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Cambridge archaeologist Sarah Weston makes an unusual discovery in the ancient Ethiopian mountain kingdom of Aksum—a sealed tomb with inscriptions in an obscure dialect. Along with her colleague, American anthropologist Daniel Madigan, she tries to identify the entombed man and translate the inscriptions. Tracking down clues in Addis Ababa and the monasteries of Lalibela, Cambridge archaeologist Sarah Weston makes an unusual discovery in the ancient Ethiopian mountain kingdom of Aksum—a sealed tomb with inscriptions in an obscure dialect. Along with her colleague, American anthropologist Daniel Madigan, she tries to identify the entombed man and translate the inscriptions. Tracking down clues in Addis Ababa and the monasteries of Lalibela, Sarah and Daniel uncover a codex in the subterranean library revealing the secret of the tomb—a set of prophecies about Earth’s final hours, written by a man hailed by Ethiopian mystics as Coptic Christianity’s 10th saint. Faced with violent opposition and left for dead in the heart of the Simien Mountains, Sarah and Daniel survive to journey to Paris, where they’re given a 14th-century letter describing the catastrophic events that will lead to the planet’s demise. Connecting the two discoveries, Sarah faces a deadly conspiracy to keep the secret buried in order to promote technological advances presently leading toward the prophesied end of the Earth.


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Cambridge archaeologist Sarah Weston makes an unusual discovery in the ancient Ethiopian mountain kingdom of Aksum—a sealed tomb with inscriptions in an obscure dialect. Along with her colleague, American anthropologist Daniel Madigan, she tries to identify the entombed man and translate the inscriptions. Tracking down clues in Addis Ababa and the monasteries of Lalibela, Cambridge archaeologist Sarah Weston makes an unusual discovery in the ancient Ethiopian mountain kingdom of Aksum—a sealed tomb with inscriptions in an obscure dialect. Along with her colleague, American anthropologist Daniel Madigan, she tries to identify the entombed man and translate the inscriptions. Tracking down clues in Addis Ababa and the monasteries of Lalibela, Sarah and Daniel uncover a codex in the subterranean library revealing the secret of the tomb—a set of prophecies about Earth’s final hours, written by a man hailed by Ethiopian mystics as Coptic Christianity’s 10th saint. Faced with violent opposition and left for dead in the heart of the Simien Mountains, Sarah and Daniel survive to journey to Paris, where they’re given a 14th-century letter describing the catastrophic events that will lead to the planet’s demise. Connecting the two discoveries, Sarah faces a deadly conspiracy to keep the secret buried in order to promote technological advances presently leading toward the prophesied end of the Earth.

30 review for The Tenth Saint

  1. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    PART THRILLER, PART HISTORICAL NOVEL - "The Tenth Saint" is a thriller, as written on the spine, but it is also a thinking person's novel. It is comprised of two separate plots that start to intertwine midway through the book. One taking place in ancient times through deserts, nomadic tribes and the days of early Christianity in Ethiopia, and a modern day quest to unravel a mysterious find that leads the protagonists deep in the bowels of Coptic Christianity's monastic life and the churches of L PART THRILLER, PART HISTORICAL NOVEL - "The Tenth Saint" is a thriller, as written on the spine, but it is also a thinking person's novel. It is comprised of two separate plots that start to intertwine midway through the book. One taking place in ancient times through deserts, nomadic tribes and the days of early Christianity in Ethiopia, and a modern day quest to unravel a mysterious find that leads the protagonists deep in the bowels of Coptic Christianity's monastic life and the churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia. The protagonists, an archeologist and an anthropologist, become renegades when they are convinced that the knowledge they have uncovered can prevent a planetary disaster. They single handedly try to stop modern advances in technology that they are convinced will lead to disaster. The story is very good especially if one is willing to believe that improbable things may happen. There are unexpected twists that keep the thrill ride intriguing. The author switches from fast pace to slow pace frequently throughout the book. The fast pace passages are page turners but the slower chapters is where this book shines. The plot is laced with spirituality without being didactic in any way. There are glimpses of nomadic shamans, monastic orthodox christian monks and agnostic scientists. The writing is mostly transparent but overpolished at times. The characters are multidimensional and well sketched with the possible exception of Daniel whom I find too one-dimensional. The orthodox monk is a jewel, well framed and exploited. The thrill ride is satisfying and I give it high marks because of its spiritual aspects, the well researched historical passages and the philosophical questions it poses : Is it destiny or free will that guides us ? Can destiny be avoided ? Is absolute devotion the answer ?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Find this and other reviews at: http://flashlightcommentary.blogspot.... Contemporary mysteries and thrillers aren't my usual stomping ground, but I've been know to sample the genre when an author builds their story on a foundation of historic fact which is what led me to D.J. Niko's The Tenth Saint. Despite being one of the oldest Christian communities in the Middle East, I knew next to nothing about Coptic Christianity when I began reading this book and though religion is not the primary theme Find this and other reviews at: http://flashlightcommentary.blogspot.... Contemporary mysteries and thrillers aren't my usual stomping ground, but I've been know to sample the genre when an author builds their story on a foundation of historic fact which is what led me to D.J. Niko's The Tenth Saint. Despite being one of the oldest Christian communities in the Middle East, I knew next to nothing about Coptic Christianity when I began reading this book and though religion is not the primary theme of Niko's work, I really appreciated how she crafted the framework of The Tenth Saint from the principles of the religion as well as the cultural values of the region in which her story is set. Unlike most, this genre is defined by both content and pacing. I'm no expert, but many of the authors I've sampled have trouble not only building momentum, but maintaining. Niko suffers neither handicap. The Tenth Saint hits the ground running, but is compromised of so many unforeseen plot twists that it is difficult for the reader to anticipate exactly how events will unfold. Though I really liked the historical aspects of the book and how those details played into the secrets Niko buried deep in the Ethiopian desert, I would have liked to see her put more into the characterization of her leads. Set against such a rich backdrop, I couldn't help feeling let down by the relative transparency I recognized in both Sarah and Daniel and while this was by no means a deal breaker, I definitely felt it the weak point in an otherwise well-developed fiction. Not flawless, but an altogether fascinating story steeped in both intrigue and suspense.

