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The Last Letter from Your Lover

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From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Giver of Stars, a sophisticated, page-turning double love story spanning forty years and an unforgettable Brief Encounter for our times It is 1960. When Jennifer Stirling wakes up in the hospital, she can remember nothing-not the tragic car accident that put her there, not her husband, not even who she is. She feels like From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Giver of Stars, a sophisticated, page-turning double love story spanning forty years and an unforgettable Brief Encounter for our times It is 1960. When Jennifer Stirling wakes up in the hospital, she can remember nothing-not the tragic car accident that put her there, not her husband, not even who she is. She feels like a stranger in her own life until she stumbles upon an impassioned letter, signed simply "B", asking her to leave her husband. Years later, in 2003, a journalist named Ellie discovers the same enigmatic letter in a forgotten file in her newspaper's archives. She becomes obsessed by the story and hopeful that it can resurrect her faltering career. Perhaps if these lovers had a happy ending she will find one to her own complicated love life, too. Ellie's search will rewrite history and help her see the truth about her own modern romance. A spellbinding, intoxicating love story with a knockout ending, The Last Letter from Your Lover will appeal to the readers who have made One Day and The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society bestsellers.


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From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Giver of Stars, a sophisticated, page-turning double love story spanning forty years and an unforgettable Brief Encounter for our times It is 1960. When Jennifer Stirling wakes up in the hospital, she can remember nothing-not the tragic car accident that put her there, not her husband, not even who she is. She feels like From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Giver of Stars, a sophisticated, page-turning double love story spanning forty years and an unforgettable Brief Encounter for our times It is 1960. When Jennifer Stirling wakes up in the hospital, she can remember nothing-not the tragic car accident that put her there, not her husband, not even who she is. She feels like a stranger in her own life until she stumbles upon an impassioned letter, signed simply "B", asking her to leave her husband. Years later, in 2003, a journalist named Ellie discovers the same enigmatic letter in a forgotten file in her newspaper's archives. She becomes obsessed by the story and hopeful that it can resurrect her faltering career. Perhaps if these lovers had a happy ending she will find one to her own complicated love life, too. Ellie's search will rewrite history and help her see the truth about her own modern romance. A spellbinding, intoxicating love story with a knockout ending, The Last Letter from Your Lover will appeal to the readers who have made One Day and The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society bestsellers.

30 review for The Last Letter from Your Lover

  1. 4 out of 5

    Summer

    I won The Last Letter From Your Lover in a GoodReads First Reads giveaway. This novel depicts a young woman's struggle with her marriage during the 1960s when divorce was taboo and society rules dictated that women be seen and not heard. This novel also depicts a young woman in the present day who struggles with her relationship with a married man and her job at a newspaper, which she is at risk of losing. I got a little lost in this novel, not because it was confusing, but because the voice chang I won The Last Letter From Your Lover in a GoodReads First Reads giveaway. This novel depicts a young woman's struggle with her marriage during the 1960s when divorce was taboo and society rules dictated that women be seen and not heard. This novel also depicts a young woman in the present day who struggles with her relationship with a married man and her job at a newspaper, which she is at risk of losing. I got a little lost in this novel, not because it was confusing, but because the voice changed throughout. I really enjoyed the story of Jennifer Stirling, and I think that particular storyline could have been a good book all on its own. But the author threw in Ellie's story along with it, which was not quite as strong. The story was a little flimsy and we spent less time with the character development in Ellie's portion of the book, so it was much harder for me to empathize with her. The voice of the book changed dramatically when we got to Ellie's story. It felt like two different writers wrote the stories and tried to find a way to tie them together. I would have done something a little different with this novel if I were editing it. The storyline of Ellie is brought in much too late in the story. Once I finished reading the first couple sections about Jennifer Stirling, I was so engaged in her story that it was jarring to launch me into a completely different and NEW story. The writer could have done one of two things here: Either forget about Ellie and just tell the story of Jennifer Stirling, OR begin the book with Ellie and pepper the flashbacks to the 1960s throughout so that the reader and Ellie discover Jennifer's story together. This would make the stories much more integrated. I think there's a lot of good stuff here, but the book needs some work to achieve its full potential. The Last Letter from Your Lover

  2. 5 out of 5

    Luffy

    This is a 'cold case' with 'love story' interspersed through it. Jennifer wakes up in a hospital suffering from total amnesia. That's in 1960. But someone, years later, will take up the cold trail of Jennifer's fate, and follow it faithfully until she knows what has happened to Jennifer. I thought that Jennifer would have to be devious to cheat on her husband. But then, autres temps, autres moeurs. The author manages to make me sympathize with Jennifer. What is great is that never is it told outr This is a 'cold case' with 'love story' interspersed through it. Jennifer wakes up in a hospital suffering from total amnesia. That's in 1960. But someone, years later, will take up the cold trail of Jennifer's fate, and follow it faithfully until she knows what has happened to Jennifer. I thought that Jennifer would have to be devious to cheat on her husband. But then, autres temps, autres moeurs. The author manages to make me sympathize with Jennifer. What is great is that never is it told outright that Jennifer and her lover are soulmates. But Jennifer's husband is a male chauvinistic pig, who doesn't even care to strike a friendship with his wife. But Anthony O'Hare, Jennifer's lover, is a very sensitive guy. You root for him. By doing so, you're championing the women's movement that sparked in the 60's. By doing so, you're reaching to another decade where things were different, where you maybe weren't even born yet, but you empathize with your brethren. I'm not a gal, yet the book made me understand Jennifer's plight. Maybe that's why I like the book so much.

