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The Metabarons - Limited Edition Oversized Deluxe Hardcover with Slipcase: Ultimate Collection

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A multi-generational tale of family, sacrifice, and survival told within an immense universe, both in scope and originality. A true classic in the pantheon of graphic storytelling and science fiction as a whole. Omnibus content includes The Metabarons #1-4 trades, presented in a limited and numbered print run of 999 copies


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A multi-generational tale of family, sacrifice, and survival told within an immense universe, both in scope and originality. A true classic in the pantheon of graphic storytelling and science fiction as a whole. Omnibus content includes The Metabarons #1-4 trades, presented in a limited and numbered print run of 999 copies

30 review for The Metabarons - Limited Edition Oversized Deluxe Hardcover with Slipcase: Ultimate Collection

  1. 5 out of 5

    ΕιζΝιnΕ

    The Metabarons: Incest, Dismemberment, Genital Mutilation... but the Comedic Fails are Brutal Alejandro Jodorowsky, at his age, will never master the art of shutting the fuck up. He has a Ph.D. in Self-Aggrandizement, specializing in The Virtue of Vanity, with a Master's in the Jodo-Economic discipline of Charm Management - his thesis for the latter was 'Fully Exploiting Charisma & Sexual Allure via New Age Spirituality' - all from the Jodo-Institute of Robotics, Sexuality, & Robotic Sexualit The Metabarons: Incest, Dismemberment, Genital Mutilation... but the Comedic Fails are Brutal Alejandro Jodorowsky, at his age, will never master the art of shutting the fuck up. He has a Ph.D. in Self-Aggrandizement, specializing in The Virtue of Vanity, with a Master's in the Jodo-Economic discipline of Charm Management - his thesis for the latter was 'Fully Exploiting Charisma & Sexual Allure via New Age Spirituality' - all from the Jodo-Institute of Robotics, Sexuality, & Robotic Sexuality. While he's a Jodo-expert on Jodo, he's an amateur in the field of accepting criticism, especially when said criticism originates beyond the Jodoverse... i.e. his cranium. Nevertheless: Jodo will never write proper female characters that aren’t idealized and objectified sex-goddesses, insane fanatics, or spiteful old hags. He will never quit trying to be funny (and failing). He will never crack a book in order to make his science fiction even vaguely scientific. I've learned to accept all that shit, after years of conflicted Jodo-fandom, though I didn't know much about him before my first reading of 'The Metabarons', back in the 00's. It was my initial exposure to his work, and I recall liking it, for all its faults. I still do, even after seeing the same tired tropes & twists repeated ad nauseum throughout decades of Jodo-Comics. This is Alejandro Jodorowsky's epic spin-off from the equally epic Incal trilogy. The character of the Metabaron was a supporting player in the fucked-up 'space-wizard' proceedings, but he was also a charismatic enigma, and Jodo had plans - ugly, evil plans - for him and his entire family. Ideas from his failed attempt at bringing Dune to the screen made their way into all the bande dessinee space operas he has written over the decades, but The Metabarons - after The Incal - squeezes the best of them from the tube, like a revised version of the film that completely expurgates Frank Herbert's story. The film had already ejected most of the novel anyway; Jodo was essentially using Dune as a subterfuge to raise capital for his own story. He had no intention of realizing Frank Herbert's vision, or any vision that wasn't his. If Kubrick could treat the source material for 2001 and The Shining like soft clay, to be shaped or cast aside by the auteur, so could he! That's another reason for the production's financial collapse, as investors suspected they were being conned into funding a mega-budget sci-fi sequel to 'El Topo', with sand-worms and spice. Mega-macho murder by numbers: Juan Gimenez provides page after fully painted page of otherworldly vistas and horrific mutant hybrids; carefully detailed robotic machinery, weapons and armor; beautiful women and brutal combat... blood spurting everywhere and often. The impressive array of artists that Jodo has worked with throughout his career includes some of the greatest comic artists of the 20th Century -- Moebius, Milo Manara, Ladronn, Georges Bess, Francois Boucq, Beltran, Das Pastoras, Arno, Travis Charest, Zoran Janjetov, etc., etc. Gimenez is far from the best of them. He's not the slickest, or the most technically proficient of Jodo's many collaborators, and there is occasionally confusion regarding both characters and action, stemming from the rough, unpolished feel. When he's at his best, though, his rich colors and dense compositions make The Metabarons look like the weird mix of beautiful and fugly that defines the spirit of the Jodoverse. It's unfortunate, in fact, that Jodorowsky's verbosity impinges on the art like it does, probably exacerbating the random bits of visual incoherence. A great deal of the action is obscured by this 'narrator-interference'... because Jodorowsky's biggest fault is an inability to just shut the fuck up and let the artist tell the story. This is the kind of thing where Gimenez shines; his talent as a conceptual artist, imagining alien worlds and future-tech, is truly fantastic: Nevertheless, this remains a multi-generational BD-epic like no other, telling the tale of four generations of Metabarons, and the harsh, inexplicably fucked-up demands they place upon themselves and their loved ones. It’s batshit crazy. They’re warriors, living by a kind of Bushido-code-on-steroids; the sick and brutal tests they inflict on their children are designed to prepare them for their final test, when the child will face the father in a battle to the bloody death. As for why? I have no fucking clue. Maybe if I was swimming in a pool of elephant testosterone and jamming steroids into my eyeballs it might seem reasonable for a family to torture, dismember and murder each other for the sake of claiming the 'Mega-Macho' crown. But… I don’t have a pool. Most of Jodorowsky’s weirdness can be distilled down to a super-violent machismo, draped with a pseudo-Zen mysticism meant to give all this earnest/ironic idiocy an illusion of depth. (Top) the idiocy in question. Is patricide/infanticide really necessary? Couldn’t the father-son death-match be swapped out for Scrabble, or some other ‘manly’ boardgame? The more I read by Jodo, and come to recognize the same basic themes and characters repeating throughout his oeuvre, the more he... annoys me. For a guy who’s spent much of his career doing science fiction, he might know less about science than any SF writer since Jules Verne... and even though Verne belonged to a temporal locale where the Newtonian model of reality hadn't been molested by the brain-fucking revelations of relativity and quantum mechanics, I still think Jules could science the fuck out of Jodo. His solution to an awe-inspiring ignorance is adorable: he puts the words ‘techno’ and ‘space’ in front of everything. I take his books in small doses, usually, so the standard 48-page BD album is just about right. Worse than the ignorance, he thinks he's pretty fucking funny, and apparently no one's had the heart to tell him that his comedic failures are getting far more spectacular and explosive than the stories themselves. Still... there is a lot to like here, if you can tolerate tuning in to the Jodorowsky wave-length... OR So... yeah. If you're down for the whacky space opera, manly violence, and the slight risk of Jodo-psychosis, 'The Metabarons' remains one of the foundation stones of modern SF BD... even if the robot narrator and his pal come perilously close to Jar-Jar Binks-level shittiness. While Gimenez is sometimes haphazard with his interior art, his covers for the various international editions of the series are spectacular, often combining Renaissance and early Baroque portraiture with classic SF elements, and somehow avoiding the artistic disaster that most SF illustrators would make of it: If you’re feeling generous, however, you could take all the camp, the silly names and over-the-top violence, and see it all as satire and/or Kaufmann-esque comedy. Perhaps the Metabaron code is a satirical ‘reductio ad absurdum’, condemning the glorification of ‘Warrior-Codes’, and exposing their deleterious effects in civilized societies where that manipulative philosophy is not just antiquated, but dangerous. It could be satire on every level… or simply a gleeful writer’s ID unleashed. In a lot of ways, Jodo's ultra-violent visions remind me of Paul Verhoeven's 'Starship Troopers' or 'Robocop': brutality and gore and vaguely fascistic politics that almost seem like satire... but it's hard to say for certain. Or perhaps Jodorowsky’s days as a film auteur -- serving as writer, director, editor and actor for his hugely influential and successful avant garde masterworks like ‘El Topo’ and ‘The Holy Mountain’ – influenced Verhoeven. As I said earlier, you either accept Jodo's flaws and eccentricities, or avoid his entire body of work. Despite the image he tries to project of himself as a shaman-philosopher in tune with the music of the spheres, walking the ley-lines and shuffling his tarot deck, he owes his success to an arrogance so intense it's blinding. He's a Director, dammit!