  3. 5 out of 5

    William Baker

    This book is just plain bad. Silly plot Dumb and predictable twists Lousy dialogue Big dose of the authors far left politics All of which makes for a terrible book. I read a little over half before I started skimming to find out what the predictable ending would be.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katie Dooley

    This book was only 266 pages and it still took me a week to read. I am a fast reader and can normally polish off an 800 page book in a couple of days. It seemed almost painfully slow moving for me. I had to keep putting it down and forcing myself to come back to it. There were enough interesting details that it made me want to read through to the end however I kept wishing that they would get to the point faster. Even more frustrating was the fact that this book is not really suited to read in This book was only 266 pages and it still took me a week to read. I am a fast reader and can normally polish off an 800 page book in a couple of days. It seemed almost painfully slow moving for me. I had to keep putting it down and forcing myself to come back to it. There were enough interesting details that it made me want to read through to the end however I kept wishing that they would get to the point faster. Even more frustrating was the fact that this book is not really suited to read in e-book form. Several pages have a illustrated "picture" of weathered looking pages with print that is in a tiny font, spaced too close together making it unreadable in e-book form. Enlarging the text did not make this illustration any larger and it had key plot revelations. These were words that were supposed to be in another language and were supposed to be difficult to translate so it makes no sense as to why they put the lettering in English and tried so hard to make it appear as if this was the actual ancient text instead of just typing the translation in italics and quotation marks. I love the premise of the book. After a tip from a local man, a female archeologist in charge of a dig in Ethiopia finds a cave and finds the tomb of the man that the local monks call the 10th saint. The coffin and body are exhumed and she slowly reveals some strange things about this body that leads to unraveling the mystery of his identity and trying to decipher the warning message about the end of the world that he left behind in an unfamiliar language. The saint's body dates back to 1600 but has perfect teeth with dental work made of polymer of unknown material far more advanced than the ones used in dentistry in the book's present day. The story weaves back and forth in time between the 1600's and modern times showing bits and pieces of the life of the man who we discover is called Gabriel. Through the entire story, entities are trying to do away with the archeologists and are trying to steal the evidence that she finds because they don't want the secrets revealed. The main character is an archeologist named Sarah who was portrayed as a cold, detached English woman who worked so hard to keep her emotions under control that I found I really didn't care one way or another what happened to her as long as the mystery of the saint was revealed. In fact, I was not fond enough of any of the characters, other then the saint called Gabriel, to care what happened to any of them. Some of the book was extremely predictable and the way the story dragged along, it made the archeologists seem a little dimwitted for taking so long to figure it all out. I am glad I read to the end. All of the loose ends were tied together nicely with a nice twist at the end and the mysteries were all revealed. The moral of the story being that the over population of mankind and our greedy disregard of the environment is stripping the mother earth of her precious resources and causing an imbalance in nature which, if we don't change our ways, will result in the end of the world as we know it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    When Sarah Weston, a Cambridge archaeologist leading a dig in Ethiopia, stumbles upon a seemingly untouched tomb, she realizes that her find could be historically significant. As Sarah works to uncover the identity of the tomb's occupant, she quickly learns that there are those who will do anything to keep the truth hidden. Determined to carry on with her work in spite of threats, Sarah joins forces with anthropologist and TV personality Daniel Madigan. Working together, Sarah and Daniel learn t When Sarah Weston, a Cambridge archaeologist leading a dig in Ethiopia, stumbles upon a seemingly untouched tomb, she realizes that her find could be historically significant. As Sarah works to uncover the identity of the tomb's occupant, she quickly learns that there are those who will do anything to keep the truth hidden. Determined to carry on with her work in spite of threats, Sarah joins forces with anthropologist and TV personality Daniel Madigan. Working together, Sarah and Daniel learn that the body belonged a man known as Ethiopia's tenth saint, a man whose prophecies describe in detail the earth's final days. But Sarah and Daniel's discoveries continue to place them, and those they associate with, in direct danger. As Sarah and Daniel come to learn more about the tenth saint's prophecies, they realize that much more is at stake then just their professional careers and, potentially, their lives. For if the prophecies hold true, the end of days is near. The Tenth Saint, the first novel in D.J. Niko's Sarah Weston Chronicles, is a modern-day thriller that will keep readers eagerly turning the pages. One of the things I liked best about this novel is that it doesn't fit neatly into any one genre. While the bulk of the narrative focuses on Sarah Weston and her quest (the thriller aspect), certain chapters also flash back in time to the days of the tenth saint. This gives the book a historical flavour. I found the prophet's chapters, while initially slow to get going, every bit as intriguing as those set in the modern-day, especially as the truth of his life is slowly revealed. Sarah Weston is a well-developed character. I admit that I didn't warm to her right away, but by the novel's end she'd won me over. Another strength of this novel is its setting. Most thrillers I've read recently are set in the United States and/or Europe. While parts of this novel are set in these common locations, much of the book takes place in Africa, which is not a typical setting for thrillers. While certain aspects of the narrative are predictable and others not entirely plausible, the suspense is maintained throughout the story. For this reason I found The Tenth Saint difficult to put down, and ended up racing through it in a matter of hours. Recommended to fans of thrillers, especially those with a historical touch. I'm looking forward to reading The Riddle of Solomon, the next book in D.J. Niko's Sarah Weston Chronicles. Source: I received a copy of this novel as part of D.J. Niko's Virtual Book Tour in exchange for a fair and honest review. This review first appeared on my blog, Confessions of an Avid Reader.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn

