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Planets

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This brilliantly illustrated book taps into children's natural curiosity about the vast world of space. This level two reader, written in simple language that is easy for young readers to understand, introduces children to our solar system, including all of the planets and dwarf planets, and lots of fascinating fun facts. This reader helps cultivate the explorers of tomorr This brilliantly illustrated book taps into children's natural curiosity about the vast world of space. This level two reader, written in simple language that is easy for young readers to understand, introduces children to our solar system, including all of the planets and dwarf planets, and lots of fascinating fun facts. This reader helps cultivate the explorers of tomorrow! This high-interest, educationally vetted series of beginning readers features the magnificent images of National Geographic, accompanied by texts written by experienced, skilled children's book authors. The inside back cover of the paperback edition is an interactive feature based upon the book. Level 1 books reinforce the content of the book with a kinesthetic learning activity. In Level 2 books readers complete a Cloze letter, or fun fill-in, with vocabulary words. Releases simultaneously in Reinforced Library Binding: 978-1-4263-1037-9 , $13.90/$15.95 Can National Geographic supports K-12 educators with ELA Common Core Resources. Visit www.natgeoed.org/commoncore for more information. 


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This brilliantly illustrated book taps into children's natural curiosity about the vast world of space. This level two reader, written in simple language that is easy for young readers to understand, introduces children to our solar system, including all of the planets and dwarf planets, and lots of fascinating fun facts. This reader helps cultivate the explorers of tomorr This brilliantly illustrated book taps into children's natural curiosity about the vast world of space. This level two reader, written in simple language that is easy for young readers to understand, introduces children to our solar system, including all of the planets and dwarf planets, and lots of fascinating fun facts. This reader helps cultivate the explorers of tomorrow! This high-interest, educationally vetted series of beginning readers features the magnificent images of National Geographic, accompanied by texts written by experienced, skilled children's book authors. The inside back cover of the paperback edition is an interactive feature based upon the book. Level 1 books reinforce the content of the book with a kinesthetic learning activity. In Level 2 books readers complete a Cloze letter, or fun fill-in, with vocabulary words. Releases simultaneously in Reinforced Library Binding: 978-1-4263-1037-9 , $13.90/$15.95 Can National Geographic supports K-12 educators with ELA Common Core Resources. Visit www.natgeoed.org/commoncore for more information. 

30 review for Planets

  1. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

    I guess that NONE of the National Geographic Kids Readers seem to include bibliographies, citations and suggestions for further reading, and while this massively bothers me in and of itself, with Elizabeth Carney's Planets, the shortcomings of not featuring such supplemental information and research possibilities really have hit home for me so to speak. For while Planets does indeed present an organised and decently informational introduction to the solar system, to our sun and the planets, due I guess that NONE of the National Geographic Kids Readers seem to include bibliographies, citations and suggestions for further reading, and while this massively bothers me in and of itself, with Elizabeth Carney's Planets, the shortcomings of not featuring such supplemental information and research possibilities really have hit home for me so to speak. For while Planets does indeed present an organised and decently informational introduction to the solar system, to our sun and the planets, due to the fact that this book is obviously geared to and has been conceptualised for recently independent child readers, it is thus by nature and plain necessity rather simplistic and sparse in detail and description (definitely understandable, albeit I do rather fault the author for not mentioning that Pluto used to be considered one of the planets and that its status of now being considered a dwarf planet is a relatively recent phenomenon). And yes indeed (and in my humble opinion) because the factual information on the Sun, on Mercury, Venus, the Earth, Mars etc. is so lacking in detail (by the necessity of author Elizabeth Carney wanting to and also needing to keep her textual content, her printed words easily accessible to and for recently independent readers), supplemental, more detailed information that is not part of the text proper (including bibliographical information, including suggestions for further study and research) should really be a given, should be an absolutely required, necessary addition (as there will likely be both children and parents who might well desire more content, who might want more details, more information and the lack of websites, of possible books where this might be found, where this might be looked up in Planets, this really does sadly limit its potential teaching and learning value, especially with regard to easy and quick supplemental study and research). Two and a half stars for Planets (and while I have indeed found Planets a generally readable, and above all a well organised introduction to the solar system, to the planets for young readers, the combination of a lack of any and all bibliographical lists, the complete absence of suggestions for further study and knowledge expansion alongside of those silly, lame and yes indeed noticeably repetitive riddles and puns is enough for me to once again only consider a two star ranking at best, although I do in fact and actually consider Planets as an adequate enough introduction to the solar system, but with definite and personally frustrating, annoying limitations).

