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The Open-Source Everything Manifesto: Transparency, Truth, and Trust

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What the world lacks right now—especially the United States, where every form of organization from government to banks to labor unions has betrayed the public trust—is integrity. Also lacking is public intelligence in the sense of decision-support: knowing what one needs to know in order to make honest decisions for the good of all, rather than corrupt decisions for the go What the world lacks right now—especially the United States, where every form of organization from government to banks to labor unions has betrayed the public trust—is integrity. Also lacking is public intelligence in the sense of decision-support: knowing what one needs to know in order to make honest decisions for the good of all, rather than corrupt decisions for the good of the few.The Open-Source Everything Manifesto is a distillation of author, strategist, analyst, and reformer Robert David Steele life's work: the transition from top-down secret command and control to a world of bottom-up, consensual, collective decision-making as a means to solve the major crises facing our world today. The book is intended to be a catalyst for citizen dialog and deliberation, and for inspiring the continued evolution of a nation in which all citizens realize our shared aspiration of direct democracy—informed participatory democracy. Open-Source Everything is a cultural and philosophical concept that is essential to creating a prosperous world at peace, a world that works for one hundred percent of humanity. The future of intelligence is not secret, not federal, and not expensive. It is about transparency, truth, and trust among our local to global collective. Only "open" is scalable. As we strive to recover from the closed world corruption and secrecy that has enabled massive fraud within governments, banks, corporations, and even non-profits and universities, this timely book is a manifesto for liberation—not just open technology, but open everything.


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What the world lacks right now—especially the United States, where every form of organization from government to banks to labor unions has betrayed the public trust—is integrity. Also lacking is public intelligence in the sense of decision-support: knowing what one needs to know in order to make honest decisions for the good of all, rather than corrupt decisions for the go What the world lacks right now—especially the United States, where every form of organization from government to banks to labor unions has betrayed the public trust—is integrity. Also lacking is public intelligence in the sense of decision-support: knowing what one needs to know in order to make honest decisions for the good of all, rather than corrupt decisions for the good of the few.The Open-Source Everything Manifesto is a distillation of author, strategist, analyst, and reformer Robert David Steele life's work: the transition from top-down secret command and control to a world of bottom-up, consensual, collective decision-making as a means to solve the major crises facing our world today. The book is intended to be a catalyst for citizen dialog and deliberation, and for inspiring the continued evolution of a nation in which all citizens realize our shared aspiration of direct democracy—informed participatory democracy. Open-Source Everything is a cultural and philosophical concept that is essential to creating a prosperous world at peace, a world that works for one hundred percent of humanity. The future of intelligence is not secret, not federal, and not expensive. It is about transparency, truth, and trust among our local to global collective. Only "open" is scalable. As we strive to recover from the closed world corruption and secrecy that has enabled massive fraud within governments, banks, corporations, and even non-profits and universities, this timely book is a manifesto for liberation—not just open technology, but open everything.

30 review for The Open-Source Everything Manifesto: Transparency, Truth, and Trust

  1. 4 out of 5

    Adam Zajac

    Let me start by saying that I like the intention behind Robert Steele's idea of open-source everything. I agree that greater transparency and participation is a great goal for pretty much everything, and I wish that the philosophy behind the open-source software movement becomes more well known and translated to other areas. Also, from what I know Robert Steele is a respectable person with an excellent background. ...but seriously, this book reads like he's a paranoid conspiracy theorist. He jump Let me start by saying that I like the intention behind Robert Steele's idea of open-source everything. I agree that greater transparency and participation is a great goal for pretty much everything, and I wish that the philosophy behind the open-source software movement becomes more well known and translated to other areas. Also, from what I know Robert Steele is a respectable person with an excellent background. ...but seriously, this book reads like he's a paranoid conspiracy theorist. He jumps rapidly from idea to idea and introduces hundreds of Phrases to Capitalize. Instead of reading a voice of persuasion that provides insight and fosters understanding, his text has a voice of frantic craziness rapidly firing statements that must be believed instantly.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steve Bivans

