web site hit counter My Cross to Bear - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

My Cross to Bear

Availability: Ready to download

For the first time, rock music icon Gregg Allman, one of the founding members of The Allman Brothers Band, tells the full story of his life and career in My Cross to Bear. No subject is taboo, as one of the true giants of rock ’n’ roll opens up about his Georgia youth, his long struggle with substance abuse, his string of bad marriages (including his brief union with super For the first time, rock music icon Gregg Allman, one of the founding members of The Allman Brothers Band, tells the full story of his life and career in My Cross to Bear. No subject is taboo, as one of the true giants of rock ’n’ roll opens up about his Georgia youth, his long struggle with substance abuse, his string of bad marriages (including his brief union with superstar Cher), the tragic death of  brother Duane Allman, and life on the road in one of rock’s most legendary bands.


Compare

For the first time, rock music icon Gregg Allman, one of the founding members of The Allman Brothers Band, tells the full story of his life and career in My Cross to Bear. No subject is taboo, as one of the true giants of rock ’n’ roll opens up about his Georgia youth, his long struggle with substance abuse, his string of bad marriages (including his brief union with super For the first time, rock music icon Gregg Allman, one of the founding members of The Allman Brothers Band, tells the full story of his life and career in My Cross to Bear. No subject is taboo, as one of the true giants of rock ’n’ roll opens up about his Georgia youth, his long struggle with substance abuse, his string of bad marriages (including his brief union with superstar Cher), the tragic death of  brother Duane Allman, and life on the road in one of rock’s most legendary bands.

30 review for My Cross to Bear

  1. 5 out of 5

    Perry

    Timely Read on the Late Gregg Allman Singer/Songwriter under Entry for 'Sex, Drugs and Rock 'n' Roll' in Rolling Stone's Rock and Roll Encyclopedia In a pivotal scene in Cameron Crowe's movie "Almost Famous," Lester Bangs, a famous rock critic played by Philip Seymour Hoffman, scolds fifteen-year-old William Miller for making friends with the rock band Stillwater. Miller is the fictional alter ego of Crowe who toured with The Allman Brothers Band--which largely inspired Stillwater--as a teen in lat Timely Read on the Late Gregg Allman Singer/Songwriter under Entry for 'Sex, Drugs and Rock 'n' Roll' in Rolling Stone's Rock and Roll Encyclopedia In a pivotal scene in Cameron Crowe's movie "Almost Famous," Lester Bangs, a famous rock critic played by Philip Seymour Hoffman, scolds fifteen-year-old William Miller for making friends with the rock band Stillwater. Miller is the fictional alter ego of Crowe who toured with The Allman Brothers Band--which largely inspired Stillwater--as a teen in late 1973 to write an article for Rolling Stone magazine, when the band was at the top of the rock world. Teenaged Miller admits being friends with the band made him feel cool, to which Bangs replies, "Hey, I met you. You are not cool. We are uncool and while women will always be a problem for us, most of the great art in the world is about that very same problem. Good-looking people don't have any spine. Their art never lasts. They get the girls, but we're smarter." Though Gregg Allman, who died May 27, got more than his share of "foxy ladies," most rock fans would strongly disagree with anyone claiming Allman's art won't last. His "Midnight Rider" and "Whipping Post" are two of the most covered songs in rock music and staples for many club bands. The live "At Fillmore East" version of "Whipping Post" (which Allman wrote in the middle of the night with burnt match sticks on an ironing board cover) has one of the most memorable openings in any musical genre, with maybe the most recognizable bass intro, followed by one then the other of dual lead guitars pealing in from Duane Allman then Dickey Betts, then Gregg's Hammond organ and his gritty voice sliding in "I've been run down / I've been lied to." In 2002, Rolling Stone lauded this as "the finest live performance ever" recorded. Gregg Allman's 2012 memoir, "My Cross to Bear," has its share of tragedies. Gregg and Duane, his eighteen months older brother, grew up without their father, who was murdered in a carjacking. The book's first half covers the early years until Duane's premature death in 1971 at 24 from a motorcycle accident in Macon, Georgia. Allman sketches a vivid portrait of Duane, named second greatest guitarist of all time by Rolling Stone in 2003, in part due to his signature guitar playing with the electric bottleneck steel sound that famously cries like a wounded angel on Derek & the Dominos' "Layla," most notably on the outro into the piano exit. Allman looked up to Duane, who was more driven and confident of his musical talents, and took his loss hard. Allman tells his tale in a candid, casual tone like an affable throwback hippie who neither pulls punches nor aggrandizes his remarkable life. He is forthright and fascinating on the rise and fall of this quintessential rock band, as he is on his experiences with "sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll," rock's early mantra. Allman's bandmates pegged him early with the moniker "Coyotus Maximus," likely a fitting nickname for a tall and shy young man with long blond hair, skinny jeans and a "cute little accent," who transformed on stage into a rock god belting out blues rock, many say, like a black man. Allman recalls, without seeming to boast or providing graphic details, how some nights he would have a woman in each of four or five different rooms, and "for a while there I was with at least three women a week -- at least three." Allman covers his marriage to Cher from 1975 to 1979 without getting too much into detail about how it was being half of the first modern celebrity tabloid couple. Nor does he explain how he was so bad at marriage, seven marriages (one this year) and six divorces. He regrets his absence as a father to his five children. He wished at least one had been raised in the South, noting "not one of my kids has got a Southern accent. Ain't that a bitch?" Decadence didn't stop at promiscuity. As Allman describes, at one time all the band members were addicted to heroin. The band's tour bus was stopped twice in Alabama in the early 1970's, the second time in Grove Hill when Allman made the mistake of throwing a bag of heroin out the window as the bus was being pulled over. Once they kicked heroin, they proceeded to cocaine and booze. On first entering their newly-purchased Boeing 730, "Welcome Allman Bros" was etched in cocaine on the bar. Allman struggled mightily with substance abuse, making 18 rehab trips. He got serious about sobriety only the morning after showing up soused at the 1995 ceremony inducting the band into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He claimed to be sober since. When addressing his power struggle for the band, after Duane's death, with lead guitarist Dickey Betts, who he depicts as a callous, controlling jerk, Allman said he had a bad vibe from the start when Betts showed up to practices wearing ruffled shirts. Yet, "Dickey ain't no devil. He's just a mixed-up guy." Allman was proud that Jaimoe, an African-American drummer from Ocean Springs, Mississippi, was one of The Allman Brothers Band's founding members in 1969 with racial tensions still prevalent in the South. Allman and other members of the band rejected the label "Southern rock," particularly after it became synonymous with uncouth rednecks flying rebel flags at Lynyrd Skynyrd concerts. The Allman Brothers Band's music was an unprecedented mix of blues, jazz, soul and psychedelic rock. As ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons wrote for Rolling Stone, the band "defined the best of every music from the American South in that time. They were the best of all of us... [and] went beyond race and ego." This book is outstanding as rock memoirs go, primarily due to Allman's incredible candor and his compelling insight into the music and behind the scenes. He tells his story without beefs or flourishes, showing the sort of spiritual serenity he says he achieved when he finally got clean, without closing the door on "all the hell I caused other people" or moralizing about his sobriety. Allman concludes My Cross to Bear with a prescient epitaph: "If I died today, I have had me a blast," but "I don't know if I'd do it again."