    Cambridge archaeologist Sarah Weston,the daughter of an Amerian actress and a British lord, wants to make it on her own. She's trying to do that on a dig in Ethopia, looking for the lost city of Aksum when she learns of a tomb covered in obscure writings rumored to belong to the tenth saint of Coptic Christianity--but it is a reality or just myth? Deep inside a cave, Sarah, along with her colleague anthropologist Daniel Madigan, both determined to find the truth, stumble upon ancient, Nostradamu Cambridge archaeologist Sarah Weston,the daughter of an Amerian actress and a British lord, wants to make it on her own. She's trying to do that on a dig in Ethopia, looking for the lost city of Aksum when she learns of a tomb covered in obscure writings rumored to belong to the tenth saint of Coptic Christianity--but it is a reality or just myth? Deep inside a cave, Sarah, along with her colleague anthropologist Daniel Madigan, both determined to find the truth, stumble upon ancient, Nostradamus-like writings that warn of future man's destruction of the earth. But someone powerful wants to keep the writings secret and comes after Sarah and Daniel. Told chapters alternating between the present and the 4th century story of Gabriel, a tall, white man who mysteriously lives in the desert with a tribe of wandering Nomads, this first novel satisfies the reader as an engaging thriller/suspense, but also is a thinking person's book featuring amazing religious detail. I look forward to the next Sarah Weston adventure. Disclaimer-I was lucky to win a free copy of this book from the author!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kelley

    The Tenth Saint was a winner. The author's rich, descriptive language painted an intriguing story carefully unfolded. Early in the book, I was thirsty for more of Gabriel's story and genuinely shocked as it was revealed. I would have never anticipated the manner in which the plot pivoted, but found it to be a fascinating juxtaposition with the rich history and traditional lifestyle of the Bedouin people portrayed throughout. I knew very little of Coptic Christianity before reading The Tenth Sain The Tenth Saint was a winner. The author's rich, descriptive language painted an intriguing story carefully unfolded. Early in the book, I was thirsty for more of Gabriel's story and genuinely shocked as it was revealed. I would have never anticipated the manner in which the plot pivoted, but found it to be a fascinating juxtaposition with the rich history and traditional lifestyle of the Bedouin people portrayed throughout. I knew very little of Coptic Christianity before reading The Tenth Saint -- I love it when fiction can open a window into reality for me. I heartily recommend the book and am eager to accompany Sarah Weston on her next adventure.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    I really enjoyed this book. To feel completely immersed in a novel can be quite rare at times, but D.J. Niko wrote The Tenth Saint quite nicely that gripped me from the very first page. Unlike other novels that have information that you are required to understand to fully the grasp the story, The Tenth Saint doesn't pile the information on heavily. It slowly fleshes out details to let them simmer and allow you to think about it before new information is presented. I especially enjoyed reading Ga I really enjoyed this book. To feel completely immersed in a novel can be quite rare at times, but D.J. Niko wrote The Tenth Saint quite nicely that gripped me from the very first page. Unlike other novels that have information that you are required to understand to fully the grasp the story, The Tenth Saint doesn't pile the information on heavily. It slowly fleshes out details to let them simmer and allow you to think about it before new information is presented. I especially enjoyed reading Gabriel's parts of the novel. The approach to the end of days was approached in a new way by D.J. Niko, and I can't wait for the next novel to be released.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marika Charalambous

    Also reviewed on my blog: http://www.mysterysequels.com/the-ten... A very interesting read, a mix of archaeologycal mystery, apocalyptic novel, bit of Indiana Jones adventure, historical novel, and time travel mixed in. And while such a varied mix might just confuse the readers in other books, the author has really pulled it together well. The book has actually two main parts, the present and the past. The story told from the present is full of action and suspense, while the past is beautiful, lyr Also reviewed on my blog: http://www.mysterysequels.com/the-ten... A very interesting read, a mix of archaeologycal mystery, apocalyptic novel, bit of Indiana Jones adventure, historical novel, and time travel mixed in. And while such a varied mix might just confuse the readers in other books, the author has really pulled it together well. The book has actually two main parts, the present and the past. The story told from the present is full of action and suspense, while the past is beautiful, lyric and really powerful. It's as if the author was actually there and could report directly from the past. Now when is the second book in the series coming up?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Without doubt, one of the most well-written and well-researched mystery thrillers that I've read in a long time. The story is excellent, and the heroine appeals, but the real strength of The Tenth Saint is in the author's depiction of Ethiopia and Arabia. You can almost feel the desert sand and rock under your feet. I'll be buying and reading the second novel, The Riddle of Solomon, straight away. Without doubt, one of the most well-written and well-researched mystery thrillers that I've read in a long time. The story is excellent, and the heroine appeals, but the real strength of The Tenth Saint is in the author's depiction of Ethiopia and Arabia. You can almost feel the desert sand and rock under your feet. I'll be buying and reading the second novel, The Riddle of Solomon, straight away.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erika Schmid

