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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Stories by Robert Louis Stevenson, by Robert Louis Stevenson, is part of the Literary Classics Collection, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable feature The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Stories by Robert Louis Stevenson, by Robert Louis Stevenson, is part of the Literary Classics Collection, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of the Literary Classics Collection: - New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars - Biographies of the authors - Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events - Footnotes and endnotes - Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work - Comments by other famous authors - Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations - Bibliographies for further reading - Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. The Literary Classics Collection pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde dramatically brings to life a science-fiction case study of the nature of good and evil and the duality that can exist within one person. Resonant with psychological perception and ethical insight, the book has literary roots in Dostoevsky’s "The Double” and Crime and Punishment. Today Stevenson’s novella is recognized as an incisive study of Victorian morality and sexual repression, as well as a great thriller. This collection also includes some of the author’s grimmest short fiction: "Lodging for the Night,” "The Suicide Club,” "Thrawn Janet,” "The Body Snatcher,” and "Markheim.”


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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Stories by Robert Louis Stevenson, by Robert Louis Stevenson, is part of the Literary Classics Collection, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable feature The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Stories by Robert Louis Stevenson, by Robert Louis Stevenson, is part of the Literary Classics Collection, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of the Literary Classics Collection: - New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars - Biographies of the authors - Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events - Footnotes and endnotes - Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work - Comments by other famous authors - Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations - Bibliographies for further reading - Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. The Literary Classics Collection pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde dramatically brings to life a science-fiction case study of the nature of good and evil and the duality that can exist within one person. Resonant with psychological perception and ethical insight, the book has literary roots in Dostoevsky’s "The Double” and Crime and Punishment. Today Stevenson’s novella is recognized as an incisive study of Victorian morality and sexual repression, as well as a great thriller. This collection also includes some of the author’s grimmest short fiction: "Lodging for the Night,” "The Suicide Club,” "Thrawn Janet,” "The Body Snatcher,” and "Markheim.”

