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Trouble with water / H. L. Gold -- Nothing in the rules / L. Sprague de Camp -- Fruit of knowledge / C. L. Moore -- Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius / Jorge Luis Borges -- Compleat werewolf / Anthony Boucher -- Small assassin / Ray Bradbury -- Lottery / Shirley Jackson -- Our fair city / Robert A. Heinlein -- There shall be no darkness / James Blish -- Loom of darkness / Jack Vance -- Man Trouble with water / H. L. Gold -- Nothing in the rules / L. Sprague de Camp -- Fruit of knowledge / C. L. Moore -- Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius / Jorge Luis Borges -- Compleat werewolf / Anthony Boucher -- Small assassin / Ray Bradbury -- Lottery / Shirley Jackson -- Our fair city / Robert A. Heinlein -- There shall be no darkness / James Blish -- Loom of darkness / Jack Vance -- Man who sold rope to the gnoles / Margaret St. Clair -- Silken-swift / Theodore Sturgeon -- Golem / Avram Davidson -- Operation afreet / Poul Anderson -- That hell-bound train / Robert Bloch -- Bazaar of the bizarre / Fritz Leiber -- Come lady death / Peter S. Beagle -- Drowned giant / J. G. Ballard -- Narrow valley / R. A. Lafferty -- Faith of our fathers / Philip K. Dick -- Ghost of a Model T / Clifford D. Simak -- Demoness / Tanith Lee -- Jeffty is five / Harlan Ellison -- Detective of dreams / Gene Wolfe -- Unicorn variations / Roger Zelazny -- Basileus / Robert Silverberg -- Jaguar Hunter / Lucius Shepard -- Buffalo gals, won't you come out tonight / Ursula K. Le Guin -- Bears discover fire / Terry Bisson -- Tower of Babylon / Ted Chiang.


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Trouble with water / H. L. Gold -- Nothing in the rules / L. Sprague de Camp -- Fruit of knowledge / C. L. Moore -- Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius / Jorge Luis Borges -- Compleat werewolf / Anthony Boucher -- Small assassin / Ray Bradbury -- Lottery / Shirley Jackson -- Our fair city / Robert A. Heinlein -- There shall be no darkness / James Blish -- Loom of darkness / Jack Vance -- Man Trouble with water / H. L. Gold -- Nothing in the rules / L. Sprague de Camp -- Fruit of knowledge / C. L. Moore -- Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius / Jorge Luis Borges -- Compleat werewolf / Anthony Boucher -- Small assassin / Ray Bradbury -- Lottery / Shirley Jackson -- Our fair city / Robert A. Heinlein -- There shall be no darkness / James Blish -- Loom of darkness / Jack Vance -- Man who sold rope to the gnoles / Margaret St. Clair -- Silken-swift / Theodore Sturgeon -- Golem / Avram Davidson -- Operation afreet / Poul Anderson -- That hell-bound train / Robert Bloch -- Bazaar of the bizarre / Fritz Leiber -- Come lady death / Peter S. Beagle -- Drowned giant / J. G. Ballard -- Narrow valley / R. A. Lafferty -- Faith of our fathers / Philip K. Dick -- Ghost of a Model T / Clifford D. Simak -- Demoness / Tanith Lee -- Jeffty is five / Harlan Ellison -- Detective of dreams / Gene Wolfe -- Unicorn variations / Roger Zelazny -- Basileus / Robert Silverberg -- Jaguar Hunter / Lucius Shepard -- Buffalo gals, won't you come out tonight / Ursula K. Le Guin -- Bears discover fire / Terry Bisson -- Tower of Babylon / Ted Chiang.

