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Eleanor Roosevelt's Life of Soul Searching and Self Discovery: From Depression and Betrayal to First Lady of the World

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From a childhood plagued with drunks and drama queens, Eleanor must now discard her dependency on Franklin and face off with her grand dame mother-in-law. Refusing to cave in to society's rules, Eleanor's exuberant style, wavering voice and lack of Hollywood beauty are fodder for the media.First Lady for thirteen years, Eleanor redefines and exploits this role to a positio From a childhood plagued with drunks and drama queens, Eleanor must now discard her dependency on Franklin and face off with her grand dame mother-in-law. Refusing to cave in to society's rules, Eleanor's exuberant style, wavering voice and lack of Hollywood beauty are fodder for the media.First Lady for thirteen years, Eleanor redefines and exploits this role to a position ofpower. Using her influence she champions for Jews, African Americans and women. Living through two world wars Eleanor witnesses thousands of graves, broken bodies and grieving families. After visiting troops in the Pacific she says:"If we don't make this a more decent world to live in I don't see how we can look these boys in the eyes."She defies a post-war return to status quo and establishes the Universal Declarationof Human Rights within the U.N. She earns her way to being named "First Lady of the World." The audacity of this woman to live out her own destiny challenges us to do the same. After all, it's not about Eleanor. Her story is history.  It's about us.


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From a childhood plagued with drunks and drama queens, Eleanor must now discard her dependency on Franklin and face off with her grand dame mother-in-law. Refusing to cave in to society's rules, Eleanor's exuberant style, wavering voice and lack of Hollywood beauty are fodder for the media.First Lady for thirteen years, Eleanor redefines and exploits this role to a positio From a childhood plagued with drunks and drama queens, Eleanor must now discard her dependency on Franklin and face off with her grand dame mother-in-law. Refusing to cave in to society's rules, Eleanor's exuberant style, wavering voice and lack of Hollywood beauty are fodder for the media.First Lady for thirteen years, Eleanor redefines and exploits this role to a position ofpower. Using her influence she champions for Jews, African Americans and women. Living through two world wars Eleanor witnesses thousands of graves, broken bodies and grieving families. After visiting troops in the Pacific she says:"If we don't make this a more decent world to live in I don't see how we can look these boys in the eyes."She defies a post-war return to status quo and establishes the Universal Declarationof Human Rights within the U.N. She earns her way to being named "First Lady of the World." The audacity of this woman to live out her own destiny challenges us to do the same. After all, it's not about Eleanor. Her story is history.  It's about us.

30 review for Eleanor Roosevelt's Life of Soul Searching and Self Discovery: From Depression and Betrayal to First Lady of the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews

    Just in time for Eleanor’s birthday on October 11. :) A childhood of neglect and a feeling of inadequacy is how Eleanor Roosevelt grew up. Her marriage to her fifth cousin was no better for her self-esteem....Franklin Delanor Roosevelt was a womanizer with a mother who had control over him and also Eleanor. Eleanor was a woman of the era in which she lived, and she live it well and the way a woman was expected to live even at her expense. She was a powerful woman despite the way she had to live, Just in time for Eleanor’s birthday on October 11. :) A childhood of neglect and a feeling of inadequacy is how Eleanor Roosevelt grew up. Her marriage to her fifth cousin was no better for her self-esteem....Franklin Delanor Roosevelt was a womanizer with a mother who had control over him and also Eleanor. Eleanor was a woman of the era in which she lived, and she live it well and the way a woman was expected to live even at her expense. She was a powerful woman despite the way she had to live, and then she realized she could make a difference and came out of her shell to do remarkable things in history. She thankfully is our history. The book was very well researched....I learned many facts I was not aware of. It was a splendid re-living of history for me. I didn't know Eleanor was at the heart of the New Deal and many other programs....I must not have been paying attention in history class. The beautiful photos also enhanced the story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ken Bergeron

    The words she left were not her own. They were the gift of Love that she had no choice but to share.. Her words will change your life. She still lives in the compassion of those who dare to speak the truth.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    She was like a teabag... Eleanor Roosevelt..was a many layered soul..Sweet..sour..tart. Very well written..author showed the love and respect so many had for this AMAZING LADY