30 review for The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Stories turned out to be a relatively quick read. Here are my thoughts on these stories: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde This was a little different than I expected. It's rather introspective, if that's an appropriate word. The emphasis is not on the action or the dirty deeds that Mr. Hyde perpetrates. Instead, the focus is on the duality of the natures of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. In truth, they are not separate men. They are two di The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Stories turned out to be a relatively quick read. Here are my thoughts on these stories: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde This was a little different than I expected. It's rather introspective, if that's an appropriate word. The emphasis is not on the action or the dirty deeds that Mr. Hyde perpetrates. Instead, the focus is on the duality of the natures of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. In truth, they are not separate men. They are two different aspects of one man's nature. Dr. Jekyll somehow discovers how to separate out the primal aspect of himself, the one who follows his most deepest, uncivilized urges. As time passes, he comes to realize that Mr. Hyde is winning control over him. I would think that this is really an allegory here. As human beings, we all have a dark side. Some of us try to control it more than others. Some throw a hypocritical facade over that dark person inside of them, pretending to be upright and moral. I don't believe that Dr. Jekyll really needed a serum to undergo this change. To see this story played out in the fantastic/science fiction manner makes it more interesting, surely. But, humanity often needs no potion to be at its darkest and most monstrous. In learning something about Mr. Stevenson's background, I can see why he chose to write about the hypocrisy of society. He came from a Presbyterian tradition, which follows the religious theory of predestination, in which some are called to salvation, and they have a better, more prosperous life, as a result. Those who are doomed to damnation, will lead low, desperate lives. Mr. Stevenson came to question this and reject these doctrines in his life. I could see some of his philosphical musings about his religious background playing out in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Dr. Jekyll was born to privilege. He worked to keep up a facade of morality, when he really wanted to indulge his darkest desires the whole time. When he invented the serum, this allowed him to do so without so-called feelings of guilt. However, this became his fatal flaw. His true self could no longer be hidden. To my surprise, this was not an action-oriented or lurid story. The narrative shows the observations of the friends of Dr. Jekyll, and towards the end, an epistolary narrative is used, in which we see the workings of Dr. Jekyll as his life undergoes this transformation. This was a thoughtful, somewhat philosophical story (at least in my inexpert opinion). It gave me something to think about. Hypocrisy is something I truly dislike. It is one thing to be a person who tries to life a good life; it is another to pretend to be moral, but hide your dark proclivities behind a polite mask. I have a feeling that Mr. Stevenson had similiar feelings on that subject. At 81 pages, this is a short read, and it's written in a very readable style. My edition has footnotes for some of the more obscure terms that Mr. Stevenson used. I'd recommend it to the readers with an inclination towards the classics, and for those who would like to see the origins of the figure (or should I say figures) who have become a part of pop culture through film versions, pastiches, and modern literary works, such as The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Vol. 1. I would give this story a four star rating. A Lodging for the Night This was another thought-provoking story. The beginning shows a rather heinous murder. The rest of the book shows one of the persons who was there during the murder. I started out thinking the worst of this man, but Mr. Stevenson gave me some insight, and helped me to see him through a different pair of glasses. Mr. Villon seeks shelter on a cold night, ending up in the home of a much adored military hero. He has to sit and listen to a self-righteous lecture for the price of a meal and a warm place to pass the night. Again, Mr. Stevenson's background in the privileged middle class of Presbyterian Scotland comes to play. Mr. Villon makes a good case for himself. He wants to be a moral man, but he has no other options besides thievery to keep food in his belly and a roof over his head. He asserts that he follows his own moral code, even if others think him behind the pale. On the other hand, the soldier can feel self-righteous that he is not a thief, and that God has blessed him with plenty for his moral actions. His success in life is due to his good character, or so he attests to. However, Mr. Villon points out that as a soldier, he committed or has been party to similar actions, but they are deemed respectable because of his high position in life. Mr. Villon had something of value to say here. It's too bad that the soldier couldn't look past his own sense of entitlement to see the wisdom in what this 'low' man had to say. It would have been a good lesson for him. I actually got quite involved in this story. I would give it four stars. The Suicide Club This turned out to be three related stories. They are very much in the mystery/adventure/suspense genre. And they were quite thrilling, especially the first. Imagine that there is a club where men can go to have themselves done away with when they are tired of living. They pay a fee, and each night, they show up. Fate will determine when they die and how. But, the person pulling the strings is doing so out of his own greed. Will justice be done here? This story had me on the edge of my seat. I literally didn't know how it was going to end. The end turns out to be open-ended, and it leads into two more stories. I liked how the next two stories start with different narrators, and I had to figure out how they tied into the first story. The way in which they relate was very imaginative. There is more mystery and suspense as each subsequent story unfolds, and I learned what they had to do with our protagonists from the initial story. I think Mr. Stevenson had a good hand with suspense, as shown through these stories. Four star rating. Thrawn Janet I had some trouble with Scottish brogue in which most of this story was written. I had to concentrate really hard to decipher what was being said. Despite that, this was a very chilling story indeed. The minister in this story was a brave man. I could see how he was much changed by his blood-curdling experience with the titular character in this story. To say more would spoil it. If you can handle the brogue, give this a try. Four stars. The Body-Snatcher This is actually a reread for me. Another story in which the worst monster in the closet is human, and a nice facade hides a putrid center. This story is based on the real life incidents of the Resurrection Men of Edinburgh, Scotland (1827-1828), who started out grave-robbing to provide corpses for dissection for an anatomist. Eventually, they started murdering people so they would have a steady supply of these corpses. I liked that there were some pretty scary consequences for the actions of the two grave-robbers in this story; although it's questionable if the person who really needed the lesson learned anything. Markheim At first, I didn't really like this story. However, I got thrown for a loop at the supernatural twist it took. Markheim is forced to face his life, and the acts he committed through the years. His false sense of righteousness, and the slippery slope that took him down the path to becoming a murder. It was a real wake-up call for him. And it gave me food for thought. Four stars. Overall thoughts: I read The Picture of Dorian Gray earlier this month, and I can't help but contrast it with this collection. Mr. Oscar Wilde seemed to be a proponent of not injecting his own sense of meaning into his story. In contrast, there seems to be a lot of Mr. Stevenson's thought processes in his stories. I don't think either is better or worse. I feel that writers have different motivations, and I can learn from any number of them, finding something of personal meaning in their stories. In the case of this volume, I can certainly see why Mr. Stevenson continually revisits the same concepts (although in different ways in each story). It is clear that they played heavily on his mind. Perhaps these stories served as a catharsis for him. Even more than a hundred years later, our society has similar divisions and issues, which might contribute to social ills in no small way (in my opinion). As such, these stories still have a relevance to this reader. Sadly, Mr. Stevenson has been dismissed by literary critics as a second-rate writer. My personal opinion is that he wrote very well. His stories were entertaining, but they had a strong message to the reader. That's not what I'd consider hack writing. But, each reader has to make their own decision about that.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    This was a good story. It also had some very horrific parts. Reading it has made me appreciate Stevnson's work on even more. This was a good story. It also had some very horrific parts. Reading it has made me appreciate Stevnson's work on even more.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Orient