    There is something compelling about religious mysteries that has me coming back again and again, no matter how terrible they end up being. While, in the grand scheme of things, this novel was not as bad as other's I have read, it also wasn't my favorite. Sarah Weston is an archaeologist digging in Ethiopia when Daniel, a TV archaeologist, comes to her site the same time she subsequently finds a hidden tomb. What ensues is an adventure that involves finding out the mystery behind the individual b There is something compelling about religious mysteries that has me coming back again and again, no matter how terrible they end up being. While, in the grand scheme of things, this novel was not as bad as other's I have read, it also wasn't my favorite. Sarah Weston is an archaeologist digging in Ethiopia when Daniel, a TV archaeologist, comes to her site the same time she subsequently finds a hidden tomb. What ensues is an adventure that involves finding out the mystery behind the individual buried in this secret tomb and what it means for the fate of the world. Oh yeah, we got doomsday stuff, we have time travel, we even have evil leaders who claim they are doing the world good. Oh, it has every cliche you could think of for an adventure such as this, including Indiana Jones references. Honestly, the cliche nature didn't start up until about halfway through though. I was very interested in Sarah at first, a bold individual who refuses to be held down or shadowed by her famous parents. I didn't even dislike Daniel at first, even though he was a flamboyant television type. It was when they slept together and became a couple that things took a turn for absolute cliche and predictability. I swear, sometimes sex just ruins things and it sort of ruined the flow of this novel. So yeah, it started getting pretty cheesy toward the end and the characters a little less dynamic than at the beginning. Overall though, it was still interesting and a solid read. Maybe I'm just the type who wants more history, which was predominant in the beginning, instead of a sweeping romance with Laura Croft and Indiana Jones.

  12. 5 out of 5

    M.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Book: The Tenth Saint: Book One (The Sarah Weston Chronicles #1) Publisher: Medallion Press, 2012 Genre: Historical Fiction, Historical Thriller, Science Fiction Rating: Source + Date Read: Purchased + June 2013 Recommend: I'd recommend this for those looking for a good historical thriller with a sci-fi twist (Though the sci-fi bit isn't really clear till near the end of the book). Book Pro’s: The Tenth Saint is a thrilling twist filled with intrigue and historical dra Book: The Tenth Saint: Book One (The Sarah Weston Chronicles #1) Publisher: Medallion Press, 2012 Genre: Historical Fiction, Historical Thriller, Science Fiction Rating: Source + Date Read: Purchased + June 2013 Recommend: I'd recommend this for those looking for a good historical thriller with a sci-fi twist (Though the sci-fi bit isn't really clear till near the end of the book). Book Pro’s: The Tenth Saint is a thrilling twist filled with intrigue and historical drama. Book Con’s: Somewhat conventional storyline in that we have overworked female, in comes overworked male with a winning smile and ability to manage work and a sex life. Female discovers secret, falls in love with male, saves world. The end. Favourite Line: “Freedom cannot be labeled nor won nor envied. Only when one doesn't realize what freedom is, is one truly free.” Cover: You gotta give it to Medallion Press' illustration crew, they know how to throw together a murky enough cover to get book readers piqued. It's murky, it's great and it reveals just enough clues about the story line. Setting: Set in the Ethiopian area of Aksum, our protagonist, archaeologist Sarah Weston (really? I just finished reading City of Dark Magic and the chick's name was Sarah Weston too! This must be a very popular literary name. I guess. What are the odds?) stumbles upon (literally, she stumbles) an age-old secret and is determined to come to the truth of the matter before sinister forces silence her for good. Review: So I'm reviewing DJ Niko's second novel in the Sarah Weston Chronicles for the Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours and I wanted to get some context before I reviewed that one. Thankfully this book is free now on Amazon (yes!) and I was able to get a proper sense for the series and the characters before I moved on. Thankfully, the style and genre of the book is right up my alley. I love it when books employ some sense of historical intrigue (successfully) with a strong set of characters (preferably female) and a hidden secret. It's like the Da Vinci code with a female twist, and less about art and more about the stuff. You know, the small itsy bits of history that tend to mean a lot more than you'd think they would. DJ Niko is a very good writer and successfully pulls everything off. I don't imagine this was an easy feat but Niko's style coupled with her very solid research make The Tenth Saint a true delight for Historical Fiction/Thriller fans! My only quip with the story line is that is has moments of cliché. The plot was a bit too contrived and to be honest, I'm tired of reading about a beautiful, rich and smart girl trying to prove something to the men (most often they're trying to one up their fathers) in their lives by over-working and appearing mean all the time. Why can't a strong female be bubbly and nice without being taken as a bimbo? Why must they be stressed and play hardball to be taken seriously? That would probably be a true work of fiction, huh? Total Score: Recommend? For sure!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eva Koschmieder

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Sad turn I liked the book in the beginning, setting up the story the author did a great job setting the scene and she jacked up expectations of the book However, the plot moved along gradually until the fatal plot twist. There is only one plot more abhorrent than hers and that is the old nazi archaeology thing. I started reading a great archaeological mystery and then it turned into a story about time traveling! The most boring, ridiculous und unimaginative plot line available! The book turned int Sad turn I liked the book in the beginning, setting up the story the author did a great job setting the scene and she jacked up expectations of the book However, the plot moved along gradually until the fatal plot twist. There is only one plot more abhorrent than hers and that is the old nazi archaeology thing. I started reading a great archaeological mystery and then it turned into a story about time traveling! The most boring, ridiculous und unimaginative plot line available! The book turned into a third rate science fiction novel. Completely disappointing!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mary Sc