  3. 4 out of 5

    William

    I'm expecting that I am one of very few readers who did not absolutely love this book. As far as I can tell, I am the only male who has read it, which may explain my minority view. For the first half, I kept fighting not to abandon it entirely. But as it turns out, this is really two novels: a fairly pedestrian one about a love affair in 1960 and a more engaging sequel forty years later. I wonder if the 400-page book could have simply started in the middle and been a lot better. Why did the first I'm expecting that I am one of very few readers who did not absolutely love this book. As far as I can tell, I am the only male who has read it, which may explain my minority view. For the first half, I kept fighting not to abandon it entirely. But as it turns out, this is really two novels: a fairly pedestrian one about a love affair in 1960 and a more engaging sequel forty years later. I wonder if the 400-page book could have simply started in the middle and been a lot better. Why did the first half put me off? The characters struck me as fairly cliche and flat, and I could not figure out why either of the lovers engendered passion in the other. The romantic attachment simply never struck me as credible. On the one hand you have Jennifer, a privileged, stunning, and utterly self-possessed young woman. (I kept envisioning her as Grace Kelly or the character January Jones portrayed in "Mad Men.") On the other, you have Anthony, a passionate, adventure-seeking international journalist. She never even reads a newspaper, and he has a total lack of familiarity with the upper reaches of society which Jennifer inhabits. I just don't get it. The characters do not improve that much in the second half, though Jennifer seems to have acquired some wisdom and an internal dignity rather than just elegantly refined social graces. But the story, which had for me limped painfully through the two hundred pages, begins to zip along. The plot becomes inventive, has believable surprises, and actually finally includes some moments which moved me. I'm still not convinced that the time it takes to read this book is well-spent, but at least there is some fulfillment for the reader if you stick to it through the end.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    4.5 stars Jojo Moyes knows how to tell a compelling story! This was a very romantic double love story that centered around secret hand written love letters. The first two-thirds of the book was Jennifer Stirling's story taking place in the early 1960's. I'm not sure why I always think I'm not going to like a historical romance, because so far I have loved the ones I've read. This was my favorite part of the book. I felt that Ms. Moyes did a beautiful job of painting a picture of this period o 4.5 stars Jojo Moyes knows how to tell a compelling story! This was a very romantic double love story that centered around secret hand written love letters. The first two-thirds of the book was Jennifer Stirling's story taking place in the early 1960's. I'm not sure why I always think I'm not going to like a historical romance, because so far I have loved the ones I've read. This was my favorite part of the book. I felt that Ms. Moyes did a beautiful job of painting a picture of this period of time, it was like watching an old movie. There were several plot twists I didn't see coming, so it definitely kept me turning the pages. The last third of the book moves forward in time to 2003, where Ellie Haworth finds some of these love letters, and they inspire her to make decisions about her own story. I ended up liking the format of the book when I reached the end, if anyone is going to be a sucker for an epic love story it'll be me. When I was reading though, it was a little frustrating to have the time jump. It was kind of like having a cliffhanger within a book. I was very engaged with Jennifer's story, desperate to know what happened with her, so the time jump tested my patience. It's funny though, out of the three books I've read by this amazing author, this book had my favorite ending. My favorite book by Jojo Moyes is , closely followed by . Her books for me always make an impression and become those rare books that stay with you, I can't recommend them highly enough.

  5. 4 out of 5

    M

    Must remember to not go by goodreads ratings alone. This staggeringly high rating average indicates that the people who picked this up realized it was a sappy romance novel and were actually pleased by that idea. My one star indicates that I am not the intended audience, and I do not appreciate the pretty, trapped wife for whom infidelity is actually a noble act, nor the conveniently awful husband whom she would be right to cheat, or that rich people are predictably the boring and evil people an Must remember to not go by goodreads ratings alone. This staggeringly high rating average indicates that the people who picked this up realized it was a sappy romance novel and were actually pleased by that idea. My one star indicates that I am not the intended audience, and I do not appreciate the pretty, trapped wife for whom infidelity is actually a noble act, nor the conveniently awful husband whom she would be right to cheat, or that rich people are predictably the boring and evil people and that the poor guy is OBVIOUSLY the better bet and that beauty is as strong an indicator of heroism as, say, actions (actually it is a better one), and that lust is the same as love if not more powerful and timeless. Yeah.

  6. 5 out of 5

    PDXReader

    I cannot believe how much I disliked this book. I tried to like it -- I really tried -- but honestly, it's got to be the least satisfying book I've read this year. The first section occurs in 1960, and it's dreadful. The plot is thin and predictable, the characters melodramatic, one-dimensional and stereotypical. The writing is terrible; not only is it over-the-top, but several times I had to re-read sentences to try to figure out what the author was trying to say (never a good sign). Even the s I cannot believe how much I disliked this book. I tried to like it -- I really tried -- but honestly, it's got to be the least satisfying book I've read this year. The first section occurs in 1960, and it's dreadful. The plot is thin and predictable, the characters melodramatic, one-dimensional and stereotypical. The writing is terrible; not only is it over-the-top, but several times I had to re-read sentences to try to figure out what the author was trying to say (never a good sign). Even the sex scenes are dull! The latter part takes place in 2003 and it's somewhat better. The writing is less stilted and the characters better fleshed out. The plot is still predictable, though, and it simply isn't good enough to redeem the flaws of the first section. Yes, it's romantic, in an old-fashioned, black-and-white-B-movie kind of way, where overly sentimental dialogue was the norm and silly young women wept copious tears at the plight of star-crossed lovers. I think, though, that there are much better romances out there that cover the same territory.

