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The intrepid spies, pilots, and sharpshooters of Wraith Squadron are back in an all-new Star Wars adventure, which transpires just after the events of the Fate of the Jedi series! Three decades have passed since Wraith Squadron carried out its last mission. Taking on the most dangerous and daring operations, the rogues and misfits of the elite X-Wing unit became legends of The intrepid spies, pilots, and sharpshooters of Wraith Squadron are back in an all-new Star Wars adventure, which transpires just after the events of the Fate of the Jedi series! Three decades have passed since Wraith Squadron carried out its last mission. Taking on the most dangerous and daring operations, the rogues and misfits of the elite X-Wing unit became legends of the Rebellion and the Second Galactic Civil War, before breaking up and going their separate ways. Now their singular skills are back in vital demand—for a tailor-made Wraith Squadron mission. A powerful general in the Galactic Alliance Army, once renowned for his valor, is suspected of participating in the infamous Lecersen Conspiracy, which nearly toppled the Alliance back into the merciless hands of the Empire. With orders to expose and apprehend the traitor—and license to do so by any and all means—the Wraiths will become thieves, pirates, impostors, forgers . . . and targets, as they put their guts, their guns, and their riskiest game plan to the test against the most lethal of adversaries.


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The intrepid spies, pilots, and sharpshooters of Wraith Squadron are back in an all-new Star Wars adventure, which transpires just after the events of the Fate of the Jedi series! Three decades have passed since Wraith Squadron carried out its last mission. Taking on the most dangerous and daring operations, the rogues and misfits of the elite X-Wing unit became legends of The intrepid spies, pilots, and sharpshooters of Wraith Squadron are back in an all-new Star Wars adventure, which transpires just after the events of the Fate of the Jedi series! Three decades have passed since Wraith Squadron carried out its last mission. Taking on the most dangerous and daring operations, the rogues and misfits of the elite X-Wing unit became legends of the Rebellion and the Second Galactic Civil War, before breaking up and going their separate ways. Now their singular skills are back in vital demand—for a tailor-made Wraith Squadron mission. A powerful general in the Galactic Alliance Army, once renowned for his valor, is suspected of participating in the infamous Lecersen Conspiracy, which nearly toppled the Alliance back into the merciless hands of the Empire. With orders to expose and apprehend the traitor—and license to do so by any and all means—the Wraiths will become thieves, pirates, impostors, forgers . . . and targets, as they put their guts, their guns, and their riskiest game plan to the test against the most lethal of adversaries.

30 review for Mercy Kill

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mitch

    Star Wars and I parted ways after New Jedi Order but I came back for X-Wing. The original books by Michael Stackpole were some of my favorites, though I did stick around when Aaron Allston took over the series. It's been thirteen years since the last book, Starfighters of Adumar, and with all the history, I wanted to like Mercy Kill, I really did. Instead, I get a book that's almost unrecognizable. WTF is this? Whatever it is, it's more like a horrible parody of the first nine books than a X-Wing Star Wars and I parted ways after New Jedi Order but I came back for X-Wing. The original books by Michael Stackpole were some of my favorites, though I did stick around when Aaron Allston took over the series. It's been thirteen years since the last book, Starfighters of Adumar, and with all the history, I wanted to like Mercy Kill, I really did. Instead, I get a book that's almost unrecognizable. WTF is this? Whatever it is, it's more like a horrible parody of the first nine books than a X-Wing sequel. I think the only thing Allston does right is writing this as a standalone, skipping over the background laid out by the most recent books. I haven't read Legacy of the Force or Fate of the Jedi (nor do I ever intend to), but I found Mercy Kill still extremely easy to get into. Unfortunately, that's about all the praise I can muster. Honestly, I miss the Rogue Squadron crew, and beyond a blink and you miss it cameo by Wedge and Tycho (forget the fact that it doesn't even make much sense), it's all Wraith Squadron's next generation. Oh, and Piggy, who gets the only semi-decent character development in the entire book thanks to a couple of flashback scenes. Yeah, of course Corran's probably not gonna be available for this book, but the crew Face of all people assembles seems rather ... unmemorable in comparison - to any of the casts of the previous books. Or maybe it's because the (new) Wraith Squadron gets one of the lamest, most inane Star Wars villains ever. This is the series that spawned Ysanne Isard, Madame Director of Imperial Intelligence, someone who I'd say is on Grand Admiral Thrawn's level of awesomeness in the Star Wars expanded universe. Crooked General Thaal by comparison is almost laughable. How this weirdly written serial womanizer has been getting away with what he's been doing apparently for years now shows more incompetence on the part of the Galactic Alliance than skill on the part of the Wraiths. And honestly, I don't even have any idea what the intention of this book even is, it is supposed to have some sort of impact on the bigger expanded universe, like every single X-Wing book before it? Or is it supposed to be some sort of forgettable behind the scenes filler, maybe set up another X-Wing down the road like the story suggests? Speaking of story, I really didn't expect Allston to lose sight of what X-Wing is all about, a bunch of fighter pilots with special skills doing covert missions for, well it was the New Republic then, but this is more like a horrible Ocean's Eleven ripoff, down to the carefully laid scams that lead to an overly complex, convoluted, nearly nonsensical trap that brings General Thaal down. A parody of Rogue Squadron using black market resources against the Empire of earlier books. I have almost no words for how awful it is (it even involves the General's ex-wife!!), except that more imaginative does not automatically equal better story, the first flashback mission with Admiral Teradoc was miles better by comparison. Oh, and X-Wings are flown for maybe three pages, a new record low. I can't believe I ended my decade long break from Star Wars for this horrible book. I give up. Seriously.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Janine Spendlove