  2. 4 out of 5

    ``Laurie Henderson

    I thought Gregg Allman's autobiography was very honest and straightforward and enjoyed learning about him and the rise and fall of the Allman Brothers Band. Drugs and alcohol doomed this band as it did so many other great bands and Allman's recounting of his addiction is tragic and sad. He was finally able to overcome his addiction after many attempts. After reading this book I can understand now why Allman could wail the blues in the manner that touched the soul. His early life was one of extre I thought Gregg Allman's autobiography was very honest and straightforward and enjoyed learning about him and the rise and fall of the Allman Brothers Band. Drugs and alcohol doomed this band as it did so many other great bands and Allman's recounting of his addiction is tragic and sad. He was finally able to overcome his addiction after many attempts. After reading this book I can understand now why Allman could wail the blues in the manner that touched the soul. His early life was one of extreme poverty with his dad being murdered when Allman was 2 years of age and Allman is unable to remember him. His older brother by one year Duane became the man of the family and stepped into the role with amazing ability for one of such a young age. Gregg Allman adored Duane and was very dependent upon him. Their mother, not being able to support her children had to send them to military school in order to further her education. It was either that or give them up for adoption as she had no family to help her financially. The stay at the military boarding school was horrific according to Allman and he felt abandoned by his mother. Allman was extremely intelligent and ranked first in his class with plans of being a Dr. or Dentist. When financially able his mother brought her 2 sons home and enrolled them in public school. Allman discovered music at this time and taught himself to play the piano and guitar. He delivered papers in order to earn money to buy a guitar. His brother Duane quickly became fascinated with the guitar and began playing the instrument day and night. Duane became a guitar prodigy who is ranked as #2 best guitarist of the rock era behind Hendrix. Music became the Allman brother's life and they soon started forming a band. Duane told Gregg to start writing music for the band and Gregg dutifully obeyed his older brother and was soon knocking out songs that would rise on the charts with ease. Sadly, just as their first album "Eat A Peach" came out Duane was killed in a motorcycle accident. Drug and alcohol abuse took over Gregg's life at this point once they had accomplished fame and fortune. He tells of his romance and marriage with Cher, one of the most interesting parts of the story. Cher was understanding and helpful about his addiction problems but in the end it would ruin their marriage and Cher left him. In later years and many tries he was able to beat his addiction and come to grips with the tragedy of losing his beloved older brother. If you enjoy reading a rags to riches story I think you will enjoy reading this always engaging book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cathrine ☯️

    3.5★ Sex—Drugs—Rock & Roll—Repeat I don’t know if I could have read this but I enjoyed listening to it with the excellent Will Patton narrating. It came across as though he was sitting back on the couch telling me his stories. It had some moments but he lived a hard and reckless life and it got a bit repetitive. Those times were mine as well but I mostly indulged in the music and never hit the harder stuff. That lifestyle finally took its toll which is what prompted me to check this out. So many o 3.5★ Sex—Drugs—Rock & Roll—Repeat I don’t know if I could have read this but I enjoyed listening to it with the excellent Will Patton narrating. It came across as though he was sitting back on the couch telling me his stories. It had some moments but he lived a hard and reckless life and it got a bit repetitive. Those times were mine as well but I mostly indulged in the music and never hit the harder stuff. That lifestyle finally took its toll which is what prompted me to check this out. So many of my musical icons are passing into history. RIP Gregg. I’d like to believe that you and your bro are making sweet music somewhere across the universe.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Meh, this was alright. I really like the Allman Brothers band and I love Gregg's singing voice. As for Gregg himself, I'm not sure. I am glad he finally got his life in order and is trying to be a better dad. Would I recommend this, probably not. (I will still rock-out to his band though)!! Update 10/11/16. Just saw an article, Gregg is now engaged to a woman in her 20's! I changed my mind, despite being sober, he hasn't learned much. Apparently, "this is the first time he's been truly in love". Meh, this was alright. I really like the Allman Brothers band and I love Gregg's singing voice. As for Gregg himself, I'm not sure. I am glad he finally got his life in order and is trying to be a better dad. Would I recommend this, probably not. (I will still rock-out to his band though)!! Update 10/11/16. Just saw an article, Gregg is now engaged to a woman in her 20's! I changed my mind, despite being sober, he hasn't learned much. Apparently, "this is the first time he's been truly in love". Me - gagging now.....

  5. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Jeez but I love summer with its hall pass to unabashedly read trash like this. If it’s content you seek you’ll learn more from the back of a box of Cocoa Puffs. It’s a stretch to consider Allman even one dimensional. Still, his ability to use the word ‘shit’ as noun, adjective, adverb and verb is impressive and omission of that word alone would trim the book’s 400 pages down to 250. Eliminating the word ‘man’ would trim it an additional 75 pages. I recall my mother once saying, “Oh, I’m so glad Jeez but I love summer with its hall pass to unabashedly read trash like this. If it’s content you seek you’ll learn more from the back of a box of Cocoa Puffs. It’s a stretch to consider Allman even one dimensional. Still, his ability to use the word ‘shit’ as noun, adjective, adverb and verb is impressive and omission of that word alone would trim the book’s 400 pages down to 250. Eliminating the word ‘man’ would trim it an additional 75 pages. I recall my mother once saying, “Oh, I’m so glad to be home. You wouldn’t believe how many accidents I saw behind me on the freeway” – an apt metaphor for My Cross to Bear. At no point does Allman ever take responsibility for ANYTHING including the various friends and roadies who went to jail for procuring his drugs. Here’s an example: “I felt guilty about the whole thing for a while, but as hard as I tried, I couldn’t figure out what it was I had to feel guilty about. I wanted some drugs, Scooter got them for me. I paid for them, and that was it – done deal. What was there to feel guilty about? Had I gone out on the street and bought them myself, I probably would have ruined my career. Scooter helped me out as a far as that went, but everyone who’s buying drugs is getting them from somewhere else. I’m sorry for what happened to Mr. Fuchs, I’m sorry for what happened to Scooter, but they knew what they were doing when they did it. Everybody made their own decisions, man. And that includes me. The whole mess with Scooter was the last straw for the band. As if the financial mess we’d gotten ourselves into wasn’t enough, most of the guys felt I’d sold Scooter out.” Similarly high marks as a family man – six failed marriages and a bunch of kids he probably couldn’t identify in a police lineup. His ‘shit, I’m the man” hubris is unwavering. Like a game of ‘Where’s Waldo?’ not only does he work in babes, drugs, alcohol, Trans Am cars and Triumph motorcycles in every chapter but also his unadulterated hatred of band mate, Dickey Betts. Spoiler alert: the title of LP ‘Eat a Peach’ being a reference to brother, Duane killing himself by rocketing his motorcycle into the back of a produce truck is complete myth. The LP title was originally ‘Eat a Peach for Peace’, the band’s response to the Kent State riots. In the plus column, this is a book you can read while doing other stuff like working on your taxes and watching the Olympics because it requires less than 3% of your attention to follow its narrative. Come for the music but side-step the book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    ☮Karen

