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The Kimchi Cookbook: 60 Traditional and Modern Ways to Make and Eat Kimchi

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Based on Korea's legendary condiment, Mother-in-Law’s Kimchi is taking America by storm with its vibrant, versatile balance of flavor and just the right amount of spice. Making kimchi is the next frontier for anyone who enjoys DIY food projects, and homemade kimchi is a must-have for connoisseurs of the beloved Korean pickle.   Following traditional kimchi-making seasons a Based on Korea's legendary condiment, Mother-in-Law’s Kimchi is taking America by storm with its vibrant, versatile balance of flavor and just the right amount of spice. Making kimchi is the next frontier for anyone who enjoys DIY food projects, and homemade kimchi is a must-have for connoisseurs of the beloved Korean pickle.   Following traditional kimchi-making seasons and focusing on produce at its peak, this bold, colorful cookbook walks you step by step through how to make both robust and lighter kimchi. Lauryn Chun explores a wide variety of flavors and techniques for creating this live-culture food, from long-fermented classic winter kimchi intended to spice up bleak months to easy-to-make summer kimchi that highlights the freshness of produce and is ready to eat in just minutes.   Once you have made your own kimchi, using everything from tender and delicate young napa cabbage to stuffed eggplant, you can then use it as a star ingredient in Chun’s inventive recipes for cooking with kimchi. From favorites such as Pan-Fried Kimchi Dumplings and Kimchi Fried Rice to modern dishes like Kimchi Risotto, Skirt Steak Ssam with Kimchi Puree Chimichurri, Kimchi Oven-Baked Baby Back Ribs, and even a Kimchi Grapefruit Margarita, Chun showcases the incredible range of flavor kimchi adds to any plate.   With sixty recipes and beautiful photographs that will have you hooked on kimchi's unique crunch and heat, The Kimchi Cookbook takes the champagne of pickles to new heights.  


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Based on Korea's legendary condiment, Mother-in-Law’s Kimchi is taking America by storm with its vibrant, versatile balance of flavor and just the right amount of spice. Making kimchi is the next frontier for anyone who enjoys DIY food projects, and homemade kimchi is a must-have for connoisseurs of the beloved Korean pickle.   Following traditional kimchi-making seasons a Based on Korea's legendary condiment, Mother-in-Law’s Kimchi is taking America by storm with its vibrant, versatile balance of flavor and just the right amount of spice. Making kimchi is the next frontier for anyone who enjoys DIY food projects, and homemade kimchi is a must-have for connoisseurs of the beloved Korean pickle.   Following traditional kimchi-making seasons and focusing on produce at its peak, this bold, colorful cookbook walks you step by step through how to make both robust and lighter kimchi. Lauryn Chun explores a wide variety of flavors and techniques for creating this live-culture food, from long-fermented classic winter kimchi intended to spice up bleak months to easy-to-make summer kimchi that highlights the freshness of produce and is ready to eat in just minutes.   Once you have made your own kimchi, using everything from tender and delicate young napa cabbage to stuffed eggplant, you can then use it as a star ingredient in Chun’s inventive recipes for cooking with kimchi. From favorites such as Pan-Fried Kimchi Dumplings and Kimchi Fried Rice to modern dishes like Kimchi Risotto, Skirt Steak Ssam with Kimchi Puree Chimichurri, Kimchi Oven-Baked Baby Back Ribs, and even a Kimchi Grapefruit Margarita, Chun showcases the incredible range of flavor kimchi adds to any plate.   With sixty recipes and beautiful photographs that will have you hooked on kimchi's unique crunch and heat, The Kimchi Cookbook takes the champagne of pickles to new heights.  

30 review for The Kimchi Cookbook: 60 Traditional and Modern Ways to Make and Eat Kimchi

