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"A great read."—Asian Reporter Japan's Gundam franchise boasts a worldwide cult of devotees. This second edition of creator Yoshiyuki Tomino's novelization is redesigned for a new generation of fans. Yoshiyuki Tomino is one of Japan's best known science-fiction directors. Frederik L. Schodt writes extensively on Japanese culture and lives in San Francisco, California.


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"A great read."—Asian Reporter Japan's Gundam franchise boasts a worldwide cult of devotees. This second edition of creator Yoshiyuki Tomino's novelization is redesigned for a new generation of fans. Yoshiyuki Tomino is one of Japan's best known science-fiction directors. Frederik L. Schodt writes extensively on Japanese culture and lives in San Francisco, California.

30 review for Mobile Suit Gundam: Awakening, Escalation, Confrontation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Awakening: ☆☆☆☆☆ Escalation: ☆☆☆☆ Confrontation: ☆☆☆☆☆ Reviews of individual novels in the links above. Awakening: ☆☆☆☆☆ Escalation: ☆☆☆☆ Confrontation: ☆☆☆☆☆ Reviews of individual novels in the links above.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Maverynthia

    48 Status updates.... It starts at page 21 and it goes till page 516. The misogyny train in this fine literature is fully booked and not stopping till it reaches the other station. WOOOO WOOOOOO Women are only around as literal sex objects, towards the end it even describes an alarm voice as "attractive female" IT'S JUST A VOICE and finally the last sentence is of a naked woman. Let's not mention that Lala Sune and Kusko Al die for manpain and Amuro is the one that sends them to their grave because h 48 Status updates.... It starts at page 21 and it goes till page 516. The misogyny train in this fine literature is fully booked and not stopping till it reaches the other station. WOOOO WOOOOOO Women are only around as literal sex objects, towards the end it even describes an alarm voice as "attractive female" IT'S JUST A VOICE and finally the last sentence is of a naked woman. Let's not mention that Lala Sune and Kusko Al die for manpain and Amuro is the one that sends them to their grave because he can't get a handle on his anger. Then the relationship with Char is just them pretty much hating each other because Amuro killed them. THen their is Sayla Mass/Artesia Deikun that really doesn't do much here but act as just a sexual outlet for Amuro who seems to love her but only so he can shove his dick in her. She's humiliated on several occasions and called a bungler and finally at the end she pees herself twice because..... because wimmin or something. The text even goes on to describe how strong she is or something but she's the only one doing it and no man does. Finally at the end she swims naked into an ocean... for no real reason. Sayla isn't the only one to escape unharmed. Frau Bow has kids dumped onto her and then is pointedly forgotten. Mirai is also constantly torn down by the creepy author gaze. I see that I posted at page 188 about "He wanted her" and then again on page 245 again that "he wanted her" AND AGAIN ON PAGE 414 Those are some creepy ass words. Even in Romance it's kind of like. "Can you not treat people like possessions, especially women?" I bet I even forgot some instances of "he wanted her". No she never wants him either. So what about the mecha and stuff. Mostly massive info dumps with a tiny bit of action going on. There really wasn't a lot to dig into character wise unless it's Amuro being a shitstain or Char being a shitstain or any of the other men being shitstains. So many shitstains this book needs some professional carpet cleaning. If you like Gundam 0079 it's best to just.. not read this book. Not only does it kill off the main character for... super telepathy message???? but it's plain shit to the other characters.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Isaac

    It's always interesting to find a translation of a Japanese novel aimed at the anime fanbase. There aren't enough of these available in the West. I'm a big fan of the original 70s Gundam series. (It wasn't as good as, say, Gundam Wing or War in the Pocket, but few anime are.) This book is a alternate retelling of Gundam 0079 and includes all of the Tomino tropes that are frustrating but fascinating. Stupid impulsive characters. Mindless senseless deaths. Pacing that's too fast for it's own good. B It's always interesting to find a translation of a Japanese novel aimed at the anime fanbase. There aren't enough of these available in the West. I'm a big fan of the original 70s Gundam series. (It wasn't as good as, say, Gundam Wing or War in the Pocket, but few anime are.) This book is a alternate retelling of Gundam 0079 and includes all of the Tomino tropes that are frustrating but fascinating. Stupid impulsive characters. Mindless senseless deaths. Pacing that's too fast for it's own good. Bizarre ending. The themes are the same as the show, but the content is different and down sized in scale. I enjoyed this more than watching most of Zeta Gundam, but not as much as watching the original series. Thank god it's as short as it is though. There's only so much Tomino I can take.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    It was nice having the technological and Newtype stuff laid out in a clearer way than the show, and I liked getting to spend more time with some of the characters and the alternate ending (although I wish there was more to it!) but HOLY MISOGYNY BATMAN. Tomino and Murakami competing to see who can write about women more terribly lol.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Khoirul Anam