  4. 4 out of 5

    gloria daniel

    Eleanor We sure could use more women like her today unafraid to stand her ground fearless and proud Americian a woman of the people's world leaving wanting to know more Eleanor We sure could use more women like her today unafraid to stand her ground fearless and proud Americian a woman of the people's world leaving wanting to know more

  5. 4 out of 5

    Queen Spades

    Full review can be found on The Review Board. I got this in exchange for an honest review. This is the abbreviated version. I can't do too much complaining about this work from a visual perspective. There were little to no hiccups in spelling, grammar, or punctuation. Brownie Points for Documentation--The author demonstrated she knows the proper way to cite references. That, and the bibliography page were definite advantages. Oh, kudos to the pictures, too. Yet this is where all the pros end for m Full review can be found on The Review Board. I got this in exchange for an honest review. This is the abbreviated version. I can't do too much complaining about this work from a visual perspective. There were little to no hiccups in spelling, grammar, or punctuation. Brownie Points for Documentation--The author demonstrated she knows the proper way to cite references. That, and the bibliography page were definite advantages. Oh, kudos to the pictures, too. Yet this is where all the pros end for me. It appears that present tense is a surging wave in the writing world. On some works, it is even passable. Not on a work that's a nonfictional account of a person's life who is already dead. When I first started reading this, I believed it was simply a tense error. All the history books I've ever read have been in past tense. Why? Because the events happened in the past. But then I noticed throughout the read (with the exception of slip ups in sections 13 and 14), it stayed in present tense. In addition, if this book is used as any type of reference guide or teaching tool, it causes way too much confusion because of the tense. It definitely was one of the deterrents that kept me from fully engaging in this story. It also didn't make sense to me for this biography to be written when so much of Eleanor Roosevelt's autobiography was quoted in this work. For me, I didn't gain any new knowledge about this incredible woman that I didn't already know--with the exception of one or two things. Another thing that made me scratch my head in disbelief was the "Reflections of the Reader" segment at the end of each part. The author took modern-day scenarios and used them to illustrate points she made about Eleanor's life. I have a few questions: (1) If these are supposed to be "Reflections of the Reader" why is so much of the "author's opinions" in it? Shouldn't the reader be able to come up with his or her own conclusions without the author's persuasive input? (2) Why were there such absurd comparisons being placed at the end of each part? One in particular spoke of Rocky's bond with Adrian to measure the level of betrayal Eleanor felt in regards to Franklin's infidelity. Also, at the end where Star Trek was quoted and how the journey into space mirrored Eleanor's achievements in the United Nations. Then the author wondered how famous or productive Eleanor would be if she had a Facebook, comparing her to the current First Lady of the United States, Michelle Obama. When I'm reading something that is nonfiction, I like a level of objectivity while being able to convey the facts. This read more like a love letter or worship of Eleanor Roosevelt. I'm not condoning Franklin Roosevelt's treatment of Eleanor nor trying to downplay what Eleanor went through. All I am trying to say is: must Eleanor Roosevelt be romanticized and Franklin Roosevelt be the low down dirty dog? Although I am appreciative that so many people have taken an interest in the Roosevelt family, they have been written about to death. In some works the authors are taking sides and passing it off as accurate representations of history. This author did the same thing, It really does a great disservice to the memory of the Roosevelt legacy. If the author wants to do this type of stance on Eleanor Roosevelt, it would have made more sense to write it as a work of fiction or in the form of a persuasive essay. This felt like certain portions were taken out that fitted the author's viewpoint of Eleanor. After they were extracted, she put them together to create this book. In its current presentation, I could not fully support the conveyance. My respect for Eleanor Roosevelt's struggle through life should come from my own interpretation not from the idea of empathy to be sold to me through the author. Verdict: 2 out of 5 Stars Despite the near perfection in grammar and punctuation, it was not strong enough to override the other elements. The author tried too hard to modernize Eleanor's struggles to the readers. In her attempts to garner more support, this approach distracted (and took away) from the richness of Eleanor's character. The marketing of this in present tense crippled the potential success of this work. When it comes to finding an objective account of Eleanor Roosevelt, it is best that this work remain undiscovered.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Y. Correa

