web site hit counter Napoleon's Hemorrhoids: ... and Other Small Events That Changed History - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Napoleon's Hemorrhoids: ... and Other Small Events That Changed History

Availability: Ready to download

Hilarious, fascinating, and a roller coaster of dizzying, historical what-ifs, Napoleon’s Hemorrhoids is a potpourri for serious historians and casual history buffs. In one of Phil Mason’s many revelations, you’ll learn that Communist jets were two minutes away from opening fire on American planes during the Cuban missile crisis, when they had to turn back as they were run Hilarious, fascinating, and a roller coaster of dizzying, historical what-ifs, Napoleon’s Hemorrhoids is a potpourri for serious historians and casual history buffs. In one of Phil Mason’s many revelations, you’ll learn that Communist jets were two minutes away from opening fire on American planes during the Cuban missile crisis, when they had to turn back as they were running out of fuel. You’ll discover that before the Battle of Waterloo, Napoleon’s painful hemorrhoids prevented him from mounting his horse to survey the battlefield. You’ll learn that an irate blacksmith threw his hammer at a fox and missed, hitting a rock and revealing the largest vein of silver ever discovered, thus changing the finances of Canada forever. Interestingly, Charlton Heston was cast as Moses in The Ten Commandments because his broken nose made him look like Michelangelo’s famous sculpture of Moses. Finally, no one knows Einstein’s last words. They were in German, a language his nurse did not speak. A treasure trove filled with fascinating anecdotes about the tiny ripples that created big waves in history, Napoleon’s Hemorrhoids is much more than just a trivial fact book; it is an astonishing historical-fate book revealing how our most famous incidents, best-loved works of art, and most accepted historical outcomes are simply twists of fate.


Compare

Hilarious, fascinating, and a roller coaster of dizzying, historical what-ifs, Napoleon’s Hemorrhoids is a potpourri for serious historians and casual history buffs. In one of Phil Mason’s many revelations, you’ll learn that Communist jets were two minutes away from opening fire on American planes during the Cuban missile crisis, when they had to turn back as they were run Hilarious, fascinating, and a roller coaster of dizzying, historical what-ifs, Napoleon’s Hemorrhoids is a potpourri for serious historians and casual history buffs. In one of Phil Mason’s many revelations, you’ll learn that Communist jets were two minutes away from opening fire on American planes during the Cuban missile crisis, when they had to turn back as they were running out of fuel. You’ll discover that before the Battle of Waterloo, Napoleon’s painful hemorrhoids prevented him from mounting his horse to survey the battlefield. You’ll learn that an irate blacksmith threw his hammer at a fox and missed, hitting a rock and revealing the largest vein of silver ever discovered, thus changing the finances of Canada forever. Interestingly, Charlton Heston was cast as Moses in The Ten Commandments because his broken nose made him look like Michelangelo’s famous sculpture of Moses. Finally, no one knows Einstein’s last words. They were in German, a language his nurse did not speak. A treasure trove filled with fascinating anecdotes about the tiny ripples that created big waves in history, Napoleon’s Hemorrhoids is much more than just a trivial fact book; it is an astonishing historical-fate book revealing how our most famous incidents, best-loved works of art, and most accepted historical outcomes are simply twists of fate.

30 review for Napoleon's Hemorrhoids: ... and Other Small Events That Changed History