    This was a quick, entertaining read, though I had some issues with some of the phrases the author used to describe characters of color. It also suffers from the "white people ruin indigenous cultures/artifacts/etc" that so many archeology books do. I enjoyed it despite these flaws, and will definitely be looking into finding the sequels to this book. The plot moved fast. The characters were relatable. Overall, worth the time to read it. This was a quick, entertaining read, though I had some issues with some of the phrases the author used to describe characters of color. It also suffers from the "white people ruin indigenous cultures/artifacts/etc" that so many archeology books do. I enjoyed it despite these flaws, and will definitely be looking into finding the sequels to this book. The plot moved fast. The characters were relatable. Overall, worth the time to read it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dee Renee Chesnut

    This ebook has been in my Nook library since 2012 when I downloaded it for free from Barnes and Noble. I enjoyed the stories of Gabriel and Sarah, and finally realizing how these story lines fit together. I learned a bit more about archeology work in the African country of Ethiopa. It was a fun and entertaining read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Letow

    While on an archaeological dig in Ethiopia, Sarah Weston, stumbles on a mystery connecting the future with the past. She and college Daniel Madigan, they risk their lives to solve. This mystery thriller is well written , kept my attention and had a lot of suprises. This is the first of three.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Coralyn

    Another author I am delighted to have discovered. On something of a mystery, suspense and detecting path at the moment and this is a good story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    An unexpected turn! Well written page turner, with an unexpected turn. One glaring mistake — they never removed the bindings on their wrists!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    The writing wasn't very good, and I was hoping for more archaeology and less science fiction. The writing wasn't very good, and I was hoping for more archaeology and less science fiction.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Review also posted at The Owl Review Rating actually 3.5 stars This book was a pretty fast read for me. I had to stop towards the end for a bit, but only to catch up on some other books that I needed to finish up. Overall I really enjoyed this novel. It did get slow in parts, namely the parts devoted to Gabriel's story. I did find it picked up again as soon as the action started, or when another piece to the puzzle was found. The last 50 pages really sped by on this story, as suddenly it all unfold Review also posted at The Owl Review Rating actually 3.5 stars This book was a pretty fast read for me. I had to stop towards the end for a bit, but only to catch up on some other books that I needed to finish up. Overall I really enjoyed this novel. It did get slow in parts, namely the parts devoted to Gabriel's story. I did find it picked up again as soon as the action started, or when another piece to the puzzle was found. The last 50 pages really sped by on this story, as suddenly it all unfolded and I wanted to keep turning the page and find out what was next. It could have been a little faster-moving up until that part, but like I said earlier, that was mostly the chapters that covered what Gabriel was doing. I loved the premise of this hidden Tenth Saint, and what it meant to history as we know it. I can't help but fall in love with tales that take you into the heart of archaeology and hidden history. Very well-written take on learning from the past and not hiding the horrors that have happened, or that are to come and can be avoided. The main character, Sarah, was at first such a cold personality. I did find myself warming to her as I learned her history of her detached, calculating, political, English father, and her carefree, movie-star American mother. Normally that would seem sort of silly almost, but for this story, it worked for me. I could see her childhood, and how she came to be where she was. As an historian, she was fierce, loyal, and true to her cause. As a woman, she was no different. During a dig, she got a tip from a local man about a tomb that was hidden a little ways away from her current dig. Inside, the walls held prophetic cave markings and a body dating from the 1600's, with dental work beyond our present amalgams and abilities. This got me intrigued, and although parts were just slow, I really did want to find out who the heck this saint was, hidden in this tomb. The romantic start for Sarah was a bit awkward in my opinion, but given her personality, this was probably true to form. As long as historical novels don't turn into "Romancing the Stone" they still work for me. In the end, her relationship with fellow archaeologist, Daniel, makes for a nice balance to the story. His character was a bit flat, and could have used a bit more fleshing out, but otherwise, a nice addition to the cast. It's a great book for a debut author, but it is also a NY Times Best Seller, which comes along with a certain approach to writing and style. I'm not always fond of those books, but aside from the slower parts, and some predictability, the ending was excellent reading for me. It was fast-paced, had some interesting turns and twists, and it tied together very well. Overall, a good read and I will look for more stories from DJ Niko in the future.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    The arid, unforgiving desert of Ethiopia plays host to the majority of D.J Niko’s thrilling novel. The Tenth Saint follows the work of Sarah Weston, an Oxford trained archeologist too independent for her own good. While on a dig, Sarah uncovers a tomb filled with perplexing finds. A tall, white man with good and advanced dentistry dating to the 4th century? An obscure dialect carved into the walls? Sarah, driven by a wish to learn and share the past, dives into an archeological mystery that will The arid, unforgiving desert of Ethiopia plays host to the majority of D.J Niko’s thrilling novel. The Tenth Saint follows the work of Sarah Weston, an Oxford trained archeologist too independent for her own good. While on a dig, Sarah uncovers a tomb filled with perplexing finds. A tall, white man with good and advanced dentistry dating to the 4th century? An obscure dialect carved into the walls? Sarah, driven by a wish to learn and share the past, dives into an archeological mystery that will threaten her life, her career, and question the impossible. D.J Niko’s first book in the Sarah Weston series narrates a fascinating tale that had me guessing at numerous answers to the question – who is Gabriel? Niko’s narrative style of alternating story lines allows the reader to slowly piece together the truth along with Sarah. While Niko had me questioning what morsel of evidence about the tomb would show itself next, there was the predictable love story. Every adventure needs some romance, I guess. At the beginning of the book, I considered The Tenth Saint a story of a female Indiana Jones. My thoughts were confirmed and chastised, on page 294, when Sarah reads an article about her discoveries with a tinge of disgust. “The article described Sarah…and Daniel…less like scientists and more like Indiana Jones types willing to risk life and limb to uncover hidden treasure.” I read this as Niko’s method of reminding the reader that her characters are more than adventurous figures; they are archeologists striving to reveal the truth of the tenth saint. Besides Niko’s skill at character development and intriguing narrative style, she illustrates history and ancient places beautifully. For instance, the description of a stone church in Aksum reveals Niko’s intimate knowledge of the time and places about which she writes. “The structure was almost Byzantine with its clay-tiled dome roof crowned by a simple wooden cross…The church interior was divided into small chambers, each decorated with murals of saints and the Christ, their eyes gleaming in the soft yellow light of the candelabra.” Her experience traveling the world and time with tribes of Africa and Asia comes through as she writes with authority about places most of us only dream of visiting. The Tenth Saint is a thrilling story about the past, present, and future and the lengths people will go to to ensure the outcome they desire. I remained captured by the story of The Tenth Saint from the first to last page. I recommend this book to anyone with an interest in history and religion, yearning for a pick-me-up adventure. The Tenth Saint is particularly good for students needing a rest after midterms or finals. Also, stay tuned. The next installment of the Sarah Weston series, The Riddle of Solomon, is supposed to come out this year.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Darlene