    Before commencing with my review I'd like to say that I am struggling with what to say about this book. In all truth, I have very few 'nice' things to say. It is difficult to say something truly constructive about a read like this, as all you can think is "Why?!" (PS: The erroneous punctuation is on purpose.) I'm still flabbergasted! I guess I'll just have to start by stating the 'good things', I suppose. PROS: 1) It has some nice pictures. 2) Grammar and punctuation is almost perfect. 3) I learned ON Before commencing with my review I'd like to say that I am struggling with what to say about this book. In all truth, I have very few 'nice' things to say. It is difficult to say something truly constructive about a read like this, as all you can think is "Why?!" (PS: The erroneous punctuation is on purpose.) I'm still flabbergasted! I guess I'll just have to start by stating the 'good things', I suppose. PROS: 1) It has some nice pictures. 2) Grammar and punctuation is almost perfect. 3) I learned ONE (that's right, just ONE) new thing I didn't know before about Mrs. Roosevelt. Okay... that about covers it. CONS: 1) Why would a person write a biography--at all, let alone of an iconic figure like Mrs. Roosevelt--in 1st person? It makes no sense WHATSOEVER! This is a BIOGRAPHY not a novel! It's an unspoken rule that biographies are written in 3rd person, past tense. Why? Because it makes sense that way! Not you, third person! Past events, past writing! Easy! Example: Chapter 11, first paragraph reads "On April 12, 1945, Franklin is in his forth term as president. WWII is still raging, although it will be over this summer." WHAT? I'm sorry, I was under the impression that it finished over SIXTY FIVE YEAR AGO! 2) 99.9% of the book felt like a High School essay, with an amazing job of cut and paste. Let me explain. Imagine being in High School and having to do an essay/project on Mrs. Roosevelt. The last thing you want to do is read book after book, so you decide to go for gold. You pick up Mrs. Roosevelt's autobiography! Whats next? Copy and paste as much information as you can about Mrs. Roosevelt. That'll give you a guaranteed A! Right? Wrong! 3) WHY IN SAM HELL would a person write a biography when an AUTOBIOGRAPHY already exists? I mean, UNLESS, some new information has surfaced that no one knew about. THEN, you might get away with it. 4) Now, this bit, I just couldn't get past... This person chose to use current day, as well as unhinged analogies to describe her thoughts about Mrs. Roosevelt. Things like Facebook, Rocky (the movie), The Wizard of Oz and Star Trek. "In today's terms this would be comparable to Michelle Obama having a daily log. Imagine Eleanor with a Facebook page." "Space: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the Star-ship Enterprise. It's five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before..." OH, OH, WAIT! Here is one of my person favorites: "A king's castle--a moat, protective high walls, guards in watch towers. He is surrounded by people he can trust. He is safe to let his guard down, scratch his balls and drink grog with this cronies." THIS is what was used to describe Mrs. Roosevelt's need for a sanctuary of her own. A place where she can "scratch her balls"! Enough said! 5) There was more quotes in this book from Mrs. Roosevelt's autobiography than there was any new or original information. 6) The very last chapter's title says, and I quote, "14 Elanor... The Chapter title is not a typo." Um. Okay. Is it just me, or is that a little weird? If you intended on misspelling her name wrong as the chapter title, then let it be. Why are you trying to explain yourself? 7) There was also a certain 'feel' in the prose, that made me get the sense that the author was trying her best to brainwash the reader, if you will--to see Mrs. Roosevelt as a victim. She kept referring to President Roosevelt's womanizing ways, and his mother's manipulating ways, and things of the sort. Now, let me be clear. Anyone whose read about Mrs. Roosevelt knows that she was a woman of great suffering, and she did not have it easy. However, I believe that if/when a biography is written that the person writing it should do so in an objective manner. Do not try to influence the reader with your opinion, let them make one for themselves. Gosh, I really can go on and on about the downfalls of this book, however I'll just say, I DO NOT RECOMMEND IT! I was extremely let down!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Erlynn (BooksHugBack)

