other and in complete silence, the whole group climbed down the palm tree ladder and vanished into the forest.  That was what amazed me most - sixteen chimpanzees in one tree and yet the only sounds I had heard them make had been the calls announcing their arrival." P. 30 This book describes the work of the Gombe Stream research center there in Tanzania, which Jane Goodall began and continues today. She got started with just her Mother to accompany her, but over the course of years her work was joined by a number of assistants, and her husband. Ms. Goodall's work began with certain premises and evolutionary mindsets, and was commissioned by her mentor, the well-known archaeologist and paleontologist Louis Leakey. She tells how his evolutionary premises guided her choices of location and tasks with the chimps. But, beyond the occasional mention of conjectures on human origins, the book is predominantly about the behavior of chimps. "Much more Louis told me during that first talk.  He was, he said, particularly interested in the behavior of a group of chimpanzees living on the shores of a lake - for the remains of prehistoric man were often found on a lake shore and it was possible that an understanding of chimpanzee behavior to-day  might shed light on the behavior of our stone-age ancestors." The study is not a blind experiment, in any fashion, and Ms. Goodall admits to some amount of worry that she has influenced chimp behavior in the group. The interactions with the chimps are influenced to a large extent by the human observers. They quickly resort to stocking large numbers of bananas to lure the chimps into the areas they were camped. The chimps soon modified their own behavior to obtain these banana stores. Very quickly, they learned to break open the stores and take more than intended each day. So, the observers resorted to more elaborate banana houses, eventually made with concrete. "The moisture that was sucked by the Sun from the lush vegetation of the mountains was trapped in the valleys, trapped between the long grass stems. Climbing the steep slopes was often a nightmare. Sometimes I felt I simply had to climb into a tree in order to breathe, and once I was up there I wondered why on Earth our ancestors had ever left the branches." P. 65 This method of gathering info, along with some tagging along the trails in pursuit of particular animals, provides much insight into animal behavior. The reader gets to see much about a number of chimps, focused around 6 main mothers and their children; as well as 6 primary males in that group. The book will officially be a classic next year, since it was published in 1971. It is a hugely important work in the field. This is filled more with details of chimp society, rather than adventure and excitement, for as Amazon's Alexa says about Jane Goodall's work: "The chance to tag along respectfully does not make compelling cinema." - Alexa The writing is simple and straight-forward observation by a student for the most part, and easy to follow and enjoy. It does not contain scientific jargon, since it was not written by a scientist, but an observing student. Occasionally, Jane waxes poetic. This book was written very early in her career... her first I think. Each chimp takes on a personality of its own within the pages and in the many beautiful photos in the book. I am sure it takes a very special person to spend so much time alone in a jungle to watch animals day by day. The work has provided much benefit to our knowledge of animal behavior today, and to the way animals are cared for in more modern zoos. "...I accepted aloneness as a way of life , and I was no longer lonely . I was utterly absorbed in my work , fascinated by the chimps , too busy in the evenings to brood . In fact , had I been alone for longer than a year I might have become a rather strange person , for inanimate objects began to develop their own identities : I found myself saying Good morning ' to my little hut on the Peak ; ' Hallo ' to the stream where I collected my water . And I became immensely aware of trees - just to feel the roughness of a gnarled trunk or the cold smoothness of young bark with my hand , filled me with a strange knowledge of the roots under the ground and the pulsing sap within . I longed to be able to swing through the branches like the chimps , to sleep in the tree tops , lulled by the rustling of the leaves in the breeze . In particular , I loved to sit in a forest when it was raining , and to hear the pattering of the drops on the leaves and feel utterly enclosed in a dim twilight world of greens and browns and dampness." My favorite parts were the display behaviors of the male chimps, and the rain dances. I read this book in the hardback edition for my stop in Tanzania on my Journey Around the World for 2019-2020. My next stop is offshore in Madagascar, where 'the rivers run red!' "However, although such relationships may be shadowy forerunners of human love affairs , I cannot conceive chimpanzees developing emotions, one for the other, comparable in any way to the tenderness, the protectiveness, the tolerance and the spiritual exhilaration which are the hallmarks of human love in its truest and deepest sense. For chimpanzees usually show a lack of consideration for each other's feelings which, in some ways, may represent the deepest part of the gulf between them and us. For the male and female chimpanzee there can be no exquisite awareness of each other's bodies - let alone each other's minds . The most the female can expect of her suitor is a brief courtship display , a sexual contact lasting , at most , half a minute , and, sometimes, a session of social grooming afterwards. Not for them the romance, the mystery, the boundless joys of human love."