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I’ll say 3.5 stars for this one. Phil Mason introduces readers to some interesting tales in this collection of ‘what ifs’ and ‘did you know’ trivia in history. As the title of the book suggests, some things are quite random, but there is seemingly a great deal of curiosity surrounding these feats, accidents, and anomalies in history. Mason organises his book into some larger themes and proceeds to offer up facts—sometimes in a few sentences and at other times a page or two—that will both baffle a I’ll say 3.5 stars for this one. Phil Mason introduces readers to some interesting tales in this collection of ‘what ifs’ and ‘did you know’ trivia in history. As the title of the book suggests, some things are quite random, but there is seemingly a great deal of curiosity surrounding these feats, accidents, and anomalies in history. Mason organises his book into some larger themes and proceeds to offer up facts—sometimes in a few sentences and at other times a page or two—that will both baffle and intrigue the reader. How things might have been different had Hitler stayed longer during a speech he delivered, or Napoleon been in better health the day of the Battle of Waterloo. Exploring sports, history, and business as well, Mason provides a seemingly endless set of examples of how the world might have changed on a whim. I am a great fan of alternate history, though I usually like longer tales or more meat to the explanations. While I suppose Mason wants to allow the reader to ponder on their own, it may have been fun to see some speculative narration when Mason presented some of the anecdotes in this piece. Full of eyebrow-raising stories, Mason lets the reader see how one small change in history could have completely changed the path taken and altered things significantly. With a number of substantive chapters, the reader can use what they learn here at their next dinner party or on a road trip to fill dead air. A fun read, though I won’t go do far as to offer a formal recommendation. Kudos, Mr. Mason, for this interesting collection. I can see this is something you enjoyed preparing quite a bit. Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I am just so exceedingly happy when I can put a book down and say "well, at least I didn't pay full price for it." This is one of those books. Admittedly, I should have known it was kinda crappy before I bought it--a quick perusal would have said it. But it was the last days of Borders and my decision making was at a low ebb. The whole book is full of "weird and crazy coincidences" and "startling facts." Some of these being just downright wrong. For the record, Eleanor of Aquitaine did not leave L I am just so exceedingly happy when I can put a book down and say "well, at least I didn't pay full price for it." This is one of those books. Admittedly, I should have known it was kinda crappy before I bought it--a quick perusal would have said it. But it was the last days of Borders and my decision making was at a low ebb. The whole book is full of "weird and crazy coincidences" and "startling facts." Some of these being just downright wrong. For the record, Eleanor of Aquitaine did not leave Louis of France over a beard. The Catholic Church, as far as I know, has yet to grant an annulment based on facial hair. I read this in a "book of facts" when I was ten. I didn't believe it then, and I sure as heck don't believe it now. The fact that they had been married 15 years and she hadn't given him a son (and they didn't much care for each other) had a lot more to do with it. The book also contains "fun sports facts" and the guy is a cricket fan. I know this because most of the facts had the word "wicket" in them. I'm sure they were very "omigod" moments, but I didn't understand a word. So at the end, I looked at the brief bio of the author. He collects clippings. No, I'm serious, that's his bio. Clippings. Great...I just read a book from a special episode of Hoarders. It's an easy read, and somewhat enjoyable, but if you have something else, anything else, read that first.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Victor Sonkin

    A lively collection of various things that went wrong, and the results they produced. It seemed to be decently researched.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Interesting, but since it lacked any sort of narrative, it could get a bit plodding. Good for a quick 10 minutes here or there, but not a page turner. I'd be interested in a similar topic with a short chapter devoted to each event, instead of just a paragraph or three. That said, there was no false advertising on this one - it's right there in the title. Interesting, but since it lacked any sort of narrative, it could get a bit plodding. Good for a quick 10 minutes here or there, but not a page turner. I'd be interested in a similar topic with a short chapter devoted to each event, instead of just a paragraph or three. That said, there was no false advertising on this one - it's right there in the title.

  5. 5 out of 5

    CrazyUnicorn

    A fun quick read about some facts from history that changed the course of the world.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tyrannosaurus regina

    I generally love trivia like this, but this book often runs on the edge of too trivial, and doesn't ever acknowledge the likelihood that something else would have lead to these historical events even if that one little thing had happened differently, preferring to dwell in speculation. (Nevermind that some, maybe most, of the anecdotes are unsubstantiated.) It was also focused on British history nearly to the exclusion of the rest of the world (except the United States, and WWII), which is not i I generally love trivia like this, but this book often runs on the edge of too trivial, and doesn't ever acknowledge the likelihood that something else would have lead to these historical events even if that one little thing had happened differently, preferring to dwell in speculation. (Nevermind that some, maybe most, of the anecdotes are unsubstantiated.) It was also focused on British history nearly to the exclusion of the rest of the world (except the United States, and WWII), which is not in itself a problem if that slant had been recognised and acknowledged and the reader was aware that entire continents would be virtually ignored. Ending many of the anecdotes on an "if only" rhetorical question gave it a juvenile, sensationalist quality, as well. But those weren't the greatest sins. I could still have gotten fair enjoyment out of the book if it hadn't been for the homophobic slap in the face near the beginning, and the inflammatory/judgmental language in several of the other anecdotes.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Geoffrey Lawson