    The Tenth Saint by D.J. Niko will take you on an adventure and will surely have you turning the pages quickly as it did me. The Tenth Saint is the first in the Sarah Weston Chronicles and I’ve actually done things a little backwards this time as I read the second in the series before this one but it made no difference. The Tenth Saint had me enthralled from the first pages to the last and I have to say that this series has me hooked. I love the characters and the fast paced story line with plent The Tenth Saint by D.J. Niko will take you on an adventure and will surely have you turning the pages quickly as it did me. The Tenth Saint is the first in the Sarah Weston Chronicles and I’ve actually done things a little backwards this time as I read the second in the series before this one but it made no difference. The Tenth Saint had me enthralled from the first pages to the last and I have to say that this series has me hooked. I love the characters and the fast paced story line with plenty of action! The Tenth Saint finds archaeologist Sarah Weston in Ethiopia where she discovers an ancient tomb with unusual inscriptions on it. The tomb is said to belong to the tenth saint of Coptic Christianity and as Sarah delves into the case she finds that the remains of this rumored saint are odd and seemingly impossible as he is found to have fillings in his teeth that are unlike anything ever seen before leaving Sarah mystified. Sarah, along with Daniel Madigan who is anthropologist, set out to decipher these inscriptions and what they ultimately learn has the power to terrify them. They tell of the eventual destruction of the earth and man’s role in causing it to happen. As with any discovery Sarah wants to share it but quickly learns that there are some very powerful people that do not want to see these inscriptions come to light and they do will anything to make sure that they don’t. Soon enough Sarah and Daniel are putting their lives in danger and they can only hope to make it out alive. I really like both Sarah and Daniel. Sarah is a very strong female character. She comes from privilege but has chosen to not live her life that way much to her father’s chagrin. I love that she falls head first into any situation, dangerous or not, in order to do what she believes is right. Daniel just seems to be a really great guy and together he and Sarah make a great team. Between the two of them they always manage to find trouble and then have to risk life and limb to get themselves out of it. On another note I love D.J. Niko’s novels for the historical elements. I find it fascinating to learn all the information she includes on religion and ancient artifacts or writings. You can definitely tell that she loves what she writes about and meticulously researches all elements to bring them together in a fictional story that has you on the edge of your seat as it unfolds. I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend The Tenth Saint or the Sarah Weston Chronicles to readers who enjoy historical fiction with a little mystery and adventure added in!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    Copy received from http://hfvirtualbooktours.com/ and review posted at booknerdloloetodo.blogpsot.com Four Stars I have to confess that I would have probably not picked up The Tenth Saint (The Sarah Weston Chronicles #1) by D.J. Niko because it’s not the type of story that I am usually drawn too. But since I was given this opportunity to review it I’m very glad that I did! For me this story was a mix of Indian Jones meets Laura Croft. I absolutely loved Sarah Weston. To say that she is gutsy is a Copy received from http://hfvirtualbooktours.com/ and review posted at booknerdloloetodo.blogpsot.com Four Stars I have to confess that I would have probably not picked up The Tenth Saint (The Sarah Weston Chronicles #1) by D.J. Niko because it’s not the type of story that I am usually drawn too. But since I was given this opportunity to review it I’m very glad that I did! For me this story was a mix of Indian Jones meets Laura Croft. I absolutely loved Sarah Weston. To say that she is gutsy is an understatement! I was completely hooked when she had a scorpion crawling on her and she was calm and collected. As Sarah is leading an excavation for months, in Ethiopia, she has not had any success in finding anything relevant to the dig. One day a local directs her to a mysterious “cave”. Sarah has a lot to prove, she is running out of time and not having any success. Daniel Madigan provided the perfect balance to the story although he threatens to be a staunch representative of UNESCO he provides Sarah with a much needed ally. They both had a common goal, figuring out the symbols found on the “cave” and the identity of the person buried there. Their mutual dedication to archaeology was a huge push for the story. Both Daniel and Sarah cannot walk away without first finding out if the man buried in the “cave” is the lost Coptic Tenth Saint. Honestly, I couldn’t either! I wanted to know who was buried there?! Besides the amazing characters I thought the air of intrigue was fantastic, the idea of the finding the 10th saint provided a great air of mystery. I don’t know much about Ethiopia but the author was able to provide just enough information to make the story interesting and still informative. Many parts of the story felt like “The Da Vinci Code” the idea of tracking down the mystery behind the letter, for example. But the plot was very unique and very different. I definitely didn’t see Gabriel coming and he was a great inclusion to the story. As the story unfolded there were many twists and turns and we traveled from Ethiopia to Paris. I’m so glad to see that this is just on book in a series of chronicles, I would love to hear more about Sarah Weston’s adventures and where they will lead her to next. I thought that both the story and the characters were not only very interesting but very smart. I also like that this novel really pushes some of the stereotypes surrounding women and the field of archeology. Perfect blend of adventure, mystery and intrigue!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    3-3.5 stars I wasn't keen on the back-and-forth between Sarah's story and Gabriel's story. It felt like I just got into Sarah's story - understood what was going on amongst all the archaelogist and sociologist jargon and geographic references, and BOOM - suddenly, I'm in Gabriel's story. The first switch was the most jarring, since there was no transition and no explanation; it's entirely up to the reader to the reader to figure out the connection between the two stories. The author certainly has 3-3.5 stars I wasn't keen on the back-and-forth between Sarah's story and Gabriel's story. It felt like I just got into Sarah's story - understood what was going on amongst all the archaelogist and sociologist jargon and geographic references, and BOOM - suddenly, I'm in Gabriel's story. The first switch was the most jarring, since there was no transition and no explanation; it's entirely up to the reader to the reader to figure out the connection between the two stories. The author certainly has a message: don't try to play God with Nature. The more we mess up our world and try to "fix it" with engineered things (whether machines or manipulating natural things), the more we screw it up. The dilemma of whether or not Sarah and Daniel prevented a disaster or added to it is mostly up to the reader to decide at the end. I realize the back-and-forth stories is a recognized literary device, and it certainly has it's place. But overall, that device agitates and irritates me; and in this case, especially so. I applaud the author's convictions and her message, and she spins an exciting, adventurous tale. But... there's so much that the author assumes the reader either understands or picks up along the way. And, unfortunately, some of those assumptions make the book dry. While the author goes into great detail explaining geological discoveries (like the cave of the tomb), most of it simply passed over my head. And much of the Ethiopian country, countrymen, and especially the monks just did, too. Not sure why - perhaps I just wasn't interested enough to follow along? And when things started to come together, I found myself having to back-track to re-read those very parts that I didn't quite piece together the first time. And I wasn't always successful, even on the 2nd read. But it's a good first book, and I hope that the author continues to write and publish.

