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Covenant Theology: A Reformed and Baptistic Perspective on God's Covenants

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More than 30 years in the making, from Greg Nichols' class notes comes a new volume that will help those who are Reformed and Baptistic understand the vital subject of God's covenants from the perspective of those persuaded of Disciple's Baptism. This volume is the first of the Scriptural and Systematic Studies Series by Greg Nichols. Baptists who embrace their historic Ca More than 30 years in the making, from Greg Nichols' class notes comes a new volume that will help those who are Reformed and Baptistic understand the vital subject of God's covenants from the perspective of those persuaded of Disciple's Baptism. This volume is the first of the Scriptural and Systematic Studies Series by Greg Nichols. Baptists who embrace their historic Calvinistic and Covenantal roots have long since needed a robust and comprehensive treatment of Covenant Theology that includes the nuanced interpretations of the biblical covenants that a baptistic hermeneutic requires. This treatment by Greg Nichols does just that and more. - Publisher.


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More than 30 years in the making, from Greg Nichols' class notes comes a new volume that will help those who are Reformed and Baptistic understand the vital subject of God's covenants from the perspective of those persuaded of Disciple's Baptism. This volume is the first of the Scriptural and Systematic Studies Series by Greg Nichols. Baptists who embrace their historic Ca More than 30 years in the making, from Greg Nichols' class notes comes a new volume that will help those who are Reformed and Baptistic understand the vital subject of God's covenants from the perspective of those persuaded of Disciple's Baptism. This volume is the first of the Scriptural and Systematic Studies Series by Greg Nichols. Baptists who embrace their historic Calvinistic and Covenantal roots have long since needed a robust and comprehensive treatment of Covenant Theology that includes the nuanced interpretations of the biblical covenants that a baptistic hermeneutic requires. This treatment by Greg Nichols does just that and more. - Publisher.

30 review for Covenant Theology: A Reformed and Baptistic Perspective on God's Covenants

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This book presents a 20th century reformed baptist view, but with some additional doctrinal problems. The book provided some useful systematic overviews of the covenants and historical theology pertaining to covenant theology, but didn't contribute much to what I have already read on covenant theology other than some of the historical theology chapters at the beginning. I would recommend Covenant Theology, A Baptist Distinctive edited by Earl Blackburn as a better introduction to 20th century re This book presents a 20th century reformed baptist view, but with some additional doctrinal problems. The book provided some useful systematic overviews of the covenants and historical theology pertaining to covenant theology, but didn't contribute much to what I have already read on covenant theology other than some of the historical theology chapters at the beginning. I would recommend Covenant Theology, A Baptist Distinctive edited by Earl Blackburn as a better introduction to 20th century reformed baptist covenant theology, that avoids Nichols' aberrant views regarding the covenant of works. The Appendix on the Covenant of Works presents some very dangerous views regarding the covenant of works, for a useful overview and response see the post on Brandon Adam's blog: https://contrast2.wordpress.com/2013/... Some of the categories for the covenants seemed to overlap and be contradictory such as his category for the New Covenant and Messianic Covenant which overlapped in most of their aspects and appeared to be labeling different aspects of the fulfillment of the covenant of grace in the New Covenant as being divided between the New Covenant and Messianic Covenant without exegetical support. One big problem was that since Nichols' book was first published in 2011 the Nehemiah & John Owen volume From Adam to Christ was readily available to him having been republished in 2005 by RBAP. If you are writing a book on Reformed Baptist Covenant Theology and ignore Nehemiah Coxe's contribution to federal theology, then it is a big loss since he was most likely the editor of the 1689 LBC, so his work on covenant theology is crucial for understanding chapter 7 of the 1689 LBC. Nichols' work could have improved a lot from citing Coxe which would have given him a more orthodox understanding of the Covenant of Works as well as 1689 federalism rather than assuming primarily a paedobatpist federalism model. I would recommend Neheiah Coxe & John Owen, From Adam to Christ, and The Distinctiveness of Reformed Baptist Covenant Theology by Pascal Denault as the 2 best primary resources for understanding chapter 7 of the 1689 LBC consistently in contrast to Westminister Federalism.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jake Litwin

    Not only Reformed Baptist, but as well as Reformed Presbyterians can be encouraged from this book and appreciate how much similarity there is within the roots of covenant theology as well as the differences.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alex Lomangino