    The novel that I have read is the second part of three part of the novel series, Gundam. I do not really remember when I watched Gundam, it was really popular back then when I was a child. It is animation show about wars between robot which is write by the same author who write this novel, Yoshio Tomino. It is a translation novel from Japan which translated by Frederick L. Schodt. The three parts of this novel are Mobile Suit Gundam: Awakening, Escalation and Confrontation and the title that I r The novel that I have read is the second part of three part of the novel series, Gundam. I do not really remember when I watched Gundam, it was really popular back then when I was a child. It is animation show about wars between robot which is write by the same author who write this novel, Yoshio Tomino. It is a translation novel from Japan which translated by Frederick L. Schodt. The three parts of this novel are Mobile Suit Gundam: Awakening, Escalation and Confrontation and the title that I read was Mobile Suit Gundam: Escalation. This genre of this novel is science fiction and focus about on mecha. Mobile Suit Gundam : Escalation starts with chapter 9 and ended in chapter 16. I think this Gundam is really different from what I remember that I watched on TV when I was a child, I think because in the animation show many kids will watch it, so the character is someone who kids will like to watch and because the writer of this novel is not a novelist but an animation writer, sometimes it is lacking descriptive which novelist usually uses. This novel is not like the animation series which is being more adult in content. The conflict in this novel is dark and not suitable for children to read it. I think you cannot just read only one book of the series/volume because all of them is one book if you only read one of them you won’t know the story of this novel. I really recommend this book to people who like to watch Gundam because it is really different with the animation series and you will know how Yoshio Tomino write with different style, darker and more adult than the animation series. You can buy this book on Amazon online.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael Blank

    My name is Mike, a Gundam fan, and I put this book down 2/3rds of the way through it. The story being different than the anime was fine. It was cool to see Amuro already be a semi-trained pilot, and the action scenes were well done. What didn't work was... well, everything else. Parts 1 and 2 literally ended the exact same way with Amuro falling for a chick he doesn't know and then killing them in combat as they pilot an Elmeth against his Gundam. Most characters got exactly zero development. To My name is Mike, a Gundam fan, and I put this book down 2/3rds of the way through it. The story being different than the anime was fine. It was cool to see Amuro already be a semi-trained pilot, and the action scenes were well done. What didn't work was... well, everything else. Parts 1 and 2 literally ended the exact same way with Amuro falling for a chick he doesn't know and then killing them in combat as they pilot an Elmeth against his Gundam. Most characters got exactly zero development. Tomino did far more telling than showing in his writing and thus it was hard to get invested in anyone beyond the "core" characters like Amuro, Bright and Char. I'm pretty sure there was a contradiction a few times regarding how Zeon treats space colonies - they are mentioned killing millions in a poison gas attack, but later are described as being protective of all spacenoids (or something; it was difficult to get a grasp of things). Multiple times a paragraph would describe how mature a character had become but then call them naïve by the end, usually over something trivial. I could go on. And yes, the other reviews of women not having the best treatment are correct. I was sad to see Sayla reduced to being the Playboy bunny of the book. If this was Tomino's "original" vision for the franchise, then I am glad it never transitioned to the anime.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Greg Kerestan

    Tolstoy's "War and Peace" in space, with a characteristically detached, emotionally stoic Japanese presentation. If you're familiar with the grandiose, almost camp world of the early Gundam anime, the deliberate pace of the novel may throw you, but there's a real sense of deliberate plotting and world-building here. The coldness of the prose takes a little getting used to, but as pretentious as the book's desire to elevate the "future robot wars" genre can sometimes make it come off, it works. T Tolstoy's "War and Peace" in space, with a characteristically detached, emotionally stoic Japanese presentation. If you're familiar with the grandiose, almost camp world of the early Gundam anime, the deliberate pace of the novel may throw you, but there's a real sense of deliberate plotting and world-building here. The coldness of the prose takes a little getting used to, but as pretentious as the book's desire to elevate the "future robot wars" genre can sometimes make it come off, it works. There are moments of enormous cosmic beauty to be found here amidst the carnage and plotting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    As a fan of the original Anime, I was skeptical when I saw the size of the book, but it covers everything from the series and a little more, as well as being a little more descriptive than the Anime was. If your a fan of Gundam in general, The original Anime or want to see what the Gundam universe is like without committing to a 50 episode series, this is a decent book for any of those categories.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Sorto

