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Brand Failures: The Truth about the 100 Biggest Branding Mistakes of All Time

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It's not just smaller, lesser-known companies that have launched dud brands. On the contrary, most of the world's global giants have launched new products that have flopped - spectacularly and at great cost. Haig organizes these 100 "failures" into ten types which include classic failures (e.g., New Coke), idea failures (e.g., R.J.Reynolds' smokeless cigarettes), extension It's not just smaller, lesser-known companies that have launched dud brands. On the contrary, most of the world's global giants have launched new products that have flopped - spectacularly and at great cost. Haig organizes these 100 "failures" into ten types which include classic failures (e.g., New Coke), idea failures (e.g., R.J.Reynolds' smokeless cigarettes), extension failures (e.g. Harley Davidson perfume), culture failures (e.g., Kellogs in India), and technology failures (e.g., Pets.com).


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It's not just smaller, lesser-known companies that have launched dud brands. On the contrary, most of the world's global giants have launched new products that have flopped - spectacularly and at great cost. Haig organizes these 100 "failures" into ten types which include classic failures (e.g., New Coke), idea failures (e.g., R.J.Reynolds' smokeless cigarettes), extension It's not just smaller, lesser-known companies that have launched dud brands. On the contrary, most of the world's global giants have launched new products that have flopped - spectacularly and at great cost. Haig organizes these 100 "failures" into ten types which include classic failures (e.g., New Coke), idea failures (e.g., R.J.Reynolds' smokeless cigarettes), extension failures (e.g. Harley Davidson perfume), culture failures (e.g., Kellogs in India), and technology failures (e.g., Pets.com).

30 review for Brand Failures: The Truth about the 100 Biggest Branding Mistakes of All Time