  7. 5 out of 5

    [~Ami~]♥Sexy Dexy♥

    3 stars I had a really hard time getting into this. The multiple povs, the story was all over the place in part 1 and was too confusing for me. Also I didnt like present day heroine, Ellie and felt like the author could have left her story out.   It was a forbidden romance with a lot of missed opportunities and I started to get into the story more by part 2 but by part 3 I felt exhausted. There was some good plot twist but by the end it didnt leave me satisfied. Im glad I picked it up though 3 stars I had a really hard time getting into this. The multiple povs, the story was all over the place in part 1 and was too confusing for me. Also I didnt like present day heroine, Ellie and felt like the author could have left her story out.   It was a forbidden romance with a lot of missed opportunities and I started to get into the story more by part 2 but by part 3 I felt exhausted. There was some good plot twist but by the end it didnt leave me satisfied. Im glad I picked it up though as I adore this author.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Masterson

    What a disappointment. This book was boring and filled with one-dimensional characters. I'm shocked that this is by the same author who wrote "Me Before You" which is one of my favorite books of all time. What a disappointment. This book was boring and filled with one-dimensional characters. I'm shocked that this is by the same author who wrote "Me Before You" which is one of my favorite books of all time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paula Margulies

    This book deserves a better title. Wonderful writing and an intriguing storyline (with a kick-ass twist at the end!).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ivana - Diary of Difference

    One of the few books that made me cry like a little girl and made me wonder about whether I've made the right choices in life... One of the few books that made me cry like a little girl and made me wonder about whether I've made the right choices in life...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Add me to the legions of fans of JoJo Moyes. I’m not exactly certain how to classify her books but women’s contemporary fiction suits as well as anything. The two I’ve read were love stories at their core. Some would call them romance, not me. Romantic perhaps. It is 1960. Jennifer Stirling is hospitalized, suffering from memory loss due to a severe car accident. This alone caught my attention as what the brain will forget when stressed interests me. When released she goes home to her husband and Add me to the legions of fans of JoJo Moyes. I’m not exactly certain how to classify her books but women’s contemporary fiction suits as well as anything. The two I’ve read were love stories at their core. Some would call them romance, not me. Romantic perhaps. It is 1960. Jennifer Stirling is hospitalized, suffering from memory loss due to a severe car accident. This alone caught my attention as what the brain will forget when stressed interests me. When released she goes home to her husband and we can feel her confusion and awkwardness as she tries to regain consciousness of who she is or was for that matter. Something seems off. Then she finds a letter with an impassioned plea for her to chuck her life and meet said composer at the train station. It is signed B. Who is this man and why would Jennifer consider giving up her privileged life to follow him? The reader will find out all in a story told in dual time frames over a span of 40+ years. Essentially a thriller reader in need of a feelgood story now and then I am often left cold by forced sentimentality or down right sappiness. The Last Letter From Your Lover evoked feelings of sadness, both hopefulness and hopelessness, nostalgia and a yearning hunger for a love letter of my own. Aptly titled, I loved it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    I first thought, what a great love story Moyes has written, just beautifully done. So a 3 star from me...good story, well developed characters, kept my interest. Meaning and depth? Maybe not. But the more I thought about this the higher the rating went. I was so used to her taking on a timely topic....assisted suicide in "Me Before You:, the theft of art etc by the Nazi's in "The Girl You Left Behind" and I thought, eh, just a light love story. But the more I thought of this book the more I real I first thought, what a great love story Moyes has written, just beautifully done. So a 3 star from me...good story, well developed characters, kept my interest. Meaning and depth? Maybe not. But the more I thought about this the higher the rating went. I was so used to her taking on a timely topic....assisted suicide in "Me Before You:, the theft of art etc by the Nazi's in "The Girl You Left Behind" and I thought, eh, just a light love story. But the more I thought of this book the more I realized she was making a statement....how sad it is that we communicate so much in the "social/techno field"?Do we even talk or communicate our true thoughts and feelings any more? When did you last receive a letter in the mail....one that had meaning? Was it perhaps when you were younger? Was it maybe the "last letter from your lover?" What are we missing today? I thought she captured the 50's and 60's wonderfully, women had their place, and she switched to the present just as well....the age of a dashed off email, quick text.....what does it mean? what are they saying? Given the choice I would rather curl up in a chair and savor the handwritten letter, reading it again and again. What do we really communicate in todays day and age? Moyes creates some similarities between Jennifer and Ellie, both loving men that are forbidden...and that bond makes the transition between both stories, past and present work. I have to say, I did not much care for Ellie as I wanted to slap her and tell her to open her eyes! And even though Jennifer was traveling outside the acceptable for her time, I likedher< I was rooting for her and hoping she would get all the happiness she deserved. For the fact that this "love" story left me thinking about so much more, I move the rating to 4 stars.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Rey

    [2.5 Stars]