    Eleanor Roosevelt's Life of Soul Searching and Self Discovery: From Depression and Betrayal to "First Lady of the World" by Ann Atkins is actually a brief look at Eleanor Roosevelt's life and how a child from a famous but floundering family can overcome countless obstacles to become a renown world leader. Atkins' biography, from a infant series entitled "Flash History", has a lot of promise. Although this is the first, the author is planning a second written about the infamous Golda Meir. At firs Eleanor Roosevelt's Life of Soul Searching and Self Discovery: From Depression and Betrayal to "First Lady of the World" by Ann Atkins is actually a brief look at Eleanor Roosevelt's life and how a child from a famous but floundering family can overcome countless obstacles to become a renown world leader. Atkins' biography, from a infant series entitled "Flash History", has a lot of promise. Although this is the first, the author is planning a second written about the infamous Golda Meir. At first the short choppy writing was a bit awkward and alarming, as history books and biographies can often be long winded and pretentious, but this was anything but that. Atkins writes for an audience who wants a good story with thought, meaning and a purpose, rather than the long drawn out scholarly work of a never ending thesis. The book describes Eleanor's troubled upbringing, courtship with Franklin Roosevelt and the difficulties facing her such as a hovering mother-in-law and an unfaithful husband. At a time of social and economic crisis, Eleanor conducted herself with decorum, compassion, and with an inner drive to achieve equality. Her inner voice just couldn't be quieted. She transformed herself from a socieal wallflower to a successful world leader who influenced the international community an United Nations and saw to the creation of the Declaration of Human Rights. In this review I will actually start with my critique because the only place I found it lacking was in aesthetics. The cover I found a bit unflattering, boring, and poor color choice. For a book that wants to catch the eye of students it fell kinda flat. I enjoyed the pictures throughout the pages, rather than what most history biographies do to include a glossy insert with them all in the middle. However, the fabulous quotes from Eleanor were written in these dark ovals in a scripted font that was truly difficult to read. Kinda rough, but I also know these problems were most likely the fault of the designers and printers and not that of the author. What I loved about this biography is that it made history relevant, interesting, and relatable. This is the goal of all good history teachers. The flow and organization was well thought out. As I was reading I found myself asking questions leading into the next sections, such as "what about the fight for suffrage" and there in the next pages the author was answering them. Reflections for the Reader gave the book meaning and direction and Atkins gave context to the numerous quotes that have become famous and that people even live their lives by today. It truly was a fast "flash" look at Eleanor who went from a young woman of reserve and manners, to an outspoken humanitarian fighting for the rights of all people, caring not what people thought or said about her. It was inspiring, uplifting, and story all women should hear. To order her book go to http://www.annatkins.com/Order.html as it is a lower price, free shipping, and a portion of the cost goes to charity. I will be sure to keep an eye out for any future work by Ann Atkins.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Ann Atkins follows Eleanor Roosevelt’s life from early childhood through her death, depicting how her childhood issues influenced her adult life and how she overcame the tragedies in the following chapters: A Bitter Beginning Awakening Political, Public and Personal Storms Life After Death In this first book in the Flash History series, Ann’s statement: “Today’s readers don’t want the drone of academic details,” which certainly applied to me when I was in history class some years back. It bored m Ann Atkins follows Eleanor Roosevelt’s life from early childhood through her death, depicting how her childhood issues influenced her adult life and how she overcame the tragedies in the following chapters: A Bitter Beginning Awakening Political, Public and Personal Storms Life After Death In this first book in the Flash History series, Ann’s statement: “Today’s readers don’t want the drone of academic details,” which certainly applied to me when I was in history class some years back. It bored me to death at the time, memorizing dates and after dates, after more dates. This smart beach read biography fit the bill for me. Presented in more of a novel-type biography, I was able to enjoy reading these historical accounts of Eleanor’s life in Eleanor Roosevelt’s Life of Soul Searching and Self Discovery. Definitely my style of history reading. It seems more personal and relatable. Ann did not gloss over Eleanor’s weaknesses, but showed how both her weaknesses and strengths gave her the impetus to change her life’s situations. Some of the life changes Eleanor incorporated include: Persevere in the face of betrayal, critics and exhaustion Leverage media tools to educate the public Discern core issues behind the raucous babble Forge friendships for the just causes and personal support Maintain a noble heart in times of trouble. Ann gleaned pertinent information from fourteen books, and condensed it down into this one powerfully packed book. One thing that clouded my reading was some surmising by the author about certain actions that may or may not be factual. I also would have liked to have learned of Eleanor’s faith and whether it influenced her life. Regardless, you will learn about the heart of one dynamic leader in the life of Eleanor Roosevelt. And if you want to know more, you can always read some or all of the books from Ann’s Bibliography list. Ann makes learning history fun and enlightening! Part of that includes the Context and Commentary section, Reflections for the Reader section, as well as short quotes listed in highlighted text throughout the book. This is the first biography in the series of Flash History. I’m looking forward to next one! Ann’s book is available here, through her website, where she offers free shipping. A portion of the money goes to charity. This book was provided by the author, Ann Atkins, in exchange for my honest review. No monetary compensation was exchanged.