    This book serves as an alternate telling to the original Mobile Suit Gundam series. The tone is much more serious and the characters more developed and deep. It provides an enormous amount of background detail surrounding the lore and technology of the Gundam universe. There are a few parts where the writing is a bit awkward, but overall it was a good read and I hardly put it down. A great read for a newcomer or for someone already familiar with the franchise.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    As someone that is a huge fan of Gundam anime in its many forms, but mostly of the UC Gundam universe, I marveled at the differences and complexities of this book. The differences are frequent, such as the story never actually decending to Earth, and the relationships were far more mature than the ones seen in the anime. This novel was far more straightforward and as I was getting towards the end of it all I kept thinking was it would be an absolutely amazing anime series!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    This book was definitely an engaging read that held my interest throughout. This novel demonstrated a war larger than any World War between two leading factions. It tackled the idea of good and bad by displaying the two sides' ideas and beliefs, which forces the reader to think about the side that they support over the other. Bias is shown towards one side, however, it really is far from the traditional novel, which shows complete bias to one side, essentially stating the faction as the "good" s This book was definitely an engaging read that held my interest throughout. This novel demonstrated a war larger than any World War between two leading factions. It tackled the idea of good and bad by displaying the two sides' ideas and beliefs, which forces the reader to think about the side that they support over the other. Bias is shown towards one side, however, it really is far from the traditional novel, which shows complete bias to one side, essentially stating the faction as the "good" side. Definitely, it is a book that I will read again from time to time.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Omar

    Its a shame that a story about war and what it brings in misfortune was turned into a kids show. Alot of Japanese authors from post WW2 era has expressed that nobody wins in war, more specifically, normal citizens get hit the most while the higher ups are playing a game of human chess. The author, however, didn't go extremely dark until his masterpiece: "Space Runaway Ideon".

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    3 1/2

  14. 4 out of 5

    Reed

    As an alternate experience to the proper Gundam 0079 anime, it's different enough to warrant a read-through, but the prose and writing itself leads much to be desired, especially in characterization.