    I quite enjoyed the adventure through the Tales of horror with creepy moments, interesting twists and some beating around the bush. The eternal fight between good and evil. A doomed personality with an inner fight between social acknowledgement and dark needs. My favorite tale is “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”. It is one of the reasons why I chose this book. I saw some adaptations and wanted to reach the real core of the story. And what did I find? (view spoiler)[Something, that f I quite enjoyed the adventure through the Tales of horror with creepy moments, interesting twists and some beating around the bush. The eternal fight between good and evil. A doomed personality with an inner fight between social acknowledgement and dark needs. My favorite tale is “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”. It is one of the reasons why I chose this book. I saw some adaptations and wanted to reach the real core of the story. And what did I find? (view spoiler)[Something, that film/cartoon adaptations of this story had not prepared me for: Hyde is not a horrible big monster. He's a little guy, described as an aggressive madman with some sparks of intellect. And he has no relationships with women. (hide spoiler)] The second half of the story with all the revelations was really less interesting than the first half which had suspense and was spooky. The other stories are quite enjoyable. I don't have much sympathy for the walking dead and body snatchers or let’s-do-something-stupid-and-make-everything-more-unnecessary-difficult stuff (the stories about the Prince), but the author’s artistic presentation is quite interesting and I quite enjoyed these stories. They are quite well-written and thought-provoking. The author evokes the fog-shrouded streets so convincingly that I could almost hear the horse's hooves, see the muddy streets. Though not as frightening as it must have been to the readers in those times, but still a great classic horror book. All in all the book is definitely not my favorite from Mr. Stevenson (“Treasure Island” is my BBFMC (Best Book From My Childhood)) but quite likable.

  4. 4 out of 5

    BLynne

    I really enjoyed this classic. Still enjoyed the story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. I also enjoyed the short story titled The Suicide Club. For me this is a creepy classic that is fun to read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    AziaMinor

    DNF at 10% because I forgot how stupidly BORING I find Robert Louis Stevenson's books are. This is one of those rare times where I'd rather watch the movies than try to read any of these dull stories DNF at 10% because I forgot how stupidly BORING I find Robert Louis Stevenson's books are. This is one of those rare times where I'd rather watch the movies than try to read any of these dull stories

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie (Reading is Better With Cupcakes)

    I read this one so I had something to base any retellings I read about the infamous Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde story on. I like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. I didn't perceive it to read as dark as I thought it would based upon my other encounters with the story. But it was good and entertaining. I also enjoyed the Suicide Club a lot. I found myself pretty pulled into that story. There was one story in this collection of short stories that I am still not 100% sure what went down. It was the narrator. Not t I read this one so I had something to base any retellings I read about the infamous Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde story on. I like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. I didn't perceive it to read as dark as I thought it would based upon my other encounters with the story. But it was good and entertaining. I also enjoyed the Suicide Club a lot. I found myself pretty pulled into that story. There was one story in this collection of short stories that I am still not 100% sure what went down. It was the narrator. Not that there is anything wrong with giving a narrator a unique tone of voice, but I probably should have read it out loud. The narrator along with the authors writing style just didn't pull things together for me in my head. The other stories were ok. I found them interesting enough. Sadly since they were shorts, they felt like they just kind of ended, but oh well. They had lessons and morals in them. And I am glad that I went ahead and read them all. You can find more of my reviews here: https://readingwithcupcakes.blogspot....