  2. 4 out of 5

    J.

    One of the biggest letdowns I've ever experienced in a book. After the huge buildup of people continuously talking about this series as the most mindblowing of all comics, I'm sorely disappointed. I made it to about page 400, and finally pulled the ripcord. People keep saying "Greek tragedy as science fiction" but I beg to differ. This lacks any of the sophistication of Greek storytelling, even the more lurid versions Ovid presented. While the science fiction elements are interesting, the behavi One of the biggest letdowns I've ever experienced in a book. After the huge buildup of people continuously talking about this series as the most mindblowing of all comics, I'm sorely disappointed. I made it to about page 400, and finally pulled the ripcord. People keep saying "Greek tragedy as science fiction" but I beg to differ. This lacks any of the sophistication of Greek storytelling, even the more lurid versions Ovid presented. While the science fiction elements are interesting, the behavior of the characters is more and more horrifying. The worst kind of masculinist nonsense--worse, a relatively childish idea of what masculinity means is upheld as the ultimate universal virtue throughout the bulk of these stories. The art is brilliant in spots, but overall lacking in subtlety. Notice that the characters are depicted as either stoically silent or screaming at one another, even when the dialogue in question doesn't call for a scream. I would love to take some solace in the lovemaking scenes, even, but as they are almost all (and I do mean all) rapes or incest, they lose a bit of something. To be honest, the fact that some writers I respect revere this book makes me lose a bit of respect for them. I'm not trying to score cheap points, but if this is what he would have done to Frank Herbert's masterpiece, then I'll take the David Lynch version any day. Avoid this one--go read The Incal, instead.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Doyle