  15. 4 out of 5

    C.T. Phipps

    I'm a long-time fan of the Gundam series even if I believe it's been about ten years and five series too many since they had anything new to say. Then again, that's the nature of all fandom for continuously operating decades-old franchises. For those unfamiliar with it, Gundam is a mecha anime based around the titular brand of mecha which is a portmanteau of the words "Gun" and "Freedom." The rough premise of (almost) every Gundam is that there's a central conflict between two factions, usually I'm a long-time fan of the Gundam series even if I believe it's been about ten years and five series too many since they had anything new to say. Then again, that's the nature of all fandom for continuously operating decades-old franchises. For those unfamiliar with it, Gundam is a mecha anime based around the titular brand of mecha which is a portmanteau of the words "Gun" and "Freedom." The rough premise of (almost) every Gundam is that there's a central conflict between two factions, usually Earth and her space colonies, which are beating the crud out of one another with little regard for civilian casualties. Then the titular mecha, almost always an advanced prototype more powerful than anything else on the battlefield, falls into the hand into an outside observer. This character chooses to fight on the side of the slightly-or-more-than-slightly-less-heinous of the two sides while learning harsh lessons on war. The series carry harsh lessons about the cost of fighting which are undercut by the fact the audience is here to see mechas blow each other to pieces. I'm particularly fond of the Mobile Suit Gundam movies, Zeta Gundam, Gundam Wing, Gundam Seed, Gundam 00, and the Universal Century mini-series (08th MS Team, IGLOO, War in the Pocket, Stardust Memory, Char's Counterattack). Which should tell you, despite my lackluster description, I really like the franchise. But what would be a good place to really read about what Gundam is about? That would be this collection of novels. Written by Gundam's creator, Yoshiyuki Tomino, and translated into English, these are about as close to his original vision for the series as you're going to get. A vision uncorrupted by the need to draw out the series longer than necessary, bow to television sensibilities of the late seventies, and the need to sell as many toys as humanly possible. Is it great? Not quite. Tomino is a television writer more than a novelist and the prose is a bit on the beige side, lacking descriptive flourishes which would bring the world alive to masterpiece levels. I've read it three times, though, so there must be something good there. It roughly follows the premise of the original Mobile Suit Gundam but with some differences in terms of time compression, where characters start, and being more adult in content. The premise is Federation military cadet Amuro Ray is one of the few survivors of an attack on neutral space colony Side-7 when he and his friends load themselves up on an experimental warship, White Base, and head down to planet Earth with both the Gundam and data on how to produce them. Side-7 violated its treaty with the Principality of Zeon in order to produce these weapons and now its survivors are being hunted by ace pilot Char Aznable in order to prevent them from being used to turn the tide of the war. The three novels are notable for the fact the Gundam is not treated as an invincible war machine but simply a very advanced piece of military hardware. Despite its power, it's not capable of turning the tide of the war on its own and can be both damaged as well as destroyed. Indeed, as the war progresses, the Gundam's advantages get less and less powerful as the Principality fields better mecha. A great deal more world-building is inserted into the narrative than was present in the original series. This includes describing the events of the One Year War before the arrival of the Gundam, General Revel's famous "Zeon is Exhausted" speech, what Minovsky particles do, the nature of Newtypes, and background for the Principality of Zeon as well as its greviances. The series is more adult as well with issues of sex amongst soldiers dealt with frankly as well as the memorable issue of talismans. Amuro Ray is a great protagonist in this adaptation of his character, being akin to Starship Troopers' Rico in that he's a novice who is introduced to the realities of war only to have him come to almost polar opposite conclusions as Rico. Char Aznable is less an obsessed rival for our hero as in the anime than a character who wandered in from another story, a Game of Thrones-style epic about feuding nobles, who is trying to take down the Zabi family. His conflict with Amuro is almost irrelevant to his actual goals. I'm also fond of Sayla Mass, who is a character who received far less attention in the original series than she deserved but shines here as the first female Gundam pilot. The conflict in the book gets extremely dark, which should come as no surprise given Tomino is known as "Kill Em All" in certain quarters. This is a war and no one is safe. Both sides are humanized and the staggering wastefulness of it all is well-done. Sadly, the book is unavailable in Kindle or electronic format, but only paperback. As it is published by a Japanese company and decades ago, I doubt this is going to change any time soon. Still, I recommend it for fans of war stories and mecha. 10/10

  16. 5 out of 5

    Daisuke Yamaguchi

    A must-have volume for those who grew up on Gundam anime and models. Quite different than the anime series, but this gives the reader additional insight into the primary characters' inner thoughts and motivations. Knowing that this was written in the 90's based on the original story from the 70's Japan, there are some quaint and frankly condescending views of women in this book. It is strange to think that this never bothered me when I was first exposed to the story in my teens. Females are portr A must-have volume for those who grew up on Gundam anime and models. Quite different than the anime series, but this gives the reader additional insight into the primary characters' inner thoughts and motivations. Knowing that this was written in the 90's based on the original story from the 70's Japan, there are some quaint and frankly condescending views of women in this book. It is strange to think that this never bothered me when I was first exposed to the story in my teens. Females are portrayed as supporting characters only (with the exception of Kycilia and Sayla), and are always described with superficial descriptions (pretty Sayla, beautiful so and so, etc), while the male characters are given much more comprehensive and nuanced descriptions. While these quirks have very little bearing on the story, it prevented me from completely enjoying the novel. Aside from my hang-ups with the differences in gender portrayals, I still highly recommend this book for those wanting to learn more about the backstory of the Gundam stories. I am not sure if the story would resonate as much with a new reader with little to no experience with Gundam. As mentioned in other reviews, there are errors sprinkled throughout this book, but nothing to jolt you out of your reading flow. An example of an error is In the illustration from the comic; the "ball" illustration is upside down. Gundam represents a paradigm shift in anime from children's animations to serious adult themed exploration of the near future and holds an esteemed position in the timeline of the genre.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Quiet

