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Becoming Mexipino is a social-historical interpretation of two ethnic groups, one Mexican, the other Filipino, whose paths led both groups to San Diego, California. Rudy Guevarra traces the earliest interactions of both groups with Spanish colonialism to illustrate how these historical ties and cultural bonds laid the foundation for what would become close interethnic rela Becoming Mexipino is a social-historical interpretation of two ethnic groups, one Mexican, the other Filipino, whose paths led both groups to San Diego, California. Rudy Guevarra traces the earliest interactions of both groups with Spanish colonialism to illustrate how these historical ties and cultural bonds laid the foundation for what would become close interethnic relationships and communities in twentieth-century San Diego as well as in other locales throughout California and the Pacific West Coast.Through racially restrictive covenants and other forms of discrimination, both groups, regardless of their differences, were confined to segregated living spaces along with African Americans, other Asian groups, and a few European immigrant clusters. Within these urban multiracial spaces, Mexicans and Filipinos coalesced to build a world of their own through family and kin networks, shared cultural practices, social organizations, and music and other forms of entertainment. They occupied the same living spaces, attended the same Catholic churches, and worked together creating labor cultures that reinforced their ties, often fostering marriages. Mexipino children, living simultaneously in two cultures, have forged a new identity for themselves.  Their lives are the lens through which these two communities are examined, revealing the ways in which Mexicans and Filipinos interacted over generations to produce this distinct and instructive multiethnic experience. Using archival sources, oral histories, newspapers, and personal collections and photographs, Guevarra defines the niche that this particular group carved out for itself.


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Becoming Mexipino is a social-historical interpretation of two ethnic groups, one Mexican, the other Filipino, whose paths led both groups to San Diego, California. Rudy Guevarra traces the earliest interactions of both groups with Spanish colonialism to illustrate how these historical ties and cultural bonds laid the foundation for what would become close interethnic rela Becoming Mexipino is a social-historical interpretation of two ethnic groups, one Mexican, the other Filipino, whose paths led both groups to San Diego, California. Rudy Guevarra traces the earliest interactions of both groups with Spanish colonialism to illustrate how these historical ties and cultural bonds laid the foundation for what would become close interethnic relationships and communities in twentieth-century San Diego as well as in other locales throughout California and the Pacific West Coast.Through racially restrictive covenants and other forms of discrimination, both groups, regardless of their differences, were confined to segregated living spaces along with African Americans, other Asian groups, and a few European immigrant clusters. Within these urban multiracial spaces, Mexicans and Filipinos coalesced to build a world of their own through family and kin networks, shared cultural practices, social organizations, and music and other forms of entertainment. They occupied the same living spaces, attended the same Catholic churches, and worked together creating labor cultures that reinforced their ties, often fostering marriages. Mexipino children, living simultaneously in two cultures, have forged a new identity for themselves.  Their lives are the lens through which these two communities are examined, revealing the ways in which Mexicans and Filipinos interacted over generations to produce this distinct and instructive multiethnic experience. Using archival sources, oral histories, newspapers, and personal collections and photographs, Guevarra defines the niche that this particular group carved out for itself.

33 review for Becoming Mexipino: Multiethnic Identities and Communities in San Diego

  1. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    Very interesting look at San Diego history: the development of intertwined Mexican and Filipino cultures in the first half of the 20th century and the neighborhoods where these two ethnic groups were confined. It's pretty academic in form and repetitive in places; I don't think I'd have read it except it's about my town. [Really this is only 170 pages; the rest is endnotes] Very interesting look at San Diego history: the development of intertwined Mexican and Filipino cultures in the first half of the 20th century and the neighborhoods where these two ethnic groups were confined. It's pretty academic in form and repetitive in places; I don't think I'd have read it except it's about my town. [Really this is only 170 pages; the rest is endnotes]

  2. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Mckee

  3. 4 out of 5

    Laura Garbes

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Chandler

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tori

  6. 5 out of 5

    synequeen

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michele

  8. 4 out of 5

    Miguel

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lawrence

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  11. 4 out of 5

    Torie

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Marie

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jen Chau

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kendra

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bianca Rios

  16. 5 out of 5

    Greg Carter

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah_novak

  18. 4 out of 5

    AACC Rutgers

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hermelinda Rocha Tabera

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

  21. 4 out of 5

    David

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tane Walters

  23. 5 out of 5

    Coorie Buwaya

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bryn Mawr A/ASA

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maricruz Piza López

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mayre York

  27. 4 out of 5

    Athena Salinas

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  31. 5 out of 5

    jassira raxlly

  32. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

  33. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

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