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nostalgia Reader

    3.8 star average across all stories, rounding up to 4 stars. After reading this entire book, rather than just Jekyll & Hyde, my J&H review still stands from a few years ago (click through to read it here). Scroll down to see star ratings and brief comments on how AMAZINGLY AMAZING Stevenson's short stories featured in here are. Really, this dude is like Poe for a modern (i.e. late 1800s) audience (and an obvious Poe fanboy to boot). A Lodging for the Night: 4.5 stars. Absolutely delightful. The Suic 3.8 star average across all stories, rounding up to 4 stars. After reading this entire book, rather than just Jekyll & Hyde, my J&H review still stands from a few years ago (click through to read it here). Scroll down to see star ratings and brief comments on how AMAZINGLY AMAZING Stevenson's short stories featured in here are. Really, this dude is like Poe for a modern (i.e. late 1800s) audience (and an obvious Poe fanboy to boot). A Lodging for the Night: 4.5 stars. Absolutely delightful. The Suicide Club: 5 stars. HELL YES. ALL THE STARS. THIS IS THE GREATEST. Thrawn Janet: 2.5 stars. Definitely spooky, but the unintroduced abrupt change to Scots was unnecessary. I skimmed it more than properly read it. The Body-Snatcher: 3 stars. Something about this just didn't captivate me, I don't know why. Markheim: 4 stars. A bit sloggy and overly wordy, but very Tell-Tale Heart-esque and heavy on the psychological torture that is anxiety.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Party of my creepy Halloween reads. boo! Just a quick note: Jeckyll & Hyde was fairly entertaining, filled with the archaic Victorian verbal effluvia. "It was a wild, cold, seasonable night of March, with a pale moon, lying on her back as though the wind had tilted her, and flying wrack of the most diaphanous and lawny texture." Oh those lawny textures! As usual with these old stories, the mechanisms of the story telling (from the POV of a 3rd party, the tale in retrospect, and telling instead of Party of my creepy Halloween reads. boo! Just a quick note: Jeckyll & Hyde was fairly entertaining, filled with the archaic Victorian verbal effluvia. "It was a wild, cold, seasonable night of March, with a pale moon, lying on her back as though the wind had tilted her, and flying wrack of the most diaphanous and lawny texture." Oh those lawny textures! As usual with these old stories, the mechanisms of the story telling (from the POV of a 3rd party, the tale in retrospect, and telling instead of showing) feel awkward today. I skipped most the other included stories - some day I'll maybe come back to them. But I did read "The Body Snatchers." It's a creepy little story about resurrection men, who dug up freshly interred bodies and sold them to medical schools for dissection. Reading this made me look up the weird story of Dr. Knox and his henchmen Burke & Hare who murdered people just to sell them to the 'good' doctor. The Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons in London talks about the resurrection practice at length. They have a fascinating detailed drawing of a typical surgeon's practice, with a dull, unmarked door on some back alley where the bodies would arrive, a prep room for the bodies, tiny places for the in-house receivers/assistants to sleep, and the big dissection lecture hall in front. Weird stuff. And it's not fiction!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sharmishtha Basu

    Read the book at least a dozen times, it is a wonderful, heartbreaking story of a genius! one truly wonders what will happen if we feed and release the black wolf that we keep dormant inside us (at least most of us do), if it is fed and then unleashed it certainly will slaughter the white one and become our master. Reality in wraps of science fiction.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Justin Kung

