web site hit counter Unfair Trade: How Big Business Exploits The World's Poor And Why It Doesn't Have To - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Unfair Trade: How Big Business Exploits The World's Poor And Why It Doesn't Have To

Availability: Ready to download

Why the world's poor continue to lose out in the global market -- and what can be done about it.   How is it that our favourite brands can import billions of pounds' worth of goods from the developing world every year, and yet leave the people who produce them barely scraping a living? Is it that big business is incompatible with the eradication of poverty? And, if so, are c Why the world's poor continue to lose out in the global market -- and what can be done about it.   How is it that our favourite brands can import billions of pounds' worth of goods from the developing world every year, and yet leave the people who produce them barely scraping a living? Is it that big business is incompatible with the eradication of poverty? And, if so, are charity and fair trade initiatives the only way forward?   In Unfair Trade Conor Woodman traces a range of products back to their source to uncover who precisely is benefitting and who is losing out. He goes diving with lobster fishermen in Nicaragua who are dying in their hundreds to keep the restaurant tables of the US well stocked. He ventures into war-torn Congo to find out what the developed world's insatiable demand for tin means for local miners. And he risks falling foul of the authorities in Laos as he covertly visits the country's burgeoning rubber plantations, established to supply Chinese factories that in turn supply the West with consumer goods. In the process, he tests accepted economic wisdom on the best way to create a fairer world -- and suggests a simpler but potentially far more radical solution.


Compare

Why the world's poor continue to lose out in the global market -- and what can be done about it.   How is it that our favourite brands can import billions of pounds' worth of goods from the developing world every year, and yet leave the people who produce them barely scraping a living? Is it that big business is incompatible with the eradication of poverty? And, if so, are c Why the world's poor continue to lose out in the global market -- and what can be done about it.   How is it that our favourite brands can import billions of pounds' worth of goods from the developing world every year, and yet leave the people who produce them barely scraping a living? Is it that big business is incompatible with the eradication of poverty? And, if so, are charity and fair trade initiatives the only way forward?   In Unfair Trade Conor Woodman traces a range of products back to their source to uncover who precisely is benefitting and who is losing out. He goes diving with lobster fishermen in Nicaragua who are dying in their hundreds to keep the restaurant tables of the US well stocked. He ventures into war-torn Congo to find out what the developed world's insatiable demand for tin means for local miners. And he risks falling foul of the authorities in Laos as he covertly visits the country's burgeoning rubber plantations, established to supply Chinese factories that in turn supply the West with consumer goods. In the process, he tests accepted economic wisdom on the best way to create a fairer world -- and suggests a simpler but potentially far more radical solution.

30 review for Unfair Trade: How Big Business Exploits The World's Poor And Why It Doesn't Have To

  1. 4 out of 5

    Aliya

    Earlier this year, I watched the entire season of Master Chef USA. In the show, one snooty chef judge, condescendingly asked a talented but bullying participant-who came from a non-privileged background-if she felt she was at a disadvantage, because she couldn't afford fine dining? It was a mean question, to say the least. But more than that, the question, and the greater equation of the program itself, showed a people lost in luxuries, where dinners are 3 course meals, with dozens of exotic ingr Earlier this year, I watched the entire season of Master Chef USA. In the show, one snooty chef judge, condescendingly asked a talented but bullying participant-who came from a non-privileged background-if she felt she was at a disadvantage, because she couldn't afford fine dining? It was a mean question, to say the least. But more than that, the question, and the greater equation of the program itself, showed a people lost in luxuries, where dinners are 3 course meals, with dozens of exotic ingredients, sourced from all over the world. Food like this, was not found even on the dining tables of European royalty, half a century ago. Today, that kind of food is served as a $20/entrée at US restaurants. Five decades ago, owning a phone at home was a convenient luxury. The whole family shared the phone, and sometimes other people borrowed the facility. Fast forward 40 years, and now everyone walks around with a phone, which is "smart." How did all that become possible? When something like that becomes a mundane reality for western and now increasingly global consumers, something doesn't seem right. Consumers covet, own, dispose, rinse and repeat. These products are within the budget of middle class Americans, Europeans and now the Chinese and Indians too. These products are sourced at the cost of human dignity, health, privation, misery, and often at the cost of life itself. Woodman takes us to world supply hubs in Central America, Asia and Africa. He shows us how the raw materials of our products are sourced and what level of human suffering is created due to it. If you read Arundhati Roy's "Broken Republic" you'd get a similar tale. The ills of capitalism. Yet Woodman despite being a self-proclaimed economist, completely misses the point about capitalism being the ill; he sees it as the cure. Jesus (pbuh) said: "My kingdom is not of this world." Muhammad (pbuh) said: "Be in this world as a traveler or wayfarer." Mindless consumption has not done anyone any good. Western societies have experienced a culture of bullying and ruthless one-upping as well as tearing down of fellow humans. The manufacturing nation of China has turned it's migrant workforce into modern day slaves. Finally, the mineral rich nations of Africa, Asia and the Americas have experienced unprecedented violence. THIS, is why the above mentioned prophets, opposed greed, covetousness, and narcissism.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Birgit