  14. 4 out of 5

    Annalynn

    This was one of those books that sounds like an incredible story, but the execution of that story is lacking. Spoilers follow, since there is no way to discuss it otherwise. It was a confusing story that could have been great, but, alas, it was presented poorly. The first half of the book is set in either 1960 or 1964. It alternates back and forth between the two time frames. Adding to the confusion is that every time it would switch between the years, the chapter would often start out featuring This was one of those books that sounds like an incredible story, but the execution of that story is lacking. Spoilers follow, since there is no way to discuss it otherwise. It was a confusing story that could have been great, but, alas, it was presented poorly. The first half of the book is set in either 1960 or 1964. It alternates back and forth between the two time frames. Adding to the confusion is that every time it would switch between the years, the chapter would often start out featuring a different character you hadn't met before (like the secretary, or the lover the first time, or the lover's boss). I was constantly having to go back and forth in the pages to figure out what was happening, which is not so easy to do on the kindle as it is in a hard copy. As if this wasn't confusing enough, the second half of the book is told in 2003, featuring another person we hadn't met before. I actually like the idea of someone finding 40 year old love letters and trying to solve the mystery of who they were to/from, and what happened to them. But I really, REALLY wish the author would have opened the book with this mystery, and just simply flashed back to the 60s from there. Frankly, too much time of the book is spent on the 60s couple, and not enough on our modern story. Instead, we have a mystery within a mystery, as our heroine has amnesia for every other story for the first half of the book, and then the modern-day heroine trying to solve a second mystery 40 years later involving our first mystery lead characters. And yes, reading the book was just as confusing as it sounds in my review. Good luck if you try and read this.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Helene Jeppesen

    When I started reading this book, I immediately got mildly irritated with all the chick-lit clichés that the first chapter had, and I thought to myself that this was going to be another one of those chick-lit books that are very relaxing to read, but that I've slowly gotten tired of over the years. Then I turned the page, the second chapter started and I was immediately grabbed by the turn in both the story and its vibe. This was a completely different story, and as I kept on reading, I got more When I started reading this book, I immediately got mildly irritated with all the chick-lit clichés that the first chapter had, and I thought to myself that this was going to be another one of those chick-lit books that are very relaxing to read, but that I've slowly gotten tired of over the years. Then I turned the page, the second chapter started and I was immediately grabbed by the turn in both the story and its vibe. This was a completely different story, and as I kept on reading, I got more and more emotionally captivated and had a hard time putting down the book. And that's how this reading experience continued for me. Especially the last 100 pages were amazing, and they made me laugh, smile and tear up a little bit all at the same time. I still can't believe how much this book surprised me and how much I was fooled by the beginning. This is nothing similar to your typical chick-lit novel. This is a heartwrenching story, and I imply you to read on if you've already started the book but aren't sure about its content, because this story comes with beautiful and breathtaking emotions as well as stunning surprises!

  16. 5 out of 5

    B the BookAddict

    The title of this book would normally render it one that I would not read. It was a freebie and I picked it up because my library book had not become available yet. And surprisingly, I'm glad I did. The theme caught my attention because it is similar to that in The Things We Never Said by Susan Elliot Wright. Both have two stories based forty years apart whose connection is revealed only in the very last pages of the novel. 1964 and Jennifer Stirling wakes in a hospital after a shocking car acci The title of this book would normally render it one that I would not read. It was a freebie and I picked it up because my library book had not become available yet. And surprisingly, I'm glad I did. The theme caught my attention because it is similar to that in The Things We Never Said by Susan Elliot Wright. Both have two stories based forty years apart whose connection is revealed only in the very last pages of the novel. 1964 and Jennifer Stirling wakes in a hospital after a shocking car accident. She can't remember the accident, details of her life, her name or her husband Larry, a business magnate; rich, successful but, she discovers, emotionally cold. As she searches for evidence about herself, she stumbles upon a letter; a fervent letter from an unknown 'B'. Although she can't recall the relationship, it was obviously passionate, intense and something for which she would jeopardise her life as she knew it. Jennifer is what we would now call probably a trophy wife. She's young, she's beautiful and she's accomplished only, it seems, at the social lifestyle of the extremely rich. Anthony is a world wearied British journalist. He's been to all the political hot spots and just returned from the uprising in the Congo, he is burned out. His personal life bears scars from his perilous work; he has put his health at risk, is divorced and his contact with his only child is obstructed by his ex-wife. In 2003 we meet Ellie Haworth; such a modern woman, she's single, in a job she loves and having an affair with a married man. And having just had a landmark birthday, she's decided she's fed up with being a mistress. A features writer with a prominent British newspaper, Ellie's career is flailing as she spends most of her time preoccupied with her lover and their relationship. She is commissioned by her eagle eyed boss Melissa, who seems to have Ellie in her guns, to write a feature based partly in the 1960s. In the newspaper's library archives, she stumbles across a letter in a file, seemingly unconnected to her task at hand. The letter is impassioned, intense and signed only 'B'. Ellie embarks on a quest for this mysterious 'B' and the unknown recipient of the letter. As small clues become evident, the quest becomes an obsession. Who was 'B' and who was the letter for? What happened to them? The fate of lovers of forty years ago speak across the decades in Ellie's mind and run a parallel to her own esoteric relationship.