    The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a book that I would recommend to readers who enjoy a good, suspenseful, enigma. This book has a mixture of horror and mystery. The setting of this story is set near the late nineteenth century so the use of language might be a bit difficult to understand at first, but becomes easier to understand later on in the story. The author does a good job on sending out his message to the readers throughout the whole story. This book is about a scientist call The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a book that I would recommend to readers who enjoy a good, suspenseful, enigma. This book has a mixture of horror and mystery. The setting of this story is set near the late nineteenth century so the use of language might be a bit difficult to understand at first, but becomes easier to understand later on in the story. The author does a good job on sending out his message to the readers throughout the whole story. This book is about a scientist called Henry Jekyll making trying to make a potion to completely eliminate the evil out of a human being. However, something goes horribly wrong. When Henry Jekyll drinks the potion, he turns into an ugly, murderous being called Mr. Hyde. When the scientist is Dr. Jekyll, he is a kind and admirable person. When he drinks the potion, he turns pure evil. Jekyll drinks this potion so much that it becomes impossible to handle. The potion becomes useless, and Mr. Hyde pops out of Dr. Jekyll whenever he wants to. The story is mainly about Dr. Jekyll trying to find a way to kill Mr. Hyde and end this chaos. Many readers would think that Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde are two completely different beings. However, the Robert Louis Stevenson's message of the story is that every human being has a pleasant side and an evil side. The author wants the reader to know by the end that Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde are the same people. Dr. Jekyll represents the good soul of the body, and Mr. Hyde represents the evil soul. When Dr. Jekyll decided to kill himself to kill Mr. Hyde, I was both shocked, and satisfied with the ending. This ending thoroughly represented the author's message. Because Mr. Hyde and Dr. Jekyll was the same person, the only way to get rid of Mr. Hyde was to get rid of Dr. Jekyll. While I was reading this book, there were many things that I related to my real life. I've seen the nicest people I know do some horrible things, and this book perfectly shows the story behind it. Many religious beliefs also have the same message with this book. The good karma and bad karma from buddhism, and the yin and yang from taoism. I definitely recommend this book considering that the Robert Louis Stevenson did such a great job on delivering his message.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    Confession - I joined a new book club. I felt like I was cheating on my California book club. I promise I was thinking about them while we discussed the duality of man - the carnal and the supernal. This concept is one those universal battles that all people face- though many do not acknowledge the battle between being their best self and indulging in life's pleasures. Dr. Jekyll is a good man with a good idea about separating our dueling selves, but of course, it does not work out the way he pl Confession - I joined a new book club. I felt like I was cheating on my California book club. I promise I was thinking about them while we discussed the duality of man - the carnal and the supernal. This concept is one those universal battles that all people face- though many do not acknowledge the battle between being their best self and indulging in life's pleasures. Dr. Jekyll is a good man with a good idea about separating our dueling selves, but of course, it does not work out the way he planned and his good British society is altered forever. I finished this book in audio form walking along the tree lined streets of residential Provo. There was a chill in the air and gorgeous fall leaves crunched under my feet. As the letters were read in the story, I felt another chill - another pull that had nothing to do with the cool November air. It was Henry Jekyll admitting defeat - that his carnal self, which took form in Mr. Hyde, was too strong and would ultimately be the end of the more noble Dr. Jekyll. It made me sad. Giving in felt too real. I didn't explain this to my new book club. They wouldn't understand. Books alter everything....

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laysa

    The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a favorite. I read it in Portuguese and while in middle school, and I remembered liking it very much. Now, older and wiser (lol) I read it again just to be more creeped out by it. At first, Dr. Jekyll seems to think of Mr. Hyde as something that can be contained and controlled... until things start to get out of hand and he is filled with terror and angst. I love it. Lodging for the Night and the Suicide Club are great ones too, they have this creep The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a favorite. I read it in Portuguese and while in middle school, and I remembered liking it very much. Now, older and wiser (lol) I read it again just to be more creeped out by it. At first, Dr. Jekyll seems to think of Mr. Hyde as something that can be contained and controlled... until things start to get out of hand and he is filled with terror and angst. I love it. Lodging for the Night and the Suicide Club are great ones too, they have this creepy/chilling vibe, but I guess Markheim is the one that stood out to me. I'm a slow reader (sometimes I re-read sentences that I love, or I re-read them to finish imagining all the details in my head) and I was especially slow while reading Markheim. The discussion he has with the stranger is deep and gives you plenty of room for reflection. The Body Snatcher is another favorite. I could actually see a movie in my head. I tend to like horror movies, and it felt like watching one. Now, Thrawn Janet was difficult to read. I clearly don't know enough English to be able to read this comfortably. I had to use the Portuguese version most of the time.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carson Quarnberg

    I was hoping Jekyll and Hyde would be longer; that story really did surprise me, and I wanted to keep hearing about the character’s Frankensteinean shame. I liked all the other stories except for Thrawn Janet, which was written in such a strong British dialect as to be unintelligible. I’ll be honest, I read two pages and then skipped it. Overall this collection of stories is spooky and incredibly well-written.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chad Schimke

    Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Robert Louis Stevenson 1886 A London lawyer investigates strange occurrences involving his old friend and the evil Edward Hyde. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Robert Louis Stevenson 1886 A London lawyer investigates strange occurrences involving his old friend and the evil Edward Hyde.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Boak