    If you've ever picked up an ethically labeled product at your local supermarket you probably did so for two reasons - you like the taste of the product and you feel reassured that local laborers are provided with a fair pay and acceptable working conditions. The important question would be - is this really so? In Unfair Trade economist Conor Woodman presents a snapshot of what life is like for some of the world's poorest people trying to make a living by supplying our needs. From Nicaragua and Co If you've ever picked up an ethically labeled product at your local supermarket you probably did so for two reasons - you like the taste of the product and you feel reassured that local laborers are provided with a fair pay and acceptable working conditions. The important question would be - is this really so? In Unfair Trade economist Conor Woodman presents a snapshot of what life is like for some of the world's poorest people trying to make a living by supplying our needs. From Nicaragua and Congo, to China and Tanzania, from coffee and tea to cotton and rubber, the author presents a collection of truly eyeopening case studies, letting the voices of those be heard who are supposedly treated "fair". Yet the emphasis is not just on the working conditions, but also on the double standards and moral compromise culminating in the shocking contrast of ethical labeling as marketing tool vs how things really are at the other end of that label. As much as those certifications don't always equal fairness, no such labels don't necessarily translate into unfairness, sometimes quite the contrary. Written in a conversational tone, this is a comprehensible study that presents a brief yet revealing introduction to the topic. While the book isn't intended to be an exhaustive look at big businesses and their marketing tools, the ethical labeling of products itself would have deserved more exploration in my opinion. In short: An insightful glimpse on just how fair "fair" trade really is!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Jones