    3.5. I probably wouldn't have paid any attention to this memoir were it not for Gregg Allman's recent passing and a mention in another review that Will Patton narrates the audiobook. Mr. Patton always does a fine job, even if he does sound just like the crazed killer in Stephen King's Bill Hodges trilogy. I wasn't a huge fan of the Allman Brothers back in the day, but I think I should have been. I like all of their songs very much today. It was probably just a timing thing or the people I hung o 3.5. I probably wouldn't have paid any attention to this memoir were it not for Gregg Allman's recent passing and a mention in another review that Will Patton narrates the audiobook. Mr. Patton always does a fine job, even if he does sound just like the crazed killer in Stephen King's Bill Hodges trilogy. I wasn't a huge fan of the Allman Brothers back in the day, but I think I should have been. I like all of their songs very much today. It was probably just a timing thing or the people I hung out with when the Allman's band was enjoying their time in the spotlight. I enjoyed the memoir and how it was presented -- just every day language telling some interesting stories. (Not all were that interesting). Name dropping.... Cher, if you care. (I couldn't understand that relationship then, but it's clearer now.) Mucho drugs and alcohol (why Cher couldn't take it). The audio was great but in a song writer's memoir, a few musical interludes would be much appreciated. Just saying.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Duffy Pratt

    The title comes from his song "It's Not My Cross To Bear," and the full song title would have been more apt. No matter what went wrong with the band, according to Gregory, it wasn't really his fault. For example, the decline the band saw in the eighties was the fault of the audience and the change in pop culture, and had nothing really to do with him being strung out on heroin, an alcoholic, or his other kinds of drug abuse. People just weren't digging good music at that time. The Allman Brother The title comes from his song "It's Not My Cross To Bear," and the full song title would have been more apt. No matter what went wrong with the band, according to Gregory, it wasn't really his fault. For example, the decline the band saw in the eighties was the fault of the audience and the change in pop culture, and had nothing really to do with him being strung out on heroin, an alcoholic, or his other kinds of drug abuse. People just weren't digging good music at that time. The Allman Brothers were part of my holy trinity growing up, along with Eric Clapton and The Grateful Dead. Gregg Allman is a very good songwriter. He has a knack for writing blues that sound authentic, like they could have come out of Chess records. He also has a great voice for blues. Unfortunately for him (and also fortunately), his brother was an absolute natural and a genius. Because of Duane's early death, much of Gregg's life seems to have been an alternation of trying to live up to Duane, and pushing himself down because he really couldn't live up to Duane. Also, because of Duane's early death, his genius tends to get exaggerated. We project his genius into the future, without taking into account the horrible drug abuse that would have given him the same kind of intermittent downward spirals that all of the survivors of that period of rock had. Instead, Duane is remembered only for the early, incandescent moments. Gregg got to live through that as second fiddle, and then got to go through the heroin withdrawal, the alcoholism, the series of failed marriages, etc... The strange thing about the Allman Brothers is that they hit their peak of popularity with Brothers and Sisters, which is mostly a Dicky Betts album, and which is a distinct move into country mediocrity after their early stuff and Fillmore East. So people got to say that they loved this band, and Duane, but they didn't actually have to listen to Duane, and instead could stay comfortable with the major pentatonic noodling on Ramblin Man and Blue Sky. The rift between Betts and Allman is fun to read about. Betts does come across as an asshole, and I am pretty sure he is one. Allman doesn't, however, see how his own failings might have forced Betts into becoming even more of an asshole in response. He is typically pretty unreflective, which struck me as being odd in an autobiography. I was also struck by Allman's attitude to other musicians. Basically, if you played with an Allman, you were great. Thus, there is admiration for Clapton, because of the Layla sessions. And for Warren Haynes, and Derek Trucks, and Otiel Burbridge, and Chuck Leavall, etc... And the old blues guys who influenced the band are also great, notably Bobby Bland. But there is almost never a good word about anyone else's music. The short passage on seeing Hendrix live says that he wasn't any good. The Grateful Dead, according to Allman, had no groove and only had any success because they fed their audience drugs. The Band, who did stuff that was similar to the ABB, and played on many billings with them, do not even get a mention. I get the feeling that Allman can't bring himself to see the merits of people he sees as competitors. The style of the book is so casual that it feels like the writer basically took the taped interviews and transcribed them. It gives a feeling of honesty, and makes for easy reading. But its sad that, having read several of these rock memoirs right now, that his life reads like such a cliche. The early struggles. The deep admiration for black R&B. The obsession with playing and the early, lean years. The sudden ascent. The downward spiral into drugs, and the clashing of egos. The horrible treatment of women. And, for the survivors, the finding of a kind of peace. The details change, but the song remains the same. Of the rock memoirs I've read, Keith Richards Life is the best book. This one is only fair.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette (Ms. Feisty)

    3.5 stars This is tough to rate. Gregory's style is conversational and easy to read and often hilarious. It's like he's just sitting there on your sofa telling you about his life, complete with colorful Southern expressions and lots of swearing. I blew through the second half in one afternoon. The first half is heavy on the drugs and sex, and could rightly be called MY CROTCH TO BARE. Mr. Allman was apparently known among the ladies and his bandmates as quite the cocksman, and he likes to pound a 3.5 stars This is tough to rate. Gregory's style is conversational and easy to read and often hilarious. It's like he's just sitting there on your sofa telling you about his life, complete with colorful Southern expressions and lots of swearing. I blew through the second half in one afternoon. The first half is heavy on the drugs and sex, and could rightly be called MY CROTCH TO BARE. Mr. Allman was apparently known among the ladies and his bandmates as quite the cocksman, and he likes to pound away on that subject. (Choice of words entirely intentional on my part.) He and his buddies also had serious problems with drug and alcohol addiction, and it gets a little old reading about people willfully destroying their young bodies. The second half still has the drugs and sex, but Gregory grew up a little, got clean and sober, and focused more on the music as he got older. If you're not a serious fan of the Allman Brothers in their various incarnations, a lot of the book will probably be meaningless. There are tons of names of people I've never heard of before. I did enjoy the trip back in time to the '60s and '70s, when the world was more laid back and less fearful.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ann Collette