    This was awful. Jodorowsky must be the world's oldest, horniest teenager. My favorite part is when Metabaron #1 plugs the controls to his spaceship into the mechanical socket that replaces his dick (as it was shot off two pages prior). In 500+ pages I only saw only 3 characters: the invincible Metabarons, the cowardly robot narrators, and the greedy everyone else in the galaxy. The Metabarons were each presented with an impossible task to overcome which they each solved by being even more powerf This was awful. Jodorowsky must be the world's oldest, horniest teenager. My favorite part is when Metabaron #1 plugs the controls to his spaceship into the mechanical socket that replaces his dick (as it was shot off two pages prior). In 500+ pages I only saw only 3 characters: the invincible Metabarons, the cowardly robot narrators, and the greedy everyone else in the galaxy. The Metabarons were each presented with an impossible task to overcome which they each solved by being even more powerful than they had been before, smashing the indestructible obstacle with a power that had never before been seen in the galaxy. All of the characters were flat, lifeless stereotypes of the 3 character categories. It kind of felt like reading an Image comic from the 90's. The dialogue of the robot's was the first offender. They repeated the same formulaic conversation every time they appeared to interrupt the story. And the art was great, so again, it felt like reading an Image comic from the 90's. And dear God the dialogue. Jodorowsky uses the prefix "paleo" on every single page. EVERY. SINGLE. PAGE. And then he crams an extra techno-meta-electro-bio-meca-prefix onto each page just for good measure.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Baal Of

    This is where I'm going to step off this train. First let's be clear, this is not science fiction at all, rather it is pure fantasy, completely disconnected from anything remotely scientific. Prefixing everything with paleo-, techno-, or bio- doesn't make it SF, it just makes it sound lazy and stupid. The framing sections between the robots are particularly repetitive and awful, as if Jodorowsky is constantly trying to tell the reader "look how exciting this story is, aren't you excited"? This m This is where I'm going to step off this train. First let's be clear, this is not science fiction at all, rather it is pure fantasy, completely disconnected from anything remotely scientific. Prefixing everything with paleo-, techno-, or bio- doesn't make it SF, it just makes it sound lazy and stupid. The framing sections between the robots are particularly repetitive and awful, as if Jodorowsky is constantly trying to tell the reader "look how exciting this story is, aren't you excited"? This may be the worst portrayal of robots I've ready in any book ever. The Metabarons stories were far less interesting than I was hoping, packed full of utterly absurd behaviors, and ridiculous extremes. Some of the artwork is gorgeously amazing, but even that failed to hold my attention by the time I hit the final third of the book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jesús

    Too surrealistic for me, the behaviour of the metabarons has less and less sense with each generation. I only really liked the first ones.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jen Fairbanks

    Like so many other reviewers, I really can't tell if any of this series is to be taken seriously or not. Let's break down what makes this "epic" some of the worst science fiction graphic fiction I've ever read: 1.) Incel-level woman hating: If you've ever read any of the old Conan the Barbarian stories, then you'll be familiar with the kind of females encountered in the Metabarons. They are one-dimensional mirrors of the ur-feminine character sexist men dream of: always barely-clothed, busty, in Like so many other reviewers, I really can't tell if any of this series is to be taken seriously or not. Let's break down what makes this "epic" some of the worst science fiction graphic fiction I've ever read: 1.) Incel-level woman hating: If you've ever read any of the old Conan the Barbarian stories, then you'll be familiar with the kind of females encountered in the Metabarons. They are one-dimensional mirrors of the ur-feminine character sexist men dream of: always barely-clothed, busty, in need of rescuing, while simultaneously "heroic", willing to die for a dude they just met, rapeable...By this I mean, the author will use rape just about any time he needs to have an excuse for the main characters to jump in and kill a bunch of guys with explosions. It's incredibly gross. Sometimes though, we get "lucky, and they'll immediately fall in love with the Metabaron, who, without fail, will ruin their life in the most gory, inhumane way possible. Women exist in these books only as plot devices to help male characters get enraged enough at their misuse to kill a lot of people. There's one character who's literally a male brain put into a female body, and the whole story around that character is just people shitting on him/her for having a vagina. Jodorowsky must hate women a whole lot, and I feel sorry for him. 2.) Proto-pseudo-meca-techno-expialodocius: Every other word in this goddamn book has some stupid prefix attached to it. I'm not kidding. If Jodorowsky is trying to make the story sound sci-fi, he's failing miserably. It's so campy it's not even fun. "Bio-balls", "Techn0-techno cult", "Paleo-Christ." Now make every other word spoken one of those words and you have the dialogue of this book. 3.) Wait...these are the heroes? : Every one of the titular metabarons is a godawful piece of shit. Period. The story traces their lineage, and how against impossible odds, they somehow manage to keep breeding. Given that at least one of them punched the head off a newborn in a fit of rage (yep, this happened), it's a wonder they exist at all. The ones who keep enough limbs/brains to live to 7 are then physically tortured while being told not to cry (you fucking pussy! Man up!) while they have more vital body parts removed, to be replaced with badass robot parts. At 16 they have to kill their dad to prove how manly and awesome and worthy of being a Metabaron they are. Everything they do after that point is Super-Saiyan levels of dumb, and since they can't ever lose, it's ultimately a snoozefest. At this point, I think the Warhammer 40k universe is trying less hard to beat you over the head with its toxic masculinity. At least those books have less rape, incest, and baby-murder...and are fun to read. 4.) The narration is as boring as robots reading a bedtime story...oh wait: Two robots are the main narrators of the story. They both suck. One is a big, dumb simpering hulk, and the other is a little prissy asshole. Every interlude is the same joke told ad-nauseum, and somehow it only makes you want to go back to the main story rather than endure their conversation, which is saying something, because the story is awful. They just trade insults, and wish they had human penises...and sometimes blow up. But unlucky us, they always come back for another round of "Really gross ways to describe human genitalia". 5.) Animal abuse: Most of the Metabarons kill their pets at some point. I think it's supposed to show that they're too cool for feelings. One of the kids had to kill his wooly TALKING frog pal, because his mom is like "Love is for plebs." When the little critter goes "Master, why?" I really wished someone would have punched THAT kid's head off before he made tartar out of super cute little friend. 6.) They fly their ships by plugging them into their dicks: I can't make this up, nor can I explain it. I am one of those lower order creatures with a vagina, so maybe I'm missing something here, but I never thought you men out there had such precision control with those things. 7.) Clearly, this is Jodo spitefully ripping off Dune: Your movie failed, so why not steal from a better book to make your own "epic"? There's ridiculous galactic empires, weird mutants, space-whore priestesses trying to control the genetic fate of the galaxy, and good guys that aren't likeable or actually good. If you're going to shamelessly crib from one of the most beloved sci fi classics, please god do something creative or unique with it. Don't make the Metabarons. The only redeeming thing I can say about this graphic novel is that the art is excellent. The city and space-scapes especially are full detail and show a real creativity. Sure, it seems like the artist has a hard time rendering people sometimes (women and men are hard to tell apart in certain situations because the guy can only draw one "angry face", which is the most common face in the whole book), but when it works, it works well. If this was just a book of cool space art, it would be way more enjoyable. I would not recommend anyone sit down to dig though the hundreds of pages of garbage that is this story. You won't leave it feeling anything profound, except maybe that human beings are capable of horrendous actions for dumb reasons. I'd certainly rather blow my bio-brain out my paleo-skull rather than try to sift through it again.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vov