  2. 4 out of 5

    SurLeFur ©

    Have you ever wondered what it would be like to travel into outer space? What do you think you might see? Students can scan this book in from “what’s new” on abc mouse. It is filled with lots solar system facts, riddles, & great illustrations! What a great way to have fun while learning & tell “out of this world” planet jokes around Valentine’s Day, like “What did Neptune say to Saturn?” 🤣

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Summary: This National Geographic text for kids explains how the solar system, and the planets in it, works. Evaluation: Like all National Geographic text and resources, the information is accurate and can be trusted by all users. The information included tells of what the different planets are made of, physical characteristics, and fun facts about each planet that makes them unique. Teaching Idea: Use this text for a science unit about the solar system. Read the text to your class or have them Summary: This National Geographic text for kids explains how the solar system, and the planets in it, works. Evaluation: Like all National Geographic text and resources, the information is accurate and can be trusted by all users. The information included tells of what the different planets are made of, physical characteristics, and fun facts about each planet that makes them unique. Teaching Idea: Use this text for a science unit about the solar system. Read the text to your class or have them read it themselves in groups. In lower level classes (1st-3rd grade), let students make a reference book about each planet with specific facts for each one and a picture to show the physical characteristics of the planets. For higher level classes (4th and 5th grade), in those same groups, have the students make a “scaled” model of what they think the solar system looks like by using different sized spheres. Once the groups are done, perform a more accurate scaling of the planets and their size based on one another.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kalley the Chipmunk

    I liked it but I'm not really a space person, I like animal stuff. I liked it but I'm not really a space person, I like animal stuff.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Love this book, especially the pictures. Good book to read with young children.

  6. 4 out of 5

    📚♾ JRFOS ♾📚

    Read this via ABC mouse which was pretty cool! Illustrations and photos are easy for a preschooler to follow even if they can’t read yet.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paige Scott

    1) This book is full of fun facts and riddles to figure out the planet each page and clue is describing. This book has everything from information about the Sun, the Solar System, the Moon, Dwarf Planets, and Earth. The book also has a section in the back to "Stump Your Parents" that allows the children to ask their parents the questions and see if they will know the answer, which I thought was fun and interactive for the students. All in all, I think this book would be great to use in the class 1) This book is full of fun facts and riddles to figure out the planet each page and clue is describing. This book has everything from information about the Sun, the Solar System, the Moon, Dwarf Planets, and Earth. The book also has a section in the back to "Stump Your Parents" that allows the children to ask their parents the questions and see if they will know the answer, which I thought was fun and interactive for the students. All in all, I think this book would be great to use in the classrom! 2) Age Level: 5-8 years old, Grade Level: Kindergarten-3rd grade 3) Appropriate classroom use for this book would be during a science lesson, or when the students are learning about planets and the solar system 4) Individual students who might benefit from reading would be students wanting a more in depth description of the solar system, with vivid pictures to go along with each explanation. 5) As far as small group use with this book I would use this book, and some of the other series of this book and let them go around to different centers and read a different one at each center and let them ask the questions in the back of the book to each other. 6) As far as whole group use, we would figure out the riddles on each page interacting the whole class and letting the students try and guess what each page is describing, and then possibly have them create their own riddle pertaining to the Solar System. 7) Related Books: Volcanoes, Weird Sea Creatures, & Weather 8) There is a Kindle version of this book, and there are also many videos leading off of this book and many other topics on the National Geographic Kids website, which would be great for the classroom!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I think that this book is really only going to be something special to kids who know very little about the solar system. My kindergarten aged nephew knew a bit; he told me that Earth was the third planet from the sun, he knew the planets furthest from the sun are the coldest, and he knew that Wall-e is a rover, similar to the Mars rovers pictured in this book. The problem was, the book was a little too long to hold his interest the whole time. We read this in Kindle format, so maybe if we would I think that this book is really only going to be something special to kids who know very little about the solar system. My kindergarten aged nephew knew a bit; he told me that Earth was the third planet from the sun, he knew the planets furthest from the sun are the coldest, and he knew that Wall-e is a rover, similar to the Mars rovers pictured in this book. The problem was, the book was a little too long to hold his interest the whole time. We read this in Kindle format, so maybe if we would have had the bigger pictures afforded by paper books, he'd have had a longer attention span. My third grade niece already knew most of the information presented in the book, so while she listened to it, I don't think that she really learned anything particularly new. A few things were new, but most of the book was solar system basics. I guess, that as Earth is in relation to the sun, a kid just has to be in the sweet-spot educationally/developmentally speaking in order get the most from this book. First or second grade, perhaps? Also, go paper with this one.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Just the right length, I was just about to chuck it all and pow! it was over!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Caixeiro