    Great. A decent take on covenant theology in its traditional formulation with a Baptist view. One big glaring issue is that Nichols doesn't hold to the covenant of works. I think a the traditional view of covenant theology is more consistent than what some are calling 1689 Federalism. However, to not hold hard and fast to the covenant of works opens up all kinds of issues. Great. A decent take on covenant theology in its traditional formulation with a Baptist view. One big glaring issue is that Nichols doesn't hold to the covenant of works. I think a the traditional view of covenant theology is more consistent than what some are calling 1689 Federalism. However, to not hold hard and fast to the covenant of works opens up all kinds of issues.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nick Sommers

    A very solid book on Reformed Baptist Covenant Theology. Nichols is an excellent theologian. There is much to learn from this book for those seeking to solidify their understanding of the highly important biblical theme of God's covenants. A very solid book on Reformed Baptist Covenant Theology. Nichols is an excellent theologian. There is much to learn from this book for those seeking to solidify their understanding of the highly important biblical theme of God's covenants.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Taylor DeSoto

    An overall accurate and faithful handling of Baptistic covenant theology. There are a few places where I disagree, but these places are minor. All Reformed Baptists must read this.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Decker

    Nothing in this that was overly remarkable. I think 1689 federalism has far more to offer than Nichols' 20th century baptist covenant theology. Nothing in this that was overly remarkable. I think 1689 federalism has far more to offer than Nichols' 20th century baptist covenant theology.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    Excellent!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dane Jöhannsson

    Though Nichols at times uses different terminology and refuses to use a few historical terms this still remains one of the best treatments of the subject.

  9. 5 out of 5

    B

    Greg Nichols' Covenant Theology is a must read for every reformed Baptist. The book starts out slowly at first, but it picks up in Chapter 6 'Summary of the Classic Reformed Doctrine'. Mr. Nichols shows that the Covenant of Grace is the same for the OT & NT; every elect individual is saved by heart circumcision that creates faith and repentance through the regeneration of the Holy Spirit. However, there are conditional, temporal promises to the nation of Israel in the OT that do not transfer to Greg Nichols' Covenant Theology is a must read for every reformed Baptist. The book starts out slowly at first, but it picks up in Chapter 6 'Summary of the Classic Reformed Doctrine'. Mr. Nichols shows that the Covenant of Grace is the same for the OT & NT; every elect individual is saved by heart circumcision that creates faith and repentance through the regeneration of the Holy Spirit. However, there are conditional, temporal promises to the nation of Israel in the OT that do not transfer to the NT. This book requires deep thought, but it is definitely worth the time to read and study.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Wes Bredenhof

    Interesting presentation of a Baptist approach to covenant theology, but not convincing. The presentation of other views in the first part of the book is rather sloppy. For instance, the author constantly refers to the Three Forms of Unity as "The Triple Knowledge." Also says that the doctrine of presumptive regeneration arises logically from the TFU -- I don't think he even knows what the controversy over presumptive regeneration in Reformed churches was really about. Interesting presentation of a Baptist approach to covenant theology, but not convincing. The presentation of other views in the first part of the book is rather sloppy. For instance, the author constantly refers to the Three Forms of Unity as "The Triple Knowledge." Also says that the doctrine of presumptive regeneration arises logically from the TFU -- I don't think he even knows what the controversy over presumptive regeneration in Reformed churches was really about.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jason Lyle

    A great book if someone wants to understand covenant theology. Especially coming from a baptist background. A little more editing would have been nice. And grammar was not that great considering the quality of education the author has. But over all a good book

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chris Whisonant

    This was an excellent resource and is an important work for Baptists today. Nichols does a good job at putting the pieces of the puzzle together in this book. I'm looking forward to seeing the other books in this series published. This was an excellent resource and is an important work for Baptists today. Nichols does a good job at putting the pieces of the puzzle together in this book. I'm looking forward to seeing the other books in this series published.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Dunn

    A stout read that I wish mor Baptist should read

  14. 5 out of 5

    vittore paleni

    clear and well organized

  15. 5 out of 5

    Evan Knies

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joey Tomlinson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Noonan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kyle B

  20. 4 out of 5

    David Thommen

  21. 4 out of 5

    Zach Wiland

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Lyerly

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bobby Crenshaw

  24. 5 out of 5

    Wesley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eric Jefferds

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mike Wyatt

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Clayton

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paul Barth

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Brown

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris

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