  25. 5 out of 5

    The Lit Bitch

    I actually started this series a little backward by reading the second book first but that didn’t spoil the series for me in the least! As I said before in my review of the second book, this is a thrilling ride through the Near East and its history! The only thing that was a little different in this book for me was the pace. I felt like the pace in the second book was much faster…this one was a little bit thick with the back story and there were a couple of parallel stories happening which bogged I actually started this series a little backward by reading the second book first but that didn’t spoil the series for me in the least! As I said before in my review of the second book, this is a thrilling ride through the Near East and its history! The only thing that was a little different in this book for me was the pace. I felt like the pace in the second book was much faster…this one was a little bit thick with the back story and there were a couple of parallel stories happening which bogged it down a bit. There was the modern story of Sarah and Daniel which I was completely engrossed in, but then there was the story of Gabriel which I felt was taking up too much space in the novel. As the stories went on they did come together but for me it took a little too long for them to come together and make sense. In this book I found the ending and the second half of the novel a little convoluted. In the second book I felt like things were much more clear and concise. The conclusion and resolution were a little wanting for me. I am actually kind of happy that I started with the second book first because the second book was a little more refined and polished than this one. Not that this isn’t a good book–it is–but I think it could use some polishing and defining to make it truly sparkle. I am amazed at Niko’s knowledge of so many different cultures! In both books, she has touched on so many rich cultures, history, religion, and mythology. She is able to articulate complicated history and present it in an understandable manner for her readers! See my full review here