    Words can't even begin to express how much I loved this book. Only Aaron Allston can make you laugh and cry in the same paragraph and also make you wish you could bleach from your mind the vision of a Gamorrean doing an exotic strip tease (hence the laughing and crying). And that's just the opening pages... I didn't really know what to expect going into it, I didn't know if it was going to be "another Wraith adventure" or something new. It turned out to be a bit of both and I highly approve! Peopl Words can't even begin to express how much I loved this book. Only Aaron Allston can make you laugh and cry in the same paragraph and also make you wish you could bleach from your mind the vision of a Gamorrean doing an exotic strip tease (hence the laughing and crying). And that's just the opening pages... I didn't really know what to expect going into it, I didn't know if it was going to be "another Wraith adventure" or something new. It turned out to be a bit of both and I highly approve! People who've never read the Wraith books will not be lost, and I think they'll enjoy the caper. Loyal fans of the Wraith books will feel well rewarded for their years of loyalty and patience (I especially liked his dedication). For me it was like coming home. When I first read the X-Wing books I was nerdy high school girl, obsessed with Star Wars & I couldn't get my hands on a new Star Wars book fast enough. These (the X-Wing books) were my favorites, and I think I can blame Aaron Allston and Mike Stackpole for subtly instilling a love for flying in me. Reading Mercy Kill took me back to that teenage girl who thought she could conquer the world and whose biggest problem was making the tape deck in her old VW van work. I felt like a kid again, I laughed out loud a lot, and wanted to cry at times. I waited 13 years for this book, and it was worth every second! Bravo, Mr. Allston, bravo! I can't wait to read it again! *2 MILD SPOILERS BELOW* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I really hope we get more Wraith books. I want to find more out about this younger generation. A wookiee and a gamorrean waltzing into the sunset was a perfect ending. :)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sam Shantz

    The original X-Wing novels were a breath of fresh air. Instead of beating the dead horse that was the rapidly tiring saga of Luke, Han and Leia, Michael A. Stackpole (and subsequently Aaron Allston) abandoned the 'big three' for the hitherto unsung starfighter pilots of Rogue and Wraith Squadron, and in many ways revitalized a stagnating genre. The cocky Rogues and misfit Wraiths allowed for humour and humanity to be (re)injected into Star Wars, creating a series that was just plain fun and enjo The original X-Wing novels were a breath of fresh air. Instead of beating the dead horse that was the rapidly tiring saga of Luke, Han and Leia, Michael A. Stackpole (and subsequently Aaron Allston) abandoned the 'big three' for the hitherto unsung starfighter pilots of Rogue and Wraith Squadron, and in many ways revitalized a stagnating genre. The cocky Rogues and misfit Wraiths allowed for humour and humanity to be (re)injected into Star Wars, creating a series that was just plain fun and enjoyable. The novels were somewhat superficial, and never truly probed (or attempted to probe) the limits of the genre, but they were Star Wars as it was meant to be; a series that didn't reject, but reveled in its pulp, and all its cheesy goodness. X-Wing: Mercy Kill promised a return to this happy go lucky brand of Star Wars, a return 12 years in the making, over which time 31 years had passed in the galaxy far far away, and at first, it appeared to deliver. A promise left unfulfilled. Seemingly picking up where X-Wing: Solo Command left off, Mercy Kill opens to a Wraith operation that features many of the original characters doing what they do best before it jumps to the post-Fate of the Jedi: Apocalypse present. A present in which the Wraiths have been disbanded. Piggy (now going by his given name - Voort) is mathematics professor, while Face is retired and trying to 'get the band back together' (by which he means create a completely new band with the addition of a former member, or two, and still call it Guns & Roses... I mean Wraith Squadron). As the story progresses, it becomes obvious that the first chapter (which is also the free preview that can be found online) is nothing but a flashback (one that will have both an anticlimactic and almost inconsequential effect on the narrative, but I'm getting ahead of myself), and that whatever magic previously permeated the series has somehow been lost. Face and Voort are the only original Wraiths to return, and Face's 'behind the scenes' role as master puppeteer effectively removes one of Allston's better characters from much of the novel. This also thrusts Voort into the spotlight, a role it would appear, he was never meant to enjoy. Piggy was a great supporting character in the earlier X-Wing novels, and had a good turn as a member of Twin Suns Squadron in Allston's contributions to the New Jedi Order, but he isn't up to challenge of the role of 'main character Voort', and both his character and the narrative sufferer accordingly. Bhindi Drayson and Sharr Latt return as representatives of the 'New Wraiths' introduced in Rebel Dream & Rebel Stand. However, both characters were never anything much more than forgettable in the first place, and they both pretty much pick up where they left off, serving more to elicit questions of 'who?' rather then enforcing any sense of continuity. And then we have 'The Offspring' (this is actually fairly pertinent, as there are in fact (spoiler alert) two bands!); Jesmin Tainer daughter of Kell Tainer and Tyria Sarkin, and Myri Antiles scion of Wraith Squadron founder Wedge. While this continuing legacy does enhance the nostalgia, and both Jesmin and Myri are strong enough characters in their own rights, neither are capable of replacing, or of living up to, their forebears. Wedge is pretty much Luke, Han and Leia's second fiddle (a position once occupied by a suave gentleman played by Billy D. Williams, or maybe, more accurately occupied by a not-so-recently deceased walking carpet), Myri? Well, she's more of a Tycho Celchu (who is mentioned in the novel, and is therefore relevant). While Tainer was a goofball whose advances towards Sarkin where all the more entertaining due to her initial rejection and eventual acceptance of them. Jesmin can't embody both her mother and father, and none of the new male Wraiths are able to step up either, and when the loses of Janson and Wedge are added to Face's reduced role, a lack of strong male characters becomes quite evident. As a result, there is also a lack of sexual tension, once a lynchpin of the series. In fact, there is a disconcerting lack of tension at all among the Wraiths. The only real source of tension in the novel can be found in the conflict between Voort and Scut. Two aliens raised by humans, they are foils for one another and butt heads from the get go because Scut is Yuuzhan Vong: fanatical, genocidal, extra-galactic invaders who had brought the New Republic to its knees 15 years ago. Voort's seemingly racist views clash with Scut's belief that the Gamorrean is unfit to be a Wraith. However, this tension never reaches much of a climax. The squabblers simply sit down, hash out their differences, and agree to disagree; then a couple chapters later they sit down, acknowledge the factors behind their disagreement, and everything is hunky-dory. Not only does the antagonism between the characters never get a chance to have much of an effect on the narrative, the resolution is so contrived that it is incomprehensible that a large chunk of the novel was actually built around said conflict. Furthermore, how is it that none of the other Wraiths appear to have any problem with working with the Yuuzhan Vong? The idea that Voort is the only Wraith unable to immediately accept a Yuuzhan Vong as a best friend is ridiculous; almost as ridiculous as the fact that if Scut's extra-galactic origins were never mentioned, he would be next to impossible to identify as Yuuzhan Vong. I understand that he was raised by humans, and the message of racial equality is commendable, but what is the point of including alien races if there are no characteristics to differentiate them from humans, or for that matter, any other alien races? These many small problems prevent a plot, which at first appeared to have potential, from ever really taking off. An overabundance of ill introduced characters confuse the plot, which is weighed down by becoming overly complicated instead of complex. There are too many tangents that don't tie in, too many possibilities that are ignored; what could have been a streamlined clash of master-plans augmented by a couple twist/surprises is instead a choppy series of operations and predictable outcomes. There are flashes of brilliance, and glimpses of what once made the series so enjoyable, but in the end the potential of the plot doesn't translate into a strong narrative as opportunities are missed, and imagination appears to be lacking. The promise simply adds to the disappointment as expectations remain unmet. To be blunt, Mercy Kill just doesn't belong in the X-Wing series; it's jokes are flatter, it's characters - flatter, and it's narrative? You guessed it: flatter. They are all simply pale imitations of the simple, yet well executed concepts that made the nine previous novels enjoyable reads, and in the end, that's all Star Wars X-Wing: Mercy Kill is: a pale imitation of an X-Wing book. What was once a breath of fresh air has now become as stagnant as the adventures it originally broke away from. sdtshantz.wordpress.com