  1. 4 out of 5

    Veeral

    We love failures. Not ours, of course not! But we love it when a brand of some criminally rich corporation fails. Didn’t we use to make fun of Microsoft’s Windows NT? Remember Windows NT? The one we "lovingly" called “Neanderthal Technology”? In the same spirit, Matt Haig has written Brand Failures – to entertain us at the expense of criminally rich corporations! Well, mostly. The book was written in 2003 so it is almost a decade old, so you wouldn't get to read anything about recent corporate fa We love failures. Not ours, of course not! But we love it when a brand of some criminally rich corporation fails. Didn’t we use to make fun of Microsoft’s Windows NT? Remember Windows NT? The one we "lovingly" called “Neanderthal Technology”? In the same spirit, Matt Haig has written Brand Failures – to entertain us at the expense of criminally rich corporations! Well, mostly. The book was written in 2003 so it is almost a decade old, so you wouldn't get to read anything about recent corporate failures, but it’s still fun to read most of the times. Haig states in his book that it might be useful for case study if you are in advertising or marketing. He has presented 100 such cases and at the end of each case, has provided a summary about “lessons learnt” from a particular brand failure. But as it happens, he contradicts himself many times doing so. Well, that tells you that there isn't an ideal way to advertise your brand but that doesn’t mean that the following couldn't have been avoided: R. J. Reynolds’ Smokeless Cigarette R. J. R. produces brands like Camel, Winston, Salem and Doral. By that we can safely assume that they are experts in causing cancer. So, it should boggle our minds that they launched a cigarette that was “smokeless”. Sure, there are still smokeless cigarettes available in the market and I am sure their main objective is to reduce passive smoking, but R. J. R.’s smokeless cigarettes (named Premier) didn’t just stop there. First, there was the taste issue. One person who ‘smoked’ Premier complained that it ‘tasted like shit’. And he was RJ Reynolds’ chief executive. And well, there was a certain problem using the product. ‘Inhaling the Premier required vacuum-powered lungs, lighting it virtually required a blowtorch, and, if successfully lit with a match, the sulphur reaction produced a smell and a flavour that left users retching.’ ‘It took them a while to figure out that smokers actually like the smoke part of smoking,’ one commentator said at the time. And in addition, absence of smoke might wrongly suggest to others in your vicinity that you are smoking pot. A certain William Shakespeare once said “What’s in a name?” I would say, “Everything.” We can imagine how the critics would respond today if they found a grocery list written by William Shakespeare himself. “The writing is sublime. Especially the “dozen limes”. A lesser writer would have written “12 limes”. But Shakespeare makes us realize that even limes are not just eatables expressed in numbers. There is much more to them than that. I like how in a detached and brutal way this whole list was written. You just want to stay home and read it again and again until your kids starve.” But unfortunately (for them), these companies took Mr. Shakespeare too seriously. The Ford Edsel – Every Day Something Else Leaks Ford was quiet serious about giving the right name to their new car. So much so that they even announced a contest for public to name their car. And even contacted the popular poet Marianne Moore to find a name which would signify a ‘visceral feeling of elegance, fleetness, advanced features and design.’ Umm.. okay. Her rather eccentric suggestions included Mongoose Civique, Resilient Bullet, Utopian Turtletop (?!) and the Varsity Stroke. Phew! So, the then Ford chairman said ‘darn it’ and decided to name their new car “Edsel”. It was the name of his father, and the Ford founder’s only son. But to their surprise, people didn’t warm up to the name Edsel. They thought it sounded more like, Now, if you conversationally said to someone that “I drive an Edsel.”, this picture would pop up in their mind. Recent example of bad brand naming would be the movie John Carter. Today’s young generation hardly knows Edgar Rice Burroughs, so it wouldn’t have made a tiny bit of difference to them if Disney had named their movie “John Papadopoulos” instead of “John Carter”. So it sounded more like a B-grade movie to today’s kids rather than a movie based on a classic novel. Pepsi AM Because its name dictated when the product should be consumed, the market size was restricted to specific-occasion usage. But do you know what I enjoy most? Translation troubles. Shall we? Pepsi in Taiwan In Taiwan, Pepsi’s advertising slogan ‘Come alive with the Pepsi generation’ was translated as ‘Pepsi will bring your ancestors back from the dead.’ Schweppes Tonic Water in Italy In Italy, the product name (Schweppes Tonic Water) was translated as ‘Schweppes Toilet Water’. Chevy Nova in Latin America General Motors’ Chevy Nova didn’t do well in Latin America. Because ‘Nova’ means ‘It doesn’t go’ in Spanish. Mitsubishi Pajero in Spain In Spanish, ‘pajero’ is slang for ‘masturbator’. Toyota Fiera in Puerto Rico Where ‘fiera’ translates to ‘ugly old woman’. Of course! Rolls Royce ‘Silver Mist’ in Germany Well… at least it’s silver. Gerber in Africa This is Gerber’s logo. Now read along. When baby food manufacturer Gerber started to sell its products in Africa it used the same packaging as for Western markets. This packaging included a picture of a baby boy on the label. Surprised at low sales, Gerber discovered that in Africa, as most customers can’t read English, Western companies generally put pictures on the label of what’s inside. Coors in Spain Coors beer had equally bad luck in Spain with its ‘Turn it loose’ slogan. It translated as ‘You will suffer from diarrhea’. Umm…. next. Frank Perdue’s chicken in Spain US food brand Frank Perdue’s chicken campaign created confusion with the strap line ‘It takes a tough man to make a tender chicken.’ In Spain this became ‘It takes an aroused man to make a chicken affectionate.’ Clairol’s Mist Stick in Germany When Clairol launched its ‘Mist Stick’ curling iron in Germany, the company apparently had no idea that ‘Mist’ was a slang term for manure. Parker Pens in Mexico Parker Pens launched their pens in Mexican market with ads intended to read ‘It won’t leak in your pocket and embarrass you’ but, the ad stated ‘It won’t leak in your pocket and impregnate you.’ They had confused ‘embarrass’ with the Spanish verb ‘embrazar’ or ‘to impregnate’. This book showcases many such failures alongwith others which are more technical rather than funny. So, read it if you are in no mood to read anything serious. Let me leave you with one particular product which was a major failure in India. You might know that Cricket as a sport is very popular in India. And the official colour of Indian cricket team is blue. So, Pepsi decided to launch ‘Pepsi Blue’ in India at the time of Cricket World Cup to cash in on the event. But to their surprise, the product failed. Why? Well… because of this.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Phil Fox