  1. 4 out of 5

    Yodamom

    Beautifully photographed picture of Kimchi and many recipes to use this tasty condiment. Kimchi really is so versatile and in hanses the flavor of so many recipes. I tried many recipes and found them all very good.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    Definitely a cookbook I will consider buying. The format is fantastic and the pictures are wonderful. As always with cookbooks, I wait until I've made several things before I give a rating; but I foresee good marks.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    One of the things that often drives me crazy is when someone lectures me on a particular food, particularly when they don't know what they're talking about. I was in the early stages of reading this book, and trying out some of the different recipes, and talking to some fellow foodies about a particular kimchi made fresh, to be eaten within a few days. One of them interrupted to give me a five minute diatribe on "real kimchi", which, according to him, is only made with napa cabbage, a particular One of the things that often drives me crazy is when someone lectures me on a particular food, particularly when they don't know what they're talking about. I was in the early stages of reading this book, and trying out some of the different recipes, and talking to some fellow foodies about a particular kimchi made fresh, to be eaten within a few days. One of them interrupted to give me a five minute diatribe on "real kimchi", which, according to him, is only made with napa cabbage, a particular process, buried in a clay jar in the yard, and aged for a minimum of six months, often several years. He was not to be deterred in his righteousness. He's not Korean (neither am I), and he's just plain wrong. This is a fantastic book, introducing western readers to the whole subject of kimchi (a word that literally translates to "soaked vegetables", with the intent, as now I understand it, to involve some level of brining, and often fermentation). It covers different styles of kimchi, talks about their different histories and uses, different vegetables that are both traditionally, and in modern day, used in kimchi making, and, a whole section of fairly modern recipes that make use of different types of kimchis in some very creative ways. I've already tried making three different sorts of kimchi that aren't the one my friend expounded upon, and they've all turned out brilliantly. If you like fermented vegetables, and some spice, this is a must read book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Lots of recipes for various delicious-sounding kinds of kimchi. I would have liked to see more discussion about the science and history, though. Rather than a mass of variations on known recipes, I’d have preferred more of the basics so I can make my own recipes.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This is a beautiful book, and reading it made me happy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    More modern than traditional. The illustrations were mostly of ingredients. It would have been helpful to have more pictures of the finished recipe and/or of steps in the recipe.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    I️ need to own the book. Navigating the ebook isn’t as inspiring. I️ think... I️ need to have this one in my hands to practice and enjoy the traditions.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Danna

    The kimchi recipes and history were great! The cooking with recipes were not my style.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jutta

    Wonderful recipes for kimchi lovers. My go to.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brianna

    Not a bad book but just was not what I was looking for. Very interesting to read about the different kinds of kimchi as I had thought there was just one type.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I love kimchi and I love this book. At the time of this review I’m pretty sure its winter kimchi-making season. This book is a great reference. I’m so excited!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    Kimchi… what in blue blazes is kimchi? Unless you are a particular aficionado of Korean food you may not know that it is Korea's national dish, a traditional fermented dish made of seasoned vegetables. With hundreds of different varieties and recipes you could almost eat kimchi every day and still not be bored. Possibly. Apparently kimchi is beginning to take America by storm (its popularity has not been particularly high in mainstream European society yet). Here is a book that will show you how Kimchi… what in blue blazes is kimchi? Unless you are a particular aficionado of Korean food you may not know that it is Korea's national dish, a traditional fermented dish made of seasoned vegetables. With hundreds of different varieties and recipes you could almost eat kimchi every day and still not be bored. Possibly. Apparently kimchi is beginning to take America by storm (its popularity has not been particularly high in mainstream European society yet). Here is a book that will show you how to make and use this dish at home. Should you be so desired, or so brave! Once you open the book you are greeted by a full page picture of a large glass jar with kimchi in, looking like a mix of pasta in tomato sauce or maybe chopped body parts. Maybe a gentler introduction would have been in order so not to scare the casual book browser. After the shocking start, the introduction to kimchi is a lot more leisurely. A great, detailed introduction and historical overview is given before the reader is then treated to learning the key components of kimchi making. The sheer level of detail is amazing and intriguing, even if this reviewer still has not found time (or courage) to try this so-called pungent delight. It is on the list of things to do, but probably the first exposure to kimchi must come from a Korean restaurant. Certainly this reviewer is more informed about kimchi and the various seasonings that can be used than before reading this book. To be forewarned is to be forearmed as they say. From looking through this book, kimchi certainly does appear to be versatile, which is probably a good thing for Koreans at least and it does not need to look like chopped up body parts as the first picture suggested. The book's publicity material states that with the 60 included recipes you may soon be hooked on kimchi’s unique crunch and heat and will make it a more regular part of your diet. Possibly is the answer here. If one had not read this book "unlikely" might have been the opinion otherwise. Certainly this reviewer is a LOT more positive and open towards kimchi than he was prior to opening the book. Now to find a Korean restaurant and see what he has possibly been missing. // This review appeared in YUM.fi and is reproduced here in full with permission of YUM.fi. YUM.fi celebrates the worldwide diversity of food and drink, as presented through the humble book. Whether you call it a cookery book, cook book, recipe book or something else (in the language of your choice) YUM will provide you with news and reviews of the latest books on the marketplace. //

