web site hit counter Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life

Availability: Ready to download

Pearl Littlefield’s first assignment in fifth grade is complicated: She has to write an essay about her summer. Where does she begin? Her dad lost his job, she had to go to a different camp—one where her older sister Lexie was a counselor-in-training (ugh!)—and she and her good friend James Brubaker III had a huge fight, which made them both wonder if the other kids were r Pearl Littlefield’s first assignment in fifth grade is complicated: She has to write an essay about her summer. Where does she begin? Her dad lost his job, she had to go to a different camp—one where her older sister Lexie was a counselor-in-training (ugh!)—and she and her good friend James Brubaker III had a huge fight, which made them both wonder if the other kids were right that girls and boys can’t be good friends and which landed one of them in the hospital. And there’s much, much more on the list of good and bad things, as Ann Martin takes this appealing character into new adventures through which young readers will see that good or bad, life is what happens when you’re making other plans.


Compare

Pearl Littlefield’s first assignment in fifth grade is complicated: She has to write an essay about her summer. Where does she begin? Her dad lost his job, she had to go to a different camp—one where her older sister Lexie was a counselor-in-training (ugh!)—and she and her good friend James Brubaker III had a huge fight, which made them both wonder if the other kids were r Pearl Littlefield’s first assignment in fifth grade is complicated: She has to write an essay about her summer. Where does she begin? Her dad lost his job, she had to go to a different camp—one where her older sister Lexie was a counselor-in-training (ugh!)—and she and her good friend James Brubaker III had a huge fight, which made them both wonder if the other kids were right that girls and boys can’t be good friends and which landed one of them in the hospital. And there’s much, much more on the list of good and bad things, as Ann Martin takes this appealing character into new adventures through which young readers will see that good or bad, life is what happens when you’re making other plans.

30 review for Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ava Trujillo

    OMG. Such an exciting and fun book to read. Its so entertaining by making her go on adventures to going on staycation 😛

  2. 4 out of 5

    Aleetha

    Pearl was little bit clueless but It was nice to read her summer essay.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    This was a pretty good book and a little bit sad, but for the most part is was good. One part it was sad because pearls (main character) dads loss his job right be fore they were about to go onvactaion to the wild west. But it is happy when her and her best friend JB111 (james something the 3rd) and her are in the same class.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    In this sequel to Ten Rules for Living With My Sister, Pearl Littlefield has to write an essay on her summer for fifth grade, but it's complicated. Her father has lost his job as a professor, which has made life difficult for her family. The family vacation out west has been canceled, the family sells their car, takes the subway to bargain stores, and has cut back on just about everything. Her author mother is working all the time. Pearl and her sister both get to go to summer camp, but Lexie ta In this sequel to Ten Rules for Living With My Sister, Pearl Littlefield has to write an essay on her summer for fifth grade, but it's complicated. Her father has lost his job as a professor, which has made life difficult for her family. The family vacation out west has been canceled, the family sells their car, takes the subway to bargain stores, and has cut back on just about everything. Her author mother is working all the time. Pearl and her sister both get to go to summer camp, but Lexie takes a job as a Counselor in Training to help pay for her tuition... and ends up with Pearl's group. Camp is fraught with the same social perils as school, and Pearl manages to get on the bad side of her best friend, JBIII, which makes things even worse. When the girls return home for the rest of the summer, Lexie gets several jobs to help out the family, but Pearl feels she has no skills... until she makes up with JMIII and the two come up with a business plan. In the end, Pearl decides that while the summer wasn't perfect, there were still some things to recommend it. Strengths: This is a good, realistic series for older elementary school students. The sense of place (New York City) and characters are strong, and the depiction of a family struggling with unemployment is one that will resonate with many students. Weaknesses: Something about this book made me want to see some more character development, which is not something I am usually looking for. Pearl is kind of annoying throughout, and I never felt that she really got the larger implications of what her family was going through. Again, not usually something I worry about, since students never come to me and say "There was a lot of action, but I didn't feel that the characters really grew at all." Maybe this was just for a younger audience than I am used to. I enjoyed the book, but was left wanting something.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Skyler