30 review for The Fantasy Hall of Fame

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    It's inevitable with any anthology that I'll like some stories more than others, and in most cases I end up not liking some at all. I shouldn't have been surprised that this was still true even of an anthology that wasn't chosen by a single editor, but by vote of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America membership (as at about 1992, when the "and Fantasy" part was added to the organisation's title). There are 30 stories. The rules limited each author to being represented by only one st It's inevitable with any anthology that I'll like some stories more than others, and in most cases I end up not liking some at all. I shouldn't have been surprised that this was still true even of an anthology that wasn't chosen by a single editor, but by vote of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America membership (as at about 1992, when the "and Fantasy" part was added to the organisation's title). There are 30 stories. The rules limited each author to being represented by only one story, whichever one of theirs received the most votes, although in several cases there were multiple stories by the same author nominated. They're presented in chronological order, from 1939 (when Unknown magazine was founded as a venue for fantasy as we now know it) to 1990. Inevitably, most are famous classics in the field, and in many cases I've read them in other collections, but it's good to have them all in one place. **** "Trouble With Water," H.L. Gold: as the editor notes, Campbell's Unknown published stories that - like the SF stories appearing in his better-known magazine Astounding - rigorously worked out the consequences of a single difference in the world, but chose a magical difference instead of a scientific difference. In this story, the protagonist is cursed by a water gnome to be unable to do anything with water (wash, drink, or touch). The characters are all stereotypes, mostly Jewish apart from the Irish cop, but they're affectionate stereotypes, and manage to have some dimension to them. It's amusing. **** "Nothing In the Rules," L. Sprague de Camp: here, it's a mermaid in a swimming competition. It's a decent story, with comedy, drama and a touch of frustrated romance. ** "Fruit of Knowledge," C.L. Moore: I'm a big Moore fan, but I couldn't finish this story based on the Garden of Eden and the character Lilith from Jewish mythology. I found it heavy going, tedious even. Surely there's a better Moore story than this that could have been included; one of the Jirel of Joiry tales, for example. Though there was a hard limit of 17,500 words, and perhaps those stories are longer. ** "Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius," Jorge Luis Borges: I didn't finish this one either. It's about a fictional encyclopaedia that somehow becomes factual, but a lot of it is just infodump of the contents of the encyclopaedia, and it didn't keep my interest. **** "The Compleat Werewolf," Anthony Boucher: a story from 1942 filled with humour and romance and action, it stands up well more than 70 years later. "The Small Assassin," Ray Bradbury: I skipped this one, because although I admire Bradbury as a writer, I'm not actually much of a fan of his stories, if that makes any sense at all. I glanced at enough of it to decide that it was more or less horror, and I wasn't in the mood. "The Lottery," Shirley Jackson: I skipped this one too, having read it before and not particularly wanting to read it again. It's a brilliant story, but dark. **** "Our Fair City," Robert A. Heinlein: I'd just recently read this in another collection, and while I enjoyed it, I didn't want to read it again so soon. Humour, corrupt politicians, the citizens standing up against them, all good stuff. **** "There Shall Be No Darkness," James Blish: another werewolf story, which I didn't feel belonged in this collection. The mood is horror, and the in-world explanation is SF; where's the fantasy? It's a decent enough story, though. ** "The Loom of Darkness," Jack Vance: I'm no fan of Vance's overwrought prose and distant, unemotional and unlikeable characters, so I didn't enjoy this particularly. Sword and sorcery, a rogue, but not a loveable one. **** "The Man Who Sold Rope to the Gnolls," Margaret St Clair: again, more horror than fantasy, to me, but a good story that sustains a mocking, almost light tone against very dark events. ***** "The Silken-Swift," Theodore Sturgeon: I'd read this recently in the same collection as the Heinlein, so I didn't reread it, though it's an excellent story, emotionally powerful and beautifully written. **** "The Golem," Avram Davidson: another Jewish author playing with Jewish stereotypes in a warm and affectionate way. The mundanity of the elderly couple plays against what I'm tempted to call the attempted darkness of the 'golem' - which is technological rather than magical, so this is, again, arguably SF, not fantasy. **** "Operation Afreet," Poul Anderson: recently read in the other collection, not reread, and another werewolf story (making three werewolves in this volume). Again, too, humour and romance and action, and a well-written piece. **** "That Hell-Bound Train," Robert Bloch: a deal-with-the-devil story, another common fantasy trope, particularly well executed by this master of the creepy, and closely approaching horror. **** "The Bazaar of the Bizarre," Fritz Lieber: although I find the Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser stories, of which this is one, darker and grittier than I usually prefer, I still enjoy them because they're so well done and so atmospheric. Lieber was excellent at evoking the strange and sinister in a sword & sorcery setting, and that ability is on full display here. **** "Come Lady Death," Peter S. Beagle: I've just read Beagle's latest novel, and it's interesting to compare it to this story from more than 50 years ago, early in his career. The story is much more mannered, with strong hints of literary descent from Poe's "Masque of the Red Death," but it's still powerful, and worthy of its inclusion here. *** "The Drowned Giant," J.G. Ballard: a style of fantasy I don't have much time for, in which the fantastic enters the mundane world and is treated mundanely. Also a 'story' which is a description of a series of observations, not plotted, and on the whole I prefer even short stories to have a plot unless they're spectacular in some other way. This isn't. *** "Narrow Valley," R.A. Lafferty: I'm not sure why this is the Lafferty story that always gets collected. He wrote others, I'm sure, just as good. But it's a quintessential Lafferty story: surreal characters and events, perhaps a bit flat, amusing in an offbeat way. *** "Faith of Our Fathers," Philip