  17. 4 out of 5

    ~✡~Dαni(ela) ♥ ♂♂ love & semi-colons~✡~

    4.5 stars Brilliant, evocative, and tragic (but not without redemption), The Last Letter from Your Lover is as good as Moyes' Me Before You. I started sobbing 90 percent in and haven't yet stopped. I'm a bloody mess; rarely does a book offer such catharsis. The book begins in 1960s London. Two people meet: The aloof, beautiful, polished Jennifer is married to Laurence, a successful, detached, casually cruel businessman who manages various mines in Africa. Anthony is a journalist, divorced, a heav 4.5 stars Brilliant, evocative, and tragic (but not without redemption), The Last Letter from Your Lover is as good as Moyes' Me Before You. I started sobbing 90 percent in and haven't yet stopped. I'm a bloody mess; rarely does a book offer such catharsis. The book begins in 1960s London. Two people meet: The aloof, beautiful, polished Jennifer is married to Laurence, a successful, detached, casually cruel businessman who manages various mines in Africa. Anthony is a journalist, divorced, a heavy drinker, a mournful, impetuous man. He's not Jenny's type, much too volatile, not settled or grounded, and certainly without riches and social status. But Jennifer and Anthony feel a connection nonetheless, even though theirs is a love not meant to be...not then, not without missed opportunities and the drudgery of pain and loss. Fast-forward 40-some years to London, 2003. Thirty-two-year-old Ellie is forging a love affair of her own. Her lover, John, is married with two young children and in no hurry to leave his wife. But Ellie has hope. Wrapped up in John, forgetting her own life, including her career as a journalist, Ellie doesn't see what's right in front of her, until she stumbles on a letter, the letter of the title: a handwritten love letter spanning decades. Obsessed with what she reads and what it means, Ellie seeks to find out more about a story that's perversely right in front of her. Is there a happy ending here? That depends. Happiness isn't always what we imagine it to be. Sometimes it's about ourselves, our own convictions, doing what's right by our child, finding our own path, writing our own story, righting wrongs we had no way of preventing. Sometimes it's about a lonely man in a library, a guy who takes you ice-skating and makes you laugh, a post office box...open for 40 years. Sometimes it's about saying sorry, and words in a letter, gathering dust.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liza Wiemer

    A giveaway for this book and ME BEFORE YOU (US only) is on my blog through February 17, 2014, 11:59 pm CST - thank you to the publisher for providing the books. http://www.whorublog.com/?p=2847 Jojo Moyes once again proves that neither time nor distance can put out the flames of true love, love that doesn't just connect bodies, but souls. Take Jennifer Stirling and Anthony "Boot" O'Hare. Anthony, a reporter for "The Nation," joined Jennifer and her wealthy husband Laurence at their home on the Fr A giveaway for this book and ME BEFORE YOU (US only) is on my blog through February 17, 2014, 11:59 pm CST - thank you to the publisher for providing the books. http://www.whorublog.com/?p=2847 Jojo Moyes once again proves that neither time nor distance can put out the flames of true love, love that doesn't just connect bodies, but souls. Take Jennifer Stirling and Anthony "Boot" O'Hare. Anthony, a reporter for "The Nation," joined Jennifer and her wealthy husband Laurence at their home on the French Rivera. From their rocky beginnings in 1960, a friendship and love is forged between Anthony and Jennifer, one that can't be destroyed in twisted metal and broken dreams. There are no true winners or losers in this novel, just lives lived, lives lost and lots of navigation through life's trials and tribulations along the way. One of Jojo's established strengths in her writing is connecting the past with the present, intertwining lives with similar situations and objects. In THE LAST LETTER FROM YOUR LOVER, the object, of course, is a letter that ties the generations: Jennifer and Anthony in 1960 to Ellie and Rory in 2003. The parallels are so fascinating and at the same time heartbreaking. But Jojo has this way of taking heartbreak and smoothing the rough edges so that the reader is left satisfied and hopeful. This is a remarkable talent, one that makes Jojo a storytelling star. Jojo Moyes is one of those writers that has created a body of work that collectively is masterful and insightful into the human spirit. I would normally say that every novel must stand on its own merit. That's absolutely true. Yet, in Jojo's case, she has established herself as an author who has immortalized characters who will stand the test of time. Having read ME BEFORE YOU, HONEYMOON IN PARIS, THE GIRL YOU LEFT BEHIND and now THE LAST LETTER FROM YOUR LOVER, I see the connections between themes she explores in her novels, and even the characters. To me, that is a tremendous gift and the reason why I recommend reading everything Jojo writes. Obviously, readers may relate better to certain characters, but there is no doubt that if you read for more than the pleasure of entertainment, there is a lot to be gained from the insights Jojo illuminates in her stories. She opens the readers' eyes to the serendipities of past and present, the lessons to be learned from the past and how they can alter the present and the future. At the same time, her novels remind us that we're fragile beings, and even though we have only one life to live, what we do, what we create can be a major part of the future. To leave a mark. Jojo Moyes most definitely leaves a mark, one that will be read and seen for generations to come!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Oh my goodness! Big sigh! A delicious read! Started this book yesterday & couldn't put it down until I finished today. Tragic & so sad, and yet hopeful... One of my favourite parts was in a letter where Anthony writes, "...to have someone out there who understands you, who desires you, who sees you as a better version of yourself, is the most astonishing gift. Even if we are not together, to know that, for you, I am that man is a source of sustenance for me. I'm not sure how I earned the right. I d Oh my goodness! Big sigh! A delicious read! Started this book yesterday & couldn't put it down until I finished today. Tragic & so sad, and yet hopeful... One of my favourite parts was in a letter where Anthony writes, "...to have someone out there who understands you, who desires you, who sees you as a better version of yourself, is the most astonishing gift. Even if we are not together, to know that, for you, I am that man is a source of sustenance for me. I'm not sure how I earned the right. I don't feel entirely confident of it even now. But even the chance to think upon your beautiful face, your smile, and know that some part of it might belong to me is probably the single greatest thing that has happened in my life." Or another great part of a letter, "...know this at least: that somewhere in this world is a man who loves you, who understands how precious and kind and clever you are. A man who has always loved you and, suspects he always will." Isn't that what we're all looking for, to be loved fully, unconditionally, & passionately?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Ok, I have to admit, I liked this book. Definitely chick lit. At times it was very reminiscent of Letters to Juliet and felt like I was reading that story. It did have a love story within a love story. As well as a 40 year gap in one of them. I might have shed a tear even. I've officially been baptized into Moyes' works and now look feverishly to her other stories! Ok, I have to admit, I liked this book. Definitely chick lit. At times it was very reminiscent of Letters to Juliet and felt like I was reading that story. It did have a love story within a love story. As well as a 40 year gap in one of them. I might have shed a tear even. I've officially been baptized into Moyes' works and now look feverishly to her other stories!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Deacon Tom F