    I totally loved this book but am very aware of the fact that my reaction is deeply personal and not at all that of an objective reviewer. I love a lot of the Allman Brothers' music and have idolized Duane Allman since I first heard him play guitar, so I'm predisposed to love any book that goes into his life in any depth. Over the years, Gregg lost some credibility for me, thanks to his marriage to Cher and his involvement in a drug trial where a friend of his paid the price for getting drugs for I totally loved this book but am very aware of the fact that my reaction is deeply personal and not at all that of an objective reviewer. I love a lot of the Allman Brothers' music and have idolized Duane Allman since I first heard him play guitar, so I'm predisposed to love any book that goes into his life in any depth. Over the years, Gregg lost some credibility for me, thanks to his marriage to Cher and his involvement in a drug trial where a friend of his paid the price for getting drugs for Gregg. But I closed this book feeling respect for him that I haven't in years. This is definitely an "as told to" book -- the book doesn't follow a strict chronological order. Rather, it appears coauthor Alan Light grouped together Allman's random memories into richly detailed chunks that ebb and flow into each other. Sometime I found it a little difficult to keep track of the time frame. But what I never had trouble with was the emotional honesty of the book. It's a little self-serving and, as a woman, I found Allman's sexist attitude towards women a little off putting at times. But overall, who he is as a person comes across loud and clear. He's not the brightest bulb in the room but he's funny and vulnerable and surprisingly innocent in some ways. Pretty much the first half of the book is about his youth and the development of the original band, with a strong slant towards the vital role his older brother Duane played in both Gregg's development as a person and the development of the band. This part of the book is hands down the most insightful material I've ever read about Duane Allman and I was fascinated, impressed and deeply moved, so much so that I cried at the section that covers his death. That Gregg Allman has spent the rest of his life dealing with Duane Allman's death is very clear. Points to him for laying it out there like that. The second half of the book covers the constant struggle of the band to keep making the best music it could, with music seeming to be the only reason Allman stayed alive. By now, the story of the alcoholic, drug abusing rock star is part of contemporary culture. But this account of one such rock star's life will always stand out for its intimate detailing of how a talented human being was shaped, both positively and sometimes, very much not so, by the life and death of a genius who happened to be his brother. I think Gregg -- oops, Gregory -- would very much agree with that statement, which is why I ended up finding this book so very poignant.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Graham Elvis

    I found this at the library and thought Id give it a read. Gregg got up and jammed with my band The Elvis Brothers in St. Louis around 1986 he played guitar with us which was a thrill and he liked The Elvis Brothers... After the show we were hanging in our dressing room with Gregg who was feeling no pain but just wouldn't chill so to speak. We had to leave our own dressing room for some peace and quiet... I remember thinking to myself " I can't believe I just had to leave my own dressing room t I found this at the library and thought Id give it a read. Gregg got up and jammed with my band The Elvis Brothers in St. Louis around 1986 he played guitar with us which was a thrill and he liked The Elvis Brothers... After the show we were hanging in our dressing room with Gregg who was feeling no pain but just wouldn't chill so to speak. We had to leave our own dressing room for some peace and quiet... I remember thinking to myself " I can't believe I just had to leave my own dressing room to get away from Gregg Allman " It's a cool story and he's got it together now and of course he's well he's "Gregg Allman ". I'm looking forward to reading this book. He's been doing it longer than most and is still here to tell the tale. OK I've read the book Gregg has had a incredible live he's not the greatest literary writer but he's not claiming to be... His early career in the 60's is fun to read about, the rise of The Allman Brothers is blusey hard work, the premature death of his brother really hurt him... The story he tells of Duane giving his then girlfriend 19,000 miles worth of penis is really funny. Gregg walked up to a table where Dyane was sitting doing math figures on a piece of paper he looked over Duane's shoulder and Duane had all these numbers going on. Somewhat bewildered Gregg asked him what on earth he was doing ? Duane said he figured his penis was 6" long and for every ten pumps of screwing his girl friend that was 60" and if he pumped her 100 X per fuck that was 600" times how ever many time he screwed her. He proudly came up with 19,000 miles that was a lot of penis he gave her so Duane thought. Gregg just shook his head... (that alone a almost worth the read.) Gregg talking about why he can't write songs with Dickie Betts is humorous as long as you're not Dickie. His being married to Cher is interesting and finally his ongoing health problems are enough to scare you away from drink and drugs...At the end of the day Gregg is still a musician at heart and a talented one at that, one can only wish this survivor the best.My hats off to you Gregg great job on the book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I have read many autobiographies by musicians and his is one of the best. I broke heavy on Pete Townsend and Carol King for, as I believed, their trying to use too many "big words" in their books. Gregory (he didn't like to be called Gregg) did not. This book is him talking to the reader as if he were sitting down with us, just shootin' the shit. I read it in three days, and loved it.....mgc I have read many autobiographies by musicians and his is one of the best. I broke heavy on Pete Townsend and Carol King for, as I believed, their trying to use too many "big words" in their books. Gregory (he didn't like to be called Gregg) did not. This book is him talking to the reader as if he were sitting down with us, just shootin' the shit. I read it in three days, and loved it.....mgc

  12. 4 out of 5

    James

    Great literature it's not, but it is a fine rock autobiography. In a folksy manner, Allman tells about 11 trips to rehab, 6 wives (including Cher), 5 kids by 5 different women, 3 breakups and reunions, 2 band members dying on motorcycles early on, one of which was his brother Duane, the acrimonious split with Dickey Betts (think Keith Richards and Mick Jagger), a business jet that had belonged to Led Zeppelin and later Elton John, a loving mother, a liver transplant, and a lot of song writing, t Great literature it's not, but it is a fine rock autobiography. In a folksy manner, Allman tells about 11 trips to rehab, 6 wives (including Cher), 5 kids by 5 different women, 3 breakups and reunions, 2 band members dying on motorcycles early on, one of which was his brother Duane, the acrimonious split with Dickey Betts (think Keith Richards and Mick Jagger), a business jet that had belonged to Led Zeppelin and later Elton John, a loving mother, a liver transplant, and a lot of song writing, tours and recording sessions. He carries out no vendettas, tells his side of the stories, and remains a class act throughout. If you're an Allman Brothers fan--or an aspiring blues player--you won't be disappointed.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joachim Stoop

    Better than I expected. Could 've earned an extra star if it was a bit more about composing music than scoring pussy Better than I expected. Could 've earned an extra star if it was a bit more about composing music than scoring pussy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joel Brown