    The first book Ten Rules for Living with my Sister was much much better than this one. I usually read a book in a day or two but this book took me a month because it was SOOOO BORING!!!!!! The whole book is practically Pearl recalling her summer and to me her summer sorta stunk. My opinion. The only good part in her summer was when she had her staycation. Pearl is sort of a brat. Her family has no money yet she still wants to go on the vacation. She got a crappy birthday present because her pare The first book Ten Rules for Living with my Sister was much much better than this one. I usually read a book in a day or two but this book took me a month because it was SOOOO BORING!!!!!! The whole book is practically Pearl recalling her summer and to me her summer sorta stunk. My opinion. The only good part in her summer was when she had her staycation. Pearl is sort of a brat. Her family has no money yet she still wants to go on the vacation. She got a crappy birthday present because her parents have no money but she wasn't grateful. She always wanted to go out instead if staying home. She even tries to make money just because her sister did. Talk about jealous! Also even when Jill was trying to be nice she didn't care and told her beat friend to stay away from her. Talk about bossy! She thought that she was the boss! Even at their field trip she wanted to go on the rides she wanted to go on! Talk about selfish! I'm glad her best friend told her off. She needed to learn that she was a bossy selfish brat! Lexie is my favorite character even if she isn't the main character.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    The sequel is a bit more heavy-handed and less hilarious than 10 RULES FOR LIVING WITH MY SISTER...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Very sweet story with a fun, spunky, relatable protagonist. Terrific voice.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