  26. 5 out of 5

    Karyn Palmer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a technically well-written book and I plan to look up more by the author. The chapters alternate between the primary narrative and the backstory. The backstory could have moved faster, but I think it was handled well as information was revealed at the same time the protagonists were finding it. The Tenth Saint is part mystery and part science fiction, with a healthy dose of "save the oceans" preachiness thrown in. I'm hoping her other books avoid the last part, but I think there's a lot This was a technically well-written book and I plan to look up more by the author. The chapters alternate between the primary narrative and the backstory. The backstory could have moved faster, but I think it was handled well as information was revealed at the same time the protagonists were finding it. The Tenth Saint is part mystery and part science fiction, with a healthy dose of "save the oceans" preachiness thrown in. I'm hoping her other books avoid the last part, but I think there's a lot of potential here. There are at least 3 storylines going on in this book (any one of which would have made good stories) which ultimately come together and are resolved at the end. The primary story is of the Cambridge archaeologist who stumbles upon a mystery while digging in Ethiopia. The second is the story of the man whose tomb she finds. Then things start getting odd. The introduction of this time-traveller adds a conspiracy theory element to the story as forces alternately try to help and hinder her. Even halfway through her travails her professional reputation is in such tatters that I found it hard to believe that anyone could take her seriously enough to relay the information the time-traveller intended to have revealed, much less to prompt anyone to act on it as he'd intended. So, to sum up, not a bad book if you like mystery and sci-fi but the preachiness detracts from real enjoyment.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Even though this book comes in at 464 pages it was a quick read. The chapters are not too long and usually ended with a little cliffhanger, which just made me want to read more and 3 days later I was finished. Weaving back and forth in time, the author wove a very interesting story that I enjoyed and thought was original. This book was a mix of mystery, action, historical, suspense, archaeological and romance along with time travel. In the 1600's we have a man named Gabriel, you know that there Even though this book comes in at 464 pages it was a quick read. The chapters are not too long and usually ended with a little cliffhanger, which just made me want to read more and 3 days later I was finished. Weaving back and forth in time, the author wove a very interesting story that I enjoyed and thought was original. This book was a mix of mystery, action, historical, suspense, archaeological and romance along with time travel. In the 1600's we have a man named Gabriel, you know that there is something different about him, but ya just can't quite put your finger on what it is. I really liked his part of the story, very mysterious and intriguing. In present day we have Sarah and Daniel, as much as I really enjoyed this book I had a difficult time connecting with these two. I found Sarah to lack feeling or any emotion, same with Daniel. There were parts of the story that I found predictable, while others were a surprise. Some of the action scenes were a little farfetched, but then again the way the author wrote them out I could cleanly see them happening in my little brain (and that's a good thing). This is the first book in the Sarah Weston Chronicles with book 2 already released, The Riddle of Solomon. All in all a fast paced book that will appeal to those that like face paced books with lots of action.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Cole

    The Tenth Saint had several hooks that drew me to reading it: the archaeology, the less well-known setting of Ethiopia, ancient prophecies, and modern technology are just a few. The story, told in alternating chapters and timelines-- from the fourth century story of a tall, mysterious white man traveling with nomads in the desert to the modern-day tale of Sarah and Daniel-- is a little bit Indiana Jones and a little bit Da Vinci Code. However, the familiar plot elements are more than made up for The Tenth Saint had several hooks that drew me to reading it: the archaeology, the less well-known setting of Ethiopia, ancient prophecies, and modern technology are just a few. The story, told in alternating chapters and timelines-- from the fourth century story of a tall, mysterious white man traveling with nomads in the desert to the modern-day tale of Sarah and Daniel-- is a little bit Indiana Jones and a little bit Da Vinci Code. However, the familiar plot elements are more than made up for by the book's fast pace, historical details, two very engaging characters, and a nice twist at book's end. Sarah Weston is the daughter of an English lord and a Hollywood actress, and that combination of parents led to the expected dysfunctional childhood. Sarah is an interesting blend of scholar, adventurer, introvert, and dreamer, and I can see her taking charge of several more books in a series. Her colleague and romantic interest, Daniel Madigan, is the more outgoing of the two, and every bit as intriguing as Sarah. In fact, I wish there had been more scenes with Daniel in the book, so I'm happy to see that they are a team again in the next (The Riddle of Solomon). If you're in the mood for a story of adventure, history, treasure, and two intrepid heroes written by an author with an eye for setting and character, you might just want to curl up with The Tenth Saint!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lillian Cummings

    Do we believe in time travel? Is it possible? Sarah is about to find someone that could change the future of the world. The thing is that Gabriel has been died for a very long time but there are still people out there who will protect him and his legacy. Sarah has been working so hard on this latest dig but she hasn't had any major breakthroughs but that is about to change. She is shown a secret cave and that is where she finds a coffin with strange wording and drawings. Sarah knows that she has Do we believe in time travel? Is it possible? Sarah is about to find someone that could change the future of the world. The thing is that Gabriel has been died for a very long time but there are still people out there who will protect him and his legacy. Sarah has been working so hard on this latest dig but she hasn't had any major breakthroughs but that is about to change. She is shown a secret cave and that is where she finds a coffin with strange wording and drawings. Sarah knows that she has found something special but the university doesn't want to know about it as the financial backers want to see results. Daniel is sent to check on her and if need be send her back home but she won't allow that to happen. Their journey will be filled with danger and new knowledge about someone who was a very special man that meant the world to many. But there are people in the world that don't want Sarah to find the truth and they will do everything to stop her. The story is full of action and so many interesting people. It is a book that draws you in and keeps your interest. I was lucky enough to get a copy through Medallion press.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    An archeological find in the Ethiopian desert turns into a discovery with global implications in this fast-paced and engaging novel. What I thought would be a historical conspiracy-theory turned into an apocalyptic prophecy involving time travel. But it worked. I thought Niko did a great job weaving the story of ancient Ethiopian Coptics with the future environmental decline of the planet. What archeologist Sarah Weston finds in a desolate cave leads her to a controversial plot with a science fi An archeological find in the Ethiopian desert turns into a discovery with global implications in this fast-paced and engaging novel. What I thought would be a historical conspiracy-theory turned into an apocalyptic prophecy involving time travel. But it worked. I thought Niko did a great job weaving the story of ancient Ethiopian Coptics with the future environmental decline of the planet. What archeologist Sarah Weston finds in a desolate cave leads her to a controversial plot with a science fiction twist. History and science collide when she realizes the origins of the ancient wall carvings she discovered are a vision of a future catastrophe. Sounds obscure and slightly far-fetched, right? The book evolved into an entirely different story that I had initially expected, and I was pleasantly surprised at the turn of events that made this book an original adventure. I received a complimentary copy of this book via Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours.

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