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Foxfire 2: Ghost stories, spring wild plant foods, spinning and weaving, midwifing, burial customs, corn shuckin's, wagon making, and more affairs of plain living

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This second volume celebrates the rites and customs of Appalachia, featuring sections on ghost stories, spring wild plant foods, corn shuckin's, spinning and weaving, midwives, granny women, old-time burial customs, witches and haints, and wagon making. Table of Contents: Maude Shope 
Sourwood Honey 
Beekeeping Spring Wild Plant Foods 
Happy Dowdle Making an Ox Yoke 
Wagon Wheel This second volume celebrates the rites and customs of Appalachia, featuring sections on ghost stories, spring wild plant foods, corn shuckin's, spinning and weaving, midwives, granny women, old-time burial customs, witches and haints, and wagon making. Table of Contents: Maude Shope 
Sourwood Honey 
Beekeeping Spring Wild Plant Foods 
Happy Dowdle Making an Ox Yoke 
Wagon Wheels and Wagons 
Making a Tub Wheel Making a Foot-powered Lathe From Raising Sheep to Weaving Cloth 
How to Wash Clothes in an Iron Pot 
Anna Howard Midwives and Granny Women 
Old-time Burials Boogers, Witches, and Haints Corn Shuckin's, House Raisin's, Quiltin's, Pea Thrashin's, Singin's, Log Rollin's, Candy Pullin's, and... Kenny Runion


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This second volume celebrates the rites and customs of Appalachia, featuring sections on ghost stories, spring wild plant foods, corn shuckin's, spinning and weaving, midwives, granny women, old-time burial customs, witches and haints, and wagon making. Table of Contents: Maude Shope 
Sourwood Honey 
Beekeeping Spring Wild Plant Foods 
Happy Dowdle Making an Ox Yoke 
Wagon Wheel This second volume celebrates the rites and customs of Appalachia, featuring sections on ghost stories, spring wild plant foods, corn shuckin's, spinning and weaving, midwives, granny women, old-time burial customs, witches and haints, and wagon making. Table of Contents: Maude Shope 
Sourwood Honey 
Beekeeping Spring Wild Plant Foods 
Happy Dowdle Making an Ox Yoke 
Wagon Wheels and Wagons 
Making a Tub Wheel Making a Foot-powered Lathe From Raising Sheep to Weaving Cloth 
How to Wash Clothes in an Iron Pot 
Anna Howard Midwives and Granny Women 
Old-time Burials Boogers, Witches, and Haints Corn Shuckin's, House Raisin's, Quiltin's, Pea Thrashin's, Singin's, Log Rollin's, Candy Pullin's, and... Kenny Runion

30 review for Foxfire 2: Ghost stories, spring wild plant foods, spinning and weaving, midwifing, burial customs, corn shuckin's, wagon making, and more affairs of plain living

  1. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    This one that has ghost stories in it...rather amusing tales of "haints" that people have seen or heard about. The talk of corn shuckin's and quiltings and other community affairs really made me realize how much the industrial revolution changed our lives forever. Not just the skills but the community togetherness that these people had. All workin' and livin' and helpin' each other through good times and bad. I'm probably romanticizing way too much, but it's appealing to think about. Seems we've This one that has ghost stories in it...rather amusing tales of "haints" that people have seen or heard about. The talk of corn shuckin's and quiltings and other community affairs really made me realize how much the industrial revolution changed our lives forever. Not just the skills but the community togetherness that these people had. All workin' and livin' and helpin' each other through good times and bad. I'm probably romanticizing way too much, but it's appealing to think about. Seems we've lost the ability to be sociable or something.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James

    A continuation of the project begun in the first book, and just as good. I wish schools everywhere had young people doing projects like the one that resulted in these books.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    I confess that all I recall are the ghost stories that used the word "haint". I haven't needed any of the other stuff. I'm not a wagon-making kind of gal. I confess that all I recall are the ghost stories that used the word "haint". I haven't needed any of the other stuff. I'm not a wagon-making kind of gal.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Colin Mann

    Like any compilation, some of these articles are more engaging than others - particularly for me the descriptions of beekeeping and midwives. The perspective of the people interviewed is very interesting not only compared to our time, but also to the time the interviews were taking place (there is a lot of comments about the moon landing). One thing that strikes me is the detail these students put into their articles when documenting weaving, wheel making, and other technical issues. This level Like any compilation, some of these articles are more engaging than others - particularly for me the descriptions of beekeeping and midwives. The perspective of the people interviewed is very interesting not only compared to our time, but also to the time the interviews were taking place (there is a lot of comments about the moon landing). One thing that strikes me is the detail these students put into their articles when documenting weaving, wheel making, and other technical issues. This level of granular information is an amazing documentation of how these items were made. Well worth at least a cursory read for anyone interested in these topics.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    My appreciation for this book is immense. No other series of literature captures the historic cultures east of the Mississippi River like Foxfire. This is information that our current western ways of living often overlook. Reading this book will humble you with the hardwork people once put in to do tasks that we take for granted today and with the pure creative problem solving accomplished with the most basic of tools and materials.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I found this book even less interesting than the first Foxfire book. I received it as a gift; one of those imperfect gifts in which the giver makes incorrect assumptions about who you are and what you like. Still, it was another popular series enjoyed by folks who were in the back-to-the-land movement, or (more likely) wished that they could be.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Havert

    This second in a collection of newsletter articles continues the exploration of mountain living and the 'pure life' of Appalachia. This collection focused more on community and care of the community with spotlights on healing, barn raising, quilting bees and more. This second in a collection of newsletter articles continues the exploration of mountain living and the 'pure life' of Appalachia. This collection focused more on community and care of the community with spotlights on healing, barn raising, quilting bees and more.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cactuskid