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zarina Marsaleh

    The drive for the pioneer field study on a group of chimpanzees living on the shores of Lake Tanganyika was due to the fact that the remains of prehistoric man were often found on a lakeshore. It was possible that an understanding of chimpanzee behavior today might shed light on the behavior of our stone age ancestors. In other words, it is for the interest in understanding ourselves. Overall genetic similarity between human and chimpanzee is more than 95%, though a world of fascinating differen The drive for the pioneer field study on a group of chimpanzees living on the shores of Lake Tanganyika was due to the fact that the remains of prehistoric man were often found on a lakeshore. It was possible that an understanding of chimpanzee behavior today might shed light on the behavior of our stone age ancestors. In other words, it is for the interest in understanding ourselves. Overall genetic similarity between human and chimpanzee is more than 95%, though a world of fascinating difference, including the biological essence of humanity, lies in the few percent that separate our two species. On a side note, I find it saddening that us the ones equipped with this essence of humanity still manage to inflict inhumane acts towards animals. In this book Jane Goodall takes us into her adventure with her chimpanzee friends through their stages of fear, aggression, hostility and acceptance towards their new white ape friends. She shares her meticulous and unobstructive observations of chimpanzees that she had named instead of identifying them by numbers, a practice that was opposed by some in the scientific world. I love not only her moments with the chimpanzees, but also the moments when it was just her and nature. I wonder what her subsequent published book, Through a Window, brings! 💛

  24. 5 out of 5

    Teagan E

    I loved this. I can't promise that everyone would - I have a feeling it was a case of "this was the perfect book for where I am emotionally/intellectually/spiritually at the moment and it struck home." But even if you were to read it and not feel compelled to give it five stars, I really think you'd like it. Jane's writing made me feel as if we were sitting together over coffee; she's well-written without being pretentious, careful in her observation and description without being dry or over-sci I loved this. I can't promise that everyone would - I have a feeling it was a case of "this was the perfect book for where I am emotionally/intellectually/spiritually at the moment and it struck home." But even if you were to read it and not feel compelled to give it five stars, I really think you'd like it. Jane's writing made me feel as if we were sitting together over coffee; she's well-written without being pretentious, careful in her observation and description without being dry or over-scientific. The drama of the chimp-world she was accepted into as an observer is fascinating and captivating. Jane was able to allow these animals a rich emotional life without ever crossing into undue anthropomorphism (she never assumes feelings onto them because it's what she would feel in their situation). Her honesty and deep appreciation, awe, and love of the chimps she met and worked with is absolutely captivating. And the fact that she spent years patiently waiting and watching in the jungle is simply inspiring to me. This is not only a story of a group of chimpanzees - it's also a singing testimony to what can be accomplished when one dedicates their days to some purpose.