  4. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    While I did like this, I don't think this newer Star Wars is for me. I just wasn't that in to it. It was still a light read for an afternoon, but I have so many of those already. This isn't really my "go to" kind of book. Since I did the audio, I did like all the sound effects. They seem to make the story fun. So 3 stars for this one. While I did like this, I don't think this newer Star Wars is for me. I just wasn't that in to it. It was still a light read for an afternoon, but I have so many of those already. This isn't really my "go to" kind of book. Since I did the audio, I did like all the sound effects. They seem to make the story fun. So 3 stars for this one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Jellets

    Thank the Force! Wraith Squadron is back! Aaron Allston is one of my favorite Star Wars writers and Wraith Squadron one of my favorite properties in the expanded universe. While noble Jedi and daredevil Corellian pilots abound in the Star Wars galaxy, Allston’s espionage squad is distinguishably sneaky – more apt to plot a trap, hoax, or ruse to snare the bad guys than to use the Force. More importantly, Allston has always been able to develop good characters, from former child star Garik Loran t Thank the Force! Wraith Squadron is back! Aaron Allston is one of my favorite Star Wars writers and Wraith Squadron one of my favorite properties in the expanded universe. While noble Jedi and daredevil Corellian pilots abound in the Star Wars galaxy, Allston’s espionage squad is distinguishably sneaky – more apt to plot a trap, hoax, or ruse to snare the bad guys than to use the Force. More importantly, Allston has always been able to develop good characters, from former child star Garik Loran to the cyborg medic Ton Phanon, and since none of his creations are tied to the Lucas-canon, the author has always been able to keep readers guessing whether their favorite Wraith would survive the team’s latest mission. Here’s a spoiler – they often don’t! So when Allston got the green light to bring back the Wraiths in a new book (after more than ten years!), there was much rejoicing! Mercy Kill is very much a “getting the band back together” book and, if you were a fan of the old series, everything that was good about past books is here again – from complex plots, elaborate tricks, heists, humor, to the occasional X-Wing battle. Where the book slips slightly (and feels a bit like the original Wraith Squadron book with its focus on Kell Tainer) is that this tale is really Voort “Piggy” SaBinring’s story, the talking Gamorrean and fan favorite from the original series. That’s not to say that other characters don’t get the chance to shine, but the spotlight is clearly on Voort. It’s actually a clever move on the part of Allston, because with much of the original Wraiths in retirement (or dead), it’s time for new blood, leading to sometimes bewildering number of new faces taking the stage. Voort, like the reader, has to cope with the new team – and to Allston’s credit, by the novel’s end, these new faces do indeed feel like the Wraiths of old. Perhaps my only other quibble is that while I’m a sucker for clever continuity (and Allston uses -- and wraps up -- a number of loose ends from other books), the gap between the original series and this book has left a lot of fog in my head about Wraith Squadron history. While the list of dramatis persona always helps, I found myself wishing there was a glossary of past Wraiths in the back of the book to help jog my memory on some of these characters. For example, neither Bhindi Drayson nor Sharr Latt rang any bells with me – and a line or two somewhere about their history might have helped a lot. Regardless, this is good stuff. With the Disney-backed Star Wars sequels in the offing, I’m not sure if this is the last hurrah for the Wraiths. But it’d be a shame if it was since this corner of the Star Wars universe has been one of the most consistently entertaining.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ian Miller

