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Discover the magic of Trudi Canavan with her brand new novel in the Traitor Spy trilogy. . . Events are building to a climax in Sachaka as Lorkin returns from his exile with the Traitor rebels. The Traitor Queen has given Lorkin the huge task of brokering an alliance between his people and the Traitors. Lorkin has also had to become a feared black magician in order to harne Discover the magic of Trudi Canavan with her brand new novel in the Traitor Spy trilogy. . . Events are building to a climax in Sachaka as Lorkin returns from his exile with the Traitor rebels. The Traitor Queen has given Lorkin the huge task of brokering an alliance between his people and the Traitors. Lorkin has also had to become a feared black magician in order to harness the power of an entirely new kind of gemstone magic. This knowledge could transform the Guild of Magicians -- or make Lorkin an outcast forever. The Traitor Spy trilogy, which began with The Ambassador's Mission and The Rogue, is the new series set in the world of the international bestselling Black Magician trilogy.


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Discover the magic of Trudi Canavan with her brand new novel in the Traitor Spy trilogy. . . Events are building to a climax in Sachaka as Lorkin returns from his exile with the Traitor rebels. The Traitor Queen has given Lorkin the huge task of brokering an alliance between his people and the Traitors. Lorkin has also had to become a feared black magician in order to harne Discover the magic of Trudi Canavan with her brand new novel in the Traitor Spy trilogy. . . Events are building to a climax in Sachaka as Lorkin returns from his exile with the Traitor rebels. The Traitor Queen has given Lorkin the huge task of brokering an alliance between his people and the Traitors. Lorkin has also had to become a feared black magician in order to harness the power of an entirely new kind of gemstone magic. This knowledge could transform the Guild of Magicians -- or make Lorkin an outcast forever. The Traitor Spy trilogy, which began with The Ambassador's Mission and The Rogue, is the new series set in the world of the international bestselling Black Magician trilogy.

30 review for The Traitor Queen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ella

    ***Spoilers may follow!!*** Hmmm...Hard to rate this book, I REALLY wanted to like it as I loved the magicians guild trilogy, but I have to say this book was pretty unremarkable, the plot struggled along at a snail’s pace, nothing happens in the first half and then ALL the action is crammed into the second making it rushed and awkward, no middle ground or easing into it. Most of the POV characters are very difficult to get to know, I tried hard to like Lorkin but I find his character cardboard and ***Spoilers may follow!!*** Hmmm...Hard to rate this book, I REALLY wanted to like it as I loved the magicians guild trilogy, but I have to say this book was pretty unremarkable, the plot struggled along at a snail’s pace, nothing happens in the first half and then ALL the action is crammed into the second making it rushed and awkward, no middle ground or easing into it. Most of the POV characters are very difficult to get to know, I tried hard to like Lorkin but I find his character cardboard and bland and Canavan's attempts to give him some character development fall flat, maybe it's a bit of prejudice on my part but the old original characters Dannyl, Sonea and even Regin were far more well-rounded and relatable than the painfully flat, boring and let's face it bafflingly stupid "new generation", namely Lilia, Lorkin, Tyvara and Anyi who in my opinion get way too much attention. The Tyvara/Lorkin romance appears to be attempting to parallel the Sonea/Akkarin "young love" relationship of the previous series, but the Sonea/Akkarin relationship developed slowly over the course of nearly two entire books and was not without its trials it was more "real" and though it managed to be simultaneously creepy and touching, was more believable. You saw it built slowly, the Lorkin/Tyvara one however seems shallow and superficial. Even those who haven't read the previous trilogy can pick up on this. Sonea does NOTHING! And for the awesome, strong-willed heroine of the last trilogy to be so crippled and to see her cowed and dominated by the whims of others is painful, especially when her substitute is supposedly the sub-par Lorkin/Lilia POV's. We are supposed to want to root for the traitors and hope they win against the tyrannical noble class that currently exists. Whilst the current aristocracy is obviously perverse and cruel the Traitors aren't much better, I hate to say this but the "evil" Sachakans got better and more in-depth characterization; we find that they aren't all irrevocably "Bad", like any normal population they run the gamut from genuinely good human beings reluctantly trying to do right by their home and country to almost cartoonishly evil, whilst unfortunately the Traitors come across as straw feminists, although its frequently pointed out that their society isn't the gender-equal utopia it first appears to be and men are in fact second-class citizens, the implications that women in positions of power would indeed treat men like this or for women to be strong, confident and kick ass in their own right means they have to belittle men have a lot of unfortunate implications Also the whole Skellin plot was pointless, less said about that the better. It ultimately ends feeling unfinished and like a middle-book rather than the final in the trilogy, Canavan in the epilogue actually, (hopefully accidently) introduced THE most interesting aspect of the entire traitor spy series by offhandedly having some of the magicians mention the threat of the anti-magic warriors of Igra and their supposedly magician-killing weapons (sounding suspiciously like guns to me)now THAT would be fascinating, so far we have the magicians who are people of mass destruction and are only threatened by other magicians. To level the playing field would introduce interesting ordinary folk who might be able to do more than hide in holes and run to the big powerful magicians for help, it would also bring up a fascinating magic vs technology aspect...Here's hoping Canavan explores that avenue

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Hmm. This was extremley hard to rate. This is the final book in a series I have been reading on and off since school. I am very sentimental about these books and even now, over a decade after reading the first novel, I feel a strong sense of loyalty and fondness for these characters. Unfortunately the four stars I gave to this novel are more of a representation of this loyalty than a reflection of the quality of the book. The novel continued its predecessor's habit of focusing on the new batch of Hmm. This was extremley hard to rate. This is the final book in a series I have been reading on and off since school. I am very sentimental about these books and even now, over a decade after reading the first novel, I feel a strong sense of loyalty and fondness for these characters. Unfortunately the four stars I gave to this novel are more of a representation of this loyalty than a reflection of the quality of the book. The novel continued its predecessor's habit of focusing on the new batch of characters rather than our old favourites. Rothen for example doesn't appear in any meaningful capacity until the final quarter of the novel. My favourite character Dannyl is heavily featured but just like in the last book, he contributes very little value. We spend a lot of time focusing on Lorkin and Lila's relationships but I found it very hard to care about either character ( especially Lorkin who has no real personality). The plot is meandering which is fine for me, as I enjoy spending time with these characters, but I imagine many other readers would be bored. Over 6 books Trudi Canavan has crafted a very intriguing world, but I sadly feel she could do more with it. I would happily read another 6 books in this world with these characters, but I would urge Canavan to lower the scale. Separating her characters geographically for the entire trilogy negatively impacted the novels Give us more Rothen/ Sonea/ Dannyl interactions. Sonea didn't meet with Cery once in this whole book which felt like a betrayal to both characters. These characters are why the original novels are so popular and I would recommend she leans on them more in future. This is probably the most ranty 4 star review I will ever write!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ferdy