    The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a classic that many people hear referenced but have never read, so I thought I'd try it out. It was only an 80-page story, so that was surprising to me. The plot was more relaxed and slow-paced than I thought it would be, though I think having been written in the nineteenth century might have had something to do with that. The characters are quite static and Mr. Hyde was far less villainous than I wanted him to be. I was looking for some pizazz here The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a classic that many people hear referenced but have never read, so I thought I'd try it out. It was only an 80-page story, so that was surprising to me. The plot was more relaxed and slow-paced than I thought it would be, though I think having been written in the nineteenth century might have had something to do with that. The characters are quite static and Mr. Hyde was far less villainous than I wanted him to be. I was looking for some pizazz here and I surely didn't get it. The rest of the book contained five other stories, four of which I read. Like the first, these were also lackluster and didn't seem to excite me or peak my interest. Meh...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    One of my all time favorites.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: 3.5/5 stars The Bottle Imp: 3/5 stars Markheim: 3/5 stars The Body-Snatcher: 4/5 stars

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Well, I have finished reading The Strange Case, and I must say, what an unnecessarily odd way to tell a story. It is 25,642 words long in total, making this a novella by SFWA's definition. The story is told from three different perspectives with overlapping chronology from each. The first section is the longest and best-written, accounting for the first 62% of the story. It is a third person limited omniscient account told from the perspective of Mr. Utterson, Dr. Jekyll's friend and lawyer. The Well, I have finished reading The Strange Case, and I must say, what an unnecessarily odd way to tell a story. It is 25,642 words long in total, making this a novella by SFWA's definition. The story is told from three different perspectives with overlapping chronology from each. The first section is the longest and best-written, accounting for the first 62% of the story. It is a third person limited omniscient account told from the perspective of Mr. Utterson, Dr. Jekyll's friend and lawyer. The second part is in the form of a letter written by Dr. Jekyll's friend, academic colleague and rival scientist, Dr. Lanyon. It comprises 11% of the story. The last 27% is written as a first person account by Dr. Jekyll himself. Dr. Jekyll's account is absolutely awful, containing no drama until the last few paragraphs, only melodrama. It is a tedious, long-winded explanation of events-previously-narrated from an exceedingly dull, one-dimensional goody-two-shoes doctor who drinks a potion so he can cut loose once in a while. His problem is that he likes to get down and break from those stuffy Victorian restrictions a bit too often. What Edwardian wouldn't? It becomes progressively harder to become good Dr. Jekyll again as time goes on. This third section is pure exposition written in interminably long paragraphs. Glazed eye insanity is bound to set in unless, like me, you choose to skim all this verbage. The main character becomes addicted to a drug that makes him act in a way that brings him misfortune. The situation Jekyll finds himself in is very easy to understand. It's the plight of any alcohol- or opiate-addicted person. There's nothing new here, only the degree of literalness being an addict turns one into a monster. The remaining stories of the collection were readable, but not particularly entertaining. Stevenson's problem in storytelling seems to be mostly landing on highly improbable plots. For example, who wants to be in a club that encourages its members to commit suicide? Who believes that a prince who wants to execute a subject would find arranging a duel the most efficient means for doing so? Stevenson's stories really make little sense all the way down to their premises, and the writing is not so engaging as to mitigate that and make reading them worthwhile.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Kammerdiener

    "You start a question, and it's like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others; and presently, some bland old bird . . . is knocked on the head in his own back garden and the family have to change their name. No sir, I make it a rule of mine: the more it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask." I really, really enjoyed Jekyll and Hyde. Stevenson has performed the miracle of crafting a masterful, engaging plot into a very short book. The "You start a question, and it's like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others; and presently, some bland old bird . . . is knocked on the head in his own back garden and the family have to change their name. No sir, I make it a rule of mine: the more it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask." I really, really enjoyed Jekyll and Hyde. Stevenson has performed the miracle of crafting a masterful, engaging plot into a very short book. The mystery and the intrigue start out on page one and drive you all to the very end. Truthfully, the only problem I have with this book is the lack of female characters. In the course of the entire book, there are only a few unnamed maids to represent the other half of the population. Again, this book was written in the nineteenth century, but it is still very frustrating when you consider many of Stevenson's contemporaries were writing books focusing on woman protagonists, and he can't even be bothered to name his female characters.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katelyn