    500 pages of garbage. Utterly flat story telling, total lack of character construction, and pages upon pages of action that lack any concrete imagery or meaning. I read this book because I was interested in seeing how giant-robots translate to literature. I was surprised by the "Pacific Rim" novelization, as the robot fights were well written and surprisingly successful in literature. But what made the PR fights interesting, the detail put into how the robots work and fight, and the struggle of t 500 pages of garbage. Utterly flat story telling, total lack of character construction, and pages upon pages of action that lack any concrete imagery or meaning. I read this book because I was interested in seeing how giant-robots translate to literature. I was surprised by the "Pacific Rim" novelization, as the robot fights were well written and surprisingly successful in literature. But what made the PR fights interesting, the detail put into how the robots work and fight, and the struggle of the pilots, is not here in Gundam. It works the same way as you see in anime and manga; teenager jumps in the cockpit, and the robot functions the same way a person does seamlessly--- boring! It's not a good book. Or rather, it's not a good trilogy of books (in Japan these were three different novels; this English volume compiles them all into one). Vapid is the best way to describe this. Everything is literal and perfunctionary; it's nonstop activity, alike with most Japanese "light-novels," which doesn't work with literature in any way meaningfully or engaging. You will immediately zone out, repeatedly, throughout the entire book; and it doesn't matter, because ultimately it's just one result after another, non-stop, without any developed importance between.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    As a fan of the original Gundam series, I couldn't pass up a chance to read the creator's personal ideas on how the series should have been played out. The result is something grittier and more "adult", in some ways at least, that gives us a bleaker vision of the war between the Federation and Zeon and the introduction of Newtypes to the universe. Overall, I loved Tomino's take on the series and I prefer it to the story the animated series itself told despite the fact that his alterations here ef As a fan of the original Gundam series, I couldn't pass up a chance to read the creator's personal ideas on how the series should have been played out. The result is something grittier and more "adult", in some ways at least, that gives us a bleaker vision of the war between the Federation and Zeon and the introduction of Newtypes to the universe. Overall, I loved Tomino's take on the series and I prefer it to the story the animated series itself told despite the fact that his alterations here effectively negate nearly everything that came after the original series in the Universal Century timeline. Since it's a translated book, there are plenty of places where I wondered if something wasn't lost in translation, but I don't necessarily think that was so much the translator's fault as it was ideas getting distilled when trying to carry an idea over from Japanese to English. Overall, if you are a fan of Gundam, this is a spectacular book to dive into to see what Gundam could have been. Even if you aren't, this is a solid scifi book that introduces some pretty unique ideas and memorable characters that are well worth reading about.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jojo

    A truly different recreation of the popular Gundam series. The story is told in third person through the eyes of various characters. Anyone who has some knowledge of the anime series might be a bit startled to see familiar characters acting somewhat differently. If it's your first experience with the Gundam series, then you might have a little difficulty adapting to the "lingo". There are some things that aren't explained very well, as if the author assumes the reader knows them already. As a wh A truly different recreation of the popular Gundam series. The story is told in third person through the eyes of various characters. Anyone who has some knowledge of the anime series might be a bit startled to see familiar characters acting somewhat differently. If it's your first experience with the Gundam series, then you might have a little difficulty adapting to the "lingo". There are some things that aren't explained very well, as if the author assumes the reader knows them already. As a whole, however, most of the events can be understood by anyone. I especially appreciated how well the action scenes were described. It was very easy to get lost in the moment. As a translated novel, there are some mistakes sprinkled throughout the book but nothing that should detract from the experience. The book can also get a bit long-winded sometimes. There are also some scenes that seem to have no big relevance to the plot. Aside from that, the book has a solid plot and is certainly worth a look into.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amju