    An interesting read... but there are two big issues with the work. 1. Hindsight is 20/20. 2. Some of these "mistakes" were simply ideas that failed due to unforeseeable circumstances and nothing more. I really don't feel like the company should be called out on those fronts. An interesting read... but there are two big issues with the work. 1. Hindsight is 20/20. 2. Some of these "mistakes" were simply ideas that failed due to unforeseeable circumstances and nothing more. I really don't feel like the company should be called out on those fronts.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    It's kinda interesting to read about failures for a change: generally there's a massive survivor bias to the analysis of business strategy and tactics. Looking at who died on their way to the podium is also instructive, though I found I wearied of relentless failure after a while. Nonetheless, a few interesting factoids along the way: Domino’s was the first company to offer home-delivered pizza and remains the leader in that particular market. Coca-Cola, the world’s top five most popular and fina It's kinda interesting to read about failures for a change: generally there's a massive survivor bias to the analysis of business strategy and tactics. Looking at who died on their way to the podium is also instructive, though I found I wearied of relentless failure after a while. Nonetheless, a few interesting factoids along the way: Domino’s was the first company to offer home-delivered pizza and remains the leader in that particular market. Coca-Cola, the world’s top five most popular and financially successful brand, was the first in the cola category. As Chapter 10 will make clear, this theory breaks down, however, in technology markets. Owing to the fact that consumer behaviour tends to be approximately five years behind technological breakthroughs [emphasis mine], the first mover advantage is often lost. As you would expect with a brand that has built its name through uniformity, McDonald’s is heavily centralized. Most branding and marketing decisions need to go through the company’s headquarters in Oak Brook, Illinois. The recipe for the Arch Deluxe itself came from the Oak Brook kitchen. This contrasts with McDonald’s major product successes such as the Big Mac, the Hot Apple Pie, the Egg McMuffin and the Filet o’ Fish, which were all invented in operators’ kitchens out in the field [emphasis mine] (whereas other flops such as the McLean burger and McPizza were also conjured up at the Oak Brook headquarters).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    Quite fun, and the chapters are usefully divided into various types of failures. The writing takes an appropriately "wtf?" tone where necessary, and it is often necessary: 15. Clairol's "Touch of Yoghurt" shampoo Launched in 1979, Clairol's yoghurt-based shampoo failed to attract customers largely because nobody liked the idea of washing their hair with yoghurt. Of those who did buy the product, there were even some cases of people mistakenly eating it, and getting very ill as a result. The "Touch Quite fun, and the chapters are usefully divided into various types of failures. The writing takes an appropriately "wtf?" tone where necessary, and it is often necessary: 15. Clairol's "Touch of Yoghurt" shampoo Launched in 1979, Clairol's yoghurt-based shampoo failed to attract customers largely because nobody liked the idea of washing their hair with yoghurt. Of those who did buy the product, there were even some cases of people mistakenly eating it, and getting very ill as a result. The "Touch of Yoghurt" concept is made even more remarkable by the introduction three years earlier by Clairol of a similar shampoo called the "Look of Buttermilk". This product had instantly bombed in test markets where consumers were left asking: what exactly is the 'look of buttermilk' and why should I want it?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Themistocles

    I found little of much interest or importance in this book. Several cases can be found in other books, but there are lots of cases where I learnt new stuff. However, several of the 100 cases "examined" are only analysed within a couple of sentences (while others extend to several pages) and as such offer very little insight. What's more, many of those cases presented here can hardly be described as 'blunders' and the smug explanations given to justify the characterisation could equally well go the I found little of much interest or importance in this book. Several cases can be found in other books, but there are lots of cases where I learnt new stuff. However, several of the 100 cases "examined" are only analysed within a couple of sentences (while others extend to several pages) and as such offer very little insight. What's more, many of those cases presented here can hardly be described as 'blunders' and the smug explanations given to justify the characterisation could equally well go the other way if these ideas had succeeded. An idea that never caught on isn't always a blunder. After reading half of it I found myself skimming through some of the stories. Quite basic, though still of interest to some.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Good brand history lesson Overall a good read and makes a good reference for many brands across many industries. Keep it close as you dicide what to do with your own brand.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Interesting both as trivia and as cautionary advice for marketers.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Yuliya