K. Dick: like basically every Dick story ever, it's about what is real, and the untrustworthiness of perception and consciousness. The setting, in a world taken over by the Communist powers, is interesting, but I'm afraid I'm just not a big fan of this author's work. (Originally appeared in Harlan Ellison's Dangerous Visions anthology.) **** "The Ghost of a Model T," Clifford D. Simak: a beautiful example of a story without much in the way of a plot, that's more about a character's realisations - and, in this case, memories and perspective on life - than any events or struggle, but nevertheless works. Simak evokes the setting so extremely well that a plot isn't really necessary. **** "The Demoness," Tanith Lee: I'm not a particular fan of Lee's dark, sex-soaked stories, but she does them well, and this is a classic example of one. It did leave me with sympathy for the title character, which was quite an achievement, all things considered, so she gets a fourth star. ***** "Jeffty is Five," Harlan Ellison: a fine story, which I'd read before recently enough that I didn't reread it. Very human and moving. *** "The Detective of Dreams," Gene Wolfe: I can hardly cavil at this being the story that represents Wolfe, since it's the only one of his I feel I mostly understand, and even sort of like a bit. What surprises me is that, apparently, a lot of other people like it too, despite its overt religious message. The 19th-century voice is beautifully and expertly done, though. **** "Unicorn Variations," Roger Zelazny: I'm a huge Zelazny fan, though more of his novels than his short stories - not that his short stories aren't good, but the longer works give me more time to sink into his powerfully imaginative settings. This one isn't, maybe, as imaginative a setting as some, but the story of a chess game for high stakes is enjoyable, and the touches of whimsy are classic Zelazny. *** "Basileus," Robert Silverberg: another author whose craft I appreciate but whose actual stories are not my favourites; there's something dark and cynical and alienated at the heart of them that puts me off. This tale of a programmer who fills his computer with angels is no exception. **** "The Jaguar Hunter," Lucius Shepard: I haven't read a lot of Shepard, but this is an impressive story, with a lot of depth to it. It uses a South American setting to compare and contrast Western consumerism with the older ways, more in tune with nature, but also more violent and savage. *** "Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight," Ursula K. Le Guin: I am a Le Guin fan, but more of some of her other work than of this. It's beautifully done, and incorporates rich material from Native American legend, but sometimes her stories lack story, to their detriment - at least in my eyes - and this is one of those. *** "Bears Discover Fire," Terry Bisson: much awarded and frequently collected, but I've never quite seen what the fuss was about. Another more-or-less plotless story; a series of events happen, but for me they don't cohere together into an effective whole. I'm probably missing something. **** "Tower of Babylon," Ted Chiang: with this story we are, in a sense, back at the beginning, because, like the stories in Campbell's Unknown magazine, it's a rigorously worked out exploration of a fantastical speculation, in this case about the structure of the universe (what if it was as some ancient civilisations believed?) The main character is somewhat flat, and largely there as an observer, but the working out of the premise is well enough done that I enjoyed it. I don't know if there's an overall conclusion to be drawn from such a diverse collection stretching over more than 50 years. Early 90s SFF writers liked funny, action-packed werewolf stories? Stories can work without a plot if you do something else amazing? Rich description is a big help, but isn't essential? SF and horror stories sometimes get called fantasy? There's no one common factor in great fantasy stories? All of those seem to be true. For me, some of these were amazing, others disappointing, but on average, they were fine, enjoyable pieces showcasing the considerable talents of their authors.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    this anthology really deserves 3.5 stars but i don't want to round up in this case. it's a huge collection, which i really liked, and some of the authors i'd never heard of before really surprised me and i loved their work. also to my surprise i've actually read quite a few of the stories before, unbeknownst to me, since they weren't by the authors names who i recognized straight off. i don't think the editors did a good job at all. that's my problem. you have such a huge repertoire to choose fro this anthology really deserves 3.5 stars but i don't want to round up in this case. it's a huge collection, which i really liked, and some of the authors i'd never heard of before really surprised me and i loved their work. also to my surprise i've actually read quite a few of the stories before, unbeknownst to me, since they weren't by the authors names who i recognized straight off. i don't think the editors did a good job at all. that's my problem. you have such a huge repertoire to choose from, even back when the book was published, and these are the stories you choose from authors such as pkd and ellison and tanith lee to throw in here? REALLY? le guin i can understand, as the more i read her work the less i like anything she writes. but i also feel like many of the stories didn't even belong, as they were neither sci-fi or fantasy but bizarre instead. and even when this book was published i can think of other authors of the genres who won the same awards who would have made far better replacements for some of those published. i felt it odd that the editors felt like reaching so far back into the repertoires of these authors and their works, avoiding at all costs anything remotely modern even if it fit the criteria better and was better written. just because it's old doesn't mean it's good. ground-breaking perhaps, but not necessarily better. but i did like so many of the stories, so i can't knock the whole book. i have a new host of authors to look to for other reading material, which is why i even bother with short story collections anyway.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Definitely a great intro to the world of the fantasy short story, although some of the material will be overly familiar to the long-time fan. Props to this book for including my favorite Peter S. Beagle short story, "Come Lady Death." Definitely a great intro to the world of the fantasy short story, although some of the material will be overly familiar to the long-time fan. Props to this book for including my favorite Peter S. Beagle short story, "Come Lady Death."