    What to say... The wait was long (two years after announcement!). The wait was torturous (leaked pages and hints and searchable on Amazon!). The wait was full of Fate of the Jedi (which...wasn't really satisfying). The wait was completely worth it. Allston managed to convince me that Piggy - or Voort, as he goes by in this book - was the correct character to go with in three short chapters - even as he developed the relationships and history he'd left at Solo Command well over a decade ago. Over fo What to say... The wait was long (two years after announcement!). The wait was torturous (leaked pages and hints and searchable on Amazon!). The wait was full of Fate of the Jedi (which...wasn't really satisfying). The wait was completely worth it. Allston managed to convince me that Piggy - or Voort, as he goes by in this book - was the correct character to go with in three short chapters - even as he developed the relationships and history he'd left at Solo Command well over a decade ago. Over forty years in-universe have passed - with too-brief cameos and development in the Enemy Lines novels (which cameos provide fodder for many of the non-legacy characters that make up the Wraiths here) - and the GFFA is a much darker, much harder place to live in. Voort's heartbreak, revealed in a familiar but not frustrating way through a few well-chosen flashbacks and dreams, provides the fan with a comparable journey to that which anyone who has followed the post-NJO era with increasing sadness and despair. But despite these dark moments and somber backgrounds, Mercy Kill delivers much of Allston's trademark wit, and manages to pack the emotional punch that reach, for me, the level of scenes like Ton Phanan's death in Iron Fist, the journey of Myn and Lara in Solo Command, and Wedge's final discovery of a future in Starfighters of Adumar. Those scenes come from a surprising place - Voort's interaction with a Yuuzhan Vong recruit, dealing with the fallout of his own bioengineered background and his tragic Vong War history - and I admit when one of these scenes was finished, I had to put the book down and just breathe for a few moments. Mercy Kill isn't perfect. Many characters have intense promise but remain hard to engage with because they simply don't have many relationships that are shown in action. Bhindi Drayson, one of the intriguing cameos from the Enemy Lines Wraiths, is a big example of these, as is her fellow Sharr Latt. Even Myri Antilles, younger daughter of one of my favorite characters of all time, has to stay in the shadow of Voort's development - which is fair. Allston has utilized a pattern of rotating the point of view characters in his books, particularly his X-Wing books, to develop a large cast of characters, and given the chance to write more in this universe, I've no doubt he will continue to work through the cast and give them their own moments. Many reviews and comments I've read have noted that the villain lacks punch or real menace - and that's definitely true. But for me, the real conflict in the book was not the villain - it was Voort's own personal struggle and past that were the real evil in the book, and that struggle was perfectly paced and handled. The caper is brilliant, sparkly fun, and comes to a perfect photo finish - but what will stay with me is Allston's brilliant, invigorating portrait of a family coming back together, and telling Star Wars fans that we can come back home without wincing or grimacing anymore. The Wraiths are back. And long may they stay.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alison Richards

    My review is based as a reader who hasn't kept up with the Star Wars EU since the NJO time period. It was a bit confusing coming back into the Star Wars world in this book not knowing a lot of the political changes that had happened since the Vong Wars, and it does make it a bit hard to follow what is going in the first parts of the book with the focus on bringing down a possible traitor in the government. Beyond that, I loved the book. It was great to see a new generation of Wraiths starting up My review is based as a reader who hasn't kept up with the Star Wars EU since the NJO time period. It was a bit confusing coming back into the Star Wars world in this book not knowing a lot of the political changes that had happened since the Vong Wars, and it does make it a bit hard to follow what is going in the first parts of the book with the focus on bringing down a possible traitor in the government. Beyond that, I loved the book. It was great to see a new generation of Wraiths starting up in a completely different fashion from the original Wraiths, with just enough influence from the original set as well as the characters that were introduced in Allston's NJO duet of books. Three generations of Wraiths in one book = three times the chaos. I was expecting a bit more from some of the characters that had once been essential to the series - aka Face Loran - but the roles that were played are perfect to fit with the reveal that comes at the end. There are plenty of moments where you have to stop because of the plot whiplash that the Wraith novels are famous for with the best one coming at page 257. There is also a wonderful guest star moment that will have any original Rogue/Wraith squadron fan squeal with joy. If you are coming in expecting the typical Wraith craziness, you may feel that the beginning is slow - I know I did. However, this isn't the same world that the original stories were placed in, and the setting of the universe brings in influences that change how the group needs to work to be successful. This book makes me want to go back to read the years of novels that I have not had time to get at if only to understand these characters more and come back and read again to see what I may have missed. You will need to at least know the summaries of the NJO on to the Fate of the Jedi series to understand the world it's set in, so do your research before you start this one to be able to get the full flavor of the world and the characters in it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    I have met Aaron Allston a couple of times, and once interviewed him for my Star Wars fan club and fanfiction plot line, The New Imperium (www.newimperium.org). He's a great guy, and is one of the best writers for SW books out there, because he can combine action, intrigue, humor, and sheer innovation together into a great story. After reading so much high-quality sci fi and fantasy, every time I go back to a SW book I am shocked by how poor the quality is. Was I settling for these kinds of book I have met Aaron Allston a couple of times, and once interviewed him for my Star Wars fan club and fanfiction plot line, The New Imperium (www.newimperium.org). He's a great guy, and is one of the best writers for SW books out there, because he can combine action, intrigue, humor, and sheer innovation together into a great story. After reading so much high-quality sci fi and fantasy, every time I go back to a SW book I am shocked by how poor the quality is. Was I settling for these kinds of books all those years? Or has the quality just dropped that far? I don't know. This book is far from Allston's best - it may be his worst, actually. I found the plot extremely difficult to follow. There were too many new characters introduced that it was hard to keep up with, plus they just didn't mesh well together. It was like casting a bunch of actors that just didn't "click" - the dialogue seems off, the humor forced, and the relationships pointless. Further, the main character is a talking Gamorrean savant - an extremely odd choice. The problem is that Allston writes him just like a human character. I realize that aliens in SW aren't really very "alien" at all. Finally, the scope of the story was just too small, and didn't make any sense to me, really. I don't know why this book was written or published. The narration is excellent though, and a special treat for Star Wars audiobooks are the music, ambient and special effects that are weaved throughout the story. You don't get that in most books, and it really helps you feel "in" the Star Wars universe. I did find it a bit distracting sometimes during some of the harder-to-follow dialogue and infodumps.