    Surprisingly, this book was an easy read for me. It was fascinating to learn about the history of the brands and how far back some of them they go. It gives me a better understanding of how the state of the current economics and its key players came to be. It only goes to show that companies are run by people, and people make mistakes all the time. I only wish this was a more current book since it was published in 2003 and I would be interested to learn about some of the more recent brand failur Surprisingly, this book was an easy read for me. It was fascinating to learn about the history of the brands and how far back some of them they go. It gives me a better understanding of how the state of the current economics and its key players came to be. It only goes to show that companies are run by people, and people make mistakes all the time. I only wish this was a more current book since it was published in 2003 and I would be interested to learn about some of the more recent brand failures.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Suraj

    We have all wondered about why certain brands fail. Why certain failed products result into the closure of companies that were once the pioneers ? All these are answered in this epic tale of failures of different brands, be it CocaCola, McDonalds, Harley Davidson or Yardley. An amazing compilation of different reasons, rather mistakes that lead to the failure of different Brands.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mukta Sharma

    Though the content was good, I personally felt the style of writing very dragging and repetitive in nature. Also, after reading the book I couldn't drive a simple or complicated math around brand failures. It was more felt more like - yes, it's easy to talk about failure now. Though the content was good, I personally felt the style of writing very dragging and repetitive in nature. Also, after reading the book I couldn't drive a simple or complicated math around brand failures. It was more felt more like - yes, it's easy to talk about failure now.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nguyen MiNhan

    Not all the cases are interesting but some good still.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shreya

    You learn more from failures than successes. A book that compiles lessons from some of the biggest market leaders. It's a book of wisdom. You learn more from failures than successes. A book that compiles lessons from some of the biggest market leaders. It's a book of wisdom.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Khanh Do

    I like this book. It taught me a lots about branding through failures of brands. There are some cases having deep analysis, others lack of detailed explanations.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dhananjayan Jayabal

    It could have been even more elaborate.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Interesting read. It's really an interesting read, especially for business case studies. I'm sure down the road there are many more examples. Pretty up to date and examples from around the world. Interesting read. It's really an interesting read, especially for business case studies. I'm sure down the road there are many more examples. Pretty up to date and examples from around the world.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hriday

    A wonderful and well-researched compilation of major branding failures. The book is valuable not just for someone involved with the branding/ marketing activity of a firm but can also be hilarious at times when you read how people trip up over elementary elements of pereption!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ana Mardoll