    Spoilers I wasn't impressed with this. It was slow paced, the majority of the characters were bland and I wasn't interested in the central plot. The conflict/war between Sachaka and the Traitors made for tedious reading. Sonea, Cery, Anyi, Tayend and Regin were the only decent characters. The others were all boring, especially Lorkin, Tyvara, Dannyl and Lillia. The arc I most enjoyed was Sonea's, probably because she was the only character I really cared about. Her interactions with Regin were in Spoilers I wasn't impressed with this. It was slow paced, the majority of the characters were bland and I wasn't interested in the central plot. The conflict/war between Sachaka and the Traitors made for tedious reading. Sonea, Cery, Anyi, Tayend and Regin were the only decent characters. The others were all boring, especially Lorkin, Tyvara, Dannyl and Lillia. The arc I most enjoyed was Sonea's, probably because she was the only character I really cared about. Her interactions with Regin were interesting to read about. I never would have expected them to have a romance, since 20 years earlier in the Black Magician trilogy, Regin bullied Sonea. Usually I would hate for a heroine to end up with a bully but their relationship actually worked, since 1. Regin was a teenager when he bullied Sonea 2. Sonea never let Regin get away with his treatment of her 3. Regin showed significant character growth. 4. Regin made up for his behaviour and was genuinely remorseful and 5. For 20 years Regin showed nothing but respect and admiration towards Sonea. I loved Sonea and Akkarin's romance in the first trilogy and even though Regin is no Akkarin, he was still a good love interest and the romance he shared with Sonea was very sweet. Unfortunately, Sonea and Regin's relationship was the only endearing and engrossing aspect of the book. What let the book down the most was the positively boring main POV character, Lorkin. After three books, Lorkin still hadn't developed a personality. I thought he would gain some depth and complexity after he was imprisoned and tortured but sadly, it didn't add anything to his plank like personality. Cery was a likeable character but he wasn't given the opportunity to shine, all he did was moan about how old he was and hide from Skellin. Also, after three books of build up between Skellin and him, Cery didn't even get a dramatic confrontation and showdown with him and instead died of a heart attack. It was disappointing. Dannyl was just as boring as he was in the previous book, he did nothing apart from hem and haw about his love life, moan about his book and generally be useless. It's just sad that he went from one of my most favourite characters to one of my most hated. Lillia was more tolerable this time around, she wasn't quite as stupid. Her loyalty to Cery and Anyi was the best thing about her, I also liked how she dealt with her bullying. After Regin and Sonea's arc, the bullying story line was probably the most interesting but that was most likely down to the fact that it reminded me of young Sonea and when she was bullied. I still thought Lillia was dull but there were parts of her arc that were somewhat engaging. All in all, I wasn't pleased with this but I did enjoy reading about Sonea and her life after Akkarin.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sianin

    Good read this one but it this book can not compare to the "High Lord" as an end book of a trilogy. I almost feel a bit disappointed but that has to do with my maybe unrealistically high expectations. It keeps the same level as the previous 2 books but it feels a bit flat( like the other two). The feeling of "questing" and "Learning" from the black magician trilogy never occurs. We get to see gemstones in action but in my opinion it felt kinda boring. We do not get to "explore" or learn more abo Good read this one but it this book can not compare to the "High Lord" as an end book of a trilogy. I almost feel a bit disappointed but that has to do with my maybe unrealistically high expectations. It keeps the same level as the previous 2 books but it feels a bit flat( like the other two). The feeling of "questing" and "Learning" from the black magician trilogy never occurs. We get to see gemstones in action but in my opinion it felt kinda boring. We do not get to "explore" or learn more about them really. I did not find any plots that did not get addressed in some small manner but some of them felt really unfinished and this has made the entire book and even the trilogy feel like a "middle book", some examples are small historical "ah experiences " by the characters that should lead forward or at least get to Dannyls attention but they just die down. This book and trilogy suffers in my point of view from trying to achieve a "generation change" within the story were neither the new generation or the old get to really play out in a satisfying way. The main example for me is Sonea who in my opinion was not time to "retire" in the way she was done in this book. I was looking forward for some action from her part in the conflict or even some great discovery's but I got nada, and no other character really steps up. My personal opinion is that this trilogy had been better if the Skellin part had been left out entirely and that the story had focused only on Sachaka, the guilds involvement there with the different fractions and that there had been more "bringing home" knowledge, Sonea, Lorkin and Dannyl would have been my main characters for this. The lack of the Duna peoples in this book is feeling a bit odd and the reason given for them not beeing in the story feels "not good enough". I'm starting to have a problem with the "lack" of intelligent people and mainly in the guild. There is to much we cant trust anyone scenarios. Over all the book and Trilogy is a good read and it gives some more insight to the world that Trudi Have created. Even tho the knowledge from Black Magician trilogy and Magicians Apprentice is mainly just managed with a few additions.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Max Masters

    ** Spoilers and opinions follow. Not good. I can stomach an anti-drug campaign in a book, but only if it isn't pointlessly thrown in like it is here. The drug 'Roet' had a distinct subplot, but it never amounted to anything or affected the main plot, I was expecting some kind of twist, or meaning. Nor did the addition of Lilia, and her relationship to Anyi and Cery. The whole book could have happened without them, and should have, considering they were completely undeveloped characters (Even Cery ** Spoilers and opinions follow. Not good. I can stomach an anti-drug campaign in a book, but only if it isn't pointlessly thrown in like it is here. The drug 'Roet' had a distinct subplot, but it never amounted to anything or affected the main plot, I was expecting some kind of twist, or meaning. Nor did the addition of Lilia, and her relationship to Anyi and Cery. The whole book could have happened without them, and should have, considering they were completely undeveloped characters (Even Cery, who I loved in the original books, had been watered down) and the only enjoyable event was Cery's death, which was laughable and had absolutely no consequences, except Sonea feeling a bit sad. The action was pathetic, as there wasn't much. There was no sense of danger because our protagonists were on the conquering, winning side. And the only time I could have felt something for Dannyl, when his lover died, was ruined by Dannyl launching into one of the many poorly placed internal monologues. Why not SHOW me his anger, and his pain, by describing it? I shouldn't have to be told that someone is feeling a certain way. This is a recurring element in all of the characters, who unrealistically have full discussions with themselves at every moment, even when there is magic being flung at them, it also didn't help that everybody spoke in the same, emotionless way. Sonea and Regin's love story felt forced, and went against everything that made the 2nd book in the original story my favorite. Regin and Sonea's rivalry, as well as Dannyl and Tayend's mysterious, controversial (in the world) love story kept me up at night on college days, and ate away my time. This book I severely contemplated throwing out the window at the half way point, just like the 2nd book in this new trilogy. Honestly it was a waste of my time, and it sullied my good opinions of the original trilogy. I'm rarely frustrated enough to write a review, because I'm sure everything I've just said has been written here before. But the needlessness of this book has motivated me to fuel my irritation into words. Lovely, lovely words.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    I'm really glad I persevered through to the end of this trilogy. The first two books set up the world as it has been for centuries, which was a bit tedious because we'd already had that history lesson in a much more compelling way. But finally in this book, things change. I'm not sure it needed a whole trilogy to tell this story, but I am satisfied with how it ended both plot-wise and character-wise. The conflicts in Sachaka come to a head, and the Guild is forced to adapt beyond their narrow-mi I'm really glad I persevered through to the end of this trilogy. The first two books set up the world as it has been for centuries, which was a bit tedious because we'd already had that history lesson in a much more compelling way. But finally in this book, things change. I'm not sure it needed a whole trilogy to tell this story, but I am satisfied with how it ended both plot-wise and character-wise. The conflicts in Sachaka come to a head, and the Guild is forced to adapt beyond their narrow-mindedness. Finally! Cool magic stuff and fighting actually happen, even though I do wish the action was more immediate instead of mostly being observed from a distance. The focus was more on the emotional state of the observers than on what was actually happening, and although I found myself caught up in those emotions, I still wished to be down on the ground. Most importantly, I like the future that is in store for most of the characters. I feel like Sonea is in a good place - she is finally able to move on from the pain of the past and to build a new life. It's a life that I can accept, and that's about all I really needed out of this continuation of her story. I ultimately still miss the brilliance of the original Black Magician Trilogy, but this gave me a measure of closure that I needed, and I actually ended up enjoying it enough that I'm sad it's over again.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jael