    Ah. Jodorowsky. I should've known better, having seen Jodorowsky's Dune documentary. It was rather amusing, but it was clear that Jodorowsky's mind works in mysterious ways. Heavy substance abuse, perhaps? I don't know. Maybe. Probably. Eisnein pretty much nails it in his review. I'll just add this: Quoting fellow GR reviewer Doyle: [This is the part] when Metabaron #1 plugs the controls to his spaceship into the mechanical socket that replaces his dick (as it was shot off two pages prior). Link t Ah. Jodorowsky. I should've known better, having seen Jodorowsky's Dune documentary. It was rather amusing, but it was clear that Jodorowsky's mind works in mysterious ways. Heavy substance abuse, perhaps? I don't know. Maybe. Probably. Eisnein pretty much nails it in his review. I'll just add this: Quoting fellow GR reviewer Doyle: [This is the part] when Metabaron #1 plugs the controls to his spaceship into the mechanical socket that replaces his dick (as it was shot off two pages prior). Link to original image.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    Some very strange stuff but the writing was solid and the art was great.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Yannis

    Well, hmm..5 efing stars! That's right, "it was amazing" rating because, well, it amazed me even though it's far for perfect. I remember reading part of the story in follow-ups in a Greek newspaper's magazing called 9. It had struck me as the best space opera I found after Star Wars. I had found the rest of the story here and there but I decided it was high time to read it in its entirety. True, now that I've read much more science fiction (although not that much space opera) I realise it doesn't Well, hmm..5 efing stars! That's right, "it was amazing" rating because, well, it amazed me even though it's far for perfect. I remember reading part of the story in follow-ups in a Greek newspaper's magazing called 9. It had struck me as the best space opera I found after Star Wars. I had found the rest of the story here and there but I decided it was high time to read it in its entirety. True, now that I've read much more science fiction (although not that much space opera) I realise it doesn't offer anything new to the genre. But what it does is giving back the best of the old...tenfold. Galactic empires, super warriors, love and tragedies, multiverse, superweapons, corruption and intrigue, with a little bit of humour(admittedly not the best part, mainly a recycling of running "funny" insults between the two robots). And above all the superd drawings. Oh, I love space opera drawings and it has some pretty good ones. The story is quite cliche and simple. The main characters are all similar, they are all metabarons like their father after all! And the rest are unimportant. Either just love interests or insignificant lords/oppontents that stand in metabaron's way for a nanosecond. Also, there isn't much of an interest. No one worries who will win since we are being told the story during the time of the last metabaron and of course the metabarons always win. But I think it's a great homage to the old pulp space opera and people who like it will love it, just like me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Spiros

    The graphic novel that offended so many PC readers in GR

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leila Anani

    The metabarons came about after Jodorowsky's ambitious project to film Frank Herbert's Dune failed. As such quite a bit of the Dune essence bleeds through into this SF epic: The mysterious Epyphite reminded me a bit of spice and we have the twisted agenda of the whore priestesses - who are basically the Bene Gesserit, this also has all the politics, barons and psychic powers you associate with Dune. However the Metabarons goes beyond it's origins into something uniquely its own. One of the ways The metabarons came about after Jodorowsky's ambitious project to film Frank Herbert's Dune failed. As such quite a bit of the Dune essence bleeds through into this SF epic: The mysterious Epyphite reminded me a bit of spice and we have the twisted agenda of the whore priestesses - who are basically the Bene Gesserit, this also has all the politics, barons and psychic powers you associate with Dune. However the Metabarons goes beyond it's origins into something uniquely its own. One of the ways it does this is with the quirky narrative technique. The multi-generational saga is relayed to us via two robots with a kind of C3PO/R2D2 comedy double act going on. If you're familiar with MST3K that's also in the same kind of vein. So these droids are the servants of the current metabaron 'No Name' and pass the time awaiting their master's return by one droid telling the other of the metabaron's history. This mixes up the pace - we go from the lol comedy of the droids to seriously dark space opera including incest, mutilation, sacrifice and death - I quite like the fluctuating tone it makes things interesting. The narrators are also significant and I won't give you spoilers, however we do get a twist I did not see coming which makes these two integral parts of the saga - they are not just a random narrative technique. Gimenez' art isn't as breathtaking as some of Jodorowsky's other collaborators (I'm a big fan of his work with Moebius and Beltran) however its still good. I particularly love the supra-lice ship and it's vampiric queen - fans of organic ships (like Lexx and Moya etc) are going to love this. Like any prequel/history spanning several generations, the metabarons is a bit repetitive and pretty dark (each generation having to die). It also fails to make any real point other than to lead us up to the present. As a narrative its not as interesting as say Incal or Megalex which is why it only gets 4* However It is still brilliant - The characters are all wonderfully well developed and this does an excellent job of exploring their psyche, Its also twisted, dark and set in a fully realised SF universe ranking up there with the greats. Fans of Dune, The epic of Gilgamesh and of course European comics and Heavy Metal Magazine really aren't going to want to miss this.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cesar Leon

