web site hit counter Signature Wound: Hidden Bombs, Heroic Soldiers, and the Shocking, Secret Story of the Afghanistan War - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Signature Wound: Hidden Bombs, Heroic Soldiers, and the Shocking, Secret Story of the Afghanistan War

Availability: Ready to download

Every war has its “signature wounds,” injuries inflicted by frightening new weapons and tactics the U.S. military has never faced before. Blistered flesh from mustard gas in World War I. Petroleum burns from oil and gas igniting on the surface of the Pacific in World War II. And now, lost legs, hands, and most devastating of all, genitals, as a result of improvised explosi Every war has its “signature wounds,” injuries inflicted by frightening new weapons and tactics the U.S. military has never faced before. Blistered flesh from mustard gas in World War I. Petroleum burns from oil and gas igniting on the surface of the Pacific in World War II. And now, lost legs, hands, and most devastating of all, genitals, as a result of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in today’s war in Afghanistan. Men’s Health contributing editor Bob Drury, a veteran reporter of both the Afghan and Iraq wars, delivers his most hard-hitting and important dispatch yet—the unforgettable accounts of U.S. soldiers who have suffered these very personal wounds. Their intense tales of battlefield survival are just a prologue to the unimaginable fights they face once they’re stateside. This is essential reading for truly understanding what our fighting forces put on the line—and lose—every single day.


Compare

Every war has its “signature wounds,” injuries inflicted by frightening new weapons and tactics the U.S. military has never faced before. Blistered flesh from mustard gas in World War I. Petroleum burns from oil and gas igniting on the surface of the Pacific in World War II. And now, lost legs, hands, and most devastating of all, genitals, as a result of improvised explosi Every war has its “signature wounds,” injuries inflicted by frightening new weapons and tactics the U.S. military has never faced before. Blistered flesh from mustard gas in World War I. Petroleum burns from oil and gas igniting on the surface of the Pacific in World War II. And now, lost legs, hands, and most devastating of all, genitals, as a result of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in today’s war in Afghanistan. Men’s Health contributing editor Bob Drury, a veteran reporter of both the Afghan and Iraq wars, delivers his most hard-hitting and important dispatch yet—the unforgettable accounts of U.S. soldiers who have suffered these very personal wounds. Their intense tales of battlefield survival are just a prologue to the unimaginable fights they face once they’re stateside. This is essential reading for truly understanding what our fighting forces put on the line—and lose—every single day.

30 review for Signature Wound: Hidden Bombs, Heroic Soldiers, and the Shocking, Secret Story of the Afghanistan War

  1. 4 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣

    A very (too!) short and concise must-read for anyone who is into promilitary rhetorics. Wars leave their signatures on people's souls and bodies. Q: That’s one thing that wars do—they turn medical techniques honed on the battlefield into standard civilian medical practices. Different wars, different tactics, different injuries. Walter Reed, a military doctor, discovered that yellow fever was transferred by mosquitoes, and that breakthrough allowed the building of the Panama Canal. One of the great A very (too!) short and concise must-read for anyone who is into promilitary rhetorics. Wars leave their signatures on people's souls and bodies. Q: That’s one thing that wars do—they turn medical techniques honed on the battlefield into standard civilian medical practices. Different wars, different tactics, different injuries. Walter Reed, a military doctor, discovered that yellow fever was transferred by mosquitoes, and that breakthrough allowed the building of the Panama Canal. One of the great advances in burn care came out of the sinking of our ships in the Pacific during World War II, when oil burned on the surface of the water. And because of the number of wounded returning from Afghanistan with their genitals blown off, well, we will surely learn from this also. This kind of stuff is already being worked on by military doctors. But at what price?” (c) Q: Although loathe to go into more detail, another JIEDDO advisor tells me that Burnett has survived 46 IED blasts, 23 of them direct hits. (c) Dunkan MacLeod could be proud of that. Q: The numbers would seem to back this up. Ronald Glasser, M.D., is a Vietnam veteran who researched precisely this phenomenon for his recent book, Broken Bodies, Shattered Minds: A Medical Odyssey from Vietnam to Afghanistan. Dr. Glasser tells me that during the Vietnam War there were 2.4 American casualties suffered for each American killed. In Afghanistan, current Department of Defense numbers yield a ratio of 8 to 1. (c) Q: Dr. Glasser, a still-practicing pediatrician and the best-selling author of the Vietnam War classic 365 Days—his gripping account of attempting to surgically repair the horrors endured by our fighting men in Southeast Asia—is a fascinating character. (c) Q: “Everyone talks about the great number of amputations during the Civil War,” he says. “Did you know that, percentage-wise, more of our soldiers fighting in Afghanistan have lost limbs or have had limbs amputated than in the Civil War? And genital wounds. Jeez, almost everybody.” “You can’t get your legs blown off without suffering genital or perineal injuries,” he says, referring to the region of the human body where the two legs meet. “And the understanding of this throughout the military is quite substantial. You mention infections? All kinds of crap is blown into the wounds from these blasts. How do you clean them out? And because of the initial swelling, you don’t know for a day or two—actually probably longer—how much tissue is damaged. And the more time it takes to glean this information and make the proper medical decisions, the higher the probability of long-lasting damage. (c)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael Flanagan

    This short book pack one hell of punch. It tells the unknown story of the secret signature wound in the current Afghanistan conflict caused by the use of IED's on infantry and it's not what you think. The strength of character show by these soldiers is truly humbling. This short book pack one hell of punch. It tells the unknown story of the secret signature wound in the current Afghanistan conflict caused by the use of IED's on infantry and it's not what you think. The strength of character show by these soldiers is truly humbling.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tanya Spackman

    Everyone should read this to better understand the cost of war.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Harman

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrea DeVoll

  6. 4 out of 5

    kenneth clark

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lee McCowan

  8. 4 out of 5

    lori gelhar

  9. 4 out of 5

    Martin Schaeffer

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tod A. Hazlett

  11. 5 out of 5

    Denise

  12. 5 out of 5

    Fabiano

  13. 4 out of 5

    GP

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lori

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elica Shaw

  16. 4 out of 5

    Fred Everett

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Reid

  18. 4 out of 5

    Buck Staiton

  19. 5 out of 5

    Heather Jacoby

  20. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Phillips

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn

  23. 5 out of 5

    Willie Jackson

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carrington Brown

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gillian

  26. 4 out of 5

    janet schneekloth

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marcel Wilson

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brendan Darby

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Morgan

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.