    "But as I have learned, things don't always happen the way you want them to." —Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life (So far), P. 194 One thing about this book that caught my attention is a blurb on the jacket from Publisher's Weekly: "It's hard not to picture Pearl and Lexie as successors to Ramona and Beezus as Martin creates a novel as entertaining as it is true." Not every sound bite, no matter how well-intentioned, accurately captures the spirit of the book it's meant to describe, but in t "But as I have learned, things don't always happen the way you want them to." —Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life (So far), P. 194 One thing about this book that caught my attention is a blurb on the jacket from Publisher's Weekly: "It's hard not to picture Pearl and Lexie as successors to Ramona and Beezus as Martin creates a novel as entertaining as it is true." Not every sound bite, no matter how well-intentioned, accurately captures the spirit of the book it's meant to describe, but in this case I must say to whomever was writing on behalf of Publisher's Weekly: Rem acu tetigisti (you've hit the nail on the head). The pleasure to be gained from reading Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life (So far) isn't only a matter of Pearl's fantastically fresh first-person narration, rivaling the best work of any other dynamic, amusing character in the annals of literature for young readers. As in Beverly Cleary's immortal Ramona books, author Ann M. Martin has ingeniously distilled the stuff of life into the thoughts and attitudes of Pearl Littlefield as she takes the good and bad that happens to her with equal determination to do what's right. Pearl is excitable and trusting, naturally thinking those around her have as insatiable an appetite for everyday life as she does, not understanding why she doesn't always see her own enthusiastic demeanor reflected in her friends, family and others. When Pearl's friend Justine moved away from their apartment building to the other side of the city, a girl who had been her best friend without any apologies for their two-year difference in age, Pearl had been mostly friendless for some time. It didn't help that her older sister, Lexie, was a continual puzzle to her, sometimes friendly and at other times shutting Pearl out of her personal life almost completely. Of course, we read all this in the book preceding this one, as Pearl's grandfather (Daddy Bo) moves in with the family on a temporary basis and Pearl makes a connection with a new friend, and a boy at that, James Brubaker III (JBIII). Fourth grade is over for Pearl now. She starts fifth grade in a new school with lots of new kids and an assignment about what her summer was like, and it is through this assignment that most of Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life (So far) is told. Pearl has had quite an adventurous summer between the end of the last book and the start of this one, and she's going to let it be the first story her new teacher hears about her. If someone had told Pearl before her summer vacation began all the twists and turns she and her family were about to go through, she probably wouldn't have believed it could ever turn out okay, but maybe this past summer wasn't as bad as it seemed at various points along the way. Pearl herself has changed in some respects, and these changes have allowed her to view the whole ordeal of the summer as an important learning experience she wouldn't be the same without. On the brink of an extended family trip, one sure to be all the more fun because Daddy Bo is going to join them, Pearl's family's plans come screeching to a halt when the hammer drops that her father has been fired from his job as a professor of economics. The Littlefields live in New York City, one of the more expensive places to set up residence whether or not one has a family, and maintaining their home on Pearl's mother's salary alone is going to require a number of cost-cutting measures. The elaborate vacation across the U.S. is the first expenditure to go, but there are many other small changes to be made around the house in the wake of the lost income. It isn't easy for fourteen-year-old Lexie or Pearl to give up some of their favorite expenses, but Pearl watches Lexie take the lead and decides to follow, repeatedly coming back to the touchstone thought that she doesn't want to make matters any harder for her parents as her father scrambles to find new employment and her mother assumes double duty, increasing her writing output in an attempt to make ends meet. Pearl lives in New York City, though, where an adventure waits around every corner should one choose to pursue it, and there's possibility for plenty of excitement even at home. Besides that, Pearl and Lexie have already been signed up for several weeks of summer camp, and even if Lexie does ignore Pearl while they are there, JBIII and Justine will be attending, too. Yet even the camp experience doesn't go as Pearl had planned, as she and JBIII fall into a quarrel and end up spending more time sulking apart from each other than laughing and having fun together, as best friends are meant to do. How many weeks like these, free of responsibility at camp to laugh and play and have a good time together, will friends like Pearl and JBIII have in their lives before the confusions of adolescence move in to obfuscate the issue? Reminiscent of the painful separation between Ellen Tebbits and her friend Austine in Beverly Cleary's 1951 book Ellen Tebbits, we see misunderstanding, resentment, smoldering anger and bewilderment over the reactions of each other get in the way time and again of potential reconciliation between two friends who shouldn't stay mad at each other for long, and as the gap widens and both Pearl and JBIII become more used to the strange absence of the other and less comfortable making the first move to mend their friendship, we begin to wonder if a wonderful thing is in the process of dissolving permanently. How could Pearl and JBIII never get back together as friends, after enjoying each other's company for such a short time? For me, the line that says it best is this one, from Pearl's perspective: "Then I looked at JBIII, who was sitting with the Dudes and punching Austin on the arm, and I thought how much more fun the week would be if my best friend and I were speaking to each other." When a big event like a convention or summer camp happens, one we would normally be so excited for and having the time of our lives diving into and experiencing with full gusto, there's nothing like a schism with one's best friend to make the waters taste more bitter than sweet. When those special days are gone, they're gone for good, and it's hard to see the days that should be jubilant drifting by in not much more than gray indifference. In my mind, it's the sharp memory of this hapless, helpless feeling that I will recall most about Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life (So far), and that's a positive thing. It's remembering the rotten feelings of losing friendship that can impel us to do whatever it takes to fix things, even when that means taking the initiative and being the first one to lay it all out on the line. Pearl's summer is dotted with moments both good and bad, but it's only in resigning herself to the unknowns of her family's situation and the role she is to play in it that she learns having to do without some luxuries doesn't have to be that bad. In fact, cutting back on a few indulgences can make one feel more self-sufficient and thrifty, relying not on piles of money to buy what one wants but on the products of one's own mind to provide entertainment and enlightenment. Without all those extra accoutrements complicating matters, it can be simpler, also, to see the importance of the people in one's life, friends and family both. In looking back on the summer she has just survived, Pearl sees there was as much good as there was bad, and one can't hope for a lot more than that. There are so many questions about what's just ahead, with Pearl's father still unemployed and seeking a job, the majority of her fifth-grade school year still to be played out, and the vital status of friendships fluctuating as people transform and so do their interests, often leaving Pearl guessing as to what will happen next. The year ahead promises to be a big one, and I'm looking forward to living it alongside Pearl. It is an honor to be her friend. Ann M. Martin may be best remembered for the multiple successful series she has launched, but to me she's always a master novelist first, one whose every book is of the caliber required to contend as surely for the big prizes in youth literature as to be among kids' favorite books in any given year. Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life (So far) may not be quite as powerful a story as Ten Rules for Living with My Sister, but it's just as fresh and just as comical, and I'd love to read more about Pearl. I would give at least two and a half stars to Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life (So far) and quite likely the full three, and I heartily recommend it to all fans of Ann M. Martin's writing in any form it has ever taken. Whether or not Pearl, Lexie and JBIII can live up to the literary legacy of Ramona, Beezus and Howie, they've certainly started out well.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Hernandez