    I loved the Black Magician Trilogy but as much as I try to, I can't bring myself to like Traitor Spy. I can't emphasise how annoyed I was with Lorkin. He seems very much like a male-version of Bella who falls for a girl at first sight and all of a sudden, it's I'will-do-anything-for-her. Okay, that's a little over-exaggerating because Lorkin is slightly more sensible but I was seriously annoyed with how stupid he was. Also, I don't get how we were supposed to root for the Traitors and hate the Sa I loved the Black Magician Trilogy but as much as I try to, I can't bring myself to like Traitor Spy. I can't emphasise how annoyed I was with Lorkin. He seems very much like a male-version of Bella who falls for a girl at first sight and all of a sudden, it's I'will-do-anything-for-her. Okay, that's a little over-exaggerating because Lorkin is slightly more sensible but I was seriously annoyed with how stupid he was. Also, I don't get how we were supposed to root for the Traitors and hate the Sachakans despite knowing full well that the Traitors aren't perfect and the Sachakans aren't all bad. I only lasted until this last book because I held hopes that Canavan would pull off some mind-blowing ending like in the Age of Five. Nothing like that happened. Instead, we get the dull good-guys-win-bad-guys-lose ending. The rants can go on. I still love TBM, but Traitor Spy is seriously not my cup of tea. Nothing worked, be it the plot, the character building or the romance.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Crazyjamie

    So here we are. After years of patience the Traitor Spy trilogy has come to a close. Was it everything that I hoped it would be? Well, mostly. Like other books in the series, the strong dialogue and character development continues, as does a reduction in the level of action scenes that one would normally expect from a fantasy novel. In other words, it is a trademark Trudi Canavan novel, and one that I did enjoy. There is one problem, though, and it is a problem that I suspect has resulted in the So here we are. After years of patience the Traitor Spy trilogy has come to a close. Was it everything that I hoped it would be? Well, mostly. Like other books in the series, the strong dialogue and character development continues, as does a reduction in the level of action scenes that one would normally expect from a fantasy novel. In other words, it is a trademark Trudi Canavan novel, and one that I did enjoy. There is one problem, though, and it is a problem that I suspect has resulted in the average rating for this book on Goodreads being below 4 at the time of writing. Whilst we are all used to Trudi Canavan's novels being light on the action side of things, with the Traitor Queen I felt like this happened to such a degree that the final third of the book lacked the sort of tension and drama that one would expect from the end of a trilogy. You see, when you look back at the other series that Trudi Canavan has written, they do all end strongly and with some sort of epic confrontation. The Ichani Invasion in the Magician's Guild trilogy was superbly tense and well written, and whilst not as dramatic the ending of the Age of Five trilogy did manage a significant sense of scale. Whilst we do have a somewhat inevitable encounter at the end of the Traitor Queen, I just couldn't help but feel that it was very vanilla and lacked tension and drama. It's a shame, because the rest of the book is classic Trudi Canavan and very enjoyable, but even hardened fans will struggle to claim that this book ended well, and sadly it does undermine the whole trilogy to a degree. As a result the Traitor Spy trilogy is certainly the weakest of the three trilogies, which is a shame, but there we go. Fortunately it won't stop me (or I suspect anyone else) from looking forward to what Trudi Canavan produces next.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melaszka

    Yes, it's true, it doesn't live up to the Black Magician trilogy or The Age of Five, and, let's be honest, the big, Akkarin-shaped hole was never going to be filled, but there's no point going on about it - one just has to take this trilogy for what it is. It did feel a bit unplanned (far too many ideas started or hinted at, but then not explored), a bit unstructured and a bit directionless. The duller characters, like Lorkin and Lilia, hogged most of the attention, while (to me) more intriguing Yes, it's true, it doesn't live up to the Black Magician trilogy or The Age of Five, and, let's be honest, the big, Akkarin-shaped hole was never going to be filled, but there's no point going on about it - one just has to take this trilogy for what it is. It did feel a bit unplanned (far too many ideas started or hinted at, but then not explored), a bit unstructured and a bit directionless. The duller characters, like Lorkin and Lilia, hogged most of the attention, while (to me) more intriguing characters, like Achati, Kallen, Lorandra, Skellin and Regin were more briefly sketched and remained underwritten enigmas. The big villain at the end frustratingly came from nowhere. And there were too many inconsistencies and Mary-Sueish implausibility (e.g. Lilia coming up with an idea so simple a five-year-old could have thought of it, but the Guild are stunned into reverence by the alleged innovativeness of it). But I was still hooked - for me, the big hooks, as with her other work, are the detail Canavan puts into her world (I almost feel like I really live there) and the nuance with which she creates conflicting civilisations (there are never any simplistic good guys or bad guys) and both of those were still here in bucketloads. The plotting, the action, the prose style, even the characterisation have never been her strongest points, even in the BMT, so I wasn't particularly disappointed that they were a bit lacking here.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Becky (Blogs of a Bookaholic)