    Fun, albeit pseudo-intellectual, account of chance events that changed the course of history. Not really a book but more a collection of anecdotes useful as conversational zingers.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    Interesting bits. After reading this, you have to wonder how we still manage to achieve anything. The tidbits were interesting, some funny, and some were down right, shake your head, amazing. This book clearly proves there is a GOD. Otherwise we would not still be here. The only thing I had a problem with is it was written by Britains, so some of the stories were about British incidents. Some sports, businesses and legal stories made no sense to me. But most of the book was an interesting read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Edwina Callan

    Judging the book by its title, I had assumed this would be a humorous trivia book. Alas, it was just a common trivia book, giving a paragraph or two of information on a variety of subjects. Some of the chapters I enjoyed and some were a bit of a slog, as I don't care at all about sports. The title was probably the best thing about this book -and- the reason I bought it. Judging the book by its title, I had assumed this would be a humorous trivia book. Alas, it was just a common trivia book, giving a paragraph or two of information on a variety of subjects. Some of the chapters I enjoyed and some were a bit of a slog, as I don't care at all about sports. The title was probably the best thing about this book -and- the reason I bought it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Christian Eggers

    Not exactly what I thought it was going to be--more an almanac of little stories than an in-depth treatise of some of history's close calls. I liked it for what it was, though. My chief complaint is that it is NOT well-referenced. Some of the facts sounded suspiciously like rumor; I would love to use some of these facts in discussions with students, but lacking rigorous referencing, I would always wonder if I was just perpetuating partial truths. Having said that, however, I also feel like this Not exactly what I thought it was going to be--more an almanac of little stories than an in-depth treatise of some of history's close calls. I liked it for what it was, though. My chief complaint is that it is NOT well-referenced. Some of the facts sounded suspiciously like rumor; I would love to use some of these facts in discussions with students, but lacking rigorous referencing, I would always wonder if I was just perpetuating partial truths. Having said that, however, I also feel like this book has suffered from some unfair reviews. The author is British, so of course the book has a British angle, but there is PLENTY that an American reader should be interested in--whether because it deals directly with Americana or because it deals with historical episodes that, while not American, profoundly affected American history. I will admit I skipped most of the cricket and football stories, though...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Hicks

    felt like an overly lung buzzfeed video

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    First, the good...the whole concept of this book is interesting, and the author does a good job of covering different subjects in which small events made a huge difference, from wars to science experiments to business decisions of historical importance. The examples he chose are also interesting. I feel I learned some new things, and that's always good. The bad: There were some editing problems...places were syntax got fouled up or there were typos or misspellings, and yes, I am aware that this b First, the good...the whole concept of this book is interesting, and the author does a good job of covering different subjects in which small events made a huge difference, from wars to science experiments to business decisions of historical importance. The examples he chose are also interesting. I feel I learned some new things, and that's always good. The bad: There were some editing problems...places were syntax got fouled up or there were typos or misspellings, and yes, I am aware that this book was written in British English as opposed to American, and I know better than to count those words. I'm a grammar/spelling/syntax/punctuation elitist, and it bothers me how the majority of books that get published these days have so many errors of that ilk. Also, and this is just my personal issue because I live on the other side of the pond--the sports section meant nothing to me, because I don't follow soccer or cricket. But a sports section, in general, would have meant little to me. The ugly: There was nothing (or at least, very little) that was explicit, but sometimes I got the distinct feeling that the author was passing judgment on the historical figures in question. And it wasn't because the people did something demonstrably stupid; I just get the feeling that the author does not like certain "social groups" very much. He's entitled to his opinion, but for me, his subtle criticisms--based on which demographic groups people belong to--detracted from the book. For instance, in discussing the events that led the fledging US to decide against becoming a monarchy, he writes that some senior members of the Continental Congress wrote to Prussian Prince Henry and invited him to become King of the US. He took too long to answer and the Congress went another direction, as we know. Then Mr. Mason continues: "They were perhaps luckier than they knew. The recommendation had come from Baron Friedrich von Steuben...who had revolutionised military training for George Washington. He was also a closet homosexual. Unknown to the Americans, Prince Henry was also gay, with a reputation as one of the most debauched homosexuals in Europe." And that's it...he moves on to the next issue. I suppose it is possible that Mr. Mason thinks the US was "luckier than (it) knew" because the homosexuality of Prince Henry would have been a detriment in a sexually-repressed and bigoted century. But he doesn't say that. He doesn't say why Prince Henry was a "debauched" homosexual. Was he debauched because he liked sadism or masochism on the side or simply because he was gay? I got the feeling throughout the book that Mr. Mason is very conservative and critical of gays/Americans/women/etc. None of the other instances were as blatant as the above quotation, but they were still there. It didn't stop me from learning from the book, but I didn't enjoy it as much as I would have had Mr. Mason steered clear of subtle judgments.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Zack McCullough