    A Real Winner I thoroughly enjoyed,“The Last Letter from Your Lover: A Novel”by Jojo Moyes. The pacing is fast and I had a hard time putting the book down. Moyes succeeded keeping my attention while the storyline transports the reader into different time zones and geographic areas. Another strong spot is how the characterisation is beautifully detailed, especially of Ellie, Laurence and Jennifer Overall, the core of the story is about affairs and their impact on the individual, the marriage and A Real Winner I thoroughly enjoyed,“The Last Letter from Your Lover: A Novel”by Jojo Moyes. The pacing is fast and I had a hard time putting the book down. Moyes succeeded keeping my attention while the storyline transports the reader into different time zones and geographic areas. Another strong spot is how the characterisation is beautifully detailed, especially of Ellie, Laurence and Jennifer Overall, the core of the story is about affairs and their impact on the individual, the marriage and even their workplace. It is impressive how the author weaves these elements together over almost a 50 year period. Lost love, longing for love that is far away, individual awareness, and happiness are the main themes in the book and in our lives as well. That made the book relatable. I highly recommend.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Where I got the book: my local library. A book club read. WARNING: A BIT SPOILERISH. This novel kept me on my toes, and therefore interested. It started out with a fairly familiar trope, where the main character is recovering from an accident and can’t remember her life before, but as time goes on she realizes that people are keeping something from her. And then she begins to find letters hidden around her house, and realizes she had a lover—now who WAS that guy anyway? So we began with a little m Where I got the book: my local library. A book club read. WARNING: A BIT SPOILERISH. This novel kept me on my toes, and therefore interested. It started out with a fairly familiar trope, where the main character is recovering from an accident and can’t remember her life before, but as time goes on she realizes that people are keeping something from her. And then she begins to find letters hidden around her house, and realizes she had a lover—now who WAS that guy anyway? So we began with a little mystery, and I kind of assumed that the story would center around Jennifer’s attempts to find out about her past. And then things got a little more interesting as we learned Jennifer’s husband was making his fortune by mining that new wonder material, asbestos. Oh-oh. Nothing like a little historical hindsight to make the informed reader prick up her ears (although, I wonder, what of the generation that never had to worry about asbestos removal?) So OK, this novel was going to have a certain historical dimension, and being set in the early 60s it had that whole Mad Men double standard going—wives were expected to be decorative, good at housekeeping, eager to produce children and, above all, faithful, while men—well, if a man was playing the field, it was his wife’s fault for not keeping him interested. And everyone got to consume as much booze, smoke as many ciggies and pop as many pills as they liked, because there was nothing wrong with needing a little something to keep you going. But then, before I was expected it to happen, we got into Jennifer’s Great Love Story, which was beautiful and tragic and poignant and all that. Only I began to feel like the author was making excuses for Jennifer—yes, her husband was a bore and a boor, but he hadn’t technically done anything wrong and her Great Love began to seem like the indulgence of a spoiled brat rather than a realistic relationship. And then all of a sudden we jumped into the new millenium and INTO PRESENT TENSE and I was annoyed, because I was happy in Mad Men Land and wanted to hear more about the asbestos. You don’t get to mention asbestos without the reader expecting something nasty to happen. But there’s no asbestos in 2003, and who was this Ellie woman, mooning after the Man Who Very Obviously Will Not Leave His Wife instead of getting on and doing her job? I began to worry if this was going to be a novel about women whose entire object in life was to have affairs. And then the story made a couple of abrupt right turns and came up with one major twist I really hadn’t anticipated, and a couple of minor ones, and by that point I was ready to give it five stars. I would knock off half a point for some poor grammar and expressions that didn’t belong to the Sixties if half points were allowed, but overall my final impression of this novel was of an entirely enjoyable read from the lighter end of the literary fiction pool. This is the kind of novel that goes down pretty quickly, so it’s not a bad choice to take to the beach or on a plane ride. Although, now the glow of the last seventy or so pages has faded, I wish Moyes had made more of the asbestos thing, but that would have been a different type of novel. And I wish I’d been able to fall in love with the characters a bit more, but seriously it now seems to take about 2,000 pages for me to fall hard for a character, so YMMV if you’re less of a cynical old bat than I am. Anyway, five stars for being enjoyable and making me want to read it instead of doing something productive.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    I do not generally read romances but Jojo Moyes manages to write her romance with a bit more substance than most including a catchy story and reasonably realistic characters. This book also has the advantage of being set back a little in the past and the descriptions of relationships and attitudes of the sixties were very true. It was certainly a page turner for me and I especially liked the happy ending. No problem giving it four stars!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Anze