  9. 5 out of 5

    DiscoSpacePanther

    Aaron Allston's (sadly) last contribution to the X-Wing arc is a fitting send-off for the Wraiths. Plotwise it is a much more infiltration and deception based story, with almost zero X-Wing -based starfighter battles, than the previous novels in the series. Which doesn't mean to say that it lacks action - it has it in spades. Told from the POV of Voort "Piggy" saBinring, the Gamorrean mathematician, Mercy Kill is a much deeper psychological study than before (although it is still a Star Wars nove Aaron Allston's (sadly) last contribution to the X-Wing arc is a fitting send-off for the Wraiths. Plotwise it is a much more infiltration and deception based story, with almost zero X-Wing -based starfighter battles, than the previous novels in the series. Which doesn't mean to say that it lacks action - it has it in spades. Told from the POV of Voort "Piggy" saBinring, the Gamorrean mathematician, Mercy Kill is a much deeper psychological study than before (although it is still a Star Wars novel!) We see the return of old favourite characters, and the introduction of a new and devious opponent. I enjoyed every page, and it's unfortunate that this entire series is no longer canon to the Star Wars universe.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    Reading this made me very nostalgic for my early twenties, when I read through a HUGE chunk of Star Wars novels in a gulp. The X-Wing books by Allston were my favorites...so of course I enjoyed this one. Piggy's storyline was by far the most effective--both the glimpses to his early days in the Wraiths and his dillusioned present. However, I didn't find the young Wraiths particularly interesting or engaging: Myri and Jesmin were both wholly forgettable, and I think an oldtimer cameo at the end o Reading this made me very nostalgic for my early twenties, when I read through a HUGE chunk of Star Wars novels in a gulp. The X-Wing books by Allston were my favorites...so of course I enjoyed this one. Piggy's storyline was by far the most effective--both the glimpses to his early days in the Wraiths and his dillusioned present. However, I didn't find the young Wraiths particularly interesting or engaging: Myri and Jesmin were both wholly forgettable, and I think an oldtimer cameo at the end of the book was a mistake--it made the young characters even less interesting to me. Ah well.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    Great book. Fast paced, revelation twist and turns come at light speed. This is one of these book once you start you cannot put it down till it is finished. The only criticism I have for this book is that it is finished. I would not have minded another 100 pages even if it was simply for character development. There are a couple of family names dependents of famous Star Wars characters, but in true spy fashion we are not given too many details about the most of the characters, this would make a Great book. Fast paced, revelation twist and turns come at light speed. This is one of these book once you start you cannot put it down till it is finished. The only criticism I have for this book is that it is finished. I would not have minded another 100 pages even if it was simply for character development. There are a couple of family names dependents of famous Star Wars characters, but in true spy fashion we are not given too many details about the most of the characters, this would make a great series (really hoping). Hint!!! The original Wraith Squadron was started by Wedge Antilles. This was a crack squadron of X-Wing aces. Doing the fate of the Jedi, the remains of this Squadron was disbanded, or people moved on. This new generation is more black ops, recruiting people of not just for their fighter piloting skills, mostly with shady pasts and some characters you might never expect to work for the Galactic Alliance unless you have read the Star Wars Legacy comics. In fact very little of this story takes place in the cop pit of an X-Wing. The story is set immediately after the fate of the Jedi series, the Wraiths are brought together to take down the remaining stragglers of the Lacersen Conspiracy. The main character we do get to know quite well is Voort "Piggy" saBinring a war veteran and a member of the original Wraith Squadron. For the last 15 year he has left the military, over Survivor’s Guilt, and works a maths teacher till he is approached and reluctantly accepts a position in the new Wraiths. The great thing about this book is it is completely self-contained all the information you need to know in this story is given to you in this book. As I said I would love another book in this series as it was that good. Also it is good to have a Star Wars book that is not just about the Jedi or the Sith, (though I do love the Jedi). Force users do make up a very small proportion of the SW universe. Also we are meet another version sect of force user.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matt aka

    Mercy Kill is a Star Wars book that involves a group of spies called the Wraith Squadron that plan to bring down a corrupt Galactic Alliance general. This was a decent Star Wars audio book with the usual well-done audio effects but it doesn't live up to many other Star Wars stories. The team have an odd assortment of characters of different races and backgrounds but I didn’t feel I got to know many of them well in the story. I also felt that the end of the story was original but not very satisfyi Mercy Kill is a Star Wars book that involves a group of spies called the Wraith Squadron that plan to bring down a corrupt Galactic Alliance general. This was a decent Star Wars audio book with the usual well-done audio effects but it doesn't live up to many other Star Wars stories. The team have an odd assortment of characters of different races and backgrounds but I didn’t feel I got to know many of them well in the story. I also felt that the end of the story was original but not very satisfying. That is why I give this book three out of five stars.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Book Nerd