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tien

    My background, though of the Asian variety, is not Korean. In fact, I remember not liking kimchi in my teen years. We had some Korean guests who stayed with us for a few months and when they made kimchi, *phew* the smell was just overpowering. I don’t quite know when it is that I began to appreciate the taste of kimchi (yes, despite the aroma) however my obsession started sometime earlier this year, due to this book: The Ancient Garden: A Love Story. Each time I read (it was a pretty chunky book My background, though of the Asian variety, is not Korean. In fact, I remember not liking kimchi in my teen years. We had some Korean guests who stayed with us for a few months and when they made kimchi, *phew* the smell was just overpowering. I don’t quite know when it is that I began to appreciate the taste of kimchi (yes, despite the aroma) however my obsession started sometime earlier this year, due to this book: The Ancient Garden: A Love Story. Each time I read (it was a pretty chunky book so it took me some time to read), they were always eating kimchi and most of the time, accompanied by beer. So I found myself, drooling & craving over kimchi at 7am (on my commute to work, before I had breakfast). Since then, I would have kimchi at least once a fortnight if not a week. If I wasn’t eating out to eat kimchi, I would probably have eaten it more often ;p Hence, my curiosity over this book. I found out that kimchi is basically just means pickles but there is whole variety of them. Originally, I thought it refers only to the cabbage ones but there are numerous types of kimchi for different seasons to be served with different types of dishes. Of course, I was drooling pretty much through this book. It was beautifully put together; a clean neat layout with photos of fresh ingredients and yummy dishes. There is a bit of background on the author, a background on kimchi and some basic explanation to what they are, the methods, and how to store. Then follows many kimchi recipes which really tempted me but which I will never attempt as they are all very time consuming. The last chapter was dedicated to cooking with kimchi. At first I thought, ooh, this might be interesting but then proceeded to grimace through the recipes like Egg Benedict with Kimchi Hollandaise, Kimchi Risotto, Grilled MILKimcheeze Sandwich, Kimchi Grapefruit Margarita, etc (with the exception of the fried rice, yum!). After a few nights contemplating Kimchi Risotto though, I’m kind of sold on that idea and broached the subject with hubby. Unfortunately, he wasn’t impressed. Nonetheless, it’s something I’m going to try when hubby is not dining at home ;) Overall, a book I’m happy to have for my coffee table but may attempt only one or two recipes (due to time constraints). It was great fun to read for a noob kimchi fanatic. With thanks to Ten Speed Press and Edelweiss for the privilege to read & review this book

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    If you've ever eaten at a Korean restaurant, you'll notice that even before you place your order, the server will arrive to place several small plates on your table. These are called banchan, small appetizers or side dishes. Banchan are generally seasonal (based on what's fresh in the market that day) or could be a specialty of that restaurant, but no matter what, one or more of the banchan will include kimchi. The Kimchi Cookbook: 60 Traditional and Modern Ways to Make and Eat Kimchi does a grea If you've ever eaten at a Korean restaurant, you'll notice that even before you place your order, the server will arrive to place several small plates on your table. These are called banchan, small appetizers or side dishes. Banchan are generally seasonal (based on what's fresh in the market that day) or could be a specialty of that restaurant, but no matter what, one or more of the banchan will include kimchi. The Kimchi Cookbook: 60 Traditional and Modern Ways to Make and Eat Kimchi does a great job of demystifying this foundation of Korean cuisine. Kimchi is a pickling technique, most commonly using Napa cabbage, but also equally delicious for radishes, cucumbers, green onions, perilla leaves (aka shiso), pears, apples, etc. I love how comprehensive this cookbook is -- while I was familiar with the fiery red spicy kimchi, it also included recipes for the water kimchi (mool kimchi), which hold back on the spiciness and make for a cool, refreshing contrast to the rest of the prepared dishes. The author cleverly breaks down the actual kimchi pickle recipes to spring/summer and fall/winter, to help the cook take full advantage of seasonal ingredients as they're available. Once you've prepared the kimchi, the last third of the book features recipes using the kimchi. She includes many traditional Korean recipes, such as mandu (dumplings) and pancake, but I especially like the other recipes which use kimchi in food that you wouldn't have expected. I mean, Eggs Benedict with kimchi hollandaise? How can that not be amazing. And the brussels sprouts with onion kimchi is a dish I would love to have for dinner tonight. I'm pretty wary with "fusion" food, but I think kimchi is such a versatile ingredient that it would fit well with a lot of non-Korean cuisine without losing its unique identity. Advance reader copy courtesy of NetGalley and Ten Speed Press.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sher