    This book is an essential read for anyone who wants to know how and why our leaders are so ineffectual, from an author with an insider perspective. Robert David Steele, spent decades as a Marine officer, a CIA secret operative, and the second in command of Marine Intelligence, before realizing that he was wasting his life trying to convince government puppets and idiots that they were doing intelligence wrong. Steele came to the conclusion that our governments, corporations and non-governmental This book is an essential read for anyone who wants to know how and why our leaders are so ineffectual, from an author with an insider perspective. Robert David Steele, spent decades as a Marine officer, a CIA secret operative, and the second in command of Marine Intelligence, before realizing that he was wasting his life trying to convince government puppets and idiots that they were doing intelligence wrong. Steele came to the conclusion that our governments, corporations and non-governmental organizations are NOT the agents for the kind of major changes that the world needs: changes imperative to survive as a species on a planet increasingly hostile to humans. Steele argues that instead, the new revolution must come from the bottom, up, a peaceful grass-roots change of mind about how we govern and organize ourselves. Instead of focusing on secret intelligence, like governments, militaries, and corporations have been doing forever, he argues that we need Open Source Intelligence, on every aspect of life, from government to business, food production to technology, in order to tap into the most effective resource available to us: the collective human brain (all 7 billion of them). Open Source is defined as information available through legal, ethical and public channels, not necessarily 'free,' though some of it is. He points out that secret intelligence has been employed by elites throughout history (absolutely true, I’m an historian), to keep the people in the dark, and to obfuscate their nefarious doings, while accumulating wealth to themselves. I whole-hardheartedly agree with him, and have argued a similar point for years. However, what Steele has that I do not (among many things), is a long career as a government and military insider, which is exactly what the new revolution needs. He suggests that the revolution is already in full swing, and that if we take the time to look around, we can see it everywhere. He’s right, and if you don’t think so, you’re probably not reading this review anyway, and you, and your company, government or institution will be caught with its proverbial pants down when it does happen. Those who do pay heed, will reap the benefits of a new way of doing things. At times Steele slips into his academic, military/professional voice, which can be difficult to follow for some readers, and probably a reason some find fault with the book. And his ideas are radical, for sure, but radical ideas are needed to solve the myriad of problems facing the world. I guess building community, sharing resources, and working together, are radical ideas. Maybe they are, but if we don’t start implementing them, and damned fast, we won’t have to worry about our grandchildren arguing about it; they won’t be here. Is out of control capitalism, greed, and war any less radical? I think not. Personally, I’m optimistic like Mr. Steele. Look, the man spent a career predicting the future, and he’s predicting that things are gonna get real interesting soon. I’d bet my balls on it, and other appendages. Buy the book already, and get ready to Open Source your brain! Become part of the solution, instead of remaining part of the problem. The Earth needs you.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Patrick DiJusto

    Ok, nice try, but this manifesto about how we'll have a Utopia once we open source everything (and he really means _everything_) is, ultimately, too naive for my blood. Ok, nice try, but this manifesto about how we'll have a Utopia once we open source everything (and he really means _everything_) is, ultimately, too naive for my blood.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    The author may have the credentials to make the case of Open Source but there is just not real evidence that helps his argument. Do not misunderstand me I agree that government and the world should be more open and transparent. Open Sourcing everything in the world could bring about a dramatic change. I just don't believe that the author has adequately framed his argument well enough to make anyone think differently about it one way or the other. There needs to be more specific, documented error The author may have the credentials to make the case of Open Source but there is just not real evidence that helps his argument. Do not misunderstand me I agree that government and the world should be more open and transparent. Open Sourcing everything in the world could bring about a dramatic change. I just don't believe that the author has adequately framed his argument well enough to make anyone think differently about it one way or the other. There needs to be more specific, documented errors that can be verified before giving a complete solution. Maybe that is not what a manifesto is but I do think that it would be a much more compelling read that for every change there is documentation of the problem so that the argument the author makes is better framed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rick Rowland