    Some interesting stories about how people lived back in my parents & grandparents days. They made everything from scratch and the kids had to help to keep the household afloat. They were happy people, made their own entertainment and had a hard but good life.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    Most interested in the "haint" stories and oral interviews, lessso in the diagrams (though I suppose it's very good practical information!) Most interested in the "haint" stories and oral interviews, lessso in the diagrams (though I suppose it's very good practical information!)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Re-read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    May

    A very interesting collection of topics in this edition.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ellee

    Really interesting. I like that they included diagrams and measurements when they were available. I also liked the mix of instructive or just interesting oral history (like the part about midwives and the part about ghosts & ghost stories) and how-to. I am going to copy parts of the section on edible spring plants & how to prepare them. There's a lot of them that I've known you could eat for a really long time, but didn't know how to prepare other than to eat a few leaves (or seeds or whatever) Really interesting. I like that they included diagrams and measurements when they were available. I also liked the mix of instructive or just interesting oral history (like the part about midwives and the part about ghosts & ghost stories) and how-to. I am going to copy parts of the section on edible spring plants & how to prepare them. There's a lot of them that I've known you could eat for a really long time, but didn't know how to prepare other than to eat a few leaves (or seeds or whatever) raw. Also the recipe for violet jelly. Interesting. :) Recommended for hipster urban farmers, homesteaders, and other people who just want to read (but not "do") the olde days.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    This is a transcribed oral history of the peoples of Appalachian Mountains. It covers various topics such as making wagons and their wheels as well as oc yokes and spinning looms. These present plenty of drawings and pictures that could be a little more details. There are also some burial customs and ghost stories. This continues a project to save information and skills from the pre-World War II period of the region.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Ward

    Foxfire 2: Ghost Stories, Spring Wild Plant Foods, Spinning and Weaving, Midwifing, Burial Customs, Corn Shuckin's, Wagon Making and More Affairs of Plain Living (The Foxfire Series #2) by Eliot Wigginton (Editor), Foxfire Students (Anchor Books 1973) (917.58). More transcribed interviews by the students at Rabun County High School in Georgia with their rural elders (See The Foxfire Book). My rating: 7.5/10, finished 1975. Foxfire 2: Ghost Stories, Spring Wild Plant Foods, Spinning and Weaving, Midwifing, Burial Customs, Corn Shuckin's, Wagon Making and More Affairs of Plain Living (The Foxfire Series #2) by Eliot Wigginton (Editor), Foxfire Students (Anchor Books 1973) (917.58). More transcribed interviews by the students at Rabun County High School in Georgia with their rural elders (See The Foxfire Book). My rating: 7.5/10, finished 1975.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Enjoying this one right now. I'm on the chapter on springtime edible plants. This is more of a history/folk tale book with its chapters on burial customs and ghost stories than Foxfire 1. That was more of a how-to book. I haven't got to the chapter on wagon making and corn shucking yet. I think there's a chapter on how to make moonshine... Enjoying this one right now. I'm on the chapter on springtime edible plants. This is more of a history/folk tale book with its chapters on burial customs and ghost stories than Foxfire 1. That was more of a how-to book. I haven't got to the chapter on wagon making and corn shucking yet. I think there's a chapter on how to make moonshine...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    A Great Series on how on people use to do thing when they were mostly self sufficient, and not store dependent different volumes cover everything from snake handling. to log cabin building to planting by the seasons, a must for DIY'ers and survivalists. Check out amazon.com for individual contents. A Great Series on how on people use to do thing when they were mostly self sufficient, and not store dependent different volumes cover everything from snake handling. to log cabin building to planting by the seasons, a must for DIY'ers and survivalists. Check out amazon.com for individual contents.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Crickett

    I absolutely love the Foxfire books so far. They teach a lot about how people use to do things when they didn't have much. I recommend this book and all the others to people that love to learn how things were did in more simpler times, and what it was like when our grandparents and great grandparents where growing up and what they had to go through I absolutely love the Foxfire books so far. They teach a lot about how people use to do things when they didn't have much. I recommend this book and all the others to people that love to learn how things were did in more simpler times, and what it was like when our grandparents and great grandparents where growing up and what they had to go through

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marguerite

    Revisiting this series I read many years ago. Some of the chapters hold up better than others. I learned a lot during my first reading. Now that I reside in Appalachia, I might find the books more useful. The photos tend toward the dark and indistinct.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jay Wright

    This is a series about life in Appalachia. This is the second book in the series. Excellent stories of people, edible wild plants, hog cleaning and on and oln. I love this type of how they lived and the details involved.

  20. 5 out of 5

    KennyO

    Foxfire 2, more of the same. It's rare that the phrase "more of the same" is a compliment but it certainly is in the case of the Foxfire series. My thanks to Wigginton and the students of Rabun County H.S. Foxfire 2, more of the same. It's rare that the phrase "more of the same" is a compliment but it certainly is in the case of the Foxfire series. My thanks to Wigginton and the students of Rabun County H.S.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kendall

    See review of The Foxfire Book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    More Mountain livin at it's best More Mountain livin at it's best

  23. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Same as all the Foxfire books, very important cultural reference.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marty

    Interesting book of those times. Survial was hard, but this describes how folks made it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Blast

    If you want to know how to live without electricity then these books are for you!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle

    Lovedthe first book in the series. This one had great sections...midwifing and wild plant foods. Depends on what intrests you.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Great stuff you never knew you wanted to know about Appalachia and Appalachian traditions!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Taylor W. Rushing

    Big fan of the broom making section.

  29. 4 out of 5

    John

  30. 5 out of 5

    James

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