    This book is about Pearlś summer and about all the good and bad things that happened during it. It's starts of as it being Pearlś the 1st day of school and going to her new class and slowly she starts talking about her summer due to an assignment she got. She talks about her summer and about how one big thing changes her whole summer and even the rest of the year. This book was very interesting, and I love how the storyline because it talks about something that a lot of kids are going through. T This book is about Pearlś summer and about all the good and bad things that happened during it. It's starts of as it being Pearlś the 1st day of school and going to her new class and slowly she starts talking about her summer due to an assignment she got. She talks about her summer and about how one big thing changes her whole summer and even the rest of the year. This book was very interesting, and I love how the storyline because it talks about something that a lot of kids are going through. The book is very shocking like how on page 168 it states 'I think he broke his elbow". I would have never guessed that JBlll would break his elbow because it was so sudden and right before was going to apologize for something she did. This book was also heartwarming because both Lexie (her big sister) and Pearl wanted to help there parents and ended up doing things that they didn't need to. For example, on page 250 it states "When all of our purchases had been loaded into bags, the cashier announced the price, and Lexie and I handed our money to Dad". Meaning they helped pay for the things even though they weren't asked to. This book is similar to Judy Moody because both books are being told from the perspective of a child and both characters have similar traits. I would recommend this book to a young audience such as 10-14 years old and to people who love books that are funny, sad, and that have lots of character development.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bev

    I loved this book! Pearl had a writing assignment on the first day of school about her summer. She started with the really bad news...:her dad lost his job as an economics professor at a local college. Each chapter she has a short list of what happened because she is working on her outline. This is such a great book about seeing the bad as as opportunities but we don’t always see that in the moment. Definitely I would love to use this book with writing but also using the theme of looking for the I loved this book! Pearl had a writing assignment on the first day of school about her summer. She started with the really bad news...:her dad lost his job as an economics professor at a local college. Each chapter she has a short list of what happened because she is working on her outline. This is such a great book about seeing the bad as as opportunities but we don’t always see that in the moment. Definitely I would love to use this book with writing but also using the theme of looking for the good in the bad or making the best of not so good situations. And life doesn’t always turn out like we think it will or as we want it to! Good book!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    I’m not quite sure how I ended up reading this whole thing when I previewed it for the kid. It made me feel ok about all the time I sank into Babysitters as a kid, though. Martin’s writing is good quality and she doesn’t neglect either plot or characterization. And while it’s about older kids it’s totally appropriate for my second grader.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Ten good and Bad things about my life so far by Ann M. Martin was one of my favorite books I love how the whole book was connected to at the end come together and make this one big thing. I also liked how each chapter was an outline for her school project. This book I recommend to everyone because I think it has a little bit of everything in there.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Myah Chappell

    it was ok like the other one.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Audrey Ricciardi

    This book was very interesting and I definitely recommend it. I couldn't get my face out of the book. This book was very interesting and I definitely recommend it. I couldn't get my face out of the book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bella Juozapaitis

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It was a very enjoying book. My favorite part was when the main character pushed her best friend into a canoe. When she was trying to apologize to him.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anna Mayernik

    I think this is a great book for a younger age. I read it when I was a lot younger and it was one of the first books I got really excited about.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Clarie

    Yes, its a children's book. And yes, it taught me more stuff than some young adults books in the market. Yes, its a children's book. And yes, it taught me more stuff than some young adults books in the market.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Rae

    About a level N guided reading. This was a pretty quick read about a young girl growing up in NYC. Her father lost his job, and this story shows how that affected her, her sister, and her friends. Students might struggle to connect with her loss as she still gets to do many things over her summer. Additionally, this book is written at a low level, and would be best for students reading at that level, but may not provide high interest.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Brand