    This review was originally published on Blogs of a Bookaholic. FEELS. SO MANY FEELS. AHHHHHHH! Finished this at 2am last night and couldn't stop smiling. As with all of Canavan’s novels, her writing really impressed me. It is so detailed and specific that it feels as if Kyralia could be a real place, that it may exist just over the next horizon. I love her word choices and sentence structures although some may call her style a little meandering, to which I would agree. She’s not a fast paced write This review was originally published on Blogs of a Bookaholic. FEELS. SO MANY FEELS. AHHHHHHH! Finished this at 2am last night and couldn't stop smiling. As with all of Canavan’s novels, her writing really impressed me. It is so detailed and specific that it feels as if Kyralia could be a real place, that it may exist just over the next horizon. I love her word choices and sentence structures although some may call her style a little meandering, to which I would agree. She’s not a fast paced writer but she is thorough and thoughtful without going over the top. I never feel like she is pushing too hard to be insightful or dramatic, her style feels very natural and that is one of the many things I love about it. I especially like the way Canavan crafts romances between characters which was particularly apparent in this book. The plot of The Traitor Queen was so much better than the previous books, mostly because STUFF ACTUALLY HAPPENED. My biggest complaint about this series so far has been its slow pacing. Both The Ambassador’s Mission and The Rogue spent far too much time switching back and forth between characters’ story lines with not a whole lot happening. While I still enjoyed the stories enough I did get frustrated. Thank goodness, I didn’t have this problem with The Traitor Queen, I’m not sure my poor Trudi Canavan loving heart could have taken it! This book hits the ground running with a brilliant first chapter that thrusts you straight into the middle of the action. I still found the point of view changes a bit frustrating at times but in this book it was for a good reason. I would get so invested in the story line I was reading but then Canavan would make me switch to another one. Then just as I was immersed in that she would switch it again! It was like a clever form of literary torture, dragging the tension out for as long as possible until the reader is ready to burst with the desperation of wanting to see how it all ends. I did feel that some of the story lines were rounded off better than others, for instance the culmination of hunt for the rogue magician Skellin was a little anti-climactic for me, but in contrast the storyline with the Traitors had me glued to the pages with an intense stare. As for the last couple of chapters, I would have yelled at anyone who dared to interrupt me! The end of this novel turned me into an emotional mess, it had me grinning uncontrollably, giggling (and I NEVER giggle) and also brought a tear to my eye. As for the characters, I warmed to Lorkin even more in this novel. I wasn’t that bothered by him when he was first introduced and he has been a bit of a slow burner for me. While I still feel he is less rounded than many of the other characters (which is a little worrying considering I would say he is the main character in this series) he gained some more personality in The Traitor Queen. He is forced to mature and make a lot of difficult decisions which made me respect and admire him more as a character. He is certainly not the overconfident naive man he used to be and I have enjoyed following his epic adventure from start to finish. Lila also surprised me in this book, I found her frustrating in The Rogue but she seemed to gain more common sense in this novel. I loved her sense of loyalty and the way she embraced her new role within the Guild with a level of pride. Anyi has fast become a favourite of mine, I love her spunk; she doesn’t let others intimidate her and she has an ability to project confidence even in the most awkward situations. As always, I was happy to be reunited with many of the original characters from The Black Magician Trilogy who feel like old friends to me now. I will forever love Lord Rothen with his fatherly wisdom, Cery the slum thief whose morals somehow stay intact, Regin, Sonea’s childhood bully who I remarkably ended up liking as a character a lot and of course, Dannyl, the lovable scholar who gets along with everyone. Special mention has to go out to Sonea, who will probably always be Canavan’s best character. I love her strength, her wit and how cool she is in tough situations. She’s just so damn awesome! I have followed her journey for six books now and it has been fascinating to see her grow and change. While The Traitor Spy Trilogy is not as strong and takes a while to gain momentum it is a still a must for any fan of The Black Magician Trilogy who will love being reunited with some of their favourite characters and will enjoy the further resolve to their stories. Laughter was had, tears were shed and I was reunited with so many of my old, wonderful friends. Hopefully this will not be the last I see of them! The author has expressed an interest in returning to this world again some day in the future if the whim takes her, and I’m sure all her fans including me will be eagerly anticipating that day! You can check out my full, unabridged review and others like it Blogs of a Bookaholic. :)

  11. 5 out of 5

    proxyfish

    Reviewed on my blog - Books by Proxy 3.5 Stars If you’re a reader of my Top Ten Tuesday posts, then you might have noticed that Trudi Canavan’s The Traitor Queen has been appearing on rather a regular basis. This is one of those books that I intended to read as soon as I bought it but managed to neglect until oh… you know, several years later! The Traitor Queen is the closing chapter in the Traitor Spy Trilogy, and while it doesn’t reach the exciting, dizzying heights of The Black Magician Trilog Reviewed on my blog - Books by Proxy 3.5 Stars If you’re a reader of my Top Ten Tuesday posts, then you might have noticed that Trudi Canavan’s The Traitor Queen has been appearing on rather a regular basis. This is one of those books that I intended to read as soon as I bought it but managed to neglect until oh… you know, several years later! The Traitor Queen is the closing chapter in the Traitor Spy Trilogy, and while it doesn’t reach the exciting, dizzying heights of The Black Magician Trilogy, it is still a rather entertaining read. - This book has, probably quite rightly, received very mixed reviews and despite the criticisms, I still found this to be an enjoyable read. It might not be heart-thumpingly-awesome, it might not have those breathtaking qualities that some of Canavan’s other work possess but it is entertaining and the overall storyline is well thought out. The Traitor Queen manages to expand upon and add detail to the world so beautifully drawn out in The Black Magician Trilogy and brings about a satisfying, if a little lacklustre, close to the trilogy. Canavan writes in an accessible and gratifying way, giving insight into the thoughts and feelings of the characters whilst providing careful doses of description throughout. Everything that should have happened did happen – that’s not where the problems lie; they lie with how each of these events unfolded. All the action is packed into the latter half of this novel and when it does occur it is somewhat rushed; we’re left with a final battle where not a lot happens and pivotal scenes where I was left wondering if I’d missed something. I would rather this book had been twice the length and had given more play time to these elements than have rushed through them in 500 pages. And though there is much to enjoy in this novel, the one thing which The Traitor Queen is seriously lacking is tension. Tension, tension, tension! And then some. The action needed more tension – more do or die moments, more close shaves and descriptive destruction; the romances needed more sexual tension – less of the predictable, the safe and the ‘nice’; the politics needed more political tension – more danger, more intrigue and more terrible consequences. The Traitor Queen had the potential for all these things, the stage was already set! It just failed to give them enough page space or execute them in a satisfying way. While all the main and supporting characters are essentially likeable and have a lot to offer, I would have enjoyed more growth and development throughout the novel. It was a shame that Sonea, our fantastic protagonist in The Black Magician Trilogy, had such a small and insignificant role in this book and though I enjoyed the development in Regin’s character, his role was too small to really make much of an impact. Lorkin doesn’t quite manage to live up to the expectations of a protagonist in a Canavan novel, nor does Tyvara succeed as well in her role as the main love interest. Having said that, I didn’t dislike any of the characters, nor did I dislike the novel – The Traitor Queen merely suffers the fate of not living up to the expectations created when you write something truly awesome. - The Traitor Queen is a tale of conflicting loyalties, of trust and of power which develops and adds insight into the world Trudi Canavan has created. This is a quick and easy read which, despite some issues, has a lot going for it. While this might not be the breathtaking read that The Black Magician Trilogy was, The Traitor Queen is still enjoyable and will probably receive far too much criticism for having such a brilliant predecessor. If you’re new to Canavan, I seriously urge you to read The Black Magician Trilogy or The Age of Five. If not, you could do much worse than pick up a copy of this trilogy!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jonathon Dunstan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Trudi Canavan is one of my favourite authors. She creates worlds that are so well thought out, but logical in their own way. They have a set of rules about how things work, and never breaks your belief in that world. However this novel and as a result, the trilogy felt flat. There were so many threads that looked to lead somewhere and Canavan does a masterful job of making sure all these threads are tied up. However, there seems to be a bit of a tiny ending, instead of the epic ones penned in th Trudi Canavan is one of my favourite authors. She creates worlds that are so well thought out, but logical in their own way. They have a set of rules about how things work, and never breaks your belief in that world. However this novel and as a result, the trilogy felt flat. There were so many threads that looked to lead somewhere and Canavan does a masterful job of making sure all these threads are tied up. However, there seems to be a bit of a tiny ending, instead of the epic ones penned in the original Black Magician Trilogy, or even the prequel. I feel that the story could have done with more compartmentalising the stories. If the second novel had handled the story of Cery and the rogue magician completely, I feel that greater weight could have been given to the villains of each case. As it stands, Skellin is never felt to be a significant threat to the guild. Beyond the fact that he manages to find Cery, wherever he is hiding, we never see him as villainous, nor did I feel him as a significant threat to the guild. I now wish that he had gained knowledge of Black Magic, and the mad scramble of of the guild scrambling to meet this immediate threat. With the story of the Skellin handled in the first novel, the third novel would be free to expend more energy on showing us more of the evils of Sachakan society, as more than just slave owners. With the threat of Black Magic once again made to the guild. Lorkin's plan to obtain gem-stone knowledge would have much more significance. Sometimes I feel like the magicians guild is full of idiots. With knowledge that black magicians can take their magic from magically infused stone, or the battle ground shield. Why is there this huge shock that they can create a store stone? What is it other than something that can hold more magic in smaller space? In the first novel, we are asked to ponder Sonea's decisions on what she would do? Turns out that the answer was not much. It would have been much more satisfying to have Sonea meet up with Dannyl and Tayend at the embassy, and having to fend off a couple of higher magicians with her saved up energy. Despite all these shortcomings, which while gripes, do not impact the story much. It did not stop my enjoyment of the novels at the time of my reading them. It does however taint my love of the storyline once you have the complete picture. There are no highs and lows that are experienced like in the first series. There is but one truly epic magical battle, and it is not even a struggle. It completely one sided and lacking in excitement. The one true threat, one of betrayal, has a change of heart and chooses not to do anything. Leaving this more like a historical story based on true events than any sort of adventure.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    **SPOILER ALERT** I did enjoy reading this book, though possibly not as much as it's predecessor, 'The Rogue'. It was typical Canavan - fast-paced, full of action and a nice splash of romance thrown in, plus a good dollop of tragedy that made me cry, as per usual. Once again, the Black Magician Trilogy will always be my true love out of all of Canavan's work, but I have enjoyed the Traitor Spy Trilogy and liked catching up with the characters. And seeing how like his father Lorkin is :) But I can **SPOILER ALERT** I did enjoy reading this book, though possibly not as much as it's predecessor, 'The Rogue'. It was typical Canavan - fast-paced, full of action and a nice splash of romance thrown in, plus a good dollop of tragedy that made me cry, as per usual. Once again, the Black Magician Trilogy will always be my true love out of all of Canavan's work, but I have enjoyed the Traitor Spy Trilogy and liked catching up with the characters. And seeing how like his father Lorkin is :) But I can tell you exactly why I have knocked those two stars off. Here goes: I knocked one star off for Dannyl and Tayend. They were perfect together (even if I resented it at the time because, yes, I'm still in love with Dannyl)and Dannyl's affair with Achati just didn't seem right to me. I did feel sorry for him when Achati died, but I didn't cry over his death - all I could think was 'Yay, now you can get back with Tayend!'. It just seemed wrong that they were ever separated in the first place, and for Dannyl to find a replacement just seemed...well, more wrong. I knocked the second star off for the thing that made me feel physically ill and also want to scream - Sonea and Regin!!!! SONEA AND REGIN!!!! Now, I'm a fan of hate to love relationships as much as the next person - my favourite Shakespeare play is Much Ado About Nothing, and love to hate is pretty much the entire plot of said play - but seriously?Regin??? The way Sonea loved Akkarin was so powerful that I don't think she ever would be able to move on, not really, though having thankfully never experienced something like that myself I cannot be sure how it would work out. That's my first problem with this relationship. The second problem -REGIN!!!! I still can't bring myself to like him, although I did pity him a bit. He's so completely different to Akkarin - why would she be attracted to him?? It seems so unlikely! And she hated him for TWENTY YEARS. I mean, yeah, she hated Akkarin for a while, but that was because she misunderstood him. Regin was just an evil brat. I don't understand it. If she had moved on with Dorrien, I might have got it, or even with Cery *sob. Why couldn't he have seen Anyi and Savara just one more time before he died!!!*. But anyone else just seems unthinkable. And that's that. Final verdict? Really good book, just made me extremely aggressive and angry with the world. But a must for any fan of BMT. Though it did have an annoying ending. In case you hadn't guessed from my fury rambling.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carina