    Brand Failures / 9780749444334 Who doesn't love reading about epic failures in marketing and product branding? A good "brand autopsy" can be both fun and educational, and can really help educate amateurs (like me) and marketing savvy experts alike on what pitfalls to avoid and how to properly package and market a new brand. "Brand Failures" attempts to ambitiously tackle 101 famous branding mistakes and errors, from the classic "New Coke" to the failure of "Betamax" to Kodak's recent efforts to r Brand Failures / 9780749444334 Who doesn't love reading about epic failures in marketing and product branding? A good "brand autopsy" can be both fun and educational, and can really help educate amateurs (like me) and marketing savvy experts alike on what pitfalls to avoid and how to properly package and market a new brand. "Brand Failures" attempts to ambitiously tackle 101 famous branding mistakes and errors, from the classic "New Coke" to the failure of "Betamax" to Kodak's recent efforts to remain relevant in a world where casual consumers are increasingly turning away from film and to digital cameras. If there is a problem with this approach, it is that at 235 pages, each brand failure story is spread distressingly thin - most of the vignettes have less than 2 pages devoted to them. This simply isn't enough time and space to discuss all the factors that went into the failure of Enron, or Crystal Pepsi, or most of the other brands on display here. The other problem with this approach is that some of the "autopsy analysis" statements seem a little questionable. It's easy, of course, to say when a brand has failed, but it's much harder to say WHY the brand has failed. Did "Earring Ken" really fail because his 'alternative' approach to masculinity alienated homophobic parents, or did he fail for the same reason that Ken sales have traditionally lagged behind Barbie - because little girls care more about the doll they can project upon? Did the leather substitute Corfam really fail because it didn't "feel" as good as real leather, or was it because the company failed to emphasize the animal-cruelty issue (which would still be a failure to correctly market a brand, but a different failure than what is given here)? Did the HotWheels PC and Barbie PC fail because parents didn't appreciate the overt gendered marketing or because parents in 1999 weren't quite ready to invest heavily in personal computers for their children? In some ways, "Brand Failures" is a failure because the quick overview approach leaves a lot of questions unanswered and aspects unexplored. I would have liked to see this book about twice the length and containing half the products - a solid 10 pages or so per product would have given the reader a much better grasp of each product and a better look at why the brand *might* have failed, with heavier discussion on potential alternatives and competitors and market factors that may have doomed the product. In other ways, however, "Brand Failures" is a success because as a good overview of failed products, there is a lot of information here that probably can't easily be found elsewhere in a similarly compiled form. I think this would be a useful text for an "intro" course as a supplemental material to a meatier book, or an interesting foray into the subject for casual readers who are intrigued by the subject but don't want to get bogged down in a lot of extra details. NOTE: This review is based on a free Advance Review Copy of this book provided through NetGalley. ~ Ana Mardoll

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    What helps a brand succeed – or makes it fail? Brand Failures attempts to divine out the secrets to success by examining one hundred products or companies which have tanked. Some were new, others ancient, still others new ventures backed by established titans – but failure comes to all. Each of the book’s one hundred sections features a different American or British brand. The sections vary in length: New Coke, which starts the work off, features a history of Coca-Cola and Pepsi’s competition, s What helps a brand succeed – or makes it fail? Brand Failures attempts to divine out the secrets to success by examining one hundred products or companies which have tanked. Some were new, others ancient, still others new ventures backed by established titans – but failure comes to all. Each of the book’s one hundred sections features a different American or British brand. The sections vary in length: New Coke, which starts the work off, features a history of Coca-Cola and Pepsi’s competition, setting the stage for why Coca-Cola made the decision it to rework its product, but the book’s midpoint is taken by a series of paragraph-long sections which are more a list of humorous advertising mistranslations than proper chapters. The longer chapters end in list of lessons learned, from the patently obvious (“Advertising is important”) to the more insightful (“Don’t clone your competitors”) . Some of the lessons conflict: while the author asserts at the start that in the Age of Branding, actual products matter little compared to the power of the brand, the way it makes people feel. Hence, while people in blind taste tastes may have preferred New Coke to classic coke and Pepsi, when the actual product was rolled out, people acted poorly: it wasn’t the coke they had been brought up with. They had been told “Coke is It”, and were now expected to believe that Coke wasn’t It. Despite the author’s deemphasizing the value of a product, numerous examples demonstrate that it can’t be ignored, either. Haig uses Beta-Max and VCR to back up his belief that quality isn’t particularly important: while he stresses the audio and video quality of the Betamax tapes, his account also mentions the fact that whole movies could not fit on such tapes. The quality of the picture doesn’t equal the quality of the product overall. To whom these lessons are to be imparted is uncertain. While they’re ostensibly aimed at business personalities attempting to launch or expand a brand, would such personalities really be reading a work written for popular audiences? Wouldn’t marketing executives be paying more attention to marketing journals? I’m particularly interested in the way marketing works so I can evade its tricks, but I found the work more entertaining as one of business history, for some of the products released were truly weird. In the 1950s, for instance, Dodge produced a car marketed for women: called La Femme and covered in pink inside and out, with floral patterns on the seats, it looked like something even Mattel would be reluctant to foist on Barbie. (The lesson of this section: don’t patronize customers.) This breezy and entertaining book may be of use to budding entrepreneurs, but I suspect most readers who be those wanting to be amused by business misadventures, which it certainly provides.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    Why did Coca-Colas New Coke fail? Why is Kelloggs not a happening product in India? What happened when Sony attached itself to the movie Godzilla€™ (which I loved of course)? Did Pepsi ever make a mighty mistake and then learn from it? What about the bizzare launches of Virgin Cola? Harley Davidsons Perfume? Ponds Toothpaste? Heinz cleaning Vinegar? Chiquitas fruits? With so many product extensions of Crest & Miller why did they actually fail? Do you still remember Pam Am? McDonalds? Enron? Planet Hollywood? Why did Coca-Colas New Coke fail? Why is Kelloggs not a happening product in India? What happened when Sony attached itself to the movie Godzilla€™ (which I loved of course)? Did Pepsi ever make a mighty mistake and then learn from it? What about the bizzare launches of Virgin Cola? Harley Davidsons Perfume? Ponds Toothpaste? Heinz cleaning Vinegar? Chiquitas fruits? With so many product extensions of Crest & Miller why did they actually fail? Do you still remember Pam Am? McDonalds? Enron? Planet Hollywood? Pets.com? Wordstar (the software)? If these questions to not arouse your curiosity, then I would honesty suggest dont bother purchasing this book. However, if these questions to spark an indefatigable and unquenchable desire to want to know the timeless truth The masterpiece by Matt Haig is your answer. For all Al Ries, Laura Ries & Jack Trout fans - Brand Failures: The Truth about the 100 Biggest Branding Mistakes of All Times by Matt Haig is a Must Read for anyone and everyone. Overall ratings - 9/10