    EL MEJOR COMIC DE SPACE OPERA.

  13. 4 out of 5

    David

    This is...utterly, completely batshit crazy. Whole galaxies will explode, incest and autoincest will happen, one being will kill defeat thousands of enemies with only a knife and so on. And that is just the beginning. It reads like a feverish dream, exploding with imagination and the weirdest hyper(sur)realistic art possible. And still - the tragedy there is understandable, ideas quite fresh and the tempo is so fast that even if you dont like one part of the story dont worry, this high speed trai This is...utterly, completely batshit crazy. Whole galaxies will explode, incest and autoincest will happen, one being will kill defeat thousands of enemies with only a knife and so on. And that is just the beginning. It reads like a feverish dream, exploding with imagination and the weirdest hyper(sur)realistic art possible. And still - the tragedy there is understandable, ideas quite fresh and the tempo is so fast that even if you dont like one part of the story dont worry, this high speed train is going to give you something else in few panels.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Damon

    A quite entertaining history of the Metabarons through history. There is an odd technique employed in the storytelling whereby the protagonist is constantly presented with a roadblock that would make it seem impossible for the story to reach the conclusion that we already know about (because the entire story is about past events). It is entertaining but does not always make sense.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sebastien

    Pros: Cool art, some nice design. Very imaginative. Negatives: Terrible story-telling. And I mean terrible. Dialogue is beyond weak. One dimensional characters, random plot jumps, no flow. Sometimes the panels are cluttered and difficult to visually figure out. Complete lack of nuance and depth to characters and story.

  16. 5 out of 5

    David

    Didn't really grab me the way the Incal did. Rather childish style of story telling. I couldn't finish it. Gave up about 200 pages into it. Didn't really grab me the way the Incal did. Rather childish style of story telling. I couldn't finish it. Gave up about 200 pages into it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Koen Claeys

    I am impressed by this epic saga, telling the history of a dynasty of ultimate warriors, in which Jodorowsky blends his crazy, over-the-top sci-fi fantasies with a compelling, logical story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eastham Erik

    Truthfully, the story of the Metabarons may be more of a 3.8 to 4 star, but because of the complete ridiculousness that continues to always out due itself throughout the read (not to mention the incredible art) I'm giving it a 5 out of 5. The Metabarons is a story spanning several generations of the "Metabarons," being narrated by a faithful robot, Tonto. The beginning prevails in story telling, taking it's time to help the reader understand the world that is being painted and spending time on cha Truthfully, the story of the Metabarons may be more of a 3.8 to 4 star, but because of the complete ridiculousness that continues to always out due itself throughout the read (not to mention the incredible art) I'm giving it a 5 out of 5. The Metabarons is a story spanning several generations of the "Metabarons," being narrated by a faithful robot, Tonto. The beginning prevails in story telling, taking it's time to help the reader understand the world that is being painted and spending time on character development. As the story advances, the story telling changes for the worse in the sense that it becomes more of a fast pace "here's the facts." Nonetheless, the utter ridiculousness that ensues is truly enjoyable. As most good stories will do, the reader will be constantly wondering how Jodorowsky will get us from A-Z . . . half way through, I gave up on guessing as Jodorowsky's creativity in connecting the dots through his absurd science fiction always proved my guesses incorrect. The Metabarons clan is a warrior family that continues through the generations by siring a single offspring, whom is mutilated at a young age to become techno-organic. The torch is passed to the next generation only once the offspring has killed the father. To give an example of the absurd enjoyment that is Jodorowsky science fiction, the very first Metabaron has his manlihood shot off in battle. The genitalia is then replaced with a piece of phallic technology, which has multiple functions as a weapon and a joystick for flying his ship . . . but lacks the function to reproduce. How on earth can the genial line continue? This is but one example of a wonderfully, sometimes laugh out loud, science fiction guessing game that Jodorowsky plays throughout this epic space opera. A fun read with terrific terrific art by Gimenez.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    Great story, epic scale, but it kinda gets tedious, all these baptisms by fire and outright savagery which serves no end. This was cool for like the first 100 pages, beyond that I hoped the story would evolve to something more.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    I thoroughly enjoyed this collection. It's very entertaining and at times it feels like an old-school Greek epic, tracing the history of the Metabarons. The narrators (two robots) make some bad attempts at humor, but otherwise they're interesting. The only big criticism from me (and the reason this didn't get five stars) is that I don't quite understand certain parts of the story. Just like other Jodorowsky stories, there is a big twist toward the end where the complexion of the story changes, l I thoroughly enjoyed this collection. It's very entertaining and at times it feels like an old-school Greek epic, tracing the history of the Metabarons. The narrators (two robots) make some bad attempts at humor, but otherwise they're interesting. The only big criticism from me (and the reason this didn't get five stars) is that I don't quite understand certain parts of the story. Just like other Jodorowsky stories, there is a big twist toward the end where the complexion of the story changes, leading into the finale. And just like other Jodorowsky stories, the twist is a bit (too) crazy for my taste.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gav451