    Finally got around to reading this after interviewing Gregg about a year ago. He said his approach was influenced much by Keith Richards' memoir, "Life," and it's easy to see. Good stuff about his early life, about forming the band and shaping their sound. In Gregg's case that leads to painful stuff about the deaths of his brother Duane and bassist Berry Oakley and the mid-70s implosion of the band amid those tragedies and huge drug intake. Like Keith's book, this one channels the star's voice re Finally got around to reading this after interviewing Gregg about a year ago. He said his approach was influenced much by Keith Richards' memoir, "Life," and it's easy to see. Good stuff about his early life, about forming the band and shaping their sound. In Gregg's case that leads to painful stuff about the deaths of his brother Duane and bassist Berry Oakley and the mid-70s implosion of the band amid those tragedies and huge drug intake. Like Keith's book, this one channels the star's voice really well, despite the use of a co-writer It's pretty funny - Allman is hilariously unselfconscious at times, awfully candid about sex and drugs. Despite his generally amiable attitude, he was definitely of an era of rocker who treated women as disposable conveniences. If his account is to be believed, they sought it out. He doesnt get exactly analytical about it. With women and marriage and business decisions and a few substance-abuse casualties, he blames himself for a lot of things, and lets himself off the hook about as often. Very Keith. Also like Keith's book, the story is fascinating only as long as the music is. From the late 70s on, this is a kind of dull recitation of band breakups, bad biz decisions, less than super reunions, etc. I am not sure that anything that happened to the Allmans in the 1980s is worth more than a paragraph, and frankly Gregg seems to feel the same. The Allmans' latter-day resurgence with Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks is covered but just isn't as compelling as the story of getting the band together in the first place. Shorter review: great read for Allmans/classic rock fans, and feel free to skim after he testifies in the drug trial. For everyone else, interesting in parts but not a must-read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    My first question when I started this book was did Alan Light do ANYTHING except have dictation typed up and organize the chapters. The answer is, it does not seems so. Gregg's voice at the beginning of this thing makes him sound to me like the 17 year old Daytona Dick Head that he was. For the first third of the book Gregory sounded to me like at 64 he was still an immature, self absorbed, cry baby. I really began to like this book and to some degree G L Allman more as it went. For a while it s My first question when I started this book was did Alan Light do ANYTHING except have dictation typed up and organize the chapters. The answer is, it does not seems so. Gregg's voice at the beginning of this thing makes him sound to me like the 17 year old Daytona Dick Head that he was. For the first third of the book Gregory sounded to me like at 64 he was still an immature, self absorbed, cry baby. I really began to like this book and to some degree G L Allman more as it went. For a while it seemed his primary purpose in writing the book was to make us believe that he really did do ass load of drugs and have a good bit of sex in the late 60s and 70s. But as my grandmother used to say "that's what I know". What I would like to have know more about was the some of the decisions that want into creating that distinctive Allman Brothers sound. I did like the story about Duane teaching himself to play slide with a pill bottle. Unlike some fans I did not expect him to talk whether or not God was actually at the Filmore that fateful night. Unlike "Life" the Keith Richards book by the end of this book I began to understand the Gregg a little better. What he never deals with very well is why the hell he keeps getting married. The only marriage he gives any detail about is the one to Cher and that is actually quite interesting. If I could go 3.5 on this scale I would have. Good but not great is really where this book falls. But it is a must for a fan. I read on the web that the movie rights have been picked up. Of course Almost Famous already covered some of this ground.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    Not the most well- written book I've ever read but overall a good read. I saw Gregg Allman promote the book on The Colbert Report. Even though I've seen The Allman Brothers at The Beacon Theater on NYC, I haven't given them, particularly Gregg, any conscious thought. Truthfully I always thought he was a little dim, and was pleasantly surprised to find out I was wrong. I'm not sure what I expected from this book but came away feeling somewhat satisfied. I'm generally not a fan of autobiographies Not the most well- written book I've ever read but overall a good read. I saw Gregg Allman promote the book on The Colbert Report. Even though I've seen The Allman Brothers at The Beacon Theater on NYC, I haven't given them, particularly Gregg, any conscious thought. Truthfully I always thought he was a little dim, and was pleasantly surprised to find out I was wrong. I'm not sure what I expected from this book but came away feeling somewhat satisfied. I'm generally not a fan of autobiographies because I think people tend to sugarcoat a lot, but I didn't get that sense here. I detected a lot of raw emotion, loneliness and a very deep sense of loss particularly where Duane is concerned. I wasn't aware of the drug trial and would want to read more about that before rendering an opinion. I was also very interested in the animosity between him and Dickey Betts. Overall, I hope this book was a cathartic experience for him. I think it is a goldmine of information for music historians and gives a brutally honest look into the music business by one of its giants, however understated he may be.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    After reading the memoir by Gregg Allman, I felt like I spent the weekend with him. The only way you can beat the immediacy in tone would be listening to the audiobook, and having him literally in your ear. (Which I personally had no problem with. Ya dig?) The memoir is honest, and includes frank descriptions of both joyful and sorrowful moments of Allman's life, such as his writing process, gratitude felt for amazing friendships and blessings, and the anguish felt over his brother Duane's death. After reading the memoir by Gregg Allman, I felt like I spent the weekend with him. The only way you can beat the immediacy in tone would be listening to the audiobook, and having him literally in your ear. (Which I personally had no problem with. Ya dig?) The memoir is honest, and includes frank descriptions of both joyful and sorrowful moments of Allman's life, such as his writing process, gratitude felt for amazing friendships and blessings, and the anguish felt over his brother Duane's death. Allman often becomes philosophical about topics. Regarding nature: "I don't want people to think that I'm some kind of exhibitionist, but there's nothing like going out and having sex on God's green earth - as long as there are no friggin' red ants." The book is worth reading for gems like that alone, but that's only one iota of the charming philosophizing that goes on. Interesting political angle: The Allman Brothers revitalized the Jimmy Carter campaign at one point. Cher had a horrible singing voice. Anything else? You need to read the book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Herbert