  20. 5 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    "Why did Coca-Colas New Coke fail? Why is Kelloggs not a happening product in India? What happened when Sony attached itself to the movie Godzilla€™ (which I loved of course)? Did Pepsi ever make a mighty mistake and then learn from it? What about the bizzare launches of Virgin Cola? Harley Davidsons Perfume? Ponds Toothpaste? Heinz cleaning Vinegar? Chiquitas fruits? With so many product extensions of Crest & Miller why did they actually fail? Do you still remember Pam Am? McDonalds? Enron? Planet H "Why did Coca-Colas New Coke fail? Why is Kelloggs not a happening product in India? What happened when Sony attached itself to the movie Godzilla€™ (which I loved of course)? Did Pepsi ever make a mighty mistake and then learn from it? What about the bizzare launches of Virgin Cola? Harley Davidsons Perfume? Ponds Toothpaste? Heinz cleaning Vinegar? Chiquitas fruits? With so many product extensions of Crest & Miller why did they actually fail? Do you still remember Pam Am? McDonalds? Enron? Planet Hollywood? Pets.com? Wordstar (the software)? If these questions to not arouse your curiosity, then I would honesty suggest dont bother purchasing this book. However, if these questions to spark an indefatigable and unquenchable desire to want to know the timeless truth The masterpiece by Matt Haig is your answer. For all Al Ries, Laura Ries & Jack Trout fans - Brand Failures: The Truth about the 100 Biggest Branding Mistakes of All Times by Matt Haig is a Must Read for anyone and everyone. Overall ratings - 9/10

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Harris

    What do Coca-Cola, McDonald's, IBM, Microsoft, and Virgin have in common?  They are all global giants, but what they are less recognized for are the branded products they've launched that have bombed -- spectacularly and at great cost.Brand Failures takes a look at how such disasters occur.  In this updated edition of Matt Haig's book, we're given the inside story of 100 major brand blunders.  Haig describes the brands that have launched with the help of multi-million dollar advertising campaign What do Coca-Cola, McDonald's, IBM, Microsoft, and Virgin have in common?  They are all global giants, but what they are less recognized for are the branded products they've launched that have bombed -- spectacularly and at great cost.Brand Failures takes a look at how such disasters occur.  In this updated edition of Matt Haig's book, we're given the inside story of 100 major brand blunders.  Haig describes the brands that have launched with the help of multi-million dollar advertising campaigns only to sink without a trace.  From brand mistakes made by successful blue-chip companies to lesser-known but hilarious bomb-shells, he explains what went wrong in every case and provides a valuable checklist of lessons learned.  A tour of Matt Haig's hall of failure will alert readers to potential dangers and describe how to ensure a long, healthy life for a brand.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Schofield

