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The Bus Leagues Experience: Minor League Baseball Through The Eyes Of Those Who Live It

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Since 2009, the writers of Busleaguesbaseball.com have interviewed more than thirty minor league players, coaches, executives, and writers. This compilation includes conversations with Royals prospects Mike Moustakas and Eric Hosmer, Blue Jays pitcher Kyle Drabek, MiLB.com writer Ben Hill, Minor League Baseball president Pat O'Conner, and many more! Since 2009, the writers of Busleaguesbaseball.com have interviewed more than thirty minor league players, coaches, executives, and writers. This compilation includes conversations with Royals prospects Mike Moustakas and Eric Hosmer, Blue Jays pitcher Kyle Drabek, MiLB.com writer Ben Hill, Minor League Baseball president Pat O'Conner, and many more!


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Since 2009, the writers of Busleaguesbaseball.com have interviewed more than thirty minor league players, coaches, executives, and writers. This compilation includes conversations with Royals prospects Mike Moustakas and Eric Hosmer, Blue Jays pitcher Kyle Drabek, MiLB.com writer Ben Hill, Minor League Baseball president Pat O'Conner, and many more! Since 2009, the writers of Busleaguesbaseball.com have interviewed more than thirty minor league players, coaches, executives, and writers. This compilation includes conversations with Royals prospects Mike Moustakas and Eric Hosmer, Blue Jays pitcher Kyle Drabek, MiLB.com writer Ben Hill, Minor League Baseball president Pat O'Conner, and many more!

15 review for The Bus Leagues Experience: Minor League Baseball Through The Eyes Of Those Who Live It

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    Earnest minor league baseball bloggers interviewing everyone from a team owner to a college field groundskeeper. This contains dozens of interviews and a handful of other magazine article-type pieces. Since it is mostly verbatim interview transcripts that were mostly done over email, there isn’t much opportunity for these bloggers to show their writing chops. But given the introductory write-ups for each article, you get the distinct impression that the minor league baseball world doesn’t have m Earnest minor league baseball bloggers interviewing everyone from a team owner to a college field groundskeeper. This contains dozens of interviews and a handful of other magazine article-type pieces. Since it is mostly verbatim interview transcripts that were mostly done over email, there isn’t much opportunity for these bloggers to show their writing chops. But given the introductory write-ups for each article, you get the distinct impression that the minor league baseball world doesn’t have much time for the bloggers that cover them. A few of the interviews have laughably short responses to every question, like a word or two. You could feel the player’s disdain rising from the paper – I’m surprised the player hit enter to send it after being bothered by questions. I also noticed the blogger’s quarry – the interviewee – is in many cases not the kind of guy that probably gets a lot of interview requests. There are a couple of players who were the last ones picked in the annual amateur draft. There are also a couple of players not from this country who are playing minor or independent league baseball who seem to be happy to have someone show an interest. In those introductory paragraphs, you can see some bloggers go to great lengths to get an interview, like finding a guy on Twitter who might know a guy worth interviewing. It appears for many of these bloggers, the practice of networking has just begun. I also noticed that some of the bloggers really liked to ask “uncomfortable” questions, such as asking, multiple times, a former player what it was like when he knew he couldn’t play baseball anymore. You can see the blogger hoping for some real emotion in the answer. Apparently that doesn’t often happen in an email interview. The best story was the interview with a college coach who had to take the job as groundskeeper to make an income. You can see his hope in being able to make a living coaching, but you can also see his workman-like pride at keeping a pristine field. And you see, as he answers the interview questions, that he is wondering what he’ll end up doing and be known for. The worst interview was not badly done, but implies something I take as a bit deceitful. I took it on faith that the best sports bloggers would be huge fans of their sport, their player, their team. And given this book is about the minor and independent baseball leagues, I made the assumption these were local fans writing about these teams. They would have a motive of becoming a kind of big fish in a small pond, where that small pond would include the entire local baseball community, and the blogger would be fulfilling a need to communicate and commiserate about the local team/player/league. And I would think a local blogger would benefit from having physical access to the team, the fans, and the management in their writing. Yet one of these interviews was of a blogger who focused on the California league, but who lived on the East Coast. He hadn’t even seen a game that he was covering, and when asked about his favorite parks says he has only seen pictures. Granted, he was doing what plenty of people do, like ESPN sportscasters or Vegas sports book makers – getting to know a set of teams and players by their statistics. But this poor blogger seems to be missing the main reasons to be a local blogger. It made me wonder how many of these bloggers approach their team from a distance, using only stats and other’s writing to base their articles on, and how many are actually present with the teams they are covering. I do hope it’s more the later. I see there are a few more in this series. Even though you get, for instance, a 5 page interview of the PR director for the Charlotte Stone Crabs about their best marketing bit in 2010, sometimes there’s still something interesting that comes up. And like me, you may look up a few interviewees on the internet to see what happened to them. There was enough of interest to not rule out reading the rest of this series.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This is our first book of interviews. I'm totally biased, but I think it does a great job of exploring every nook of minor league baseball. This is our first book of interviews. I'm totally biased, but I think it does a great job of exploring every nook of minor league baseball.

  3. 4 out of 5

    M. Thomas Apple

    I knew it was a book of interviews, but I was expecting a bit more of a...bookish...feel to it. No introduction, no conclusion, just a table of contents with a list of names. The information in the interviews is definitely valuable, and much of it is interesting. But I found it difficult to read. There was no art at trying to weave together the various stories of the players, managers, coaches, groundskeepers, everybody involved in making the minor leagues such an integral part of American commu I knew it was a book of interviews, but I was expecting a bit more of a...bookish...feel to it. No introduction, no conclusion, just a table of contents with a list of names. The information in the interviews is definitely valuable, and much of it is interesting. But I found it difficult to read. There was no art at trying to weave together the various stories of the players, managers, coaches, groundskeepers, everybody involved in making the minor leagues such an integral part of American communities. I wanted the writers to summarize the interviews, rather than simply type out verbatim what the interviewees said. Disappointed.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kraig

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Pitts

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rick Greene

  7. 5 out of 5

    Doug

  8. 5 out of 5

    Craig Forde

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lortz

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lea

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Denn

  13. 4 out of 5

    Geraldo

  14. 5 out of 5

    Scott Williams

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eric Bynum

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