    Southern Rock was the embarrassment of growing up in the South until I lived enough to understand the Blues. 'Whipping Post' wore out a few needles on my turntable along the way. Bittersweet, lovely ride and the voice is as authentic as far as I can tell. Made me pull out a bunch of old Outlaws and Marshall Tucker. I found this to be honest and fair, you get alot of the pain and tragedy and alot of the love and laughter, but most of all you get the music and it is a gift to us. Southern Rock was the embarrassment of growing up in the South until I lived enough to understand the Blues. 'Whipping Post' wore out a few needles on my turntable along the way. Bittersweet, lovely ride and the voice is as authentic as far as I can tell. Made me pull out a bunch of old Outlaws and Marshall Tucker. I found this to be honest and fair, you get alot of the pain and tragedy and alot of the love and laughter, but most of all you get the music and it is a gift to us.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    "If I fell over dead right now, I have led some kind of life." That's Gregg Allman near the end of "My Cross to Bear," and after reading his autobiography, "My Cross to Bear," I have to agree with him. Some kind of life indeed. Gregg Allman is best known, of course, as the frontman for The Allman Brothers Band, and his story is inextricably linked to the band's. In the early Allman Brothers days, Gregg's big brother, Duane, was running the show. Duane was the one who kept everyone in line, who wa "If I fell over dead right now, I have led some kind of life." That's Gregg Allman near the end of "My Cross to Bear," and after reading his autobiography, "My Cross to Bear," I have to agree with him. Some kind of life indeed. Gregg Allman is best known, of course, as the frontman for The Allman Brothers Band, and his story is inextricably linked to the band's. In the early Allman Brothers days, Gregg's big brother, Duane, was running the show. Duane was the one who kept everyone in line, who was the heart and soul of the music. Being leader was not a role Gregg wanted, nor was he especially well-suited to it. He was so shocked and saddened by his brother's sudden death in a motorcycle crash, that he was on an alcohol and drug-fueled autopilot for years. Well, decades, really. "My Cross to Bear" is full of amazing stories--some hilarious, some sad--and Gregg Allman never hesitates to blame himself where appropriate. He is also unflinchingly honest about his alcohol and drug abuse, which lasted decades and nearly killed him a number of times. Allman was notoriously married to Cher back in the 1970's. He speaks candidly about life with her, as well as with his five other wives. Mostly, though, this is a story about a musical career. I just read Eric Clapton's autobiography, and Clapton focused more on his abuses and--especially--his recovery than he did on his legendary music. Gregg Allman talks about his early days, learning to play along with Duane, about early appearances at school talent shows, and playing high school dances. He describes the hunger he and Duane felt just to play, to get as good as possible. They played in bar bands, then formed their own band, the Allman Joys. From there, it was off to L.A., then back to Florida to form The Allman Brothers Band. It took me a chapter or so to get used to Gregg Allman's narrative voice. Where Clapton's autobiography was eloquent and relatively polite, Allman writes like you'd imagine he'd talk, his writing peppered with Southernisms and frequent profanity. That said, I also laughed a lot reading "My Cross to Bear." Allman is a hell of a storyteller, even when the stories are tough and cast him in a bad light. As an autobiography, "My Cross to Bear" covers everything, from his childhood through being a grandfather. Told from a survivor's viewpoint, it gives the early recollections a bit more poignance: we know going in that the narrator lived through a chemical blur, and was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. In fact, the book starts off with a story from the Hall of Fame induction. Gregg Allman was blotto the whole time, even more so on a subsequent "Late Night with David Letterman" appearance. Shortly after, he was carted off to a rehab in Pennsylvania. Allman talks about his various stints in rehab, and about how he finally was able to kick drugs and alcohol. While Clapton is big on AA and The Twelve Steps, Gregg Allman's lone AA meeting ended up with three girls asking him for autographs. As he put it, "So much for Anonymous!" (Sometime later, Waylon Jennings told him, "All you need for an AA meeting is another drunk and a pot of coffee.") Sober several years now, Allman attributes his success to his growing faith in God. One of the strong points in Allman's storytelling is that the book never bogs down in any one period. The Allman Brothers have been together for more than 40 years (with a couple of short-lived breakups). They've been hugely popular, and they've fallen out of favor. Gregg Allman has had some solo projects as well, to fill the gaps. It seems like he was always recording or touring either with the AllBros, or his own band, and we're along for the ride. One highlight for me was reading about a certain Miami show back in the early 70's. The Allman Brothers Band was tearing it up onstage, when Gregg looked down and saw Eric Clapton sitting on the grass, intently watching the band. Allman talks about going back to Criteria Studios with Duane, and jamming with Clapton and his band. There was definite chemistry, and Gregg had a good time. Duane stayed behind, and became a member of Clapton's band Derek and the Dominoes. In Clapton's book, he describes the meeting from the other point of view. Either way, they agree that they became friends and played well together. Corroboration is always nice, especially since they were both wasted at the time. As rock & roll autobiographies go, "My Cross to Bear" isn't earthshaking in its originality. It's not written in iambic pentameter, or with flowery, Fitzgeraldian prose. It doesn't raise any sort of bar, nor did I really want it to. This is simply a guy whose music I've always loved telling stories about his life and career, and nothing more is required.

  20. 5 out of 5

    spikeINflorida

    Brothers Never Forgotten 🎸🎶🎤🥁🎹

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    I give this 4 stars as a fan who wanted to hear the inside scoop on the career of Gregg and the Allman Brothers Band. His early life is very interesting, with his unsettled childhood in Nashville and Daytona Beach. His father was murdered while Gregg was still a young boy, and his mother put the brothers into military school, feeling she had no option but to instill something into them. When he discovered the guitar, Gregg actually taught his older brother Duane how to play it and Duane became t I give this 4 stars as a fan who wanted to hear the inside scoop on the career of Gregg and the Allman Brothers Band. His early life is very interesting, with his unsettled childhood in Nashville and Daytona Beach. His father was murdered while Gregg was still a young boy, and his mother put the brothers into military school, feeling she had no option but to instill something into them. When he discovered the guitar, Gregg actually taught his older brother Duane how to play it and Duane became the proficient one. Thus began their entry into the music world. Slugging it out with the Allman Joys lead to a dead end it seemed, but eventually the ingredients formed for what became the Allman Brothers Band. Gregg speaks very highly of Duane of course. He even is a bit disparaging of Jimi Hendrix in comparison. Duane's tragic death shook up the band, and forced Gregg and Dickey Betts to fill the leadership void. The result was Brothers and Sisters, their biggest album ever. Good stories about the road, about songwriting, and his various relationships, Cher especially. The resulting descent into drug abuse and alcoholism is an unfortunate byproduct of many such rock bios. Gregg is candid about it, and he must feel lucky to be alive at this stage. The second half of the book suffers as a result, the band splitting up, reforming, splitting up again. Sadly Gregg seems to hold a grudge against Dickey Betts, who was turfed from the band about ten years ago. Betts' guitar playing and songwriting was a huge factor in saving this band after Duane Allman's death. Their greatest hit "Ramblin' Man" barely rates a mention here, since it is Dickey's song. Regardless of who was at fault, Betts deserves better than what he gets here. Otherwise I respect Gregg Allman's dedication to music. He seems to rail against the "southern rock" label, and he's right. The ABB is a very accomplished band that should transcend labels. They were proficient in the blues and had gospel tinges as well, with Gregg's Hammond organ work and soulful singing. Contrasted to today's media creations, the ABB worked everywhere for years, a hard working touring band that could play with anyone. They still play today, doing what Gregg Allman loves to do.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Peter Prasad