    1. Awards the book has received (if any): Elizabeth Carney won the AAAS Science Journalism Award (2005) 2. Appropriate grade level(s): K-3 3. Original 3-line summary: This book explains our solar system and planets. The author describes their appearance and some key features. She focuses specifically on the Sun and Earth for some pages. At the end of the book, there is a quiz covering much of the information stated in the book. The readers are told to show off to their parents how much they learne 1. Awards the book has received (if any): Elizabeth Carney won the AAAS Science Journalism Award (2005) 2. Appropriate grade level(s): K-3 3. Original 3-line summary: This book explains our solar system and planets. The author describes their appearance and some key features. She focuses specifically on the Sun and Earth for some pages. At the end of the book, there is a quiz covering much of the information stated in the book. The readers are told to show off to their parents how much they learned about planets, using the quiz. 4. Original 3-line review: The colorful pictures and enlarged images of parts of our solar system help keep the reader interested in this book. I think it was extremely helpful to include the definitions of some key words throughout the book, in order to accommodate to the younger readers. I also think that the quiz at the end was a good addition, because it will help to find out how much information the reader really comprehended. 5. 2-3 possible in-class uses: This book can be read by the teacher to the class before handing out a printout of the quiz at the back of the book. It does not necessarily have to be graded, but can be discussed as a class in order to let the content really sink in. The book can also lead to a project for groups of students. They can choose a planet of interest for them and make a poster with some key facts about that planet.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Fay

    1. This informational text offers everything one needs to know about the Planets. It includes information on the Sun, our solar system, dwarf planets and even the many moons throughout it all. The content is delivered through eye-popping illustrations and easily digestible facts, clues, interesting oddities and even knee-slapping jokes! 2. These series of National Geographic Kids books are so engaging for the reader. The photographs are stunning and the captions offer great information and facts 1. This informational text offers everything one needs to know about the Planets. It includes information on the Sun, our solar system, dwarf planets and even the many moons throughout it all. The content is delivered through eye-popping illustrations and easily digestible facts, clues, interesting oddities and even knee-slapping jokes! 2. These series of National Geographic Kids books are so engaging for the reader. The photographs are stunning and the captions offer great information and facts about the topic being discussed. I love the fun and weird facts that are included on each of the planets and the jokes add an extra touch that make you forget you're learning and instead having fun while reading! 3. I would pair this book with other informational texts on planets to teach a science unit on the solar system. Other picture books that would be a great fit include "The Sun is Kind of a Big Deal" by Nick Seluk and "Earth! My First 4.54 Billion Years" by Stacy McAnulty. 4. I would use this as a mentor text for writing using text features. I would ask my students to label their illustrations, add captions, a Table of Contents and even headings into a informational text book they are creating.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

    If you like to learn about the solar system and our planets then this is a good book for beginners. The pictures inside the book are very colorful and educational. The solar system is very fun to learn about and to learn all about the planets. You can learn basic facts about the solar system. The pictures and fun to look at and learn about all the planets its not a very long book but it has some good facts to read about. Its always fun when camping out to look up at the stars. It would be fun to If you like to learn about the solar system and our planets then this is a good book for beginners. The pictures inside the book are very colorful and educational. The solar system is very fun to learn about and to learn all about the planets. You can learn basic facts about the solar system. The pictures and fun to look at and learn about all the planets its not a very long book but it has some good facts to read about. Its always fun when camping out to look up at the stars. It would be fun to go into space and fly on a rocket up into space. But you would be gone for a very long time and maybe get boring being in space for that long. I would probably miss my family a lot. This book you can learn a lot and have lots of pictures to look at very bright and nice to look at.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary Volesky

    Genre: Informational Grade: 3rd - 5th Unique Feature: In this book there was a very fun feature where it had a small box on the page that says "Science Clue" and in this box there would be a feature or vocabulary word pertaining to the planets or the solar system and would define it. I thought this could be very helpful for the students who were not sure what some of the words meant or just wanted to know a fun fact. Genre: Informational Grade: 3rd - 5th Unique Feature: In this book there was a very fun feature where it had a small box on the page that says "Science Clue" and in this box there would be a feature or vocabulary word pertaining to the planets or the solar system and would define it. I thought this could be very helpful for the students who were not sure what some of the words meant or just wanted to know a fun fact.