  25. 5 out of 5

    C

    Jane Goodall is as fascinating as her research. I loved reading her story and about her development from student to researcher (and the work and patience that goes into this) and her observations on chimpanzees. There was one chapter that was a touch gruesome on chimpanzees hunting. I mention this only because I tend to read while eating breakfast, and reading about chimps banging baboon heads on rocks to get the brains out was not a great accompaniment to scrambled eggs! So if you're a Eating R Jane Goodall is as fascinating as her research. I loved reading her story and about her development from student to researcher (and the work and patience that goes into this) and her observations on chimpanzees. There was one chapter that was a touch gruesome on chimpanzees hunting. I mention this only because I tend to read while eating breakfast, and reading about chimps banging baboon heads on rocks to get the brains out was not a great accompaniment to scrambled eggs! So if you're a Eating Reader, be warned. :) It was interesting to see her work through trial and error in her research methods and learning what was not a good idea (for both her and the chimp's safety) and what methods could continue. Overall, I'm grateful the professor had us read this as an intro to her lectures on primates. Much more engaging than a text and still fascinating. I realize, when I read books about scientists in the field, that there are three things I deeply envy: their research locations (case in point, this book and the Grants in The Beak of the Finch), their patience, their methodical, systematic approach to data gathering.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    A magnificent and illustrative book. It's both educative and thought-provoking, this because she reflects about how we treat non-human primates and animals in general, also the way how we raise children and other matters In this book, Goodall describes her work and findings about chimps, she is the person that knows the most about chimps so it's always good to read her own words. You probably already know about her findings (that chimps are tool makers, that they are carnivores... etc.) but the bo A magnificent and illustrative book. It's both educative and thought-provoking, this because she reflects about how we treat non-human primates and animals in general, also the way how we raise children and other matters In this book, Goodall describes her work and findings about chimps, she is the person that knows the most about chimps so it's always good to read her own words. You probably already know about her findings (that chimps are tool makers, that they are carnivores... etc.) but the book is more that that, it's full of great descriptions of their behaviors and Goodall's own life. Worth reading, it may be a little boring sometimes, but most of the times it is amazing

  27. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Rizzo

    An absolutely remarkable book on the chimp communities in Gombe. At times I was laughing, at others I was crying. Goodall reports the good and the bad, the horrific and the uplifting. Every page was captivating and it was such an easy read, though not necessarily emotionally. I was particularly attached to the chimp family of Flo, Fifi, Faben, Figan and Flint, and the plight of some of the chimps who were orphaned, struck by flu or polio. Jane Goodall is an amazing person who has shed so much light An absolutely remarkable book on the chimp communities in Gombe. At times I was laughing, at others I was crying. Goodall reports the good and the bad, the horrific and the uplifting. Every page was captivating and it was such an easy read, though not necessarily emotionally. I was particularly attached to the chimp family of Flo, Fifi, Faben, Figan and Flint, and the plight of some of the chimps who were orphaned, struck by flu or polio. Jane Goodall is an amazing person who has shed so much light on chimp behaviour and I am now a huge fan of hers after reading this as my first introduction to her and her work. I can’t wait to read more of her writings and a quaint myself more with the chimpanzee!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Neha

    I just loved this book.  This book was published almost 20 years before I even existed and still this book is an amazing read. Jane Goodall's research is written in a funny and entertaining way and anyone can read it to know more about chimpanzees. And a lot of beautiful photographs by Hugo van Lawick. Even if you are not interested in chimpanzees, I can promise you that you will not get bored reading this book. I just loved this book.  This book was published almost 20 years before I even existed and still this book is an amazing read. Jane Goodall's research is written in a funny and entertaining way and anyone can read it to know more about chimpanzees. And a lot of beautiful photographs by Hugo van Lawick. Even if you are not interested in chimpanzees, I can promise you that you will not get bored reading this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This was a wonderful gift (signed copy!) Goodall brings such compassion to get observations about chimpanzees without ever losing the sense that they are wild animals. I learned a lot about chimp behavior from this book--and it even made me think differently about human behavior, especially power relationships.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Suffer_well

    Great journey! An enlightening and very distinctive book about the chimpanzees' communities and behaviour. It satisfied my curiosity for the problems in studying such animals and living by them in the wild. Jane Goodhall is one of the most inspiring naturalists of our times. Great journey! An enlightening and very distinctive book about the chimpanzees' communities and behaviour. It satisfied my curiosity for the problems in studying such animals and living by them in the wild. Jane Goodhall is one of the most inspiring naturalists of our times.

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