    So the premise of this book is that the great events in history and the overall direction that history has taken can both be traced to random circumstances, coincidences, mistakes, and happenstance. The title references one example of this where Napoleon's significant defeat at Waterloo was brought about because he had hemorrhoids and was unable to survey the battlefield and issue orders in a timely manner. The book then proceeds to list hundreds of other instances like this where history would So the premise of this book is that the great events in history and the overall direction that history has taken can both be traced to random circumstances, coincidences, mistakes, and happenstance. The title references one example of this where Napoleon's significant defeat at Waterloo was brought about because he had hemorrhoids and was unable to survey the battlefield and issue orders in a timely manner. The book then proceeds to list hundreds of other instances like this where history would supposedly have been different if some small thing had been different. Here's the problem though. Just because things would have been slightly different, does not mean history would have been changed in an extreme way. For example, let's say Napoleon did not have hemorrhoids and was able to fight as effectively as he had in other battles. Would he have not been defeated eventually? If not at Waterloo, surely at another location. Would his victory at Waterloo have propelled the French Empire to a position of dominance on the world stage that would have led to much of the world speaking French and watching French movies? This is unclear. Also, how do we know that this is what caused the defeat anyway? Is this a case of false correlation? Some of the stories are just slightly humorous facts, and don't seem to fit the general theme of the book because they do not alter anything significant in history, and sometimes the minor coincidence or event only alters one individual's experience, such as the section on athletes losing events because they misunderstood what day the competition was being held. While that is terrible for them, do I really care? How would that effect the rest of us not directly involved in the sporting event? There is a good bit of interesting trivia in the book that you could bring up to impress friends, but also a lot of mediocre and flat out boring stories. I liked some of the things I learned, but I am not sure I would recommend that someone read the entire thing. Maybe it would be good to just pick up every now and then or leave by the toilet (if you are into that sort of thing).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rev. M. M. Walters

    Walk into any sizeable bookstore and you immediately notice that the books are arranged on shelves according to categories beyond simply fiction and non-fiction. Try as you like though, you probably won't find Phil Mason's book in a category by itself, even though I think it deserves one. This is what I would call a waiting-room book, something to read in brief snatches of time while waiting for something else. Composed of short articles that take little time to read, it is the perfect book to r Walk into any sizeable bookstore and you immediately notice that the books are arranged on shelves according to categories beyond simply fiction and non-fiction. Try as you like though, you probably won't find Phil Mason's book in a category by itself, even though I think it deserves one. This is what I would call a waiting-room book, something to read in brief snatches of time while waiting for something else. Composed of short articles that take little time to read, it is the perfect book to read while sitting in the waiting room before you get called in to see the doctor. It is a book that you can dip into at any point or read sequentially. There are chapters that keep the stories organized by subject/theme, but it's not a novel that you have to read in order. You may not learn anything profound here, but you do learn that history is often decided by quirks rather than grand plans.

  15. 5 out of 5

    C.A. Gray

    This is fantastic information, but the layout could use a lot of work. I love the concept: it's similar to my "kairos makers" series in the sense that it details lots of small moments in history that changed everything, for better or for worse. The number of these stories is overwhelming! But that's also kind of the problem. The setup reads almost like a series of bullet points, and the audiobook narrator did not pause long enough for me to realize that we've moved on to a new topic now after a This is fantastic information, but the layout could use a lot of work. I love the concept: it's similar to my "kairos makers" series in the sense that it details lots of small moments in history that changed everything, for better or for worse. The number of these stories is overwhelming! But that's also kind of the problem. The setup reads almost like a series of bullet points, and the audiobook narrator did not pause long enough for me to realize that we've moved on to a new topic now after a sentence or two, or perhaps a small paragraph. It might have been easier to absorb had I read the book on kindle and highlighted as I went, since I am always doing something else while I listen to audiobooks. As a result, the vast majority of these stories went right over my head, except for the ones I already had heard before so I had a framework for them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chani Kynes