    I've only finished the titular novella for now. Perhaps, in the future, I will return to the other stories. Stevenson is a wonderful storyteller, but his sentences are incredibly winding and it takes some — you might say — sedulous effort on my part to always get the meaning behind each. Still, despite their difficult nature, his sentences are quite beautiful. I found his descriptions of different dualities to be particularly engaging — for there is much more than Jekyll versus Hyde and good ver I've only finished the titular novella for now. Perhaps, in the future, I will return to the other stories. Stevenson is a wonderful storyteller, but his sentences are incredibly winding and it takes some — you might say — sedulous effort on my part to always get the meaning behind each. Still, despite their difficult nature, his sentences are quite beautiful. I found his descriptions of different dualities to be particularly engaging — for there is much more than Jekyll versus Hyde and good versus evil within these pages. That's all to be said without spoiling the story, though. However, I'd highly recommend this novella to anyone looking for something challenging yet rewarding for their next read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    The "other stories" were almost unreadable. Some of the worst fiction I've ever come across. Thrawn Janet is written in indecipherable Scots dialect and the The Suicide Club and Markheim use so much dialogue they should be plays. The Strange Case Of Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde story is well known through it's many theatrical and film adaptation, but the sad secret is the source material, though originating a clever idea, is weak. I have enjoyed the other Stevenson books I've read, but I suppose they The "other stories" were almost unreadable. Some of the worst fiction I've ever come across. Thrawn Janet is written in indecipherable Scots dialect and the The Suicide Club and Markheim use so much dialogue they should be plays. The Strange Case Of Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde story is well known through it's many theatrical and film adaptation, but the sad secret is the source material, though originating a clever idea, is weak. I have enjoyed the other Stevenson books I've read, but I suppose they fall more under the young adult category and the triteness there is easier to forgive. Hated, hated, hated this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    I am actually just listening to the main story (as read beautifully in the LibriVox version) in order to participate in the SFFaudio readalong discussion. I originally listened when Heather Ordover at CraftLit discussed the book a couple of years ago (?). Perfect listening for October and I am very much enjoying going over the story again. A fascinating look at good and evil and a short read actually. If you have only seen a movie or know "what everyone knows" about this story, do yourself a favo I am actually just listening to the main story (as read beautifully in the LibriVox version) in order to participate in the SFFaudio readalong discussion. I originally listened when Heather Ordover at CraftLit discussed the book a couple of years ago (?). Perfect listening for October and I am very much enjoying going over the story again. A fascinating look at good and evil and a short read actually. If you have only seen a movie or know "what everyone knows" about this story, do yourself a favor and read the book which is full of surprises compared to "what everyone knows."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    When it is reported that Mr. Hyde has trampled a girl, lawyer Mr. Utterson goes out to investigate; finding out that Mr. Hyde knows his close friend Dr. Jekyll things become ever more suspicious. No one has ever seen Hyde and Jekyll together, except Mr. Lanyon, and the suspicions continue. This story was very well written and is a really great piece of writing; it’s fast paced, with so much happening in such a short amount of time. The characters were monstrous and fun to read; they were definit When it is reported that Mr. Hyde has trampled a girl, lawyer Mr. Utterson goes out to investigate; finding out that Mr. Hyde knows his close friend Dr. Jekyll things become ever more suspicious. No one has ever seen Hyde and Jekyll together, except Mr. Lanyon, and the suspicions continue. This story was very well written and is a really great piece of writing; it’s fast paced, with so much happening in such a short amount of time. The characters were monstrous and fun to read; they were definitely executed well. As for the other short stories in this volume, which include: The Body Snatcher, Markheim, The Bottle Imp, and The Weir of Hermiston, they were also told very well. Stevenson has a knack for storytelling and the way he tells a story is so captivating, even though his endings are a bit abrupt, this helps his unfinished work, The Weir of Hermiston, fit in with all the others. His characters are really thought out throughout all his works of art, but when he tries to write them with accents, he loses his reader because it gets really hard to understand and the writing doesn’t flow anymore. His writing is creepy, yet done in a way where it’s not completely scary. This collection of works is definitely something worth reading as part of the Gothic era-style writing.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anastacia Trubetskaya

