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Owly Wormy, Bright Lights and Starry Nights

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Out on a stargazing venture in this wordless picture book, Owly and Wormy discover that it’s fine to be frightened—but it’s better to be brave. Owly and Wormy want to see the stars! So they gather their telescope and their lantern and head out into the dark night, all the way to the edge of their branch. Try as they might, though, they can only see leaves…and branches…and m Out on a stargazing venture in this wordless picture book, Owly and Wormy discover that it’s fine to be frightened—but it’s better to be brave. Owly and Wormy want to see the stars! So they gather their telescope and their lantern and head out into the dark night, all the way to the edge of their branch. Try as they might, though, they can only see leaves…and branches…and more leaves.      But these two friends are not about to let a little obstacle like foliage stop them. Armed with camping gear, galoshes—and their wits, of course!—Owly and Wormy set out once again. And this time there are even bigger challenges to face. What’s that screee sound? What’s that click click clicking noise? And what has happened to their telescope?!      Owly and Wormy find plenty to be frightened of, but with a little bravery, they also find there are nearly as many helpful new friends on the horizon as there are stars in the sky. This wordless picture book conveys a nuanced narrative with charming illustrations that will appeal to even the earliest readers.


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Out on a stargazing venture in this wordless picture book, Owly and Wormy discover that it’s fine to be frightened—but it’s better to be brave. Owly and Wormy want to see the stars! So they gather their telescope and their lantern and head out into the dark night, all the way to the edge of their branch. Try as they might, though, they can only see leaves…and branches…and m Out on a stargazing venture in this wordless picture book, Owly and Wormy discover that it’s fine to be frightened—but it’s better to be brave. Owly and Wormy want to see the stars! So they gather their telescope and their lantern and head out into the dark night, all the way to the edge of their branch. Try as they might, though, they can only see leaves…and branches…and more leaves.      But these two friends are not about to let a little obstacle like foliage stop them. Armed with camping gear, galoshes—and their wits, of course!—Owly and Wormy set out once again. And this time there are even bigger challenges to face. What’s that screee sound? What’s that click click clicking noise? And what has happened to their telescope?!      Owly and Wormy find plenty to be frightened of, but with a little bravery, they also find there are nearly as many helpful new friends on the horizon as there are stars in the sky. This wordless picture book conveys a nuanced narrative with charming illustrations that will appeal to even the earliest readers.

30 review for Owly Wormy, Bright Lights and Starry Nights

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

    When the first Owly book came out years ago, I made sure to get it into the hands of my own reluctant reader. Unburdened by the need to read words, he immediately took to both Owly and Wormy. I’m happy to say that the series has continued to be just as good as that first book. Runton has started to do more picture book versions as well and this is one of those. In this book, Owly and Wormy go on a trek out of the woods and up to a hill where they will be able to view the stars better. Along the When the first Owly book came out years ago, I made sure to get it into the hands of my own reluctant reader. Unburdened by the need to read words, he immediately took to both Owly and Wormy. I’m happy to say that the series has continued to be just as good as that first book. Runton has started to do more picture book versions as well and this is one of those. In this book, Owly and Wormy go on a trek out of the woods and up to a hill where they will be able to view the stars better. Along the way, they get caught in a rainstorm and take refuge in a cave. There are strange and frightening noises and their telescope has disappeared! It will take real bravery and no fear of the dark to figure out what happened. This wordless picture book relies on its illustrations to succeed. Happily, Owly and Wormy have a warm friendship that is evident from the very first page. Add the dash of darkness, the storm and a really dark cave and you have a real adventure. All of the content is ideal for the youngest independent pre-readers who will enjoy having a graphic novel of their very own. Runton takes fear of the dark and the unknown and turns it into a chance to make new friends and see new things in this strong addition to a great series. Appropriate for ages 3-5.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie

    I seriously love all the Owly books.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn Woagh