    A wicked good read! I got the beat in three pages, could hear Gregg on the Hammond after five, then Duane came in with the bottleneck and I liked to pop. He's the only man that can race up and down my spine like that. If you can find Southern Rock on the map, then you'll delight in reading My Cross. Huzzah Sarasota! The Allmans were our local band at the Armory. It was my first taste of tribal. Now I know why. Rich with detail: who knew Gregg was top in his 7th grade class at military academy; r A wicked good read! I got the beat in three pages, could hear Gregg on the Hammond after five, then Duane came in with the bottleneck and I liked to pop. He's the only man that can race up and down my spine like that. If you can find Southern Rock on the map, then you'll delight in reading My Cross. Huzzah Sarasota! The Allmans were our local band at the Armory. It was my first taste of tribal. Now I know why. Rich with detail: who knew Gregg was top in his 7th grade class at military academy; raised by a single mother; how he got his V-card punched, etc. Sure, he tape recorded it. Someone else edited it. But so what. You get more than the facts; you get the taste of the times, line by line (joke). Here's the how to for Macon bacon & eating a peach. In fifty years, this will be a history book on why mommy & daddy had a better life than me. Boogie on, Garth, opps, Gregg.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura Jane

    Could not put it down! This Macon, Georgia girl loved every word.....thanks, Gregory!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Valera

    I tried to be opened minded about "My Cross To Bear", but to be honest I wasn't sure what to expect. I knew he didn't write his book by himself--he had a writer partner--and I wasn't sure how much he actually contributed to the writing of the book; I mean, did he cut a CD with just enough pertinent information about his life to have filled his contract with his publishers? But I must say some of the parts, especially those that involved his brother, Duane, were enjoyable. It is clear form the star I tried to be opened minded about "My Cross To Bear", but to be honest I wasn't sure what to expect. I knew he didn't write his book by himself--he had a writer partner--and I wasn't sure how much he actually contributed to the writing of the book; I mean, did he cut a CD with just enough pertinent information about his life to have filled his contract with his publishers? But I must say some of the parts, especially those that involved his brother, Duane, were enjoyable. It is clear form the start that though Duane was just over a year older than Greg, he was the father figure for his younger brother. Greg also claims his brother kicked his butt ever day of his life. Now, I consider that figure a little steep. I mean, couldn't Duane had been doing something a little less violent one day a week, like knitting socks or something? But that said, it's obvious both brothers had great love for each other. There are some funny stories in the book concerning Duane and Greg. According to Greg, he and Duane went horse back riding once. Duane got dumped on his butt along with the horse he rode. Duane hurt his left elbow and left the stables really PO at Greg and told him to stay away from him. Greg stayed away for a few weeks and then he went and bought the LP album by Taj Mahal and a bottle of coricidin cold medicine. According to Greg, he knock on the door, left the goods on the welcome mat, and hauled ass. An hour or two latter, Duane calls his brother and says, babybra, get your ass over here. Boy do I have something to show you. Well Greg goes over to Duane's and he's taken all the cold pills out of the bottle, put the bottle on his third finger of his left hand and was just burning up and cooking on the tune Statesboro Blues. So a legend was born on the slide guitar. As brothers, once they started playing music they pretty much were inseparable and played a lot of gigs on some pretty bad musical tour circuits, but they were playing and getting better all the time. Though when they were kids, Greg did show Duane the ropes on the guitar, and after a short while they started fighting over Greg's guitar, and to keep the peace in the family their mother bought Duane A 1957 Les Paul Jr. And soon after that Duane quit school and quickly surpassed Greg on the guitar. Then there's the year the Draft came a knocking on Duane's door. He was going to be drafted and be sent to Vietnam. Well, he went down to the draft board in a pair of women's frilly underwear. That didn't work, so when all the draftees were lined in a row and told to swear an oath, Duane had his hand in his pockets and kept repeating, "I'm not goin', I'm not goin'! After a while the Sergeant took Duane outside and asked him if he was short a marble or two? Duane explained to the sergeant that his father had been murdered shortly after his return home from World War II. And his mother needed him at home. Duane was set home, and he never heard from the draft again. Greg, being a year younger than Duane, was called in for a physical the following year. So Duane says, "We can't let you get drafted babybra, so were going to have a toe shooting party. They had it, Greg shot his big toe on his right foot, but missed every bone; from all reports, the affair was very bloody and involved a lot of towels and a trip to the ER, and then to the draft board. Well, the shooting party successfully kept Greg out of the draft. The band started to make a name for its self, and the heavy drugs kicked in. We find out that Greg had a propensity for heavy drugs as did Duane and the rest of the Brothers, except for Butchie, he stayed away from the heron. (In 1970 they played 300 gigs on the road; I guess they needed something to chill out with. Just before his death in October of 1971, Duane and Barry Oakley went to a drug rehab program and got clean. Not a week later, Duane was Dead from wrecking his Harley. Then a year latter Barry died just about the same way Duane did. Greg talks of his marriage with Cher, and five other women; and of course the drugs and drinking. He wasn't alone in doing drugs, but Dickey and Greg got pretty much out of control with the booze. Greg wasn't violent though, but Dicky, as Butch puts it, was a real redneck that would punch people upside the head in a heart beat. I thought Greg would come off as more of a whiner than he did. He came off as an Alcoholic, a womanizer, and a man who'd loved music more than anything else in his life. I wished I could give this book 3.5 stars, but since you can't, I gave the book four stars. IT's amazing to me that the band was together for forty four years. They asked Dicky Betts to dry up in 2000 and not come on the tour they were getting ready to start. Instead, Dicky sued the band and never played with them again for the last 14 years of the band's existence. Out of the four books I read about the Allman Brothers this year, this was the weakest one, yet it's not a bad read and can be entertaining for the most part. So . . . in good conscience I can recommend this book to those fans that love to hear and read anything that has to do with the Brothers, especially Greg.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    Interesting read. An honest memoir of a life in music. Loved his music for a long time. RIP brother Gregory!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carey Shea