  4. 4 out of 5

    BL834

    For a Fantasy "best of" collection I was really disappointed. Much preferred "Epic: Legends of Fantasy" (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1...) For a Fantasy "best of" collection I was really disappointed. Much preferred "Epic: Legends of Fantasy" (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1...)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    DNF, seemed more like horror stories than fantasy. 1 Star

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ebenmaessiger

    "Trouble with Water," by H.L. Gold (1939): 3 - So, this is a really bad story, but not necessarily in a way that antagonizes me against it, and maybe especially because it’s so bad. Because it can’t help but wear its amateurnish so lightly, because this reads like the most benign version of many daytrading amateur stories. And there’s something nice maybe(?) in that attempt. Or, maybe I’m just being charitable to this and not to the other on account of some faux-nostalgia for early 50s New York "Trouble with Water," by H.L. Gold (1939): 3 - So, this is a really bad story, but not necessarily in a way that antagonizes me against it, and maybe especially because it’s so bad. Because it can’t help but wear its amateurnish so lightly, because this reads like the most benign version of many daytrading amateur stories. And there’s something nice maybe(?) in that attempt. Or, maybe I’m just being charitable to this and not to the other on account of some faux-nostalgia for early 50s New York. And here we do have an affable-enough Jewish man, clearly mining something out of the mix of cultures in the city, and envisioning a real working-class mensch, beset by life on all sides, just trying to get by. It’s just too bad the story’s so hackneyed--man meets and gets cursed by water gnome, water flees from him, meets Irish friend, and they find way to break the curse. Still, there is something folklorish about its composition and telling that nicely makes its failures less than genre failures and more in line with a type of communal telling and narrative I’m less familiar with, and maybe less predisposed to simply dismiss wholesale. Also, based on the construction of this anthology, this so clearly speaks of a titan in the field being honored on account of that fellow-feeling, although he’s a publisher and not a writer. "Nothing in the Rules," by L. Sprague de Camp (1939): 3 - Good god, this book. Another interminable piece of belated juvenalia; fantasy as adult bedtime story. These are the types that I could either write two pages or two sentences about, and both are about as deserving--former, cause it's filled with clear allusions to the class, status, and precise time and place of its construction and author, as well as just as many interesting markers revealing aspects of genre literature history and it's estranged relationship to the broader literary world, and the other just because it's decades-old weak genre writing, meriting not too much thought either now or then. The story: what if a mermaid swam in a meet?! “That Hell-Bound Train,” by Robert Bloch (1958): 7.5 - An ultimately shallow tale, a famous one at that, and you see the connections between the two: like the workman’s ditty framing the story, Bloch’s largely smuggled in a folk tale in horror clothes, as evidenced by the flattened “horror”, the breezy narrative development, the moral message of the immoral tale, and the demotic affectations of style and substance. Take from those what you will, but it creates a certain constrained spectrum of quality control — as hard to rise above a certain level as it is to fall below it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mark Wilson