    The different format from previous Owly books is very cute and welcome. It's a larger book in the format of a children's book, and a single story, whereas previous books in the series have been a condensed collection of stories. With the new format, there are larger pictures and multiple new colours. The story as well is just as happy, enjoyable, and emotional as past stories, with the common and highly-welcome theme of making new friends. This one also focuses on adaptation to variables during a The different format from previous Owly books is very cute and welcome. It's a larger book in the format of a children's book, and a single story, whereas previous books in the series have been a condensed collection of stories. With the new format, there are larger pictures and multiple new colours. The story as well is just as happy, enjoyable, and emotional as past stories, with the common and highly-welcome theme of making new friends. This one also focuses on adaptation to variables during adventuring. For example, Owly and Wormy adventure out for a day's hike, and it begins raining. Luckily, Owly brought raingear! Something I should do more often, living in a rain-heavy region. Another factor that I enjoyed with this particular Owly book was how consistently cheerful and encouraging Owly was to his understandably-nervous friend Wormy. At one point, Wormy is to guard the camp while Owly sets off to find something they dropped, and Owly references Wormy's knightliness from a previous story involving his exposure to a story of fantasy knights and dragons. Wormy quickly becomes confident from this concept. It has me thinking more often of constructive ways I can encourage and help empower those I care for, and things I can do to adapt to new changes and make our lives easier.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    I really don't care for books with no words....Reading is about literacy..but I guess making up stories that go with the pictures is a good thing. However...trying to make out the story isn't very clear...you have to look very closely to get what they are trying to portray and I just didn't care for it! I really don't care for books with no words....Reading is about literacy..but I guess making up stories that go with the pictures is a good thing. However...trying to make out the story isn't very clear...you have to look very closely to get what they are trying to portray and I just didn't care for it!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Vince

    This book was awesome fun for my (almost) 4 yr old daughter and I. There aren't any words; the characters think and talk through thought bubbles that contain only pictures. It made reading it an adventure. Will definitely be looking for more Owly & Wormy adventures. This book was awesome fun for my (almost) 4 yr old daughter and I. There aren't any words; the characters think and talk through thought bubbles that contain only pictures. It made reading it an adventure. Will definitely be looking for more Owly & Wormy adventures.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    The illustrations are SO adorable, and it was a cute little wordless story. But honestly, I kind of had a tough time deciphering some of the pictures. If you're letting a child make up a story to go along with the pictures anyway, then that doesn't really matter. The illustrations are SO adorable, and it was a cute little wordless story. But honestly, I kind of had a tough time deciphering some of the pictures. If you're letting a child make up a story to go along with the pictures anyway, then that doesn't really matter.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Kramer

    Owly and Wormy Bright Lights and Starry Nights! is a stunning wordless picture book by author/illustrator Andy Runton. Owly and his friend Wormy cannot wait to use their telescope to see the stars. No matter how hard they try, they cannot seem to find anything in the night sky. Owly decides that in order to see stars, they should go camping. The pair soon get stuck in a rain storm and must take cover in a spooky, dark cave. Strange noises are coming from the back of the cave and Wormy does not wa Owly and Wormy Bright Lights and Starry Nights! is a stunning wordless picture book by author/illustrator Andy Runton. Owly and his friend Wormy cannot wait to use their telescope to see the stars. No matter how hard they try, they cannot seem to find anything in the night sky. Owly decides that in order to see stars, they should go camping. The pair soon get stuck in a rain storm and must take cover in a spooky, dark cave. Strange noises are coming from the back of the cave and Wormy does not want to stick around to see who or what it could be. Racing from the cave, Owly accidentally drops his telescope in the forest. Will he be able to recover it in time to show Wormy the stars? Have Owly and Wormy truly escaped the cave monster? This is a stunning book from start to finish. Children will fall in love with Runton's adorable characters. Instead of words, Runton makes use of speech bubbles that communicate Owly and Wormy's thoughts. The story reads like a comic book which children will absolutely enjoy. I highly recommend this book to readers of all ages. I cannot wait to read more of Owly and Wormy's adventures.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brigitte