    This is a large number of one to five paragraph "funny things" that happened in history. Some of them were funny, most were not. My biggest problem was the lack of cohesion in the book. In the sports section they discuss American football and the rest of the worlds football, but are not specific about which football is being discussed. To add to the confusion they also occasionally also referred to soccer. The entertainment section might have been amusing if I had been my grandmothers age and act This is a large number of one to five paragraph "funny things" that happened in history. Some of them were funny, most were not. My biggest problem was the lack of cohesion in the book. In the sports section they discuss American football and the rest of the worlds football, but are not specific about which football is being discussed. To add to the confusion they also occasionally also referred to soccer. The entertainment section might have been amusing if I had been my grandmothers age and actually knew who the heck they were talking about half the time. Yes, some of the names were familiar in the I know they existed kinda way; but I could not put a face to a full 80% of them. All in all a very disappointing book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bob Cantrell

    A look at the what if's This book is just loaded with what if's and some you got to be kiddings. Though most of the things covered are British in nature there is a good sprinkling of other events from other countries also. Now when you read this book some of the events may be familiar if you like this type of reading. I found this book to be a light hearted look at the crazy world we live in. Some might find these little vignettes a big whoop, but it is strange how things turn out. So for amusing A look at the what if's This book is just loaded with what if's and some you got to be kiddings. Though most of the things covered are British in nature there is a good sprinkling of other events from other countries also. Now when you read this book some of the events may be familiar if you like this type of reading. I found this book to be a light hearted look at the crazy world we live in. Some might find these little vignettes a big whoop, but it is strange how things turn out. So for amusing read this book will do.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Jehlik

    Written from a very British perspective, this book is filled with historical trivia ranging from politics to science to crime. Based on the various coincidences, near misses, and outright lies described in this book, it's amazing that anything gets done in many arenas of life. This is one of those books that would make a great study guide for possible Jeopardy questions. Who knew that Judy Garland got the part as Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz movie because Shirley Temple turned down the role? Written from a very British perspective, this book is filled with historical trivia ranging from politics to science to crime. Based on the various coincidences, near misses, and outright lies described in this book, it's amazing that anything gets done in many arenas of life. This is one of those books that would make a great study guide for possible Jeopardy questions. Who knew that Judy Garland got the part as Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz movie because Shirley Temple turned down the role?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Giselle Roeder

    Ah! I bought this book because of the 'hilarious' title. I still have 4 hours left to read - but I must say that occasionally I thought I might not finish it. I have changed my mind! I will finish it. Even if not organized within a timeline - it jumps back and forth between centuries - but there is a lot of unknown, half-forgotten or forgotten information. Especially for writers of historical fiction (or even non-fiction). Some info makes you wonder, some other makes you say to someone, "did you Ah! I bought this book because of the 'hilarious' title. I still have 4 hours left to read - but I must say that occasionally I thought I might not finish it. I have changed my mind! I will finish it. Even if not organized within a timeline - it jumps back and forth between centuries - but there is a lot of unknown, half-forgotten or forgotten information. Especially for writers of historical fiction (or even non-fiction). Some info makes you wonder, some other makes you say to someone, "did you know..." and lots of it can be related to present-day happenings. So, I'll keep on reading when I am not writing and let you know what I think when finished. I actually think that the author, Philk Mason, earned more than 3 stars for the incredible research he has done to unearth all the information he presents. It makes me smile when I think how valuable this book would be for "Trivia Contestants!" How else could you find so much information bundled in one book? If it's politics, sports or business or how certain toys, Matchbox cars, Monopoly, Scrabble or Bingo came to be or even how MacDonalds surfaced or learning more about actors and actresses of the olden days, it's all there - and more! It is not a heavy-duty book - but worth the time to read it if you don't expect earth-shattering revelations. And, heh, if you are interested to register for a trivia contest, you need this book! www.giselleroeder.com

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I liked it because I like listening to historical events. It’s amazing how little incidents add up to big altering outcomes. Like the butterfly effect. My favorite chapters had to do with science/inventions and the arts. My only criticism is that there are too many little stories and therefore I couldn’t absorb it all. It was just tidbit after tidbit. Maybe this could have featured less events and focused more time on a few. Also, the narrator spoke so fast! I had to slow him down to .9. 3 out o I liked it because I like listening to historical events. It’s amazing how little incidents add up to big altering outcomes. Like the butterfly effect. My favorite chapters had to do with science/inventions and the arts. My only criticism is that there are too many little stories and therefore I couldn’t absorb it all. It was just tidbit after tidbit. Maybe this could have featured less events and focused more time on a few. Also, the narrator spoke so fast! I had to slow him down to .9. 3 out of 5 butterflies.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bob Carroll