    Matt Haig describes the different ways brands have failed, whether it is from bad ideas, over extention of the brand, PR failures, cultural failures, rebranding failures or just the brand becoming old and tired. In the materialistic world we live in I find the concept of brands and why people believe that brand A is better than brand B interesting. As is why brands fail. Matt Haig's describes why 101 brands fail and although it is faninating these can become repetative and his section on the less Matt Haig describes the different ways brands have failed, whether it is from bad ideas, over extention of the brand, PR failures, cultural failures, rebranding failures or just the brand becoming old and tired. In the materialistic world we live in I find the concept of brands and why people believe that brand A is better than brand B interesting. As is why brands fail. Matt Haig's describes why 101 brands fail and although it is faninating these can become repetative and his section on the lessons on each failure seemed a bit pointless. Written in 2002 this book already seems outdated. Despite these critisms Brand Failures is an interesting and easy read for those interested in consumerism.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nana

    A really enjoyable and informative read that summarizes briefly 100 notable cases of branding mistakes in the last few decades. Haig has a concise, but casual enough style that means you don't need technical business savvy to get this. Especially liked how each case study had a little "lessons" section at its end to give you big points to come away with - I learned a lot. Obviously a tiny bit out of date given that it was written slightly over a decade ago, but most of these "failures" are far e A really enjoyable and informative read that summarizes briefly 100 notable cases of branding mistakes in the last few decades. Haig has a concise, but casual enough style that means you don't need technical business savvy to get this. Especially liked how each case study had a little "lessons" section at its end to give you big points to come away with - I learned a lot. Obviously a tiny bit out of date given that it was written slightly over a decade ago, but most of these "failures" are far enough in the past that it isn't too distracting.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sonika

    Some of the biggest brands - from Coke to British Royal Post - failed miserably due to various reasons. We often talk of how they rose, but this book gives us those important lessons of how the best of brands can die. It captures different brand stories very well with lessons drawn from each of those examples.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elise

    This book provided a fascinating history of US culture in a way that I could relate to since almost all of the products were brand names that I recognized. Some examples were British, and those obviously didn't trigger memories for me. The only downside is the book had a lot of spelling errors and many English words with British origin that couldn't be found in my Kindle e-book dictionary. This book provided a fascinating history of US culture in a way that I could relate to since almost all of the products were brand names that I recognized. Some examples were British, and those obviously didn't trigger memories for me. The only downside is the book had a lot of spelling errors and many English words with British origin that couldn't be found in my Kindle e-book dictionary.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    There is a lot of information in this book about why "brands" not products, fail, and I found it most interesting but.....probably not useful as a predictor of what "will" succeed, only an analysis of why these brands failed. It was a quick read and interesting and the author did his homework. There is a lot of information in this book about why "brands" not products, fail, and I found it most interesting but.....probably not useful as a predictor of what "will" succeed, only an analysis of why these brands failed. It was a quick read and interesting and the author did his homework.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anh

    Very interesting read, those failing examples always make me laugh. I will recommend it for educational purpose, though some of the brands name are from so long ago that I hardly know them, it would be better if there is another book on more-current failing brands.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gopinath Raj

    The book will improve the knowledge about marketing strategies. It will tell about the failure of great companies too, which came with an idea of advance one too. If you are in the field of marketing this one of the good book to read

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anton

    It is a fun read, but gets kinda repetitive in some chapters. Reading about FAIL is always fun.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Martin Linkov

    Interesting read so far

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