    Trudi Canavan is one of my favourite authors and for good reason. The worlds she makes are compelling and different from the vast majority of fantasy out there. This book is the third and final book in the Traitor Spy series which picks up about 20 years or so after the events of the Black Magician Trilogy. When I first found out that there was a continuation of that series I was worried it would be a bit of a money grabber, but this series and the prequel are each well written and really add to Trudi Canavan is one of my favourite authors and for good reason. The worlds she makes are compelling and different from the vast majority of fantasy out there. This book is the third and final book in the Traitor Spy series which picks up about 20 years or so after the events of the Black Magician Trilogy. When I first found out that there was a continuation of that series I was worried it would be a bit of a money grabber, but this series and the prequel are each well written and really add to the story that was already known. It has been almost a year since I read the previous entry in the series and I will admit I remembered very little of the events - Canavan has a knack in this book at reminding you of the events of previous books without recapping them and does so to great effect. As to the events of this book I am glad with how they all turned out with the exception of (view spoiler)[ Cerys death (hide spoiler)] . Yes there were hints throughout that something was wrong but for (view spoiler)[him to die like that (hide spoiler)] it felt so... wrong. When you recall how this person acted in the original trilogy it seems like such a waste. Lorkin has definitely grown up from the youth we were first introduced to, Dannyl is, to be honest, as naive as ever but that's part of the reason why I like him! I also quite liked the growth in the relationship between Sonea and Regin. He has a clear character arc over the six books and is a great example of how you can go from really disliking someone to actually wanting to hear more about them. There were some cliché moments here and there (view spoiler)[ like how all the traitors could see that Sonea and Regin liked one another and thought that they were lovers before it was acknowledged or even really noticed by Sonea (hide spoiler)] . Was this the best end to the series... well, no - I found the events at the end of the original trilogy to be much better (after all who can forget the shock at (view spoiler)[Akkarins (hide spoiler)] death??), but it worked. There were also some hints there as to a possible continuation (I swear the ballshooter referred to in the last pages is a gun - and how interesting would it be to see the Guild learn about and adapt to guns??), if that is the case I look forward to reading more about this world.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nico

    German review on GosuReviews Mediocre finish to the Traitor Spy Trilogy and (finally) an end to the Black Magician universe. I just felt the series dragged on for too long. The storyline was flat and nothing really new in the worldbulding. The new characters introduced in the series didn't work for me. They felt very one dimensional and I had a hard time cheering for them. Fans of the series should read it, even if it's just to get closure. Hopefully this was the last time we heard of Sonea. I kno German review on GosuReviews Mediocre finish to the Traitor Spy Trilogy and (finally) an end to the Black Magician universe. I just felt the series dragged on for too long. The storyline was flat and nothing really new in the worldbulding. The new characters introduced in the series didn't work for me. They felt very one dimensional and I had a hard time cheering for them. Fans of the series should read it, even if it's just to get closure. Hopefully this was the last time we heard of Sonea. I know Trudi Canavan is an amazing writer and I am looking forward to her next book Thief's Magic.