    Graphic novel: Owly & Wormy, Bright Lights and Starry Nights! Owly and wormy are 2 friends that seek to see the beautiful things the sky has to offer. They are two friends who are afraid but find the courage to expand and explore what is out there. I loved this story because it’s adventurous, but it also gives you the sensation that you can overcome any situation you feel you can’t. I think that it’s a good moral story for children to read. Children need to explore but they also need to know tha Graphic novel: Owly & Wormy, Bright Lights and Starry Nights! Owly and wormy are 2 friends that seek to see the beautiful things the sky has to offer. They are two friends who are afraid but find the courage to expand and explore what is out there. I loved this story because it’s adventurous, but it also gives you the sensation that you can overcome any situation you feel you can’t. I think that it’s a good moral story for children to read. Children need to explore but they also need to know that it’s okay to be afraid. The book is all pictures and a couple of sound effects, so it allows you to create and explore your own ideas. The pictures send a clear message about what the story is about. You will fall in love with the story and will want to go out and explore yourself. I recommend this book!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    I love the illustrations, and Owly and the bats are especially adorable (I'm a sucker for spherical animals, I think). The book is a wordless picture book, so if that's off-putting to you, then give this one a pass. If you don't mind building a story yourself, it's a pretty cute one. I actually used this in a storytime on day/night (could also be good for bats, stars, owls, etc). I sketched in the bare bones of the story, asking the kids lots of questions to fill in the rest ("what do they see in I love the illustrations, and Owly and the bats are especially adorable (I'm a sucker for spherical animals, I think). The book is a wordless picture book, so if that's off-putting to you, then give this one a pass. If you don't mind building a story yourself, it's a pretty cute one. I actually used this in a storytime on day/night (could also be good for bats, stars, owls, etc). I sketched in the bare bones of the story, asking the kids lots of questions to fill in the rest ("what do they see in the telescope? why can't they see any stars?" - that sort of thing). They enjoyed having a chance to chatter and create the details of the story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Meg McGregor

    Once again, Mr. Runton weaves his magical spell, and invites little ones, into his world! Owly & Wormy want to see the stars at night! They get everything prepared. But there is one problem! They can't see any stars! What are they to do? This is a great way, to introduce your readers, to the wonders of astronomy! Lexi and Victoria enjoyed making up their own story! They had so much fun, that they read the book three times, and each time created a different story! Once again, Mr. Runton weaves his magical spell, and invites little ones, into his world! Owly & Wormy want to see the stars at night! They get everything prepared. But there is one problem! They can't see any stars! What are they to do? This is a great way, to introduce your readers, to the wonders of astronomy! Lexi and Victoria enjoyed making up their own story! They had so much fun, that they read the book three times, and each time created a different story!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Viviane Elbee

    I picked this book up because I liked the cover & the title. It’s a nearly wordless book, but the adorable illustrations show Owly & Wormy’s friendship and camping adventure - through rain and a dark scary cave - all in the search of a perfect spot to view the stars. Fun for preschoolers & young elementary. Kids enjoyed it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Meaghann

    For a wordless picture book this is very adorable and I've come to love Owly and Wormy. Their friendship is amazing and they are always encouraging eachother and being very optimistic. You have to make sure to read their "speech" bubbles to make sense of what they would be trying to say, but otherwise very short and sweet story! For a wordless picture book this is very adorable and I've come to love Owly and Wormy. Their friendship is amazing and they are always encouraging eachother and being very optimistic. You have to make sure to read their "speech" bubbles to make sense of what they would be trying to say, but otherwise very short and sweet story!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nicola

    Charming graphic novel-esque picture book that Miss 2 enjoyed. I like finding books that have a clear narrative without text; it's nice discussing the story with her and identifying how characters are feeling based on the visual elements. Charming graphic novel-esque picture book that Miss 2 enjoyed. I like finding books that have a clear narrative without text; it's nice discussing the story with her and identifying how characters are feeling based on the visual elements.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maia

    Another full-color Owly book. Owly and Wormy want to look at the stars through their new telescope. But things keep getting in the way! They can't see from their home because the leaves are too thick, and another night it's raining. Will they ever get to see the sky? Another full-color Owly book. Owly and Wormy want to look at the stars through their new telescope. But things keep getting in the way! They can't see from their home because the leaves are too thick, and another night it's raining. Will they ever get to see the sky?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Soobie's scared