    The Strange Case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde is a novel full of mysteries, but murder, crime, and law, isn't the only thing waiting to be solved. A London lawyer, Gabriel John Utterson, investigates strange cases that are cautiously happening to an old friend, Dr.Jekyll. Many clues appear, but it just can't be solved yet. The outcome to waiting too long lead to Dr.jekyll’s death, which revealed many more clues to the murderer. But Mystery is what was needed to be solved. The strange case of Dr.Jeky The Strange Case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde is a novel full of mysteries, but murder, crime, and law, isn't the only thing waiting to be solved. A London lawyer, Gabriel John Utterson, investigates strange cases that are cautiously happening to an old friend, Dr.Jekyll. Many clues appear, but it just can't be solved yet. The outcome to waiting too long lead to Dr.jekyll’s death, which revealed many more clues to the murderer. But Mystery is what was needed to be solved. The strange case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde fits into the mystery category because of its unique technique of grabbing the reader's attention. It gives brief clues to lead the reader to want to read more. For example, “With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to the truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two.” The ending of the quote is where the confusion occurs, “That man is not truly one, but two.” There is a lot of figurative language in each page of the book, it's adds many detail. I enjoyed reading this novel and got a good understanding about what mystery is all about. I rate this book a ⅘ stars because of its ability to enlighten people to different genres. I don't recommend for younger children to read this as there is profound language and high level of context, but highly recommend to ages older than 12.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elli

    ok so i really liked the idea of the book, but I feel like the author could have done so much more with it. Maybe it’s supposed to be like that cuz it’s a short story but whatever (btw i only read Jekyll & Hyde). also, for some reason the writing style was so difficult for me to follow along but it’s probs cuz i’m an imbecile. I definitely need to reread it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zibbernaut

    So many unnecessary words, but an interesting concept. Glad I read it so that I never have to do it again. Also, I didn't know the actual events of the story. (view spoiler)[Hyde stepping on a child without a care was such a mood tho (hide spoiler)] So many unnecessary words, but an interesting concept. Glad I read it so that I never have to do it again. Also, I didn't know the actual events of the story. (view spoiler)[Hyde stepping on a child without a care was such a mood tho (hide spoiler)]

  27. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    I enjoyed this. Well-plotted stories that are genuinely creepy in places, even when (as with the title story) everyone already knows what they're about by cultural osmosis. I enjoyed this. Well-plotted stories that are genuinely creepy in places, even when (as with the title story) everyone already knows what they're about by cultural osmosis.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    I really enjoyed the mystery and profound message in this story. I thought it was very well written and it was a page-turner until the end. Loved it!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    This isn't the edition I have but I couldn't find mine. I have spoiled by today's versions of classic horror, because this was unsatisfying, but still interesting. It didn't scare me but it has a mysterious and eerie quality to it. The novel looks at the duality of man and how we all have darkness in us. Dr. Jekyll creates a potion that brings out his evil side, Mr. Hyde, but it backfires and Hyde takes over Jekyll's life. It is told mostly through Jekyll's lawyer, butler, and a fellow doctor as This isn't the edition I have but I couldn't find mine. I have spoiled by today's versions of classic horror, because this was unsatisfying, but still interesting. It didn't scare me but it has a mysterious and eerie quality to it. The novel looks at the duality of man and how we all have darkness in us. Dr. Jekyll creates a potion that brings out his evil side, Mr. Hyde, but it backfires and Hyde takes over Jekyll's life. It is told mostly through Jekyll's lawyer, butler, and a fellow doctor as they do not know what happened to Jekyll and why he has isolated himself. The lawyer Utterson tries to piece it together and understand it. I wish it wasn't just from their perspective, because we didn't see Jekyll's change play out, but we get a last chapter that sums up what happened and the creation of Hyde. It took away from the story for me. I did like how it looked at the good and evil in all of us, but didn't explore it enough. I almost wish it wasn't a novella. I'm glad I read it and didn't hate it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Franklin P

    Loved this story. Everything that Frankenstein wasnt. Paced well, interesting, well set and scened. It was brilliant. The reveal was excellent. Wish I hasnt known the story. Must have been amazing to hear if for the first ever time.

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