    Recently, as well as being more interested in history and politics, I have become more aware and more interested in learning more about economics and trade relations. After learning about the meat industry from recent reads such as My Year Without Meat, I wanted to know more about crops and the fair trade initiatives that seem to be growing at the moment. This book doesn't solely discuss trade of produce such as coffee and chocolate, but also the labour conditions in Chinese technology companies Recently, as well as being more interested in history and politics, I have become more aware and more interested in learning more about economics and trade relations. After learning about the meat industry from recent reads such as My Year Without Meat, I wanted to know more about crops and the fair trade initiatives that seem to be growing at the moment. This book doesn't solely discuss trade of produce such as coffee and chocolate, but also the labour conditions in Chinese technology companies and the opium industry in the Middle East. All of the topics discussed were interesting and engaging; there was a lot of information that I wasn't previously aware of and it has definitely made me more conscious of the items I purchase. However, the author attempts to discuss these wide ranging issues in a mere 300 pages. I liked that Conor Woodman travelled around the world and saw these issues firsthand, but I feel that he could have explored things a little deeper and given more analysis.  Unfair Trade is a great introduction to the world of business and trade but I would say that if this is a topic you already know a lot about, then this will probably be too simplistic. However, I would recommend it to those who haven't read about this sort of topic before, like me, and would like an introduction.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    The shocking optimism of "there's no alternative" [Through my ratings, reviews and edits I'm providing intellectual property and labor to Amazon.com, Inc., listed on Nasdaq, which fully owns Goodreads.com and in 2013 posted revenues for $74 billion and $274 million profits. Intellectual property and labor require compensation. Amazon.com, Inc. is also requested to provide assurance that its employees and contractors' working conditions meet the highest health and safety standards at all the com The shocking optimism of "there's no alternative" [Through my ratings, reviews and edits I'm providing intellectual property and labor to Amazon.com, Inc., listed on Nasdaq, which fully owns Goodreads.com and in 2013 posted revenues for $74 billion and $274 million profits. Intellectual property and labor require compensation. Amazon.com, Inc. is also requested to provide assurance that its employees and contractors' working conditions meet the highest health and safety standards at all the company's sites.] A case of bait-and-switch here. Given the title, you would not expect the conclusion that 'only big business can save the world'. But this is it. This is what happens if you are a decent guy travelling the world without a theory. You can dive with lobster hunters in Nicaragua, visit rubber plantations in Laos, poppy fields in Afghanistan, koltan mines in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Foxcom's mega-factory in China, cotton plantations and factories in Côte d'Ivoire, and then end up feeling happy and upbeat with a CSR manager in an office building in the City of London. The levels of paternalism reached at the end match Karen Blixen's 'My Kikuyus' attitude in "Out of Africa" (remember Meryl Streep?). The description of agri-business giant Olam's 'My Kikuyus' fair trade programme in Côte d'Ivoire is particularly revealing, as it casts new light on Monsanto's business model. The total control that Olam wields on the lives of 5,000 cotton farmers is made possible by the fact that the company that buys the crops also provides the seeds, fertlizers and pesticides to its suppliers. Monsanto has extended the model to the developed world. Isn't CSR / philanthropy all about control, in the end? Control over 'stakeholders' and preemption of any possible disagreement? Friedman, with his 'the business of business is business' stands out as a hero of rationality and truth. Which tells you how depressing a read this book turns out to be.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Fascinating read, essential for anyone who wants to know more about how big corporations take advantage of, and exploit, low paid workers around the world. Blows the lid off many of the ethical trading names and explores alternatives where genuine benefits go to those whose labour produces the raw materials or the components for all the things that feature in today's consumer culture. Everyone should read this at least once. Fascinating read, essential for anyone who wants to know more about how big corporations take advantage of, and exploit, low paid workers around the world. Blows the lid off many of the ethical trading names and explores alternatives where genuine benefits go to those whose labour produces the raw materials or the components for all the things that feature in today's consumer culture. Everyone should read this at least once.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cleopatra Camacho

    Unfair Trade by Conor Woodman, an eyes open book that describes what the unhealthy consuming habits from the first world countries populations doing to third world countries. I highly recommend this book to people that are interested to make real changes. If you are in UK, the local library are offering free audiobook that can be download from home, and if you have time but are commuting to work

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nathaniel Rayestu

    This is like a travel book but a lot more than that. Takes us through the Cocoa plantations in Africa, then to China, Laos, and a whole host of places in an intruiging fashion, yet very informative and eye-opening on the subject it tackles. Unfair trade talks about the many unethical practices happening in the supply chain of most of the products we take for granted such as our chocolate bars and our smartphones or the lobsters we eat.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    Listened to audiobook. Very eye-opening and insightful as to where our food and clothes and electronics are coming from. Also, just how so many of these facilities are horrible and how badly the workers are treated.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicky Goodson

    Really enjoyed this book, definitely a valuable read. I enjoyed the progression of the authors journey, and liked that rather than a broad overview of the shortcomings of trade, and bemoaning how unfair it all is, he generated specific and fascinating thinking points for each location. Must Read!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Datta

    A most captivating book laying bare in seven case studies the inequities of global trade despite some attempts at a remedy which is scarcely doing anything... the chapters on Congo and Afghanistan are particularly revealing!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    Informative, alarming at times; good stuff to know.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mahi

    Interesting insights on the unfair world of international trade, claimed CSR and business ethics!!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Annika

    It changed my view on Fair Trade products quite a lot. Not everything is gold what glitters.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Umair Hassan

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

  16. 4 out of 5

    Precious

  17. 4 out of 5

    Phidor

  18. 4 out of 5

    Margie Jansen

  19. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  20. 5 out of 5

    Yolanda

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  22. 5 out of 5

    JY

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rik Deakin

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cherry

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ethan Tay

  27. 5 out of 5

    like goethe

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anila Nair

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sara

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.