    Piggy was my favorite Wraith. I liked him being the main character.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    Do you remember fondly the Star Wars novels of the 90s? Are you into Star Wars but a newcomer to the Expanded Universe? Do you enjoy your Star Wars with an undertone of comedy, so long as a certain floppy-eared terror is nowhere in sight? If so, X-Wing: Mercy Kill may be a good book for you to check out. Unlike most of the books being released set in the "modern" era of the Star Wars universe (44 ABY--i.e., 44 Years post-Episode IV), Mercy Kill lets you jump right in, more or less without knowing Do you remember fondly the Star Wars novels of the 90s? Are you into Star Wars but a newcomer to the Expanded Universe? Do you enjoy your Star Wars with an undertone of comedy, so long as a certain floppy-eared terror is nowhere in sight? If so, X-Wing: Mercy Kill may be a good book for you to check out. Unlike most of the books being released set in the "modern" era of the Star Wars universe (44 ABY--i.e., 44 Years post-Episode IV), Mercy Kill lets you jump right in, more or less without knowing the situation to that point. A lot of the others you could read cold, but they wouldn't make much sense. Mercy Kill, however, has little to do with the ongoing plot of the Expanded Universe. It's rooted in recent events, but the setup is very simple and easily grasped. It would pay to know the characters from the X-Wing novels of the 90s, but even that is not really necessary. You could check out three or four articles on Wookiepedia and be fine--I did, just to refresh my memory. So....here's what you need to know. In the 90s, they published a series of comics and then novels based around Rogue Squadron, led by Wedge Antilles and a number of the X-Wing pilots from the films along with some new faces. These comics and the first four novels were written by Michael Stackpole, but after the fourth he dropped out for a while citing other commitments he had to work on. So they hired in Aaron Allston to continue the series. Allston decided to let the Rogues go off on their own adventures while he created a new team for his novels--Wraith Squadron, a team of X-Wing pilots who would work equally well as a ground-based commando team. The result was a cross between The A-Team and The Dirty Dozen, with some aerial action thrown in. For the purposes of this new novel, notable characters included Garik "Face" Loran, a child star turned soldier and the eventual commander of the Wraiths; and Voort "Piggy" SaBinring, a genetically-modified Gamorrean. There are a few other returning faces, but these were the better developed and you can probably get by just knowing them. The Star Wars publishing event of the early 2000s was the New Jedi Order series, in which a race of extra-galactic aliens called the Yuuzhan Vong invaded the Galaxy Far, Far Away and sought to subjugate its people. They almost did it, and they changed the way Star Wars novels worked in the process. Characters--MAIN CHARACTERS--died. Chewbacca, Han and Leia's youngest son Anakin Solo, and countless others fell to the military might of the invaders. There have been other upheavals since, most notably a second Galactic Civil War when Han and Leia's oldest son Jacen Solo fell to the Dark Side. In the aftermath of that war, a conspiracy was formed to take over both the Galactic Alliance and the Empire and merge them together once again, recapturing the glory of the height of the Old Empire. This conspiracy failed, but it may not have been completely rooted out..... In this book, Garik Loran is called out of retirement by the head of the Alliance military. He wants Loran to quietly look into rumors that an up-and-coming officer may have been connected to the Lecerson Conspiracy. Wraith Squadron is back in business! The resulting adventure is a fun trip, dealing both in nostalgia for those of us who read the adventures of the original Wraiths long ago and in action that newer fans can get into, all the while serving up Allston's signature undertone of humor mixed with heart. I heartily recommend it. The one caveat I will mention for fans of the original books is that there is comparatively little aerial combat in this book. The plot doesn't call for it, and I certainly didn't really miss it too much, but some may be disappointed by that. If you want more reading suggestions, the X-Wing: Rogue Squadron comics and X-Wing novels are quite good. If you wanted to enhance your experience with this book, I would have you read at least the novels, but you may not have the patience for all nine of the previous books. If not, I won't hold it against you.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Johnny

    If you’re looking for Oceans 11, Mission: Impossible and The A Team rolled into one, X-Wing Mercy Kill is a major success. The truth is, I procrastinated reading this book, even though the author is an acquaintance whom I’ve respected for a long time, because the set-up just seemed so lame. “Getting the band back together” with regard to the Wraith Squadron and their “A-Team” style of action seemed like an obtrusive and tiresome idea that would keep me from experiencing the proper suspension of If you’re looking for Oceans 11, Mission: Impossible and The A Team rolled into one, X-Wing Mercy Kill is a major success. The truth is, I procrastinated reading this book, even though the author is an acquaintance whom I’ve respected for a long time, because the set-up just seemed so lame. “Getting the band back together” with regard to the Wraith Squadron and their “A-Team” style of action seemed like an obtrusive and tiresome idea that would keep me from experiencing the proper suspension of disbelief throughout the novel. But, as soon as the … let’s euphemistically call it an extraction … of the first scene began to play out, I was hooked. The pacing is tight, the action is described with vivid descriptions better than some special effects in film. It seems like there is another twist, feint, surprise, or scam every few pages and those little delights kept me in orbit around the book once I had started it. I couldn’t gain enough escape velocity to get free of its story (lame as I originally thought the set-up was), even if I had wanted to. When you look at the Dramatis Personae, you can’t help but notice all the “retired” designations next to the job descriptions of the protagonists. That’s probably jarring to most readers because one doesn’t expect “retired” personnel to have interesting adventures. One expects the “retired” personnel to have more mundane lives like the ones several of these protagonists appear to have had before “Face” decided to “get the band back together.” One’s first impression (like mine of the set-up) would be wrong, and that’s a good thing in this case! In its simplest form, one could call X-Wing Mercy Kill a sting operation. That would be a vast oversimplification. It follows the vision of the old Israelite prophet, Ezekiel, in that there are wheels within wheels as the plot moves on. Indeed, one is two-thirds of the way through the book before one sees the X-Wings one would expect from the title and the cover image. Even then, these aren’t your father’s X-Wings (or perhaps, judging from the way things unfold, these ARE your father’s X-Wings). Such a cryptic observation well illustrates how Allston masterfully interweaves plot elements, twists, reveals, and action. But, there is a modicum of X-Wing action from the Wraiths (retired Wraiths?) as the operation nears its close. I really enjoyed this novel because it restricted the focus to a basic team. You knew what they wanted to do and could keep your eye on the objective even when the author’s equivalent of a funhouse rolling barrel was taking place. Remember those barrels that would knock you down if you looked at the turning walls, but couldn’t knock you down if you were focused on something stable beyond the rolling barrel? That was the way I felt in reading this novel. There was plenty of collateral excitement and there were potential distractions to keep me alert (and in suspense), but I always felt I was moving forward. X-Wing Mercy Kill didn’t sound like it was going into my favorites list of Star Wars novels, but Allston pulled me in with enough stealth and sting action that I don’t plan to miss the next episode.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I see divided responses on this. I loved it almost unreservedly. I think that if you read the previous X-Wing books and loved the Wraiths the best, you'll enjoy Mercy Kill much more than if you were more of a Rogue fan. I don't feel able to write a decent review, (too emotionally attached) so instead a few points, things I loved and things I didn't. This is Wraiths: The Next Generation. So there's a decided lack of beloved characters in leading roles. Wedge, for example, shows up in literally jus I see divided responses on this. I loved it almost unreservedly. I think that if you read the previous X-Wing books and loved the Wraiths the best, you'll enjoy Mercy Kill much more than if you were more of a Rogue fan. I don't feel able to write a decent review, (too emotionally attached) so instead a few points, things I loved and things I didn't. This is Wraiths: The Next Generation. So there's a decided lack of beloved characters in leading roles. Wedge, for example, shows up in literally just a few paragraphs, and Tycho is only mentioned. Face has an important, but brief part to play, and Piggy is the only former Rogue or previous Wraith with a big part. No Wes or Hobbie. I am semi-devastated by this. That said, the new Wraiths are pretty awesome, even if they don't have the same character development that Piggy (now going by Voort) gets. I'm especially fond of Myri Antilles (daughter of Wedge, of course) and Jesmin Tainer (daughter of Kell). Jesmin is her father's daughter, and Myri shows every sign of having spent too much time with Aunt Mirax as a child. The tone is, for the most part, exactly as I'd expect from an Allston X-Wing novel. You call in the Wraiths when you want hilarious explosions, and they deliver. They have, however, switched from being a fighter pilot unit to being intelligence, so they're a bit more Leverage-y now. On one hand, it makes the X-Wing tag essentially a lie, on the other, it makes sense for the skillsets. That said, I wish this had been set decades earlier, so I could've seen the original Wraiths transitioning from pilots to intelligence. There's a few brief flashbacks to that effect, and it only makes me want to see that book more. But the EU seems to have transitioned to almost entirely NJO and later or Clones War era material. SIGH. Speaking of the EU... If you haven't been keeping up with the last several years of Star Wars books (I haven't) and have intention of doing so (not likely) I'd suggest a visit to Wookiepedia to do a quick read about Jacen Solo, the Yuuzhan Vong, and the Yuuzhan Vong War. You don't need to know all of this, and the book does an admirable job of explaining what's necessary, but I think you'll get more out of the book if you have that background knowledge in advance. Finally, the villain her is far less compelling than Isard. Don't go in expecting a worthy successor to her, because you won't get one. Given that it's been thirteen years since the prior X-Wing book and there's likely no guarantee of another ever seeing print, I wonder if Allston was hesitant to put that much effort into the opposition. To sum it up... If you read and loved the X-Wing books, especially the Wraith ones, read this now. If you haven't read the other X-Wing books, why not? They're among the best Star Wars novels, and just about the only thing that could break my decade-long avoidance of the EU was a new installment.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bernd Velling