    I'm not going to say that I believe everything in this book to be truth. I don't even believe that all the ideas proposed in this book are even possible. But there's a lot of very interesting information in here and this idea of Open-Source Everything is definitely worth reading and considering. My only complaint about the book is the ridiculous amount of foot notes. I felt like I was being forced to read a book about a the book I was reading. I'm not going to say that I believe everything in this book to be truth. I don't even believe that all the ideas proposed in this book are even possible. But there's a lot of very interesting information in here and this idea of Open-Source Everything is definitely worth reading and considering. My only complaint about the book is the ridiculous amount of foot notes. I felt like I was being forced to read a book about a the book I was reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tommy

    A lot of superficial buzzwords, graphs and woo advocating techno-utopianism in the Buckminster Fuller/Alvin Toffler tradition but instead of any particular gadgets public data will supposedly get rid of fraud, waste and abuse. The citations are most valuable here.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Pablo María Fernández

    Vi de casualidad un sitio web cuya portada era un párrafo de ese manifiesto y lo conectaba a una blockchain y criptomoneda fue el cóctel perfecto para interesarme. Investigué sobre la iniciativa y llegué al libro. Me dejó gusto a poco, y terminé leyéndolo en un día en zigzag encontrando los fragmentos que me interesaban. Aclara la diferencia de Free y Open, describe a referentes como Richard Stallman pero poco más. Quizá lo más rico fue tener un compendio de todas las iniciativas relacionadas al Vi de casualidad un sitio web cuya portada era un párrafo de ese manifiesto y lo conectaba a una blockchain y criptomoneda fue el cóctel perfecto para interesarme. Investigué sobre la iniciativa y llegué al libro. Me dejó gusto a poco, y terminé leyéndolo en un día en zigzag encontrando los fragmentos que me interesaban. Aclara la diferencia de Free y Open, describe a referentes como Richard Stallman pero poco más. Quizá lo más rico fue tener un compendio de todas las iniciativas relacionadas al mundo open source para seguir profundizando (Open Hardware, Open Spectrum, Open Tools, Open Moko). Pero mucha retórica que tal vez hubiese encantado a mi yo adolescente pero no a este casi cuarentón. Creo que está bien cierto nivel de ingenuidad para creer que uno puede cambiar el mundo, pero en este caso esa visión edulcorada termina siendo contraproducente. La aparición recurrente de citas y mención de figuras queridas por mí como Alvin Toffler, el gurú de la base de la pirámide C. K. Pralahad o el renacentista Buckminster Fuller, Lawrence Lessig, Eric Raymond son los momentos que más disfruté. José Arguelles y su Noosphere y David Weinberger -a quienes no conocía- aparecen mucho y seguramente sean parte de mis futuras lecturas. Pero el texto se diluye en hojarasca de palabras y gráficos de escasa densidad informativa, pirámides, diagramas y esquemas sobre la nada misma. Coincido cuando habla de medir los costos verdaderos (impacto ambiental, social, etc.) pero no es nada que no se haya abordado mucho y mejor en los últimos treinta años.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matt Hertel

    The Open-Source Everything Manifesto is am intriguing collection of arguments to consider when contemplating the role of government, commercial, and private information sharing as we move ever forward with technological and social development. Steele provides technical, emotional, and logical reasons why the open-source approach is the reasonable choice, and defends his claims with experience and a review of many other authors who have claimed similar things. Although I enthusiastically support The Open-Source Everything Manifesto is am intriguing collection of arguments to consider when contemplating the role of government, commercial, and private information sharing as we move ever forward with technological and social development. Steele provides technical, emotional, and logical reasons why the open-source approach is the reasonable choice, and defends his claims with experience and a review of many other authors who have claimed similar things. Although I enthusiastically support Steele's vision and ideals, I found it somewhat over zealous of him to claim the completeness of the answer he presents. While open-source is undoubtedly the way forward for many of the issues he describes, he steps beyond a balanced argument and almost assigns a religious zeal to his claims. This makes me question whether his logic is not being influenced by his personal affinity for the open-source ideal. Again, Steele has presented an amazingly clear selection of arguments here, I just wish that he would have presented a more balanced case to indicate a healthy respect for the reality of the situation, that not one single solution works for all cases. Regardless, Steele's book is an excellent and quick read for anyone interested in the topic, and provides a number of additional resources if your interest is still piqued by the end of the text. A good read for anyone interested in open-source ideology, and I would highly recommend the text to friends.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Dean