    This should have been so much better. The art is beautiful and some of the ideas that it starts with are amazing so why then, did it gradually go right off the boil for me? The art is clearly AMAZING, the detail and the colour is a wonder to behold. Some of the larger scenes have so much going on in them that you feel what they need to really appreciate their splendor is a much larger canvass. So the shame of this collection is that by the end the things that I did not enjoy forced such a disconn This should have been so much better. The art is beautiful and some of the ideas that it starts with are amazing so why then, did it gradually go right off the boil for me? The art is clearly AMAZING, the detail and the colour is a wonder to behold. Some of the larger scenes have so much going on in them that you feel what they need to really appreciate their splendor is a much larger canvass. So the shame of this collection is that by the end the things that I did not enjoy forced such a disconnection that I went right off the books, I read them, I still enjoyed the art but in the end I found I just didn't care at all. I became more focused on the negative than the positive. The tale actually begins well, we have 2 robot characters who are effectively a chorus for most of the story, narrating and commenting and giving asides and then the story itself. The start has some really good concepts, the galactic history is intriguing and the way the metabarons are introduced is great but there seemed to be a loss of focus and so many annoying features that I became overwhelmed and bored by it. It turned into a self important and self parodying concept album of a read. So I cannot go into all that annoyed me about the series but here are just a few examples:- 1. The narrators. The way one got so excited at the end of each volume just annoyed me. Once is fine but to repeat the trope over and over and over again quickly stops being charming and becomes tiresome. By then end I would have been happy without them, and while I am on the subject of the narrators, in the future who in their right mind designs a robot to wet itself then instills an uncontrolled excitement circuit? Why? Where was its boredom circuit because it bloody needed it. The fact their relationship never ended and the conversation hardly ever developed killed any enjoyment of them and made one twist underwhelming rather than astounding. 2. We get that the book it set in the future. We get it because there are robots, space ships and aliens. So there is no need to prefix words all the time the make them sound futuristic, especially when the same prefixes are used over and over and over again. Paleo when old and techno for futuristic among others. A cup of coffee is still a cup of coffee whether you call is space-coffee or not. The era in which you drink the coffee is irrelevant to the nature of the item. I could, right now, be on my space computer, typing a space review having just eaten my space tea. Did the word space add anything? (aside from making it cooler, everything is cooler with the word space in front of it.) No it didn't and to be fair it begins to look lazy. Or space-lazy in this case. “Oh what shall we call this item they drink in the future?” “Ive no idea…..I know what about techno-drink? He could have it out of his techno-cup and later go for a techno-wee.” It got space-boring, and some times there were so many space-prefixes that it actually became space-annoying. I would have been less space-annoyed if they had just used the word space. (Space-space?) 3. If you are going to have MASSIVE time shifts in the story to show an epic scale and the passage of time why not actually have things change in them? The passage of time became irrelevant in this tale because whenever the story started again nothing had changed at all. For most of the incidents in this story 30 seconds would have worked just as well as 30 generations. The impact of the long breaks was quickly diminished. How was it that millions of years passed yet all the characters could think of to bring against the Metabarons was loads of blokes with guns? Not once did it work yet its all they tried. Views never changed, the technology did not change and tactics did not change, nothing appeared to change. 4. If you have a cool idea, like for example a society where part of the body is replaced with a robot equivalent don't then run the idea so far to an extreme that it becomes little more than a Monty-pythoesque joke. It saps the gravitas from the work and again undoes all of the good ideas that were there at the start. I will not go into detail for fear of spoilers but really? Is that really where you wanted to go with this? This idea was pushed to a point and used over and over again and again once the story finished it had been destroyed. Perhaps the book was too long? I might be being too harsh on it. The art is genuinely beautiful and someone wrote this and it is a great achievement. Perhaps is is the translation but my disappointment was such that it left a bitter taste in the mouth. Sorry.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Omar

    I was seduced into checking this because the art was SO appealing. And the art did reach my expectations and soar. But..unlike many other reviewers here who had expectations going into this, I wasn't told that this is an equivelent sci fi comic book to greek mythology. But I had my expectations for the storyline and narrative to be met as high as the art was. And to me that wasn't the case. The narrative was inconclusive and unsatisfactory relying merely on shock factors and incomprehensible word I was seduced into checking this because the art was SO appealing. And the art did reach my expectations and soar. But..unlike many other reviewers here who had expectations going into this, I wasn't told that this is an equivelent sci fi comic book to greek mythology. But I had my expectations for the storyline and narrative to be met as high as the art was. And to me that wasn't the case. The narrative was inconclusive and unsatisfactory relying merely on shock factors and incomprehensible words that are obviously made on the fly and quite cliche.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lowe