    Fermented foods such as yogurt, provide beneficial flora for your gut and help with digestion. This is especially important if you are over 50, because as you get older you may not digest foods quite as easily. More and more Americans are learning how to enjoy fermented foods, and the Korean staple kimchi is high on our list of fermented foods worth enjoying. Kimchi is usually cabbage based, but it can be made with a variety of vegetables and in a variety of combinations. Also, the mixture may Fermented foods such as yogurt, provide beneficial flora for your gut and help with digestion. This is especially important if you are over 50, because as you get older you may not digest foods quite as easily. More and more Americans are learning how to enjoy fermented foods, and the Korean staple kimchi is high on our list of fermented foods worth enjoying. Kimchi is usually cabbage based, but it can be made with a variety of vegetables and in a variety of combinations. Also, the mixture may be mild or spicy as heck--depending on what heat level you like. Although kimchi can be purchased from the grocery store, it is fun to try making your own. Making your own kimchi and using it in recipes is what this book is all about. Both traditional (longer ferment) recipes and contemporary quick ferment recipes are listed. So far I have tried both with wonderful results. The bok choy kimchi is fantastic. Some of the kimchis need to be consumed within 4 days and some last 3 - 6 months in the refrigerator. Also, the illustrations in the book are beautifully presented. I have taken fermentation classes through Master Food Preservers and have been working with fermenting vegetables for about a year now. This is a good place for a beginner to start.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cyndi

    Beautiful, clearly written, kimchi guide written by an expert. Very clear explanations of what kimchi is; it differs from Western-style sauerkraut not just in ingredients but also in technique. How to source ingredients in the United States. Modern changes in technique. And lots of gorgeous pictures (more pictures of the kimchi in various stages would have been better). The book is roughly divided into 3 parts: 1) spring/summer kimchi, which are all "dressed salads" or foods that take no more tha Beautiful, clearly written, kimchi guide written by an expert. Very clear explanations of what kimchi is; it differs from Western-style sauerkraut not just in ingredients but also in technique. How to source ingredients in the United States. Modern changes in technique. And lots of gorgeous pictures (more pictures of the kimchi in various stages would have been better). The book is roughly divided into 3 parts: 1) spring/summer kimchi, which are all "dressed salads" or foods that take no more than a day or two to "meld." 2) fall/winter kimchi, which are the traditional foods we Americans think of as kimchi, the full ferments. 3) recipes for cooking with kimchi. The kimchi making sections are entirely free of gluten, dairy, and egg. Although many of the recipes contain beef broth or shellfish, the author gives vegan alternatives (both in general and also some specific to each recipe). A perfect manual for anyone interested in making kimchi.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Coffelt

    this book is INCREDIBLE. who knew that kimchi was such a complex, nuanced, versatile and DELICIOUS method of cooking?!?! i certainly didn't before reading this! thank you to lauryn chun for helping to bring the ancient and mysterious art of kimchi to american kitchens! sadly, my copy was due back to the library today (sniffle, sniffle) before i got to try as many recipes as i wanted! the silver lining in this diversion is that it is prompting me to head over to the bookstore and get a copy in pe this book is INCREDIBLE. who knew that kimchi was such a complex, nuanced, versatile and DELICIOUS method of cooking?!?! i certainly didn't before reading this! thank you to lauryn chun for helping to bring the ancient and mysterious art of kimchi to american kitchens! sadly, my copy was due back to the library today (sniffle, sniffle) before i got to try as many recipes as i wanted! the silver lining in this diversion is that it is prompting me to head over to the bookstore and get a copy in permanent residence in my home kitchen library :) NOW i don't have to rush and can try several new recipes each season, the way the author intended! can't wait.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Autumn

    Serious look at kimchi and how it pairs with other aged foods, like wine and cheese. Cleverly divided into 'spring/summer' instant kimchis and 'fall/winter' long-fermented types. I'm excited to try her recipes using Asian pears. Lots of good info about traditional kimchi jars, modern kimchi fridges and kimchi culture in general.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rob Gall

    If you want to eat, explore and/or make kimchi, you NEED this book. Ms. Chun knows and shares a lot of personal knowledge here. Plus, if you buy it, a small but persistent entrepreneur will be helped. So look for "My Mother-in-Law's Kimchi" on the shelf of your favorite kimchi store.

  20. 4 out of 5

    MM

    Once again I'm merely reading and benefitting from this cookbook, not doing the cooking. But if you love kimchi and want more versatile ways to eat it, I highly recommend. Delicious, all of what I've had from it so far. Seriously, get this book!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Iris Lee

    I love this book. I love the the author gives lots of vegan kimchi recipes, and also that she gives options how to turn recipes into vegan. Beautiful colored photos, and fabulous recipes.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Greenbaum

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dan

  26. 5 out of 5

    David

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rosie

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gabe

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steven Patterson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen Petersen

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