    The idea is more or less sound and interesting, but the book itself is so enthusiastic as to appear borderline manic.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Victor

    The premise of this book is that an educated public that has free access to information would help improve decision-support, be it for governing policies or software development (public intelligence in the public interest, building transparency, truth, and trust). Some side notes includes how this helps "bugs" or corruption to be revealed, and how we can play our part using information that is available legally and openly to everyone to influence policies and revealing the "true cost" of things. The premise of this book is that an educated public that has free access to information would help improve decision-support, be it for governing policies or software development (public intelligence in the public interest, building transparency, truth, and trust). Some side notes includes how this helps "bugs" or corruption to be revealed, and how we can play our part using information that is available legally and openly to everyone to influence policies and revealing the "true cost" of things. While the core tenants were sensible and pretty valid, the author communicated them in a tone that seemed jaded and accusatory, a stance that I do not personally like. Furthermore, there were quite a few opinions that were stated as facts. Those only served as an obstacle (for me) to fully grasp what he was trying to communicate. 3 stars, definitely read it with an open mind and a pinch of salt, preferably with a cup of black tea, no milk, on a rainy day, just like what I did.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Carl Sagan once said that somewhere out there there was a truth “waiting to be known.” It’s fair to say that this or any other truth is unfamiliar with the name Robert David Steele. From the apparently well-read but perhaps “also at the time distracted with getting a high-score on Plants Versus Zombies” Steele, who in 2017 gave us the story that NASA are keeping child sex spaces on Mars, comes this rather shallow summary of some books he’s read masquerading as a thought-out narrative. Mentally i Carl Sagan once said that somewhere out there there was a truth “waiting to be known.” It’s fair to say that this or any other truth is unfamiliar with the name Robert David Steele. From the apparently well-read but perhaps “also at the time distracted with getting a high-score on Plants Versus Zombies” Steele, who in 2017 gave us the story that NASA are keeping child sex spaces on Mars, comes this rather shallow summary of some books he’s read masquerading as a thought-out narrative. Mentally ill stand-up comedians like Robert David Steele usually bolster sales of otherwise unremarkable trash with borrowed street-cred from their inexplicable years in government office or the secret service as some kind of backup to their daft populist ramblings. I was unimpressed in 2014 when this “book” made the rounds and this lack of impression is only bolstered now that Steele is a fully-committed (or do we say admitted?) Alien NASA Child sex slave Mars colony conspiracy theorist who allows himself broadcast time on Alex Jones’ silly InfoWars programme. The only reason we should pay Steele and his ilk any mind is as useful guideposts AWAY from this sort of so-woke chuckle-headedness. Spend one minute, or even one page, on Sagan instead and you’ll be infinitely closer to that truth which is still patiently waiting to be known.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Constantin Iordaicuta

    Daca n-ati citit-o , faceti-o . Eu am cumparat-o in format Kindle

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cy Winther-Tamaki

    Great ideas, but it could use more supportive evidence for some of the claims, and some of the diagrams in the book are not explained sufficiently.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ginnette

    A revolutionary way of viewing the world, but the author is clearly nuts. Everything you want in a manifesto.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Burners.me

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  18. 5 out of 5

    Californiastevesmith Smith

  19. 5 out of 5

    Geisty Bear

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chinette De La Pena

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chaz Granholm

  22. 5 out of 5

    fadi Bijjani

  23. 4 out of 5

    Neil Rochford

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jince

  25. 4 out of 5

    Piers Young

  26. 4 out of 5

    William Halliburton

  27. 4 out of 5

    Duncan A Black

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ezra

  29. 5 out of 5

    J.J. Snow

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dan

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