    My only major complaint about this book would have to be that the title really doesn't relate to the book. Although Pearl does discuss good and bad things about her life, the book focuses on a single summer - not her entire life - and the phrase in the title never comes up in the novel, as the title of the first book did. Other than that, this book was a wonderful sequel to Ten Rules for Living with My Sister, with a slightly more mature Pearl who has a better understanding of the world and the My only major complaint about this book would have to be that the title really doesn't relate to the book. Although Pearl does discuss good and bad things about her life, the book focuses on a single summer - not her entire life - and the phrase in the title never comes up in the novel, as the title of the first book did. Other than that, this book was a wonderful sequel to Ten Rules for Living with My Sister, with a slightly more mature Pearl who has a better understanding of the world and the dynamics in her own family. I think a lot of preteens will be able to relate to Pearl's struggles with being old enough to see the problems her family is facing, but not being old enough to help out, as her teenage sister can. I could see how Pearl had matured from the last book, but she still had some little quirks and mannerisms that made me realise how young Pearl still is. I think Ann M. Martin accurately captured the way that ten year olds speak and think, and there were many phrases that made me want to laugh out loud. Others weren't so funny, but were still touching, like when Pearl's father loses his job and the first thing Pearl wonders is whether this means he'll have more time to play Boggle with her. She understands what losing his job will mean for the family and their finances, but as a child she's still happy that her dad will be around more to play games. This section of the book, and many others, felt so honest and realistic. As in the first book, I loved the dynamics between Pearl and Lexie, and although they weren't quite as amusing as in the prequel, it was touching to see Pearl comforting Lexie when her boyfriend broke up with her and Lexie protecting Pearl from bullies at camp. I don't have a sister, but the presentation of their relationship seemed fairly realistic. I loved the way that Pearl's love of art was continued from the first book, but developed out of making posters for her door into designing her own notecards and stationary. I often wonder how many kids can really relate to all the sewing and knitting in Ann M. Martin's 'Main Street' series, but general art is something that I imagine more kids enjoy doing. All in all, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. When I finished Ten Rules for Living with My Sister I had immediately wished that Ann would write a sequel, but I didn't imagine it would happen. I stumbled across this book on Amazon purely by accident about a week before the novel was due to release and it was a lovely surprise to learn that I could read more about Pearl and Lexie. Obviously these books have been a big success. Publishers Weekly described Pearl and Lexie as a modern-day version of Ramona and Beezus, and perhaps that is part of the reason why I like these books so much. I'm so glad that Ann M. Martin is continuing to write children's books. Having grown up with the Baby-Sitters Club books, I hope that Pearl and Lexie and the Main Street books will appeal to my daughters, if I have any. But who knows, maybe Ann will have another series by the time my kids are old enough to read chapter books? Highly recommended to girls aged 8 - 10. And I'm sure plenty of adults will enjoy Pearl's antics as much as I did. 4*

  20. 5 out of 5

    710Ben

    A hopeful book for all younger siblings and patents.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Estelle

    Almost 6 years ago, my dad was laid off from the only job he had ever had post-college. It was a total surprise and there was nothing gracious or sympathetic about it. I guess I hadn't read the back of TEN GOOD AND BAD THINGS ABOUT MY LIFE because I was surprised when this book focused so much on Pearl's dad losing his job as a professor and how this affects their entire summer: their vacation, their transportation, where they go shopping, and the shifted roles in the family. Ann M. Martin sheds Almost 6 years ago, my dad was laid off from the only job he had ever had post-college. It was a total surprise and there was nothing gracious or sympathetic about it. I guess I hadn't read the back of TEN GOOD AND BAD THINGS ABOUT MY LIFE because I was surprised when this book focused so much on Pearl's dad losing his job as a professor and how this affects their entire summer: their vacation, their transportation, where they go shopping, and the shifted roles in the family. Ann M. Martin sheds a lot of realism here, and made me relive all the different motions my family went through when my dad lost his job. So many emotions, and even years later, this change continues to affect my family. Anyway, Pearl is a great 10-year old MC. She's bossy, the typical little sister, curious, artistic, clumsy, and a little outspoken. She's VERY confident. She loves to act older than she is. Typical 10-year old. I loved absolutely every minute I got to get with her spunky self as she deals with her male best friend, how annoyed she gets by her older sis, and even how insensitive she is when her dad first loses his job. She really grows over the course of this summer, and her world widens. The best part of this book is watching a family come together when faced with an unexpected complication. I loved that this book could encourage a conversation about money, sacrifice, and those little things we may take for granted. Plus there's a Seaside Heights cameo which made me really happy AND Pearl is a huge fan of I Love Lucy which cracked me up. (I believe this was always a part of Martin's biography when she was writing The BSC series.) For sure looking forward to checking out the other book about Pearl and her family. Keywords: summer, New York City, parents losing jobs, day camp, staycations One other note: would have probably rated this higher but I didn't feel the true diverse environment of NYC crowds was depicted here.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kidsmomo