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Well what to say ? I have to admit it took me a while to pick this up and read it. I read the X Wing novels when the series started 20(has it really been that long??)years ago the main reason that this rates "only"four stars is that a detective story with some action just doesn't compare to the hunt for an SSD and its commanding war lord other then that it was nice to see "old friends" again like the man himself Wedge Antilles. Must read for die hard EU ppl like me , not recommend for SW beginne Well what to say ? I have to admit it took me a while to pick this up and read it. I read the X Wing novels when the series started 20(has it really been that long??)years ago the main reason that this rates "only"four stars is that a detective story with some action just doesn't compare to the hunt for an SSD and its commanding war lord other then that it was nice to see "old friends" again like the man himself Wedge Antilles. Must read for die hard EU ppl like me , not recommend for SW beginners

  18. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

    I stopped reading Star Wars EU novels around the beginning of the New Jedi Order series. While I was glad that the approach of using long, multiple-author series would lead to bolder storytelling, I just didn't feel up to the task of sticking with any series for so long. A few years ago I resumed reading a few stand-alone titles in the EU. I was excited to hear that Aaron Allston was writing a new Wraith Squadron novel, because for me his earlier entries were the best books in the EU. This turne I stopped reading Star Wars EU novels around the beginning of the New Jedi Order series. While I was glad that the approach of using long, multiple-author series would lead to bolder storytelling, I just didn't feel up to the task of sticking with any series for so long. A few years ago I resumed reading a few stand-alone titles in the EU. I was excited to hear that Aaron Allston was writing a new Wraith Squadron novel, because for me his earlier entries were the best books in the EU. This turned out to be a disappointment, although not a train-wreck by any means. I know that Allston worked the Wraiths into his installments of the New Jedi Order and probably other series, but I didn't read those. The cast of characters from his original novels are mostly not in force here: some of them show up in flashbacks or cameos, others have children in the current team. Mostly this is the story of an old and grouchy Voort saBinring, the genius Gamorrean, getting his groove back. Face Loran, who has been pretty thoroughly developed as a character by this point, is wisely left in the background. Allston's trademark humor is here, but the novel wasn't as much fun for me as its predecessors. The villain never really registers as worth caring about, and the plot all centers around one elaborately contrived "heist" scenario. In the previous Wraith Squadron novels, the cons were simpler and needed to be adjusted organically in the face of setbacks. This feels more like Ocean's 11, where the audience is supposed to revel in the audacity and complexity of the scheme, much of which is only revealed in the end. It felt like cheaper, more manipulative storytelling to me, and it is also frequently disorienting. Throughout much of the first half, I didn't have any clue to the significance of what I was reading. On the good side, the novel does pick up a lot at about the half-way mark, and Allston's characterization is still fun. I was surprised that I cared about what was mostly a new cast of characters. This was an enjoyable encore for a much-loved series, but also a case of diminishing returns.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ethan I. Solomon

    Well, not all of them can be home-runs. My fiancee asked me if there wasn't a single nice thing I could say about this book. I don't think there is. To start with, I could never really get into the Wraith X-Wing books, I preferred the Rogue Squadron books. Nevertheless, I put those prejudices aside in the hopes that after such a long break, the series might come back with a roar. In case you couldn't tell by now, I never found that roar. The writing was mediocre, the large majority of the charact Well, not all of them can be home-runs. My fiancee asked me if there wasn't a single nice thing I could say about this book. I don't think there is. To start with, I could never really get into the Wraith X-Wing books, I preferred the Rogue Squadron books. Nevertheless, I put those prejudices aside in the hopes that after such a long break, the series might come back with a roar. In case you couldn't tell by now, I never found that roar. The writing was mediocre, the large majority of the characters were utterly and completely forgettable. The worst thing of all though was the story-line, in which nothing of interest happens. Without spoiling anything, I will say that the book tries to "open with a bang", you know, that cool action sequence that lets you know what kind of book your in for. Unfortunately, the book NEVER progresses beyond that feel, it is simply one action trope after another. Nothing affecting the Star Wars Expanded Universe actually happens, a recent trend I don't like seeing in the Star Wars novels. I'd only recommend this book to absolute die hard Wraith Squadron fans.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tom Taylor