    I am a big fan of the Allman Brothers and have been since 1970. I still listen to them. I did not know much about Gregg Allman except he was married to Cher and had a son by her Elijah Blue. I was so glad he came out with this autobiography. I really liked it and learned so much about him. He is still mourning the death of his brother Duane. You can tell it weighs heavy on him. Gregg was a herion addict and did other drugs as well. Then he started drinking really bad. He is now clean and sober a I am a big fan of the Allman Brothers and have been since 1970. I still listen to them. I did not know much about Gregg Allman except he was married to Cher and had a son by her Elijah Blue. I was so glad he came out with this autobiography. I really liked it and learned so much about him. He is still mourning the death of his brother Duane. You can tell it weighs heavy on him. Gregg was a herion addict and did other drugs as well. Then he started drinking really bad. He is now clean and sober and loves his band. There were many difficulties with the Allman Brothers after Duane died. Dicky Betts was not a good person and had a huge ego. He did not get along with the band. At this time Gregg has no contact with him. Dickie was a drunk as well but when the whole band quit drugs and alcohol, Dickie's playing became subpar plus his behavior was erratic. That was when he left the band. The Allman Brothers still have a couple of the original players and Gregg seems happy now. He is single after being married 6 times. In his younger years he was a sex addict but he did not mention that in current times. I think his feeling now is that he will probably never get married because once he marries the woman the relationship goes to hell fast. He also has like 4 kids from 4 different mothers. He is very close to Duane's daughter as well. Greg has been through alot. He has chronic hepatitis C and ended up having a liver transplant. That was pretty recent. He blames his hep c on dirty needles in a tattoo parlor when he was in his early 20's. I would of thought it had to do with all the women he was with. Anyway, I liked this book very much and highly recommend it if you are an Allman Brothers fan. If you are not into Gregg and the band, it won't mean much to you.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bobby

    Let me preface this review by stating I have been a huge fan of the Allman Brothers Band music for the vast majority of my life. In fact, the first concert I saw was when I was in junior high school. The concert was at Berry College in Mount Berry, Georgia. This was the original line up of band members. I saw the band as recently as 2009 in Nashville, Tennessee. Gregg's voice was as powerful and as soulful as I have ever heard it. I have often told people that Gregg Allman is one of the most und Let me preface this review by stating I have been a huge fan of the Allman Brothers Band music for the vast majority of my life. In fact, the first concert I saw was when I was in junior high school. The concert was at Berry College in Mount Berry, Georgia. This was the original line up of band members. I saw the band as recently as 2009 in Nashville, Tennessee. Gregg's voice was as powerful and as soulful as I have ever heard it. I have often told people that Gregg Allman is one of the most underrated songwriters of our generation. So, naturally, I read this book with great interest and anticipation. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about not just the members of the Allman Brothers, but also about other musicians that played with the band. I never knew, for example, that one of the members of Widespread Panic was in Colonel Bruce Hampton's Aquarian Rescue Unit. (I used to have one of their albums; however, unfortunately, I gave it away to a friend a long, long time ago.) I loved reading about the band that I have spent (and continue to spend) countless hours listening to over and over again. I'd love to see the Brothers at least one more time, but their music will be with me forever. Reading about Duane, Berry, and really everybody was fantastic. If you're into music, I highly recommend this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Gregg Allman's autobiography was definitely an interesting read for me, having grown up listening to the Allman Brothers Band. I'm still not too sure what to make of Mr. Allman - or Gregory as he says in the book he prefers to be called. On the one hand he seems like someone who would make a good friend - he'd definitely have your back. But on the other hand, with all the drugs and drinking over the years - he has a ton of baggage and has burned a bunch of bridges. At times his boasting gets a l Gregg Allman's autobiography was definitely an interesting read for me, having grown up listening to the Allman Brothers Band. I'm still not too sure what to make of Mr. Allman - or Gregory as he says in the book he prefers to be called. On the one hand he seems like someone who would make a good friend - he'd definitely have your back. But on the other hand, with all the drugs and drinking over the years - he has a ton of baggage and has burned a bunch of bridges. At times his boasting gets a little tiresome as well. Allman's numerous chilling tales of conquest regarding women - his six failed marriages - and the aforementioned drinking, drugging and fighting all make for a sad story. That coupled with the tragedies everyone is aware of - the death of his talented brother Duane at only 24 years of age and the death a year later of another band member - makes for a somewhat depressing read. Those who wince at grammar and bad language shouldn't read this one either. The "F Bomb" appears on practically every page of the book, and Allman's terrible grammar feels like someone scratching on a chalkboard to me. The publisher apparently felt that leaving Allman uncensored and uncorrected gave him a more authentic voice. I suppose it did. Honestly - the book is interesting, it's probably just an acquired taste.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Snem

    Continue reading for a completely biased review of this book. It's biased for two reasons: 1) The Allman Brothers might be one of my Dad's top 5 favorite bands so I grew up on their music. It reminds me of my childhood and makes me happy. 2) I had the pleasure of meeting Gregg Allman at the signing for this very book. He was the sweetest, nicest man ever. I fully expected him to suggest we chat more over coffee afterwards. I soon realized he made every person in line that day feel the same way. Continue reading for a completely biased review of this book. It's biased for two reasons: 1) The Allman Brothers might be one of my Dad's top 5 favorite bands so I grew up on their music. It reminds me of my childhood and makes me happy. 2) I had the pleasure of meeting Gregg Allman at the signing for this very book. He was the sweetest, nicest man ever. I fully expected him to suggest we chat more over coffee afterwards. I soon realized he made every person in line that day feel the same way. He also made the reader feel that way, like you're not actually reading this story, but hearing him tell it to you on some sunny southern porch over a pitcher of sweet tea. Very insightful particularly about his lackings as a parent and his fear of being alone. I was very moved by the way he wrote about his brother with reverence but also acknowledging his shortcomings that often doesn't happen when someone dies young. I also really liked how he acknowledged, with what seemed like genuine gratitude, the people who helped him along the way (friends, band mates, roadies, Louise at H&H restaurant, etc.) It's not the most literary of books, but it's really great. I'm also not sure anyone would be interested if they're not a fan of the Allmans or that style of southern rock jammy music, but if you are I recommend it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Margie

    Um, wow . . . sex, drugs, and rock-n-roll. This memoir has that and much more. I was born and raised in Macon, GA where the Allman Brothers moved after signing with Capricorn Records. Reading about their time in Macon brought back a lot of memories - the Big House, Capricorn Records, Grants Lounge, Rose Hill Cemetery, Olcmulgee River, College Street, and even the restaurant he and Cher frequented is one my husband and I have celebrated an anniversary at. I love the Allman Brothers music - just e Um, wow . . . sex, drugs, and rock-n-roll. This memoir has that and much more. I was born and raised in Macon, GA where the Allman Brothers moved after signing with Capricorn Records. Reading about their time in Macon brought back a lot of memories - the Big House, Capricorn Records, Grants Lounge, Rose Hill Cemetery, Olcmulgee River, College Street, and even the restaurant he and Cher frequented is one my husband and I have celebrated an anniversary at. I love the Allman Brothers music - just enough blues, country, and rock mixed together. If you can get past all the cussing, it's a decent read. It's typical 70's and 80's band stuff. I think Gregg and Duane were very talented and had that desire to learn as much as they could and be the best. It's a shame to think how much better they might could have been without all of the drugs and alcohol they consumed. I was not aware of how many times he has been married and all of his children. It's great that he got sober towards the end of his life and forged some kind of relationship with his children.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.