    WoW! Owly and Wormy in colors. I love it! I've almost read all Owly's books and I don't have troubles anymore understanding the meaning the author wants to convey. I think Runton did a wonderful job when it came to convey meaning though images. I love the colors of this book: the blue is amazing! WoW! Owly and Wormy in colors. I love it! I've almost read all Owly's books and I don't have troubles anymore understanding the meaning the author wants to convey. I think Runton did a wonderful job when it came to convey meaning though images. I love the colors of this book: the blue is amazing!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Beatrice Fox

    Adorable. Guaranteed to put a smile on your face.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Naomi Ruth

    See my review for Owly & Wormy, Friends All a Flutter.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Heather Jo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. lily fall reading 2018, children's book, picture book, series, wordless, camping, animals lily fall reading 2018, children's book, picture book, series, wordless, camping, animals

  19. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I love Owly so much.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeani

    Love this wordless book!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    My son absolutely loves this book

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    Super cute and clever with its illustrations and emoji talk. There aren’t any words!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Reign_ 1982

    The graphics/illustrations were great. Just this particular book 📚 wasn't as good as the others. The graphics/illustrations were great. Just this particular book 📚 wasn't as good as the others.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stefany Boleyn

    Very adorable book, but I don't think I'll be able to read it for storytime. Not many actual words, and it's too long to guess what's going on in each picture. Very adorable book, but I don't think I'll be able to read it for storytime. Not many actual words, and it's too long to guess what's going on in each picture.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joella

    I like the Owly graphic novels, so I was excited to see this particular picture book. In this book Owly and Wormy are excited to look through a telescope to see the stars. But things don’t go quite as planned. For one thing Wormy is very scared of being in the dark. So they keep looking through the telescope, but they always have candles lit while they do so. And they can’t see stars. So they go on a journey to a nearby hill to look at the stars. But there are a couple of more reasons for Owly a I like the Owly graphic novels, so I was excited to see this particular picture book. In this book Owly and Wormy are excited to look through a telescope to see the stars. But things don’t go quite as planned. For one thing Wormy is very scared of being in the dark. So they keep looking through the telescope, but they always have candles lit while they do so. And they can’t see stars. So they go on a journey to a nearby hill to look at the stars. But there are a couple of more reasons for Owly and Wormy to be afraid and to possibly give up on seeing the stars. But soon they make new friends and realize just why they can’t see the stars. And soon everyone is as happy as can be. This is a fun book that doesn’t have any words. All of the “talking” is done with pictures. Therefore even the youngest kids can look at this book and practice their narrative skills–even if they can’t read text yet. And it will be a great book to discuss how thoughts, meanings, and ideas can all be portrayed through pictures and without any words.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brianna Deines

    Primary 1. This story doesn't have any words but the characters have thought bubbles that show what they are "saying" or thinking. I would say it is fairly easy to follow but the reader couldn't rush through looking at the pictures or else they wouldn't be able to follow the plot very well. If a student does take the time and has background knowledge of a telescope and looking at the stars this story could be very engaging. 2.A great way to use this book is with children who have a fear of the d Primary 1. This story doesn't have any words but the characters have thought bubbles that show what they are "saying" or thinking. I would say it is fairly easy to follow but the reader couldn't rush through looking at the pictures or else they wouldn't be able to follow the plot very well. If a student does take the time and has background knowledge of a telescope and looking at the stars this story could be very engaging. 2.A great way to use this book is with children who have a fear of the dark. I could see a guidance counselor coming in and reading this book to a kindergarten/first grade classroom to discuss fears. Using the thought bubbles as teaching lessons on how to overcome a fear or how to problem solve. 3.What I find really positive about this book is Andy Runton has a series of Owly and Wormy. Getting to know the characters and being able to use these books for teaching character lessons or how to handle certain situations with younger students is a huge plus because a teacher could continue to refer back to Owly and his problems.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marlowe