  16. 5 out of 5

    WritingCaia

    It was a great to read about Trudi's magic world again. I recommend for those who loved the previous series. Albeit, not being up to par, it still answers a lot of questions left behind on the anterior series and closes some chapters while leaving others open to new ones. I was quite happy to see how some characters evolved from one series to the other, especially Regin, obviously ;) Read it! It was a great to read about Trudi's magic world again. I recommend for those who loved the previous series. Albeit, not being up to par, it still answers a lot of questions left behind on the anterior series and closes some chapters while leaving others open to new ones. I was quite happy to see how some characters evolved from one series to the other, especially Regin, obviously ;) Read it!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Not as good as predecessors. Rounds up story though. Wanted to like it more but something just didn't click. Not as good as predecessors. Rounds up story though. Wanted to like it more but something just didn't click.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anders Larsson

    A perfect ending to the trilogy. And it was just vague enough to allow another book/series to follow years later. Damn, now I want more from this world! Definitely 4.5 stars.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karon Grace bsc

    Gutted there's no more adventures in the Allied Lands and Sachaka. These were my first Trudi Canavan books and look forward to reading more. Gutted there's no more adventures in the Allied Lands and Sachaka. These were my first Trudi Canavan books and look forward to reading more.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Veronica Ika

    While The High Lord makes an epic conclusion to The Black Magician trilogy, I can’t say the same with this book. Frankly speaking, I’m a bit disappointed that this book ends Traitor Spy trilogy in what I can say only mediocre at best. Nevertheless, I should give you the same warnings as I give those reading The High Lord: prepare to have your heart broken, because, again, there will be some losses, too, though I can assure you that there are more happy endings to this book, even though it is up While The High Lord makes an epic conclusion to The Black Magician trilogy, I can’t say the same with this book. Frankly speaking, I’m a bit disappointed that this book ends Traitor Spy trilogy in what I can say only mediocre at best. Nevertheless, I should give you the same warnings as I give those reading The High Lord: prepare to have your heart broken, because, again, there will be some losses, too, though I can assure you that there are more happy endings to this book, even though it is up to you whether to love them, or in my case, hate them. NO GOOD CHOICES “Some things are worth risking lives for,” he said. “If you had seen what the Ashaki do – experienced it – you’d want to rid the world of them, too.” Lorkin, no longer a Guild Magician but a Traitor who knows higher magic, is trusted by the late Queen Zalara to negotiate an alliance between his new people and the Allied Lands. But how can he finishes his task when the King of Sachaka puts him into a detention for refusing to tell him all about the enemy of his kingdom? Accompanied by Regin, Sonea goes to Sachaka as the representative of the Allied Lands to negotiate the alliance with the Traitors, also to save his son from the ruthless ruler of Sachaka. The negotiation works well, but the new queen, Savara, asks for something that the Guild cannot comply: assist them in a civil war against Ashaki of Sachaka. Can Sonea only observe the battle without interfering when she knows that her only son risks his life in the war? Meanwhile in Imardin, Lilia’s new life as the only novice knowing black magic is getting not any easier. Not that because some fellow novices try to bully her after Sonea’s departing to Sachaka, or because she can barely catch up with her lessons in the University and private lessons with Black Magician Kallen, but because she is worried about the safety of her lover Anyi, Cery, and Gol, forced to live in hiding. Can they design a perfect plan to capture Skellin, the King of the Underworld, and put an end to the clutches of roet in Imardin? This book deserves some compliments and insults at the same time (bravo to Trudi Canavan for giving me such mixed feelings?). This book starts with a promising tension, and Cery’s fans might be exhilarated to read his POV again, besides the other four usual POVs: Sonea’s, Lorkin’s, Lilia’s, and Dannyl’s, but rather than escalating, it gradually shrinks in the next chapters up to nearly the beginning of the second part of the book! I find all of the POVs are less engaging than the second book and though the second part is much better, it still lacks the appeal of The High Lord. I’m sorry for keep comparing them, but if you read this trilogy after Black Magician trilogy, you might want to prepare to be as disappointed as I am after finishing this trilogy. Regarding villain, or ‘the bad guys’, we can never really guess in this trilogy. While in the Black Magician trilogy we can point our fingers to Akkarin and the Ichani (also Fergun and Regin, though a bit reluctantly), we cannot do the same here. Skellin and Lorandra seem to be the fixed ones throughout the trilogy, but Naki in the second book is unexpected, and so are several bad guys in this book. Good job to elude us from the truth. And the civil war between Traitors and Ashakis! I never see it coming! To be honest, I’m not sure what kind of an end this trilogy will bring us. I can comprehend the necessity to get rid of Skellin, but what about the Traitors? I can’t read them at all. It’s not like they blatantly declare Ashakis as the enemy to destroy like the Ashakis consider them a threat. All this time they seem doing fine in their hidden Sanctuary and besides sending their own to secretly pose as the slaves of the Ashaki, I don’t get any impression that they want to destroy Ashakis. Again, good job! And may they fare better than the Kyralians hundred years ago. Speaking about the magic, it is boring at some parts but interesting at some other parts. Everything taught by Kallen to Lilia is boring, because they are nothing new and we all already know about them. Don’t blame us for Lilia not knowing yet and don’t force us to suffer the repetition of those lessons! Akkarin is a much better and more handsome teacher (okay, I’ve gone too far :p). But Lilia’s idea to use magic than knife is creative! The civil war offers us the more interesting aspects of magic. Suddenly non-magicians can also join a dangerous magical war using magical stones. And what a good strategy to use stones before using the magicians’ reserve of power! Cheating? From the perspective the Ashaki, maybe. The war gives me another opinion regarding the Traitors. At first I think they treat their male members unfairly by not teaching them magic. While still cannot be said fair, at least they do not render their males completely ‘useless’. The men can also be magicians with the stones and be as menacing as their female counterparts. Finally, Trudi Canavan gives the LGBT couple the luxuries only provides for the straight couples, making them no longer awkward to be called lovers or wrong to be called just friends, namely sexual relationship (not in detailed manner, mind you, since it is a young adult novel). It will be unfair when the straight couples kiss and have sex but the LGBT couples do not, right? Unfortunately, this couple is not my favourite one, so rather than happy with the development, I find myself horrified. BUT! Trudi Canavan never ends her books/series with pure happy endings, that joy should walk side by side with sadness. Rather than mass losses of Guild magicians like that of The High Lord, we will lose two main characters in this book and how my heart hurts for one of the deaths! We will have four couples, two are blissfully happy (though one makes me cringe), one only time can tell, and one is left broken-hearted. MEET THE MAIN CHARACTERS Lorkin Am I really brave enough – foolish enough – to join a people I have no ties of blood with and dare to wage war on the legendary black magicians my people have feared for centuries? It’s hard to tell whether I like him or not despite him being the main protagonist of the trilogy. I’m afraid my liking to him is influenced by the fact that he is the son of my two favourite characters of the previous trilogy. He has good sides and bad sides, too, but he doesn’t really stand out compared to others in my opinion. I just know that I want him to be happy in the end of the story, because otherwise it will sadden Sonea and I don’t want that. And what a dilemma it is for him to find his happiness: either choosing Tyvara and leaves his mother or choosing Sonea and leaves his love. But I thank Trudi Canavan for letting him have both women in his life (if the indication in the epilogue is not a bluff). Sonea Actually, I don’t remember him smiling much this last year. Unless with forced politeness, or maybe in sympathy. To her surprise, she felt sad. He’s a very unhappy man, she realised. When I thought that she will never find her happiness, Fortuna finally pours relentless luck into her life in this book! From finally be able to go anywhere in the Guild without the obligation to report it, she is now permitted to leave the Allied Lands and go to Sachaka. Dannyl’s loss and her loss of her best friend cannot even leave a stain on her bliss, cause finally, though she doesn’t plan for it at all, she has the chance to experience love for the second time. BUT!!!!!!!! Of all bloody characters out there, why should it be Regin?!?!?!?!? Yes I know he is a good man now, and maybe we can say that he has atoned for all of his sins torturing her back then, but still! Normally, enemies to lovers is my favourite trope. But I can’t accept this couple at all!!! She tarnishes the memory of Akkarin because she starts to fall for Regin on their way to Sachaka, twenty years after her exile with Akkarin to the same land!!! Regin “You saved us and the Guild. I have admired you ever since.” Sooooo this man, once so obnoxious and manipulative, admits to fall in love with Sonea since her bravery in the Ichani Invasion. Hmph! Does it mean he like it when Akkarin didn’t make it? Well, he might learn his lesson very well, because it seems he was married by political obligation rather than love and his ex-wife is practically a whore who, instead of getting ashamed with herself whenever he found out her many affairs, trying to play victim and attempting suicides. Sonea says he is an unhappy man. Do you think his sufferings for almost 20 years are enough for us to forgive his bullying Sonea for a year or two back then? Dannyl “All we can hope for is that, whatever the outcome, the people we care about survive and escape.” Well, though he is still my least favourite character in this trilogy, I admire him for at least wanting to ‘fix’ his hostile relationship with Tayend and I admire Tayend for his big heart, accepting that Dannyl loves Achati like he did love him for past twenty years. That is why I can’t help but feeling almost nothing about his pain to see his new love dead in front of his eyes. If I’m feeling pity or sorry, it will be for the Ashaki. Ever since his first appearance, I admire his loyalty towards his king and his friendliness and kindness towards non-Ashaki. Against all odds, he loves Dannyl unconditionally, it is Dannyl who is so stupid to be hesitant and doubtful. It’s too bad, because I think he deserves to live, because it is obvious he is not a cruel and ruthless Ashaki. Lilia If the only future she had was to be restricted to the Guild grounds, groomed to be a protector of the Allied Lands and the main target of any enemy who might attack, then she wanted to be treated with respect in return. Her naivety in the previous book makes me disregard her so much. It turns out she has the best character development here. When a fellow novice tries to bully her, like Regin did to Sonea once, I’m a bit afraid, thinking that Trudi Canavan will repeat the exact same condition as back then. But wow! Nobody should underestimate Lilia! She is a badass, like her lover is! She is also an ingenious and clever girl, and given time, she might be a better Black Magician than Kallen. Ceryni The loved ones of a Thief are never safe. My heart breaks for him. He is not young and strong anymore. And everything that happens since the first book add to his stress. From a reputable Thief to a familyless man (except for a daughter from his first marriage and a best friend/bodyguard), always running for his life and getting cornered like the rodent his name represents. I hate Skellin for that. Savara “To do what the Guild failed to do seven centuries ago: destroy the Ashaki and end slavery in Sachaka.” Who can tell that the woman with whom Cery had a brief fling back then is now a Queen of Traitors, the conqueror, and will definitely be the Queen of Sachaka!? One thing that I regret is, these two people do not and will not have the opportunity to meet each other. Not that I ship them or anything. THE MORAL VALUES OF THE STORY As Dannyl said, being friends with the enemy certainly complicates matters. So, what being in love with the enemy will do? We often fall in love with the most unexpected person at the most unexpected time and the most unexpected place.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Midnight Blue