    “The Fantasy Hall of Fame” introduces the Sci-Fi/Fantasy reader to fantasy stories that the ‘Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America’ felt deserved a place of prominence in the world of speculative fiction. They selected 30 stories from 1939 -1990 that they considered classics. It ranges from the humorously unserious good natured fun of fantasy to the more serious thought provoking ideas fantasy has to offer. It includes the lighthearted, the terrifying, the morality tale and the mini-epic “The Fantasy Hall of Fame” introduces the Sci-Fi/Fantasy reader to fantasy stories that the ‘Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America’ felt deserved a place of prominence in the world of speculative fiction. They selected 30 stories from 1939 -1990 that they considered classics. It ranges from the humorously unserious good natured fun of fantasy to the more serious thought provoking ideas fantasy has to offer. It includes the lighthearted, the terrifying, the morality tale and the mini-epic. Most of the stories are written by writers known for their science fiction. This anthology contains…. a man whom water cannot touch, a mermaid who enters a swimming completion, 2 tales of biblical fiction, an encyclopedia from another world, 3 tales of werewolves one involving fighting Nazis, another one that takes place at a dinner party and one where the werewolf is involved in a magical war where the enemy has a jinni for a weapon, a killer baby, a classic dystopian tale involving rocks, an intelligent whirlwind, 2 tales of sword and sorcery, creatures called Gnoles, a unicorn and a unholy virgin, a confused golem, a deal with the devil, a ball where death is the guest of honor, a dead giant washed on the shores of a village and how the locals react to it, a valley that could have been designed by time lords, a drug induced version of god, a time-traveling intelligent model-t, a woman who sucks the life out of men and who chases one that got away, a boy who perpetually stays five (perhaps the best in the collection) a detective mystery involving dreams, a chess match with a unicorn for the fate of the world, computer generated angels, a girl who can transform into a jaguar, a girl who stumbles into a strange world of north American desert animals, and the evolution of bears. This walk through the halls of fame has some real masterpieces worth reading, some stories worth forgetting and a few that belong somewhere else. If I were picking out the stories, there are quite a few I would throw out and others I would bring in and of course some I would leave as is. It’s overall an entertaining (if long) read of some truly great fantasy stories. Grade B

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dark-Draco

    This is a collection of 22 short stories that have a fantasy theme. They aren't the most modern of stories, as the book was first published in 1983, but the stories are great. Some of my favourites... "The Sword of Welleran" where ghostly heros come back from the dead to save a city they love. "The Women of the Wood" where a lonely traveller becomes embroiled with saving a wood from destruction. "The Valley of the Worm" where a hero has to destroy a hellish worm like beast that haunts the nearby va This is a collection of 22 short stories that have a fantasy theme. They aren't the most modern of stories, as the book was first published in 1983, but the stories are great. Some of my favourites... "The Sword of Welleran" where ghostly heros come back from the dead to save a city they love. "The Women of the Wood" where a lonely traveller becomes embroiled with saving a wood from destruction. "The Valley of the Worm" where a hero has to destroy a hellish worm like beast that haunts the nearby valley. "Black God's Kiss" where a brave commander travels into hell to find a weapon aginst her oppressors. "Mazirian the Magician" where an evil magician persues a mystery woman through the woods. "The Silken Swift" My absolute favourite, where an evil girl gets her comeuppance at the hands of a mythical beast. "Pretty Maggie Moneyeyes" about a haunted gambling machine. Just right for dipping in and out of as the thought takes you, or devouring in one go.