    When Jennifer Stirling wakes up in the hospital, she has no recollection of her life. Jennifer is told she was in a car accident but no further details are given to her. When she returns home Jennifer learns that she is a lady of society with a wealthy husband and glamorous lifestyle but she remembers none of it. In trying to reconnect to her former life Jennifer searches among her belongings and finds a love letter to her simply signed by "B". As that is not her husband, Jennifer begins to wond When Jennifer Stirling wakes up in the hospital, she has no recollection of her life. Jennifer is told she was in a car accident but no further details are given to her. When she returns home Jennifer learns that she is a lady of society with a wealthy husband and glamorous lifestyle but she remembers none of it. In trying to reconnect to her former life Jennifer searches among her belongings and finds a love letter to her simply signed by "B". As that is not her husband, Jennifer begins to wonder who she really was prior to her accident. Ellie Hawort, a young journalist, finds Jennifer's letters, some forty years later, and sets out on learning how this love affair played out. I am not unfamiliar with Jojo Moyes. I love 'Me Before You' the best but have enjoyed a few other titles by her as well. Looking for a "lighter" read, I picked this book. Jennifer wakes up after a car accident suffering from amnesia. She does not remember her name, husband or life at all. As she is trying to piece back her life together, she comes across a love letter from a man who simply signs it as "B". Jennifer is at a loss at to who B is and just how involved was she with this man, which further complicates her memories. When Ellie Hawort uncovers Jennifer's letters, she is captivated by her story and decides to investigate. Where Jojo Moyes shines is in developing the motivations behind her character's actions. I did not think I would like a woman that cheated on her husband yet I rooted for Jennifer and her mystery man. Generally speaking, I enjoyed the book but it did fail to hold my attention after the halfway mark. Towards the end, there was a lot of skimming going on. I still love Jojo Moyes and by no means do I regret picking this title. This is just not one of my favorite books by her.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Connie G

    3.5 stars The Last Letter from Your Lover is a romance complicated by family obligations and missed opportunities. In London in the 1960s, Jennifer is recovering from a serious auto accident and has severe memory loss. She does not remember her wealthy husband who treats her like a possession. She finds some hidden passionate letters, signed only with a B, and tries to piece together her secret life. Who was B? Forty years later, a journalist Ellie comes upon several of B's romantic letters stored 3.5 stars The Last Letter from Your Lover is a romance complicated by family obligations and missed opportunities. In London in the 1960s, Jennifer is recovering from a serious auto accident and has severe memory loss. She does not remember her wealthy husband who treats her like a possession. She finds some hidden passionate letters, signed only with a B, and tries to piece together her secret life. Who was B? Forty years later, a journalist Ellie comes upon several of B's romantic letters stored in the newspaper archives. Involved in a relationship with a married man herself, she sees a spark in the letters that is not present in her own life. Ellie investigates what happened to Jennifer and her lover, and also has to make some difficult personal decisions. In addition to passion, the story also showed the problems that an affair can bring--a devastated spouse and hurt children. Historically, the book also illustrated the difference in communication from the wonderful 1963 love letters to the quick 2003 text messages. I've read two other books by Jojo Moyes, and found she was an engaging storyteller again. She has the ability to express emotions so well that I genuinely care what happens to the characters.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is another of Jojo Moyes wonderful stories, this one centering on Jennifer Stirling who wakes up in a hospital in 1960 not knowing who she is or where she is. Having been in a horrible car accident, she has no knowledge of what got her there. Coming home, she discovers that she lives a life of privilege and is living a life with a husband who is cold and unloving. Searching around the house in hopes of discovering who she is, she discovers letters secreted in hiding places, love letters wri This is another of Jojo Moyes wonderful stories, this one centering on Jennifer Stirling who wakes up in a hospital in 1960 not knowing who she is or where she is. Having been in a horrible car accident, she has no knowledge of what got her there. Coming home, she discovers that she lives a life of privilege and is living a life with a husband who is cold and unloving. Searching around the house in hopes of discovering who she is, she discovers letters secreted in hiding places, love letters written so lovingly, from "B." But who is "B?" The story then goes to Ellie Haworth, in 2003, a journalist who is in a dead-end relationship with a married man. Her life is centered around him, while her work is suffering. Ellie discovers a love letter in a dusty pile of papers from the newspaper library, with such heartbreaking writing that she determines to find the lovers behind the love letter. The letters are from "B." This story has you in turns happy, sad, wondering and is a page turner requiring kleenex for the ending. Read on, I promise that you will love it!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Great Story This wasn't my favorite JoJo Moyes book, because it was slow at times, but once the two stories come together it's fantastic! Worth the time to read. Great Story This wasn't my favorite JoJo Moyes book, because it was slow at times, but once the two stories come together it's fantastic! Worth the time to read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I have loved every book that I have read by Jojo Moyes…Me Before You, Me After You, The Girl You Left Behind, One Plus One, Honeymoon in Paris, and Paris for One, and I have about 6 more of her books on my shelf waiting to be read. She is one author I would recommend without any reservations to anyone who loves stories that while often heartbreaking are also insightful, poignant, clever, and speak of the strength of the human spirit as well as its frailties. Moyes is a consummate storyteller, and I have loved every book that I have read by Jojo Moyes…Me Before You, Me After You, The Girl You Left Behind, One Plus One, Honeymoon in Paris, and Paris for One, and I have about 6 more of her books on my shelf waiting to be read. She is one author I would recommend without any reservations to anyone who loves stories that while often heartbreaking are also insightful, poignant, clever, and speak of the strength of the human spirit as well as its frailties. Moyes is a consummate storyteller, and she excels at creating characters that are rich, fascinating, vibrant and more than anything so very real. Her plots are beautifully woven and masterful, and this is especially true in The Last Letter from Your Lover, where she intertwines duel storylines of lovers spanning 40 years apart…forbidden love, neverending love, lost love, misguided love, passion, and loathing are all part of this story that centers around secretly written love letters that serendipitously brings the past and present together. While I enjoyed both storylines, I was most in love with the story of Jennifer that begins in the 1960s and spreads over 40 years. She is beautiful, intelligent, polished, and married to a wealthy man who treats her as a trophy and little else. When readers meet her, she is recovering from a severe car accident and has no recollection of her life or who she really is but she does feel a sense of loss and no connection with her husband. It is as she begins to recover that she finds hidden love letters signed by “B” and understands she’s passionately in love with someone else and her memories begin to slowly return. These letters from her lover are absolutely breathtaking, and they remind you of why people long for the kind of love shared between Jennifer and Anthony (“Boot”) so desperately that they will go to great lengths to have it or in some cases convince themselves that they do have it when they don’t. I was rooting for them all the way and became heavily invested in their relationship. There were so many times that I was in tears because I had no idea what was going to happen…I actually didn’t know what was going to happen until almost the end of the book! In the present, Ellie is also involved in an affair, but she is beginning to question if it is just a fling when she wants real love. When she finds one of the impassioned letters Anthony wrote Jennifer asking her to leave her husband, she is determined to find out what happened to the couple if only to prove to herself that forbidden affairs can have a happily ever after, and that she isn’t expecting too much or dreaming too big for wanting her lover to leave his wife and kids. Although I liked Ellie and I loved her job as a reporter, I didn’t love parts of her storyline as much since it seemed like she should just know for some reason that when a married man tells you never do this, only text him these times, never call him, ignores you repeatedly, and is only available on “his” terms that he is never leaving his wife and children. Still, I really did like Ellie a lot, and I loved how her storyline played out, especially since it had its own twist in the end that was quite lovely! What I really enjoyed was how the story took these two very different women’s lives and brought them together since they each brought something unique and special into the other’s lives that was missing. It is such a beautiful book full of strong emotions even if it is heartbreaking at times. The beauty in Moyes writing is in her ability to tell a heartwrenching and breathtaking tale that will make you feel hopeful and alive at the same time. Highly recommended!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Angela M