    A worthy ending to the trilogy. As I suspected, there was more suspense the further you got in the books, so it is definitely worth powering through the slower bits. Sometimes, the POV changes were too quick for my liking, but as that wasn't always the case I managed to ignore it. Also, I liked all POVs, that helped, too :) The new ideas and plot twists that appeared in this last book were surprising and interesting. The concept of the Traitor society is really cool and I like how it was portray A worthy ending to the trilogy. As I suspected, there was more suspense the further you got in the books, so it is definitely worth powering through the slower bits. Sometimes, the POV changes were too quick for my liking, but as that wasn't always the case I managed to ignore it. Also, I liked all POVs, that helped, too :) The new ideas and plot twists that appeared in this last book were surprising and interesting. The concept of the Traitor society is really cool and I like how it was portrayed. I'm a little disappointed that the thing Sonea discovered about them in the pond wasn't explored further, because it was quite a discovery but didn't really have any influence in the story. The Skellin storyline was resolved well, I think. Lilia grew on me more and more during the books :) Lastly, I would have liked to have some of the romantic storylines get just a little more time. But all in all, I enjoyed reading this book and the whole trilogy more than I expected, judging by other reviews I'd seen. So if anyone's still unsure, maybe give it the benefit of the doubt ;)

  22. 5 out of 5

    C.C. Monö

    I really enjoyed this series. The author had certain expressions and words she used with annoying regularity, but other than that, I found myself drawn to the story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    I enjoyed The Traitor Queen more than The Rogue (book 2 of the Traitor Spy Trilogy), and I enjoyed the trilogy as a whole. Seeing Sonea, Cery, Rothen, Dannyl, and others twenty years after the events of the original trilogy was interesting. However, while all the story lines were tied up by the end of The Traitor Queen - and most of them in a satisfying way - the conclusion to the Ashaki/Traitor story line seemed surprisingly easy in terms of the costs to the characters and only occupied a short I enjoyed The Traitor Queen more than The Rogue (book 2 of the Traitor Spy Trilogy), and I enjoyed the trilogy as a whole. Seeing Sonea, Cery, Rothen, Dannyl, and others twenty years after the events of the original trilogy was interesting. However, while all the story lines were tied up by the end of The Traitor Queen - and most of them in a satisfying way - the conclusion to the Ashaki/Traitor story line seemed surprisingly easy in terms of the costs to the characters and only occupied a short amount of the book. (I don't mind having battle scenes be short, but in this case, it felt a bit anticlimactic.) The end of the book also didn't feel like a firm ending to the series, merely the end of this particular stage in Sonea's personal journey. Of course I want to know what happens next, and the way the book ends had me hunting for the next trilogy. The author's website FAQs indicate that she might at some point write another trilogy in this world, but nothing is currently in the works. So, the trilogy-level story arcs are resolved (sort of) but there's a lot left the author could pick up with, and it winds up feeling a bit incomplete right now, not just for Sonea personally, but the world as a whole.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Its probably more 4 and a half, I just feel a bit empty cuz what to do now that there is no more books from here to read? Saying that I do feel that it was the right place to leave as well.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gemma ✨ a bookish blether

    The conclusion to this trilogy was rather flat, bland and did not live up to my expectations of previous books by Canavan. My review of the second book in this series mentioned how much it stagnated and suffered from middle book syndrome, and this book didn't seem to change pace from the second much at all. I feel like this series was written more as an indulgence out f love for the world rather than because there was a plot to be told. As such, it felt like the plot meandered along at a slow pa The conclusion to this trilogy was rather flat, bland and did not live up to my expectations of previous books by Canavan. My review of the second book in this series mentioned how much it stagnated and suffered from middle book syndrome, and this book didn't seem to change pace from the second much at all. I feel like this series was written more as an indulgence out f love for the world rather than because there was a plot to be told. As such, it felt like the plot meandered along at a slow pace until it came time to wrap everything up. I think this has something to do with my preference for grittier, more viseral stories in fantasy. Some authors prefer the more positive style of story telling, which means any unpleasentness gets glossed over as much as possible. This leaves me missing a fuller experience of the plot and characters, as we don't experience hardship and struggle the same way. I am hopeful that some of Canavan's other stories make a bigger impact in these areas. I would skip this series if you aren't too interested, but it was quite a nice series for a little bit of nostalgia.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tina Knudsen