    This book is definitely a must-read for any sci-fi, if you have seen the original Mobile Suit Gundam anime then you'll love this....well, you might, can't spoil it. But it goes in-depth with the characters, the story, and best of the all, the next step of human evolution, newtypes. Though i did start to lose it at first because it was kind of slow leaving the colony, it picks up fast. I'd give this a 5 but I'm a hardcore fan of the anime, and there are a few major differences. If you read this y This book is definitely a must-read for any sci-fi, if you have seen the original Mobile Suit Gundam anime then you'll love this....well, you might, can't spoil it. But it goes in-depth with the characters, the story, and best of the all, the next step of human evolution, newtypes. Though i did start to lose it at first because it was kind of slow leaving the colony, it picks up fast. I'd give this a 5 but I'm a hardcore fan of the anime, and there are a few major differences. If you read this you should watch Gundam Char's Counter Attack, and after that look for a fan translation of Gundam Char's Counter Attack: Beltochika's Children, it's another completely Tomino original without any of Bandai or Sunrise's revisions to the story, just like this trilogy. Sorry if it's a confusing rant but just read it even if you aren't a fan of Sci-fi stories because it's a great starting book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    While it's based on an animated television series and its three compilation movies, the book itself is a completely separate entity telling its own unique story. As such, new readers need not be familiar with the source material to understand this book. I may even dare say that this book will add to the base series and movies since it expands on concepts and themes that are brushed upon in those said mediums. As for the story itself, it's a militaristic take on the Gundam story. It gets quite dep While it's based on an animated television series and its three compilation movies, the book itself is a completely separate entity telling its own unique story. As such, new readers need not be familiar with the source material to understand this book. I may even dare say that this book will add to the base series and movies since it expands on concepts and themes that are brushed upon in those said mediums. As for the story itself, it's a militaristic take on the Gundam story. It gets quite depressing and is heavy on its notions of Newtypes in which I can only describe as 'transcendental understanding' which is Tomino's take on human evolution. I read this as a fan of the Gundam franchise and what I got were the roots that gave it meaning - characters, relationships, war, understanding, and a world not too dissimilar from our own - from the man who started it all.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Yoshiyuki Tomino's vision for the original Gundam, stripped of the super robot anime cliches. While the robotic mobile suits play a significant role in the novel, they are downplayed, while the political and social aspects of the story come to fore. Tomino attempts to examine (not always successfully) how space colonization might usher in a new, more highly-evolved type of human. Unfortunately, the book ends with the dawning of that new age, and we don't really get answers to many of the questio Yoshiyuki Tomino's vision for the original Gundam, stripped of the super robot anime cliches. While the robotic mobile suits play a significant role in the novel, they are downplayed, while the political and social aspects of the story come to fore. Tomino attempts to examine (not always successfully) how space colonization might usher in a new, more highly-evolved type of human. Unfortunately, the book ends with the dawning of that new age, and we don't really get answers to many of the questions he raises.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Allen

    As a fan of the universal century and not a big fan of the recent works i.e. Gundam SEED and sequel I was expecting a lot from this book and i received it. Of course the start of it was slow but it was enjoyable. When it sped up into the story it made it much more enjoyable. The characters are icons to anime Char especially in Japan. I read this again and again for pure enjoyment. I did not have a problem for its departure from the Compilation Trilogy and the series as a matter in fact I liked t As a fan of the universal century and not a big fan of the recent works i.e. Gundam SEED and sequel I was expecting a lot from this book and i received it. Of course the start of it was slow but it was enjoyable. When it sped up into the story it made it much more enjoyable. The characters are icons to anime Char especially in Japan. I read this again and again for pure enjoyment. I did not have a problem for its departure from the Compilation Trilogy and the series as a matter in fact I liked the idea.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aznable

    The inconsistencies from the TV series quickly fall to the wayside as the story takes a life of it's own. Very valuable as a Gundam fan to garner insight on Tomino's ideas of Newtypes. The story is just as great if not better. The translation did a good job of retaining the style of writing from the Japanese text while lending to readability in English, though still strange in some points that might be off putting to someone not familiar with the style.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Astray Penguin

    An excellent trilogy of novels for Gundam fans. Those outside of the fandom may struggle with the Universal century timeline if they read these first. They are an alternative telling of the original series and many of the changes are in harsh contrast to the animated story line. They add a lot of interesting details to the series for long term fans, as well as showing how different the original outline was compared to the final canceled anime.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jean Konieczny

    Great action! I had a little bit of a hard time following the book at first, that's my own fault though, I never followed any of the original anime. Still a great trillogy. I have a habit of passing on books I like, and this one will be for my brother. =)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Joseph

    A wonderful mature take on the oringal series, worth reading if you've seen the show or you're a big science fiction fan.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Arsenio Garcia

    This was a great take away from the story of the original series. It's interesting to see how Tomino originally envisioned Gundam.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ariston

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eric Fleenor

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