    Review by Karen, intended for young readers: There’s something sad about the summer ending, no matter how excited you might be about seeing your friends at school. If you agree, then I suggest you pick up Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life (So Far) by Ann M. Martin. The book starts at the beginning of the school year, but it’s really all about the amazing summer that Pearl has with her family. It’s not the summer they planned because Pearl’s father gets fired right before vacation starts. So ins Review by Karen, intended for young readers: There’s something sad about the summer ending, no matter how excited you might be about seeing your friends at school. If you agree, then I suggest you pick up Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life (So Far) by Ann M. Martin. The book starts at the beginning of the school year, but it’s really all about the amazing summer that Pearl has with her family. It’s not the summer they planned because Pearl’s father gets fired right before vacation starts. So instead of going on an epic Wild West trip, they do a staycation where they live (which is New York City). But Pearl and her older sister, Lexie, still also get to attend camp for part of the summer — which is great except for, well, let’s just say there are several incidents that occur (one involving broken bones). Despite some disappointment, it’s a summer of adventure — even without taking a big trip — and I feel like I experienced it all with Pearl. I recommend this book to fans of Sharon Creech and of course fans of Ann M. Martin! This is actually the second book about Pearl and her family. The first one is called Ten Rules for Living with My Sister and it’s about what happens when Pearl and Lexie have to share a room when their grandfather comes to stay with the family. I haven’t read it yet, but now I want to! If you want to go in order, you can start with that one first — but if you’re looking for a summer story like I was, then go for Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life (So Far). This review also appears on Kidsmomo.com.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    Pearl's first assignment for fifth grade is to write an essay about her summer. But to explain about her summer, she has to go further back, back to when her dad lost her job. Suddenly, things started changing. The big vacation the family had planned turned into a staycation. Her older sister has to volunteer part-time at the summer camp they go to. Her parents can't afford nice presents for her birthday. Pearl has to learn a new way of living, and it's not always easy. Honestly, I kept reading t Pearl's first assignment for fifth grade is to write an essay about her summer. But to explain about her summer, she has to go further back, back to when her dad lost her job. Suddenly, things started changing. The big vacation the family had planned turned into a staycation. Her older sister has to volunteer part-time at the summer camp they go to. Her parents can't afford nice presents for her birthday. Pearl has to learn a new way of living, and it's not always easy. Honestly, I kept reading this book only because I was hoping that the narrator would finally grow up. She does a bit, but not very much. Mostly she's pretty bratty, self-centered and completely oblivious to the fact that the world does not revolve around her and what she wants. True, she does learn some lessons, like realizing that it's wrong to boss your friends around, and that she needs to help contribute to her family rather than complain about how they have no money. But it's not a very satisfying character development. One part that especially bothered me was her treatment of Jill - even though Jill had been a bit of a bully before, it seemed like she might actually be trying to be friendly, and Pearl immediately brushes her aside and refuses to let JB hang out with her. This makes her no better than how Jill had been before. If she had realized the error of her ways, I might have been swayed.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I think Ann M. Martin is highly underestimated as an author. Most people only know her for The Baby-Sitter's Club series, which, let's face it, got pretty repetitive after awhile, and won't win any awards for sophisticated writing. But, then you read something like her book Anything for a Dog and you think, I want to read everything this woman writes. (And trust me, I'm always suspicious of dog books, because of the whole "dog usually dies" thing.) I picked up this book by Martin based on the cove I think Ann M. Martin is highly underestimated as an author. Most people only know her for The Baby-Sitter's Club series, which, let's face it, got pretty repetitive after awhile, and won't win any awards for sophisticated writing. But, then you read something like her book Anything for a Dog and you think, I want to read everything this woman writes. (And trust me, I'm always suspicious of dog books, because of the whole "dog usually dies" thing.) I picked up this book by Martin based on the cover. It looked fun. And it was. The narrator, Pearl, is very reminiscent of Ramona or Clementine-precocious but not obnoxious. The story is framed within an assignment to write about summer vacation, but Pearl begins her story prior to that, when her father loses his job. Everything that happens after, she says, wouldn't have been the same if her dad hadn't lost his job. From friend problems to summer camp and a staycation. Pearl's figures out how to find her "new normal," and her voice is both hilarious and heartfelt. Despite Pearl's tendency to act now and think later, she'll win you over with her love for her friends and family and her honest desire to do right by them. This is actually the second book about Pearl and her family, but you don't need to have read the first to thoroughly enjoy this one.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Ann