  9. 4 out of 5

    S.S.

    I really enjoyed this book. There were a lot of good stories in here (and some which weren't quite so good, even though they weren't actually horrible). I'm more of a fan of 'serious' fantasy (and high fantasy) rather than 'comic' fantasy, however. (although, having said that, I do usually enjoy Terry Pratchett's books.) As such, I preferred the more serious tales on offer here. My favourite tale in this book has to be 'The Silken Swift' by Theodore Sturgeon, but I did enjoy quite a few of the ot I really enjoyed this book. There were a lot of good stories in here (and some which weren't quite so good, even though they weren't actually horrible). I'm more of a fan of 'serious' fantasy (and high fantasy) rather than 'comic' fantasy, however. (although, having said that, I do usually enjoy Terry Pratchett's books.) As such, I preferred the more serious tales on offer here. My favourite tale in this book has to be 'The Silken Swift' by Theodore Sturgeon, but I did enjoy quite a few of the others almost as much (for example - The Women of the Wood by A. Merritt). This is another book which I know I will be enjoying again in the future. Jolly good!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Purnima Bhagria

    This book was amazing! i love the ending it was the most intense part! i recommend this book for people that are into anthology,fantasy, and action a book filled with packed info its interesting to know about this book because of all the true facts you may think by looking at the cover its not a good book it may seem boring but actually no that's not true the thing is the facts are all TRUE! and that surprised me and seriously surprisingly i loved the book and i think you would too (: give it a This book was amazing! i love the ending it was the most intense part! i recommend this book for people that are into anthology,fantasy, and action a book filled with packed info its interesting to know about this book because of all the true facts you may think by looking at the cover its not a good book it may seem boring but actually no that's not true the thing is the facts are all TRUE! and that surprised me and seriously surprisingly i loved the book and i think you would too (: give it a try!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tzar

    Niejednego zdziwić może, jak szeroko pojmowanym gatunkiem jest fantasy. I taka też jest ta antologia. Niewiele tu opowiadań kojarzących się z "typowym" fantasy. Poziom bardzo różny, z kilkoma perełkami i kilkoma nieporozumieniami, przeważają jednak całkiem niezłe utwory. Zaskakujące jest to, że nie znalazło się tu ani jedno opowiadanie Roberta E. Howarda o Conanie. Niejednego zdziwić może, jak szeroko pojmowanym gatunkiem jest fantasy. I taka też jest ta antologia. Niewiele tu opowiadań kojarzących się z "typowym" fantasy. Poziom bardzo różny, z kilkoma perełkami i kilkoma nieporozumieniami, przeważają jednak całkiem niezłe utwory. Zaskakujące jest to, że nie znalazło się tu ani jedno opowiadanie Roberta E. Howarda o Conanie.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Daphnar

    A classic compendium of stories. Enjoy old favorites (The Lottery by Shirley Jackson) and be introduced to those you should have read. That said, I found the quality of the stories a bit variable, ranging from outstanding to just head-scratching (still no idea what archetypal fairy tale Gene Wolfe was referencing in The Detective of Dreams).

  13. 4 out of 5

    bluetyson

    Fantasy Hall of Fame by Robert Silverberg (1998)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    All the stories seemed so depressing. Maybe I was just short storied out...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Juho

  16. 5 out of 5

    Landon Ronay

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark Gibson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dennistag

  20. 4 out of 5

    annikki

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

  22. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  23. 5 out of 5

    Karolina

  24. 4 out of 5

    James

  25. 4 out of 5

    danny

  26. 4 out of 5

    William Lexner

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michał Wilczyński

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessy Faiz

  29. 5 out of 5

    Pat Donohue

  30. 4 out of 5

    Silverraven

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