    Trudi Canavan is one of my absolute favorite writers. Once I start one of her books, I can't put it down again. I will always recommend her books. Trudi Canavan is one of my absolute favorite writers. Once I start one of her books, I can't put it down again. I will always recommend her books.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rowen

    This book was good, however I was left feeling a little dissatisfied with the ending, not because of anything particularly wrong with it, but more because there's so so much more I want to know about this world and Canavan currently has no more stories for it. I really want Kyralia to encounter Igra, I was a little disappointed after they were introduced in 'The Ambassador's Mission' that nothing more was really made of it, beyond giving a starting point for some changes to some laws that we won This book was good, however I was left feeling a little dissatisfied with the ending, not because of anything particularly wrong with it, but more because there's so so much more I want to know about this world and Canavan currently has no more stories for it. I really want Kyralia to encounter Igra, I was a little disappointed after they were introduced in 'The Ambassador's Mission' that nothing more was really made of it, beyond giving a starting point for some changes to some laws that we won't actually get to see take effect. (view spoiler)[I really enjoyed watching the complete turnaround for Sonea's feelings towards Regin, however I would have liked more romantic interaction between them before being told 'oh and she moved in with him' right at the end. I do think it seemed like a natural romance, despite, or perhaps because of, all the existing antagonism between them. (hide spoiler)] I liked Lorkin and Lilia's threads in this. They seemed to have more action, which felt like something they were lacking a little in the earlier books. My heart broke a little more for Dannyl with each page of his story I read. (view spoiler)[I was quite disappointed with Cery's death. For two reasons. Firstly he was pretty much my favourite character in the first trilogy. Secondly it seemed a needless waste which lacked flair and effort. While I appreciate those in fantasy worlds are likely to die of natural causes as well as dramatic ones, I don't really wish to watch it happen to one of my favourite characters. I would rather have it hinted at in a sequel set a long way in the future. But then that's just me. (hide spoiler)] My only major criticism of this book is that it felt like the overall arc should belong to someone, but it was really hard to tell who, and I think Canavan almost fell back on Sonea out of habit.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alex Jones

    I'd probably give this book 4.5 stars if I could, but as I have to choose I'll give it 5, because its faults aren't really its fault. The good? Well, it is a fitting and exciting conclusion to the Traitor Spy trilogy which wraps everything up while leaving room for subsequent books. The writing, as always, is exceptionally crisp. I think one of my favourite things about Canavan's books is that she only writes what's necessary for the story - either plot or character/world building. If you'd read I'd probably give this book 4.5 stars if I could, but as I have to choose I'll give it 5, because its faults aren't really its fault. The good? Well, it is a fitting and exciting conclusion to the Traitor Spy trilogy which wraps everything up while leaving room for subsequent books. The writing, as always, is exceptionally crisp. I think one of my favourite things about Canavan's books is that she only writes what's necessary for the story - either plot or character/world building. If you'd read the last two and enjoyed them then definitely read this. Complaints? Unfortunately there are a couple. One minor annoyance I had was a few typos I noticed, nothing detracting from the story too much, but I'm sure at one point she calls the character, Tyvara, by Samara. The unfixable issue, however, is that I think after seven books in the same world and six books with the same characters it is starting to feel a little stale compared to how it used to. I don't think this is because the quality has decreased, just that there is nothing new to discover about the world in this novel, which is a shame. One of my favourite things about Canavan's books is that the worlds she creates I want to explore, but here we're taken to the same locations with the same people doing exactly what we expect of them. That's not to say it is predictable - just familiar. So, I'm not disappointed with this book, but I would like to see a new world in Canavan's next book. Or, alternatively, something set far in the far future/past of her Age of Five trilogy, which is one of the best trilogies I've ever read!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Soteris

    As many have already said, the Black Magician trilogy is one of the greatest series of fantasy books ever written. The Traitor Spy trilogy is not. It is good, but to me personally, the fact that all my favourite characters (Sonea, Rothen, and Regin) have such a small part in the story has left me feeling a bit empty. The constant references to homosexuality is cringey, nothing like the relationship between Danyl and Tayend of old. That was great, and truly believable. In this series, anybody that As many have already said, the Black Magician trilogy is one of the greatest series of fantasy books ever written. The Traitor Spy trilogy is not. It is good, but to me personally, the fact that all my favourite characters (Sonea, Rothen, and Regin) have such a small part in the story has left me feeling a bit empty. The constant references to homosexuality is cringey, nothing like the relationship between Danyl and Tayend of old. That was great, and truly believable. In this series, anybody that is gay seems to be attracted to each other. I didn’t like it as it felt like story padding. I found the plot for Lilia a little pointless and found her to be quite dippy, although I can see potentially great things happening with her if another book gets written. Anyi is another character that I could not relate to and found way too much time was devoted to her in this book. Setting my complaints aside, the world that Trudi Canvan has created is excellent. It’s huge and believable. The Traitors were brilliantly done and I really liked Lorkins character. He reminded me of a softer version of Sonea. Tyvara was fantastic and it’s a shame not enough was focused on her. Again she reminds me of Cerys old flame from the first series of whose name I forget. There’s a very mixed bag of characters and I found very few of the new characters impacted on me like the older ones. The combat seemed toned down and the pace far slower. For fans, this is a must read. It is a very enjoyable story, but I fear unless she writes a book that focuses on Sonea’s adventures, I don’t believe I’ll ever see the same magic that was captured in the Black Magician.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    So it ends... :( I do have to say that I've had a lot more trouble reading through than I did in book 2. Maybe that was partly, because I really didn't want this series to end, as it has been with me for the last few years. I always dread to end things I really like. But once I was about half way through, I wanted to find out and there was no point in trying to put the book away, when I wanted to know so badly what was happening next. (view spoiler)[BUT I also gotta admit that I have expected so m So it ends... :( I do have to say that I've had a lot more trouble reading through than I did in book 2. Maybe that was partly, because I really didn't want this series to end, as it has been with me for the last few years. I always dread to end things I really like. But once I was about half way through, I wanted to find out and there was no point in trying to put the book away, when I wanted to know so badly what was happening next. (view spoiler)[BUT I also gotta admit that I have expected so much more from the battle between the Ashaki and the Traitors. Most of the book was leading to that one battle and then it just happened in like 10 pages or something. I wasn't okay with that. I did not expect it to be as detailed as a J.R.R Tolkien would write, but then again it has been 3 books leading up to that event... gotta expect something from it, right? I was like waiting for the moment that they missed a trap or something. But no. Just like that it was all over. (hide spoiler)] The end was okay, I guess. Leaving it open to probably a fourth book about Lorkin and the future, but as I know there won't be a 4th book and I am not too sad about it, actually. This story has been dragging on and on and I really did enjoy the "Black Magicians Guild" much more than this one. But then again, we all love the world of Kyralia and the Magicians. Overall I did like that story, although it was slow in the beginning and a bit disappointing in some ways. But still worth the read, if you liked the first series of Trui Canavan.

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