    There are many reviewers who write about this graphic novel’s flaws much better than I but suffice to say there is much to be suspect of in this work. I was initially drawn to the story after hearing Akala sing its praises which, in hindsight given his leftist politics, surprises me a great deal. There are many fascistic themes in the story from racially motivated massacres of other species to the crushing of all resistance for the sake of colonialism and wealth accumulation. All of that is befo There are many reviewers who write about this graphic novel’s flaws much better than I but suffice to say there is much to be suspect of in this work. I was initially drawn to the story after hearing Akala sing its praises which, in hindsight given his leftist politics, surprises me a great deal. There are many fascistic themes in the story from racially motivated massacres of other species to the crushing of all resistance for the sake of colonialism and wealth accumulation. All of that is before we get to one of the most troubling aspects of Jodo’s oeuvre which is on display in this story: his treatment of women. The female characters are portrayed as unsophisticated, brainless sex objects or evil, conniving witches. Jodo seems to have a thing for referring to women as ‘whores’ and having them treated in the most sickening ways from being subjected to rape and/or brutal murder that always posits the man in the position of power. There does seem to be moments of light in all this grimness where a women is portrayed as brave, fleetingly, or the protagonist decides to save or help life rather than mindlessly destroy it. The book’s final part takes a turn towards emancipation with the Metabaron character finally choosing to help free humanity from the curse of its megalomaniac power structures but this comes too late and weak to change the overall fascist tone of the story. Part of me hopes that all of this is satire and that it’s done in such a way as to sicken the reader and display how heartless and cold such a future might be but given the writer’s history and his own written admission of rape in the filming of El Todo, I think my hope is in vain. Jodo is likely allowing his subconscious free reign to produce a tome of mindlessly repetitive violence and propagate extremely harmful views of the relation of masculinity to domination and violence. The art style is stylised and a pleasure to look at and whilst at times confusing the grand vistas and sheer imagination of the artist are something worth looking at. Overall, I’m disappointed in the dark and often hateful tone of the story. I’m much more of a fan of SF that is hopeful like Iain M. Banks’ culture stories; even if there’s just as much chance of humanity going down the path of Jodo’s hell vision, it’s much better to see what could be possible if we choose to leave our hatred behind. Also, what was Jodo thinking by adding so many, repetitive, boring and sometimes socially regressive scenes of the two narrators in there?

  24. 4 out of 5

    hweatherfield

    Jodorowsky's The Metabarons receives an overall 3.5 star rating. A story compromised from a failed recreation of Dune (as described in the 2013 documentary, Jodorowsky's Dune), The Metabarons depicts the backstory and lineage of a clan of ultimate warriors set in a futuristic space-verse, who serve bounties of the highest buyer and undergo treacherous challenges. Although illustrated beautifully by the late Juan Gimenez, The Metabarons is both a tale interesting, yet ridiculous. I did not enjoy Jodorowsky's The Metabarons receives an overall 3.5 star rating. A story compromised from a failed recreation of Dune (as described in the 2013 documentary, Jodorowsky's Dune), The Metabarons depicts the backstory and lineage of a clan of ultimate warriors set in a futuristic space-verse, who serve bounties of the highest buyer and undergo treacherous challenges. Although illustrated beautifully by the late Juan Gimenez, The Metabarons is both a tale interesting, yet ridiculous. I did not enjoy the blatant rip-off of the classic Dune narrative (view spoiler)[Such as the sacred oil in place of the Dune spice melange, the androgynous heir and witches, and overall political narrative (hide spoiler)] , and was disappointed in its lack of originality. Just adding the prefix "paleo" and "techno" didn't make for believable science fiction mechanics, and the on-going sexual innuendos (however not too surprised here), were unnecessary and immature even for Jodorowsky. The Incal is one of my favorite epics, and I was looking forward to reading the back story of the Metabaron. I was hoping it would be more spiritual. The story itself was interesting, and those who like Game of Thrones may enjoy the weaving of relationships depicted. Yet too many scenes seemed random and out of place, putting characters in situations because of a tangental trail. Overall, The Metabarons is successful mostly for its art. Personally, I prefer Moebius' works with Jodorowsky, and could definitely see how this graphic novel was the result of his failed attempt of his film adaptation of Dune. I would just recommend people to read Dune and The Incal instead, and watch the documentary if they are interested in his thoughts.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andromeda M31

    "Your father himself has lost his memory! He's confusing paternal adoration with passionate love! He will rape you if you don't stop him!" This comic is a trip. The Metabarons is the family saga of the Castaka men, born and trained to be the fiercest warriors in the galaxy. Five generations of Metabarons are mutilated, instilled with atomic minibombs, and forced to commit patricide in order to take on the title. The last Metabaron can easily destroy a Universe. It's toxic masculinity space opera "Your father himself has lost his memory! He's confusing paternal adoration with passionate love! He will rape you if you don't stop him!" This comic is a trip. The Metabarons is the family saga of the Castaka men, born and trained to be the fiercest warriors in the galaxy. Five generations of Metabarons are mutilated, instilled with atomic minibombs, and forced to commit patricide in order to take on the title. The last Metabaron can easily destroy a Universe. It's toxic masculinity space opera style, narrated by a small, obnoxious robot to his larger, stupider, robot friend. Babies heads are exploded by mental powers. Massive Suprelice motherships roam the space between galaxies, ready to devour planets in a single gulp. The Emperoress of the Golden Planet, leader of the known universe, is a single being made up of a male and female fused back to back, always shown in a floating egg (recognizable from the Incal). Jodorowsky's views on gender are reductive and confusing, possibly a deal breaker for most readers. The violence in this is absurd. But Jodorowsky manages to work with some of the best illustrators in the business: space battles never looked so good. I would never applaud you, Alejandro, because I think you are deeply sexist and you need help, but I raise my glass to the over the top nature of whatever you do and your ability to get great artists to work with you.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Monsour