  9. 5 out of 5

    ManOfLaBook.com

    Eleanor Roosevelt's Life of Soul Search­ing and Self Dis­cov­ery: From Depres­sion and Betrayal to "First Lady of the World" by Ann Atkins is a brief biog­ra­phy of the first lady aimed at the young adults (YA) crowd or adults that just want a 'beach read' style biog­ra­phy — authen­tic but all the aca­d­e­mics. The book is a first in a series called “Flash History”. The book starts by describ­ing Eleanor’s tribu­la­tions dur­ing her upbring­ing and leads into her courtship with future pres­i­den Eleanor Roosevelt's Life of Soul Search­ing and Self Dis­cov­ery: From Depres­sion and Betrayal to "First Lady of the World" by Ann Atkins is a brief biog­ra­phy of the first lady aimed at the young adults (YA) crowd or adults that just want a 'beach read' style biog­ra­phy — authen­tic but all the aca­d­e­mics. The book is a first in a series called “Flash History”. The book starts by describ­ing Eleanor’s tribu­la­tions dur­ing her upbring­ing and leads into her courtship with future pres­i­dent Franklin Roo­sevelt. While Eleanor loved Franklin, she had to deal with her mother-in-law and her husband’s philandering. The book describes how Eleanor won her­self many fans using deco­rum in tough sit­u­a­tions and com­pas­sion where very few could find some. Her con­stant strug­gle for social jus­tice trans­formed the mild man­nered girl into a feisty woman which his­tory will remem­ber by her own right. Eleanor Roosevelt's Life of Soul Search­ing and Self Dis­cov­ery: From Depres­sion and Betrayal to "First Lady of the World" by Ann Atkins is a short, quick biog­ra­phy with some points to pon­der while telling a good story. The book is divided into sev­eral parts, each one starts with a “Con­text and Com­ments” sec­tion in which Ms. Atkins pro­vides some gen­eral back­ground about the era. The parts con­clude with “Reflec­tions for the Reader” sec­tion in which Ms. Atkins pro­vides some gen­eral thoughts and reflec­tions about the con­text of the sec­tion in com­par­i­son with today’s world. At first I didn’t know what to think of the “Con­text and Com­ments” and “Reflec­tions for the Reader” but, keep­ing the audi­ence in mind, I came to like them. Those sec­tions made the book rel­e­vant and his­tory fun. I liked this book, even though it cer­tainly isn’t and encom­pass­ing biog­ra­phy (and clearly isn’t meant to be), it was well researched and writ­ten. The book is pep­pered with quotes from Mrs. Roo­sevelt, which per­son­ally were hard for me to read due to the curvy font, but I cer­tainly got the gist. For more reviews and bookish thoughts please visit: http://www.ManOfLaBook.com

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    * Full Review can be found here: http://therevboard.com/2014/06/06/con... * “ELEANOR ROOSEVELT’S LIFE OF SOUL SEARCHING AND SELF DISCOVERY: From Depression and Betrayal to First Lady of the World” is a 104-page write by Ann Atkins. This book examines the highs and lows in the life of Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt. Despite all that she has experienced in her life, Mrs. Roosevelt persevered; staring deeply into the abyss that was her loveless relationship with her mother, her drunkard womanizer of a father * Full Review can be found here: http://therevboard.com/2014/06/06/con... * “ELEANOR ROOSEVELT’S LIFE OF SOUL SEARCHING AND SELF DISCOVERY: From Depression and Betrayal to First Lady of the World” is a 104-page write by Ann Atkins. This book examines the highs and lows in the life of Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt. Despite all that she has experienced in her life, Mrs. Roosevelt persevered; staring deeply into the abyss that was her loveless relationship with her mother, her drunkard womanizer of a father, and the destruction of her familial structure, only to become a well-versed, strong minded incredible woman who informed not only the Nation but the World, while facing Adversity and stomped it in the balls while becoming the darling of all whom she had touched. TO ME, I am struggling to figure out if the reference on page 37 is a Good Thing or a Bad Thing. I may need Schrödinger’s Cat to figure out if Mrs. Roosevelt’s actions were either a Compliment or an Insult (Ms. Atkins can certainly clarify if the reference is either Good or Bad). I’m going to be honest: I did not like this read at all. I was looking for SO MUCH MORE as far as depth, insight, and understanding of this dynamic woman. I was left very disappointed due to the presentation of Mrs. Roosevelt by Ms. Atkins. She was portrayed as meek, weak, and used like a sanitary napkin to where no one would care to recycle her. That, along with what was mentioned earlier, took away from the read and caused further heartbreak for me. If you want to read it, that is up to you.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    The accomplishments of this great woman are lost in the muddled timeline the author presents (in the present tense, no less).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Meagan