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is the first book that I have ever read that has dealt with the impact on the whole family when a parent loses a job. I liked that the family pulled together even if there were bumps in making adjustments. It was a realistic depiction that could be a positive model for kid readers. I especially liked the "staycation". Even if employed, not every family can go to Disneyland! Taking advantage of the opportunities around you is a good message. Since I have never been to New York, I enjoyed read This is the first book that I have ever read that has dealt with the impact on the whole family when a parent loses a job. I liked that the family pulled together even if there were bumps in making adjustments. It was a realistic depiction that could be a positive model for kid readers. I especially liked the "staycation". Even if employed, not every family can go to Disneyland! Taking advantage of the opportunities around you is a good message. Since I have never been to New York, I enjoyed reading about the attractions there and also found the endnotes on each place informative. I wish I had read "Ten Rules for Living with My Sister" first because references were made in "Ten Good and Bad . . ." and I knew I had missed some things. Also I enjoyed reading about camp because I have my own fond memories of summer camp. And finally, I loved that a grandparent was respected and played an important role in the family. I thought it was great to see how one family interacted with a grandparent that was living in a retirement community. Daddy Bo was such a sweet man and I loved it that he was included in family birthday celebrations and special outings like going to a Broadway Show. So many stories deal with disfunction that it is nice to read about a family that respects and loves one another.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matt Ostrowsky

    This was a decent story overall; a cute summer tale with nothing incredibly compelling to speak of. I probably woukd have given it three stars, but it redeemed itself in the end with an important lesson in maturity and empathy. I was halfway through the book when it occurred to me that there was nothing overly compelling about it. Further, I had a hard time really liking Pearl. Despite her father having lost his job, our heroine still manages to eke out a pretty solid summer vacation, grumbling This was a decent story overall; a cute summer tale with nothing incredibly compelling to speak of. I probably woukd have given it three stars, but it redeemed itself in the end with an important lesson in maturity and empathy. I was halfway through the book when it occurred to me that there was nothing overly compelling about it. Further, I had a hard time really liking Pearl. Despite her father having lost his job, our heroine still manages to eke out a pretty solid summer vacation, grumbling her way through most of it. She goes to camp, tours NYC, performs in a talent show, gets into a fight with her best friend, inadvertently injures him, watches movies, starts a business... I suppose not every story in the world needs to be extraordinary. As I said though, the ending earned this book one more star in my rating. I love that Pearl finally began to see through her father's eyes and gained the insight to know that, no, we don't know what's right around the corner in life. I love that she used her own earnings to contribute to the family. I just wish there was more of THAT version of Pearl throughout the rest of the story.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Terrie

    On the first day of 5th grade, Pearl Littlefield gets an assignment to outline and then write an essay about her summer. This book is essentially her essay. Pearl is a loquacious, curious, somewhat naiive girl. Thank goodness for her older 14 year old sister, likeable Lexie, who accompanies Pearl to camp, and is a good example in most ways. The family is planning a vacation far from their home in NYC, out west, when her father unexpectedly loses his job. This makes for a summer of penny pinching On the first day of 5th grade, Pearl Littlefield gets an assignment to outline and then write an essay about her summer. This book is essentially her essay. Pearl is a loquacious, curious, somewhat naiive girl. Thank goodness for her older 14 year old sister, likeable Lexie, who accompanies Pearl to camp, and is a good example in most ways. The family is planning a vacation far from their home in NYC, out west, when her father unexpectedly loses his job. This makes for a summer of penny pinching, and a staycation, the idea of which is quite disappointing. When Pearl gets in a fight with her best friend JBIII, things take a giant turn for the worst. This is a very sweet story, written by the author of THE BABYSITTERS CLUB series, full of great characters, real life drama, and a nice feeling of what it must be like to live in an apartment in NYC. This will appeal to girls from 4th grade and up. The scrapbook illustration on the cover is an example of Pearl's talent and personality, and is very representative of the book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Ann