    Bright Lights is a sweet story about two friends, Owly and Wormy, who want to see the stars and, on the way, they become friends with a family of bats. The story is told in a graphic novel style, except that instead of text in speech bubbles, there are instead more images. This made it great for reading with my pre-literate kid, because it meant that we could look at the pictures together and talk about what was happening – encouraging him to deduce from the visual cues how the characters are fee Bright Lights is a sweet story about two friends, Owly and Wormy, who want to see the stars and, on the way, they become friends with a family of bats. The story is told in a graphic novel style, except that instead of text in speech bubbles, there are instead more images. This made it great for reading with my pre-literate kid, because it meant that we could look at the pictures together and talk about what was happening – encouraging him to deduce from the visual cues how the characters are feeling, what they are saying, etc. Another thing I loved about the book is that it was just so very sweet. When Wormy was afraid of the dark, Owly brought out lights to make him feel better. When Owly lost the telescope, the bats helped to find it. The situations provided us with many opportunities to discuss things like friendship, helping, being afraid of the dark, and so forth. Overall, this was just a lovely, sweet book that provides ample occasions for the pre-literate crowd to flex their logic muscles.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This was a "read-aloud" for a group of kindergarteners through second graders at a library program on graphic novels, and let me tell you - it's the most engaged I've seen the kids with a book. Any book. They loved interpreting the rebuses that Owly and Wormy use to communicate with the reader, particularly the kids whose reading skills were still emergent. I displayed several Owly picture books at this program and they were all checked out. I really like the regular Owly graphic novels and reco This was a "read-aloud" for a group of kindergarteners through second graders at a library program on graphic novels, and let me tell you - it's the most engaged I've seen the kids with a book. Any book. They loved interpreting the rebuses that Owly and Wormy use to communicate with the reader, particularly the kids whose reading skills were still emergent. I displayed several Owly picture books at this program and they were all checked out. I really like the regular Owly graphic novels and recommend them to patrons all the time, but was concerned about how the picture book would go over as a read-aloud. I shouldn't have been. Every library and school ought to have Owly picture books, both for kids who are not yet fluent readers and want to work on their literacy, and for fluent readers who need practice with visual literacy (this was me as a child, and I could have benefited greatly from Owly).

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dione Basseri

    Owly books are always great picks for children becoming more independent, but aren't yet ready for reading actual words. Runton does a wonderful job of conveying a story in just the pictures, with a little help from some "picture speech," where the animals convey their problems in simple pictograms. It was particularly interesting to me to see this book as it's the first Owly book I've seen which is done in color. His comic collections are all black-and-white, and, while still good, the addition Owly books are always great picks for children becoming more independent, but aren't yet ready for reading actual words. Runton does a wonderful job of conveying a story in just the pictures, with a little help from some "picture speech," where the animals convey their problems in simple pictograms. It was particularly interesting to me to see this book as it's the first Owly book I've seen which is done in color. His comic collections are all black-and-white, and, while still good, the addition of color really leaves and impression. I also loved the bats thing. I know books about how bats are nice are becoming more common, but it still makes me quite happy to find a positive depiction. Of course, this is all my personal opinion. I'm really unsure how well a child will like this book, so unless they're really into owls, bats, or, I suppose, worms, best to give it a try from the library BEFORE an outright purchase.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Owly and Wormy plan a camping trip so that they can use their telescope to see the stars, but run into a few roadblocks. The weather doesn’t cooperate, they get lost/scared in a cave, and they separate so that Owly can find the telescope they lost in their haste to outrun the creatures in the cave. A family of bats befriends the duo and all ends well as the stars finally make a bright and brilliant appearance. A wordless comic book that’s appealing/recommended for pre-readers through early eleme Owly and Wormy plan a camping trip so that they can use their telescope to see the stars, but run into a few roadblocks. The weather doesn’t cooperate, they get lost/scared in a cave, and they separate so that Owly can find the telescope they lost in their haste to outrun the creatures in the cave. A family of bats befriends the duo and all ends well as the stars finally make a bright and brilliant appearance. A wordless comic book that’s appealing/recommended for pre-readers through early elementary school grades.

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