    4stars for the Artwork...and nothing else. Metabarons shows us that ultimate power can make anyone a D!ck, even those guys without one. There are like 3 types of character in this book (or 4 if your adding the dumbass princess with a hot on a never existing flower...spoilers) 1. The Metabarons: A family tree of space AKIRA's who's probably has the worst parenting issues in the galaxy(Except for the old dude who work on mines) 2. Galaxy people (aliens, space humans, space pirates space witch, spac 4stars for the Artwork...and nothing else. Metabarons shows us that ultimate power can make anyone a D!ck, even those guys without one. There are like 3 types of character in this book (or 4 if your adding the dumbass princess with a hot on a never existing flower...spoilers) 1. The Metabarons: A family tree of space AKIRA's who's probably has the worst parenting issues in the galaxy(Except for the old dude who work on mines) 2. Galaxy people (aliens, space humans, space pirates space witch, space donkeys YOU NAME IT) all one dimensional characters and nothing else, most of them are creepy and terrible. 3. The Robo-narrators(dunno wat to say from them). For me the story is more like an anti-war story because It shows you that violence wont solve anything and in fact its gets worst and worst in every generation of the new METABARONS. I cant say anything actually :/ SO YEAH artworks great, fun to read, awesome concept and others are yu know ... BUT that's not the whole point of this comic. Its about METAL, awesome concept, awesome fight scene and blah blah blah. Im pretty sure that's what Jodo's thinking when hes writing the story. He just wanted to show that concept he and his friends made when there making the dune movie who's probably know as the THE BEST MOVIE NEVER MADE.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Alejandro Jodorowsky really hits his stride here, burning the fuel of the failed film adaptation of DUNE as he did with The Incal. Among other things, Jodorowsky offers a web of themes of gender, violence as problem/ solution, genocide, conservation, and much more disguised as comic book space opera. The men are brawny and the women busty, but Jodorowsky plays with stereotypes and conventions of the medium in ways that will delight thinking readers. Juan Giminez's art is breathtaking with lots o Alejandro Jodorowsky really hits his stride here, burning the fuel of the failed film adaptation of DUNE as he did with The Incal. Among other things, Jodorowsky offers a web of themes of gender, violence as problem/ solution, genocide, conservation, and much more disguised as comic book space opera. The men are brawny and the women busty, but Jodorowsky plays with stereotypes and conventions of the medium in ways that will delight thinking readers. Juan Giminez's art is breathtaking with lots of splash panels that convey the epic scope. There is the usual rumination on alchemy, mysticism, and dystopia, so readers will have much to mull over. Best of all, while Dune was its inspiration, it stands as its own unique work.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Burnam-Fink

    The Metabarons is beyond fantastic, beyond epic, it is MYTHIC! Rising from the ashes of Jodorowsky's failed Dune movie, The Metabarons chronicles themes of violence, revenge, salvation, and the sins of the father in a multigenerational tale of universe-spanning warfare. The artwork is simply incredible; imaginative and evocative in a way that Jodorowsky's films only wish they could be. And finally, this complete edition is beautifully bound and printed (important when you're dropping $$$ on a bo The Metabarons is beyond fantastic, beyond epic, it is MYTHIC! Rising from the ashes of Jodorowsky's failed Dune movie, The Metabarons chronicles themes of violence, revenge, salvation, and the sins of the father in a multigenerational tale of universe-spanning warfare. The artwork is simply incredible; imaginative and evocative in a way that Jodorowsky's films only wish they could be. And finally, this complete edition is beautifully bound and printed (important when you're dropping $$$ on a book). Wow, just wow.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hugh

    Fantastic hardcover book. Very well made and weighty...like a textbook and it has a ribbon marker. The story and art are fantastically creative and rich. It's a great buy for anyone that likes sifi and or graphic novels. Just finished it and WOW! Really creative, really original (even though it is space-opera and has at least one theme derived from Frank Herbert). The author threw in some surprises that were very well done. So, so SO worth a read for fans of science fiction. Fantastic hardcover book. Very well made and weighty...like a textbook and it has a ribbon marker. The story and art are fantastically creative and rich. It's a great buy for anyone that likes sifi and or graphic novels. Just finished it and WOW! Really creative, really original (even though it is space-opera and has at least one theme derived from Frank Herbert). The author threw in some surprises that were very well done. So, so SO worth a read for fans of science fiction.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    Greek tragedy as space opera. Much has been culled from Jodorowsky's aborted attempt at a Dune movie, but the weirdness is cranked up to eleven. This is not a graphic novel for everyone, but if you like the idea of an almost stream-of-consciousness plot that is far more symbolic than direct, this might appeal to you. Greek tragedy as space opera. Much has been culled from Jodorowsky's aborted attempt at a Dune movie, but the weirdness is cranked up to eleven. This is not a graphic novel for everyone, but if you like the idea of an almost stream-of-consciousness plot that is far more symbolic than direct, this might appeal to you.

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