    This book is the sequel to Ten Rules for Living with My Sister – which is about Pearl Littlefield and her older sister, Lexie, who is a little difficult to live with. In this book, Pearl is on summer vacation between the 4th and 5th grades. Her first assignment for 5th grade will be to write an essay about what happened during the summer. Pearl has big plans, and the family has big plans, for this summer. First Pearl, her best friend, JBIII, and Lexie will go to summer camp – several weeks of day This book is the sequel to Ten Rules for Living with My Sister – which is about Pearl Littlefield and her older sister, Lexie, who is a little difficult to live with. In this book, Pearl is on summer vacation between the 4th and 5th grades. Her first assignment for 5th grade will be to write an essay about what happened during the summer. Pearl has big plans, and the family has big plans, for this summer. First Pearl, her best friend, JBIII, and Lexie will go to summer camp – several weeks of day camp with one week of sleep-over camp. Then, the family, including Pearl’s grandpa, Daddy Bo, will go out west – to Wyoming, to see ghost towns and geysers; from there they will take a train to Arizona to see the Grand Canyon and ride donkeys, and stay in national parks in giant hotels and see redwood forests. Pearl is super excited about the whole summer! But…her dad loses his job and the western trip is cancelled. Things won’t go the way Pearl expects that summer – but maybe they will turn out better!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Talaiah Lee

    This book has a lot of adventure as Pearl Littlefield goes to a summer camp and gets news that she doesn't get to go on her trip. Her family turns the vacation into a boring staycation. Her best friend JBIII and her get into a big fight and JBIII breaks his arm! I liked this book because I didn't want to put the book down! It was a great book to read with a great layout and funny characters! Many good things happened in this book! But there were a few bad things about this book. I personally d This book has a lot of adventure as Pearl Littlefield goes to a summer camp and gets news that she doesn't get to go on her trip. Her family turns the vacation into a boring staycation. Her best friend JBIII and her get into a big fight and JBIII breaks his arm! I liked this book because I didn't want to put the book down! It was a great book to read with a great layout and funny characters! Many good things happened in this book! But there were a few bad things about this book. I personally didn't like the characters names. They reminded me of stupid people and also some had weird names. I also would have put in a few more details at times because in some points of the book the words were just mumble jumble! Although, this was a great book! I would also recommend this book to readers 9+. Even for adults! Pearl goes through many adventures with her older sister and her best friend JBIII. It is an easy read and i never wanted to put the book down! If you like adventures and little bit of drama, I recommend this book to you!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This book reminded me of some of Judy Blume's books like Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great and Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. Pearl Littlefield has to write the dreaded "What I Did on My Summer Vacation" essay at the beginning of 5th grade. The book recounts her summer that didn't go as planned. Her father lost his job which had repercussions including where they shopped, what they ate, and how they spent their summer. It was a light-hearted book, but it wasn't purely fluff. I thought the au This book reminded me of some of Judy Blume's books like Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great and Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. Pearl Littlefield has to write the dreaded "What I Did on My Summer Vacation" essay at the beginning of 5th grade. The book recounts her summer that didn't go as planned. Her father lost his job which had repercussions including where they shopped, what they ate, and how they spent their summer. It was a light-hearted book, but it wasn't purely fluff. I thought the author's portrayal of a 10-year-old was very realistic, both in how she acted and how she spoke (or wrote). I'm embarrassed to say that after years of being a librarian and working in a bookstore, I think this is only the second book by Ann Martin that I've read (the other one being The Doll People). I always think of Ann Martin as the author of the Baby-sitters Club books. I'll definitely read some of her other books now.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.