    The life of Eleanor Roosevelt was one like any other, it had its ups and downs. Honestly, until I read this biography, I was completely unaware of everything that she did to aid in efforts for the rights of so many groups of people. To be even more honest, I slept through almost all of my highschool history classes so I didn't know much about her at all. I really liked that parts of her biography were told more in a story format that was easier to read and kept me wanting to know more. I was mov The life of Eleanor Roosevelt was one like any other, it had its ups and downs. Honestly, until I read this biography, I was completely unaware of everything that she did to aid in efforts for the rights of so many groups of people. To be even more honest, I slept through almost all of my highschool history classes so I didn't know much about her at all. I really liked that parts of her biography were told more in a story format that was easier to read and kept me wanting to know more. I was moved and inspired by her immense amount of compassion for others and her willingness to help anyone in need. The part of the book talking about how she had people over to stay in the whitehouse made me wish I was from that era so that maybe, just maybe, I would have been one of those lucky few who were invited to stay overnight in the Whitehouse. How much of an honor would it be for just one night to stay there where so many great presidents and first ladies have stayed. I wish I would have picked up this book sooner because it was a good and informative read. Who knows, there might just be more biographies to be read in my future.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Meg - A Bookish Affair

    You all know by now that I'm a history fan. Fictional or non-fictional, I love it all! I know a lot of people aren't so much into non-fiction history books. A lot of the typical criticisms are they're too long or too dry. This book seeks to change all that. Atkins does a great job of making history super accessible in this slim book. She hits all the highlights and seeks to put Roosevelt's life in context for those who may not be familiar with her story. This book would be very well received by y You all know by now that I'm a history fan. Fictional or non-fictional, I love it all! I know a lot of people aren't so much into non-fiction history books. A lot of the typical criticisms are they're too long or too dry. This book seeks to change all that. Atkins does a great job of making history super accessible in this slim book. She hits all the highlights and seeks to put Roosevelt's life in context for those who may not be familiar with her story. This book would be very well received by young adult or adult readers with little background in the life of Eleanor Roosevelt. If you already have a background in Roosevelt's life, you probably are not going to gain any new insights into her history. One of the most interesting things about this book is the section at the end of each chapter that makes connections between Eleanor and pop culture references. It's an interesting concept but I think that it could really draw readers into the book. It certainly drew me in a little more too! Bottom line: This is great History-light!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    I was curious to learn more about Eleanor Roosevelt so I was excited to read it. I definitely learned a lot about her and her family. I learned things about FDR that I had no clue about which was interesting. So in that regard it was fun to learn about a part of history that I wasn't all that familiar. On the flip side, I was bothered by how the book was laid out. I felt that it jumped around in time so that I wasn't really sure when certain events were really happening. I think it would've been I was curious to learn more about Eleanor Roosevelt so I was excited to read it. I definitely learned a lot about her and her family. I learned things about FDR that I had no clue about which was interesting. So in that regard it was fun to learn about a part of history that I wasn't all that familiar. On the flip side, I was bothered by how the book was laid out. I felt that it jumped around in time so that I wasn't really sure when certain events were really happening. I think it would've been a more fluid read if it had started at the beginning of her life and just moved right on through it all. Also, I was a bit bothered by the author's random questions (her opinions??) in the book. I felt it was trying to paint a picture that may have not been reality. Becoming almost fictional if you will. All in all, it was a quick read with interesting tidbits of information and inspirational quotes from Eleanor.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Jared