    It had me from the first page, wondering just who was this woman Jennifer. As the result of an injury from a car accident, she has no idea herself of what her life was like before the accident. Her character is slowly revealed through letters and flashbacks and we come to know quite a bit about her as she learns at the same time. The beginning is taking place in London in 1960 and the scenario that Moyes skillfully creates could be from one of those old black and white movies. Simply put, it's a It had me from the first page, wondering just who was this woman Jennifer. As the result of an injury from a car accident, she has no idea herself of what her life was like before the accident. Her character is slowly revealed through letters and flashbacks and we come to know quite a bit about her as she learns at the same time. The beginning is taking place in London in 1960 and the scenario that Moyes skillfully creates could be from one of those old black and white movies. Simply put, it's a passionate love story . Then the story moves forty years ahead and we meet Ellie, a journalist,who stumbles on a love letter. Most of the rest of the book focuses on Ellie trying to piece together Jennifer's story for an article and relating it to the mess of a love affair that she is involved in. Moyes uses this mechanism of tying the past and present in another one of her novels, The Girl You Left Behind. In my view it was much more successful in that book . One of the things that was the same for me in these books, is that I liked the old story better than the current one. I thought that Jennifer's story was a sophisticated love story; Ellie's story was not. However, I did enjoy the novel and for me it was solid 3.5 stars, so I rounded up to 4.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Britany

    Beautifully written love story between two estranged lovers. The setting for this story overlaps from the 1960's to 2003. Forty years, shifting back and forth between the past and present. It ties together bits and pieces from a lost love story between an unlikely pair. The way that the story is laid out and presented keeps the reader immersed and waiting for more. Jennifer Sterling and Anthony O'Hare are two characters I hope to never forget. Passion never dims on these two, and I massively fell Beautifully written love story between two estranged lovers. The setting for this story overlaps from the 1960's to 2003. Forty years, shifting back and forth between the past and present. It ties together bits and pieces from a lost love story between an unlikely pair. The way that the story is laid out and presented keeps the reader immersed and waiting for more. Jennifer Sterling and Anthony O'Hare are two characters I hope to never forget. Passion never dims on these two, and I massively fell in love with love while reading this again. The concurrent storyline between Rory & Ellie Hayworth is a more present love, one that has to overcome technology and modern day obstacles. I could relate to their story because it falls more in line with my life. Although, one day I hope to find my Boot...

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