    Entertaining History Many entertaining historical nuggets. The author gathers many interesting historical events in government, wars, business, entertainment, sports and gaming. The author is British; consequentially several anecdotes were lost on me. I don’t know anything about the sport of cricket or about football (I.e., soccer) rivalries. But all in all it provides sufficient ingredients to start many cocktail party or family gathering conversations.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Oscar Lilley

    Although this book is published by an American publishing company, the content is so heavily about the UK that a reader with only a basic understanding of that country would find much of this book very interesting without the necessary background knowledge. It also has more grammar errors than I expected. I was looking forward to reading this book and found some of it quite interesting but overall I was disappointed with it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Johnson

    I was intrigued by the title of this book and it sounded fascinating. Unfortunately, this is simply a glorified buzzfeed list with clickbait for a title. The collection of factoids is interesting at times but with nothing really tying it together it becomes disappointing in general. The most interesting facts can be found in the description and many facts I’m left wondering why they were even included. Save your time and read something else.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

    Well, I like history and weird facts. But this book is just one, long-winded list of trivia facts. I hardly remember any of them because it was an absolutely overwhelming experience. I think it would have worked better if they either picked a few stories to expand on the impacts/history of these events rather than just listing things off forever. Or it might work better as a written book. Anyway, not enjoyable for me.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christine Delea

    This is a fun book with lots of interesting stories. Unfortunately, if you did not know any better, you might think that--after reading this--women have done nothing in history beyond being wives, girlfriends, and mistresses. People of color don't get much acclaim here, either. It is mostly American and English (with a few other European nationals) white men. What is in the book is fine, but what is in the book is very incomplete and narrow. This is a fun book with lots of interesting stories. Unfortunately, if you did not know any better, you might think that--after reading this--women have done nothing in history beyond being wives, girlfriends, and mistresses. People of color don't get much acclaim here, either. It is mostly American and English (with a few other European nationals) white men. What is in the book is fine, but what is in the book is very incomplete and narrow.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dio Derbyshire

    Some of the facts are interesting and fun. But most are not, and very few actually could've changed the course of history. Also, there are many that are are about the history of the U.K. That's okay, but since I live in the US I found anecdotes about British politics and European soccer or cricket right down boring. Some of the facts are interesting and fun. But most are not, and very few actually could've changed the course of history. Also, there are many that are are about the history of the U.K. That's okay, but since I live in the US I found anecdotes about British politics and European soccer or cricket right down boring.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Yaaresse

    An entertaining book, but necessary to keep many grains of salt nearby as the material includes some stories that are are either myths or lack any proof. It is very Brittish-centric, so the chapters on modern politics and sports didn't do much for me. No doubt people in Britain say the same thing about a lot of American-centric trivia books. An entertaining book, but necessary to keep many grains of salt nearby as the material includes some stories that are are either myths or lack any proof. It is very Brittish-centric, so the chapters on modern politics and sports didn't do much for me. No doubt people in Britain say the same thing about a lot of American-centric trivia books.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    While there are some interesting and really funny incidences, a large majority of the facts are about Caucasian-identifying individuals from Europe or North America. There are very few stories about People of Colour or non-colonization events. Would be great to see more diversity in a book like this!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Belinda Turner

    This book is full of interesting, sometimes funny and sometimes sad events and items, that although small, had large effects. The author has items from history, sports, science, art, and other fields. For Americans, heads up, his football stories are not about the NFL. They're about soccer leagues.❤️🌺🌸❤️ This book is full of interesting, sometimes funny and sometimes sad events and items, that although small, had large effects. The author has items from history, sports, science, art, and other fields. For Americans, heads up, his football stories are not about the NFL. They're about soccer leagues.❤️🌺🌸❤️

  30. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Oates

    I viewed this as a collection of anecdotes, to pick up and put down at will and in that, I was pleased. I have to admit I skipped sections in which I had no interest (cricket stories, for example). Ultimately, it was what I expected and I have some interesting stories that I have shared with friends/family (whether they wanted to hear them or not!)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.