    It was interesting but not very well written. It's written in present tense (annoying!) and reminds me a lot of the essays we had to write in my women's history class but longer. There are also these weird questions/thoughts for the reader that the author puts at the end of some sections that are really stupid, like where she compares Eleanor to Rocky and her heartbreak over FDR's infidelity to Rocky's love for Adrian or weird stuff like that. There are other, much better books about Eleanor out It was interesting but not very well written. It's written in present tense (annoying!) and reminds me a lot of the essays we had to write in my women's history class but longer. There are also these weird questions/thoughts for the reader that the author puts at the end of some sections that are really stupid, like where she compares Eleanor to Rocky and her heartbreak over FDR's infidelity to Rocky's love for Adrian or weird stuff like that. There are other, much better books about Eleanor out there so I'd read one of them instead.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I heard the author, and I am very interested in learning about Eleanor Roosevelt. But, this book was a huge disaapointment. Not well-written at all (in my opinion). Also, nearly every page had a shaded oval with a quote or something related to Eleanor Roosevelt. These shaded ovals were distracting, and the words were tiny and difficult to read. I learned a few new things about Eleanor and enjoyed seeing the pictures, but mostly, I was sorry that I purchased the book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amy Samin

    This book needs thorough proofreading and editing. It is riddled with spelling and grammatical mistakes, as well as errors in word choice. One paragraph might start out in present tense (which is ridiculous for historical nonfiction) then switch to past tense in the middle. The shoddy writing calls the accuracy of the content into question. Unfortunately, this book reads like a ninth-grader's attempt at a history paper. Fortunately for me, I did not actually purchase this book. This book needs thorough proofreading and editing. It is riddled with spelling and grammatical mistakes, as well as errors in word choice. One paragraph might start out in present tense (which is ridiculous for historical nonfiction) then switch to past tense in the middle. The shoddy writing calls the accuracy of the content into question. Unfortunately, this book reads like a ninth-grader's attempt at a history paper. Fortunately for me, I did not actually purchase this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tara Chevrestt

    This is a very short biography, not a long and drawn out 500 page thing. It tells the need to know information about Eleanor. By need to know, I mean: Where she came from: A very dysfunctional family. Her father was a womanizer and a suicidal alcoholic. Her mother felt that she was ugly and did not make a secret of it. Imagine growing up in that environment. For full review, please click the link below: http://wwwbookbabe.blogspot.com/2011/... This is a very short biography, not a long and drawn out 500 page thing. It tells the need to know information about Eleanor. By need to know, I mean: Where she came from: A very dysfunctional family. Her father was a womanizer and a suicidal alcoholic. Her mother felt that she was ugly and did not make a secret of it. Imagine growing up in that environment. For full review, please click the link below: http://wwwbookbabe.blogspot.com/2011/...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Severance

    While the author is obviously a big fan of Eleanor, I really enjoyed reading about her from childhood to death. This book also makes me want to read more about Eleanor including her autobiography. I do recall a biography I read about Eleanor; it had the subtitle as something like the woman who really ran the country.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I didn't have high expectations since it was only $0.99 for my Kindle, but it is a quick read and is a fascinating account of Eleanor's life. I would definitely recommend it for anyone that wants to learn more about this fascinating woman and how the political and social world she lived in shaped who she was. I didn't have high expectations since it was only $0.99 for my Kindle, but it is a quick read and is a fascinating account of Eleanor's life. I would definitely recommend it for anyone that wants to learn more about this fascinating woman and how the political and social world she lived in shaped who she was.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    This is a very short biography. Nice and obviously the author is a staunch supporter of Eleanor, but it was just short and I feel that it had to leave out a lot of information. It felt like a Cliff Notes version.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eilagh

    I really enjoyed this book! I knew very little about Eleanor but this book is a great introduction - what a fascinating woman! i intend to read more about her and her life.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Adams

    Enjoyed this short bio..sometimes I don't really want to commit to a long book!! Enjoyed this short bio..sometimes I don't really want to commit to a long book!!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    What a remarkable life!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brooklyn Parr

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Paola

  27. 4 out of 5

    Beatrice K. Demko

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hanan Awaad

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

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