    I listened to the audio version of this book. The Star Wars audios have high production values. The added special effects and the music really make for a good listening experience. I read most of the X-wing novels back in the day, but that was a long time ago... This novel does stand alone fairly well, so prior knowledge of the characters is not necessary. Indeed, I had forgotten most of them anyway. The problem, is that the book was hard to follow. I was never quite sure what exactly the Wraith S I listened to the audio version of this book. The Star Wars audios have high production values. The added special effects and the music really make for a good listening experience. I read most of the X-wing novels back in the day, but that was a long time ago... This novel does stand alone fairly well, so prior knowledge of the characters is not necessary. Indeed, I had forgotten most of them anyway. The problem, is that the book was hard to follow. I was never quite sure what exactly the Wraith Squadron was trying to achieve. That might be partly because of the intrigue aspects of the book or partly because of the fact that I listened to the audio. And while I did enjoy some of this book, I found myself glad that this was over, so I could move on to another audio.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel Vidrine

    Weak. I spent most of the book trying to remember the characters, because they pretty much get zero introduction. The book is difficult to follow because of the almost-ridiculous convoluted plan to catch the laughable "if-it-wasn't-for-you-meddling-kids" villain Thaal. And the fact that every few chapters or so you have to learn completely new names for all of the characters--oh, and there are a bunch of other characters that we suddenly have to know about half way through the book, and they don Weak. I spent most of the book trying to remember the characters, because they pretty much get zero introduction. The book is difficult to follow because of the almost-ridiculous convoluted plan to catch the laughable "if-it-wasn't-for-you-meddling-kids" villain Thaal. And the fact that every few chapters or so you have to learn completely new names for all of the characters--oh, and there are a bunch of other characters that we suddenly have to know about half way through the book, and they don't get much of an intro either--because of their insistence on using code names, ones that are imaginative as "Drug Boy" and "Ranger Girl." Oh, and Pop-Dogs. Really? Skip this one unless you must read it for completeness.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Josh Harms

    The story and execution were fairly entertaining, but I gave this 2 stars because it was a novel in the X-Wing series. I love the X-Wing Series. Each book in he series leading up to this, the final book, were amazing. Mercy Kill had none of the elements that made me like the rest of the series: intense dogfights, expansion of key characters, and Wedge Antilles as a focal character. If it was not an X-Wing book, I would probably have Mercy Kill 3 stars. But as a finale to one of my favorite series The story and execution were fairly entertaining, but I gave this 2 stars because it was a novel in the X-Wing series. I love the X-Wing Series. Each book in he series leading up to this, the final book, were amazing. Mercy Kill had none of the elements that made me like the rest of the series: intense dogfights, expansion of key characters, and Wedge Antilles as a focal character. If it was not an X-Wing book, I would probably have Mercy Kill 3 stars. But as a finale to one of my favorite series in recent memories... not so much.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eric Evans

    So I had to do a re read on this the first time I was lost because I read out of order. This was great glad to see the Wraith Squadron back. Piggy was my favorite character in the others glad they brought him back. Glad I gave it a second chance. *****original review***** I've been away from the expanded universe for too long obviously because in some parts I was completely lost. Maybe once i get caught up and dk a reread i can score higher. It was a good story just wish I hadn't been so lost in So I had to do a re read on this the first time I was lost because I read out of order. This was great glad to see the Wraith Squadron back. Piggy was my favorite character in the others glad they brought him back. Glad I gave it a second chance. *****original review***** I've been away from the expanded universe for too long obviously because in some parts I was completely lost. Maybe once i get caught up and dk a reread i can score higher. It was a good story just wish I hadn't been so lost in some parts.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Milan Pohl

    A worthy new installment in the fan-favorite series, Mercy Kill introduces a new generation of Wraith pilots and brings back several old-timers, most notably Voort "Piggy" saBinring and Garik "Face" Loran. Although the new characters are not quite as developed as they might have been, Mercy Kill is certainly one of the best Star Wars novels published in the last few years. The plot twists and the author's unique sense of humor make this a must-read. A worthy new installment in the fan-favorite series, Mercy Kill introduces a new generation of Wraith pilots and brings back several old-timers, most notably Voort "Piggy" saBinring and Garik "Face" Loran. Although the new characters are not quite as developed as they might have been, Mercy Kill is certainly one of the best Star Wars novels published in the last few years. The plot twists and the author's unique sense of humor make this a must-read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Relstuart

    A fun Star Wars story that is more Oceans Eleven than Top Gun. Wraith Squadron veterans are brought together to investigate a highly placed General in the Republic suspected of being willing to go over to the Imperial remnant. Some good twists and turns in the story with a satisfying conclusion. This is the last Wraith Squadron book. Probably forever with Disney erasing the original Star Wars extended universe. :(

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emily S.

    I've just read the 1st chapter, included in Apocalypse. I'm ever MORE excited about heading back into adventures with these hotshots! I've just read the 1st chapter, included in Apocalypse. I'm ever MORE excited about heading back into adventures with these hotshots!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    OMG. FINALLY. I haven't been able to stomach the newer star wars books since they went off the deep end, so a return to THIS series makes my day! Can't wait!!! OMG. FINALLY. I haven't been able to stomach the newer star wars books since they went off the deep end, so a return to THIS series makes my day! Can't wait!!!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steven Calandra

    Sooo looking forward to reading this ! It's been too long since the last novel, 'Starfighters of Adumar', in the action-packed series ! Sooo looking forward to reading this ! It's been too long since the last novel, 'Starfighters of Adumar', in the action-packed series !

  29. 4 out of 5

    Yy

    I won this book for free through Goodreads First Reads. Hope to read it soon. Thanks.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Frank Jarome

    This was by far the most fun Star Wars book I've read in literally YEARS. A total blast to read, I wish there were more like this. Highly recommended This was by far the most fun Star Wars book I've read in literally YEARS. A total blast to read, I wish there were more like this. Highly recommended

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