  14. 5 out of 5

    MotherofReaders

    My preschool aged daughter wasn’t all that interested in reading this book and didn’t select it in her own. However, when I encouraged her to read it with me before we returned it to the library, she was interested and engaged. She loved the multiple choice quiz in the back (the first one of these she has ever done). She only missed one. I missed two. Am I embarrassed that my three year old beat me in a reading comprehension/memory test? Yes, a little bit ... but I’m also pretty proud.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    Great teaching resource My students Enjoyed. Good teaching supplement. Kept students engaged and asking more questions. Graphics were clear and brightly colored holding their intereet

  16. 5 out of 5

    Colin Soder

    Does fine as an intro to the solar system One of the better National Geographic kids readers (which isn't saying a whole lot). It does not describe the planets individually but is more of an overview of the solar system. The graphics are OK but not great. Does fine as an intro to the solar system One of the better National Geographic kids readers (which isn't saying a whole lot). It does not describe the planets individually but is more of an overview of the solar system. The graphics are OK but not great.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alli Trenkamp

    This informational book shows and explains all of the planets in our solar system. This is a great book for all ages to learn more about the solar system. Students learn about telescopes, astronauts etc. I would use this book in group work and to learn more about science.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sydney M

    Plants This book describes what planets are and what surrounds them. It shows the solar system in order. There are eight big planets and five small planets. It tells you what are the gas plantes are and what the dwarf plants are. It talks about the earth you live on and the moon.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lauren DeVore

    Published in 2012, Nonfiction. This book informs students about the solar system and the different planets in the solar. This includes fun pictures, jokes, discussion and guiding questions, and vocabulary and I think it would be nice to have a collection of the National Geographic books because they provide a fun way for students to learn about different things.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laykin Toney

    Great short read for kids to learn about planets on their own!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kevin lowman

    Love it I got a book a real book😇

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kay Mcaloney

    Wonderful teaching at the appropriate level for learning about our planets and the solar system. Great visuals and descriptions. Highly recommend!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brooklyn Shaffer

    The illustrations were on both pages and used as the background. I liked learning about the planets.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Usama Albastaki

    Present a lot of information in simple way. Read to my kid.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jayda Safford

    Earth is the third planet

  26. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Space has always interested me. Last semester I had a class about space and this book refreshed a lot of that information I learned in that specific class.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elpida Cervantes

    National Geographic books for kids are always fun to read. Especially this book on planets. Students who are curious about space can learn a lot of interesting information from this book. Students will know more about our solar system after reading this book. This book is at a level 2, meaning that it is for students who are ready for longer sentences and more complex vocabulary.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    [3.5 stars] Cute and quick.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

    Planets is a great informational nonfiction book about the planets in our solar system. The book goes through each planet and the solar system overall including definitions for words young readers might not know such as orbit, gas, and weather. It states that some rockets that go to different planets or orbit in space are launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida. Other facts the book includes are that jupiter has four moons, the tallest mountain is on Mars (called Olympus Mons), and that Neptune Planets is a great informational nonfiction book about the planets in our solar system. The book goes through each planet and the solar system overall including definitions for words young readers might not know such as orbit, gas, and weather. It states that some rockets that go to different planets or orbit in space are launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida. Other facts the book includes are that jupiter has four moons, the tallest mountain is on Mars (called Olympus Mons), and that Neptune has winds that are much faster than Earth's strongest wind.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Milan Žila

    A simple introduction to the solar system. Short and simple sentences are used and words are explained well. Even though it's supposed to be read by an independed reader, my daughter memorized the solar system from this when she was 2, then forgot it by the time she turned 3 :) You can always get years of reading value with National Geographic Kids products. The topic is well organized and I liked the quiz at the end. It's also a good introduction to a bigger book like Little Kids First Big Book o A simple introduction to the solar system. Short and simple sentences are used and words are explained well. Even though it's supposed to be read by an independed reader, my daughter memorized the solar system from this when she was 2, then forgot it by the time she turned 3 :) You can always get years of reading value with National Geographic Kids products. The topic is well organized and I liked the quiz at the end. It's also a good introduction to a bigger book like Little Kids First Big Book of Space. What I didn't like is how they change the hues of Uranus and Neptune. I feel like this is an oversight as on page 11 Neptune is dark blue, then on page 17 the hues of Neptune and Uranus are switched, on page 20 it's different yet again, then on page 30 it's back to the original hue. The incosistency of the colours was confusing regardless of the reason why they did it.

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