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Bamboozled at the Revolution: How Big Media Lost Billions in the Battle for the Internet

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The 1990s was one of the most dynamic eras in American business history. Technology was advancing at such a rapid pace, with such widespread growth, and with such giddy enthusiasm from investors, that it seemed too good to last. It was. Media insider John Motavalli gives a vivid account from the front lines of the compelling drama that developed in the media industry duri The 1990s was one of the most dynamic eras in American business history. Technology was advancing at such a rapid pace, with such widespread growth, and with such giddy enthusiasm from investors, that it seemed too good to last. It was. Media insider John Motavalli gives a vivid account from the front lines of the compelling drama that developed in the media industry during this time, as old-world, advertising-driven companies thought they'd found a new world to dominate. But it led to some rather colossal failures. Time Warner's FSN was a multibillion-dollar interactive cable disaster and its sequel, the Web-based Pathfinder, was even more embarrasing. Disney, Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, and the New York Times Company also stumbled. These examples are just the tip of the iceberg: this struggle is one of the great business follies of our time and continued until January 2000, when AOL swallowed up Time Warner, a first-of-its-kind marriage of new and old. Fast paced and exciting, Bamboozled at the Revolution reveals a period of wonderful excess and is sure to join Barbarians at the Gate, Burn Rate, and, more recently, The New New Thing as the definitive portraits of unique eras in business.


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The 1990s was one of the most dynamic eras in American business history. Technology was advancing at such a rapid pace, with such widespread growth, and with such giddy enthusiasm from investors, that it seemed too good to last. It was. Media insider John Motavalli gives a vivid account from the front lines of the compelling drama that developed in the media industry duri The 1990s was one of the most dynamic eras in American business history. Technology was advancing at such a rapid pace, with such widespread growth, and with such giddy enthusiasm from investors, that it seemed too good to last. It was. Media insider John Motavalli gives a vivid account from the front lines of the compelling drama that developed in the media industry during this time, as old-world, advertising-driven companies thought they'd found a new world to dominate. But it led to some rather colossal failures. Time Warner's FSN was a multibillion-dollar interactive cable disaster and its sequel, the Web-based Pathfinder, was even more embarrasing. Disney, Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, and the New York Times Company also stumbled. These examples are just the tip of the iceberg: this struggle is one of the great business follies of our time and continued until January 2000, when AOL swallowed up Time Warner, a first-of-its-kind marriage of new and old. Fast paced and exciting, Bamboozled at the Revolution reveals a period of wonderful excess and is sure to join Barbarians at the Gate, Burn Rate, and, more recently, The New New Thing as the definitive portraits of unique eras in business.

32 review for Bamboozled at the Revolution: How Big Media Lost Billions in the Battle for the Internet

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael Harper

    John motavalli of antquebookcentral is disnonest . This book is terrible

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chuck

    This is one of those books that warms an anti-capitalist’s heart. Motavalli is an excellent writer who knows how to frame a story that involves many players and many organizations. I chuckled throughout reading this book as I read case after case where big important CEOs made stupid decisions concerning the Internet. The chief player in this sorry story is the Time Warner corporation, which threw billions of dollars after bad ideas and then managed to get bought up by AOL 3 months before the Int This is one of those books that warms an anti-capitalist’s heart. Motavalli is an excellent writer who knows how to frame a story that involves many players and many organizations. I chuckled throughout reading this book as I read case after case where big important CEOs made stupid decisions concerning the Internet. The chief player in this sorry story is the Time Warner corporation, which threw billions of dollars after bad ideas and then managed to get bought up by AOL 3 months before the Internet bubble burst. Bamboozled gives lots of insight into how the world of big media and publishing work. It details the players at the major companies and traces their incestuous careers as they jump back and forth between companies. The book follows the big deals that either fall flat on their face or are consummated in ways never intended by the people who initiated them. You have to wonder how these companies manage to stay in business.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Peter Espelien

    It was a very good book about what big media company's did to screw up the internet. I thought it was very intriguing, because it explains in detail what stupid things big media company's did with the internet and how they lost millions and billions of dollars. The most vivid and shocking example of one of these huge mistakes was the fact that Time Warner thought that interactive TV was actually going to take off. TW also declined to buy into Yahoo! or Netscape.com even after both came to them a It was a very good book about what big media company's did to screw up the internet. I thought it was very intriguing, because it explains in detail what stupid things big media company's did with the internet and how they lost millions and billions of dollars. The most vivid and shocking example of one of these huge mistakes was the fact that Time Warner thought that interactive TV was actually going to take off. TW also declined to buy into Yahoo! or Netscape.com even after both came to them and asked to be acquired. After reading the book I was left wondering about why the big media company's were so clueless as to think that interactive TV was going to be the thing but not realize the potential in the internet until it was too late. I would definitely recommend it to somebody that likes computers who asked for a book to read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Martin

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gaurav Makkar

  6. 4 out of 5

    John

  7. 4 out of 5

    Megan Ochoa

  8. 5 out of 5

    David Churbuck

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Jeffrey

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Bussiere

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shayne Bowman

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rafat Ali

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Collins

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chad

  16. 4 out of 5

    John

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Kay

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Lake

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christa (linuxchic)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Virginiamichelle

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chaoticreader

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Lintott

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael DAlto

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  27. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  28. 4 out of 5

    Allen

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rongbiao

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marko Calvo-Cruz

  31. 4 out of 5

    Sahra

  32. 4 out of 5

    Dilshad

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