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Damn Good Advice (For People with Talent!): How To Unleash Your Creative Potential by America's Master Communicator, George Lois

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Damn Good Advice (For People With Talent!) is a look into the mind of one of America's most legendary creative thinkers, George Lois. Offering indispensle lessons, practical advice, facts, anecdotes and inspiration, this book is a timeless creative bible for all those looking to succeed in life, business and creativity. These are key lessons derived from the incomparle lif Damn Good Advice (For People With Talent!) is a look into the mind of one of America's most legendary creative thinkers, George Lois. Offering indispensle lessons, practical advice, facts, anecdotes and inspiration, this book is a timeless creative bible for all those looking to succeed in life, business and creativity. These are key lessons derived from the incomparle life of 'Master Communicator' George Lois, the original Mad Man of Madison Avenue. Written and compiled by the man The Wall Street Journal called "prodigy, enfant terrible, founder of agencies, creator of legends," each step is borne from a passion to succeed and a disdain for the status quo. Organised into inspirational, bite-sized pointers, each page offers fresh insight into the sources of success, from identifying your heroes to identifying yourself. The ideas, images and illustrations presented in this book are fresh, witty and in-your-face. Whether it's communicating your point in nanosecond, creating an explosive portfolio or making your presence felt, no one is better placed than George Lois to teach you the process of creativity. Poignant, punchy and to-the-point, Damn Good Advice (For People With Talent!) is a must have for anyone on a quest for success.


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Damn Good Advice (For People With Talent!) is a look into the mind of one of America's most legendary creative thinkers, George Lois. Offering indispensle lessons, practical advice, facts, anecdotes and inspiration, this book is a timeless creative bible for all those looking to succeed in life, business and creativity. These are key lessons derived from the incomparle lif Damn Good Advice (For People With Talent!) is a look into the mind of one of America's most legendary creative thinkers, George Lois. Offering indispensle lessons, practical advice, facts, anecdotes and inspiration, this book is a timeless creative bible for all those looking to succeed in life, business and creativity. These are key lessons derived from the incomparle life of 'Master Communicator' George Lois, the original Mad Man of Madison Avenue. Written and compiled by the man The Wall Street Journal called "prodigy, enfant terrible, founder of agencies, creator of legends," each step is borne from a passion to succeed and a disdain for the status quo. Organised into inspirational, bite-sized pointers, each page offers fresh insight into the sources of success, from identifying your heroes to identifying yourself. The ideas, images and illustrations presented in this book are fresh, witty and in-your-face. Whether it's communicating your point in nanosecond, creating an explosive portfolio or making your presence felt, no one is better placed than George Lois to teach you the process of creativity. Poignant, punchy and to-the-point, Damn Good Advice (For People With Talent!) is a must have for anyone on a quest for success.

30 review for Damn Good Advice (For People with Talent!): How To Unleash Your Creative Potential by America's Master Communicator, George Lois

  1. 5 out of 5

    Miguel

    If I were to rename this book, it would probably be "Damn Bad Advice (that is, in large part, based on nonsensical conjecture)". While George Lois is certainly a talented advertiser and author (the book is, if nothing else, entertaining) much of the advice offered in this book is nonsensical, and in some cases not even advice at all. I'm not sure there's a piece of advice in here that isn't already immediately apparent to anyone with any semblance of critical thinking skills. Of the 120 points i If I were to rename this book, it would probably be "Damn Bad Advice (that is, in large part, based on nonsensical conjecture)". While George Lois is certainly a talented advertiser and author (the book is, if nothing else, entertaining) much of the advice offered in this book is nonsensical, and in some cases not even advice at all. I'm not sure there's a piece of advice in here that isn't already immediately apparent to anyone with any semblance of critical thinking skills. Of the 120 points included in the text, a good portion of them are self-congratulatory accounts of Lois's greatest successes. While, I suppose, it could be argued that these stories each contain an underlying principle that should be followed on the road to success; I think it's tough to discern any meaningful advice from Lois's tirade against Mad Men in point 92. While there's certainly a few decent nuggets of insight for graphic designers and aspiring advertisers, even when read by its intended audience I could only suggest this book is passable. I think the best advice would probably be to not read this turd and ignore these contradictory and masturbatory ramblings.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad

    While it says (For People with Talent), it is mainly focused on the "traditional advertising" world. Nevertheless, the writer has a great sense of doing things the right way. While it says (For People with Talent), it is mainly focused on the "traditional advertising" world. Nevertheless, the writer has a great sense of doing things the right way.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Miranda

    Not so "damn good". Most of the advice is either thinly veiled career boasting or something you should already know if you've progressed beyond the first year of marketing or design school. The book reads like a giant run-on sentence of "do more and do better" without actually giving insight into how to do this other than to "try". I've read more creative insight in a dry textbook, which is very disappointing because George Lois is talented and accomplished in his career. There are many examples Not so "damn good". Most of the advice is either thinly veiled career boasting or something you should already know if you've progressed beyond the first year of marketing or design school. The book reads like a giant run-on sentence of "do more and do better" without actually giving insight into how to do this other than to "try". I've read more creative insight in a dry textbook, which is very disappointing because George Lois is talented and accomplished in his career. There are many examples of work shown, but it somehow fails to tie them into the text, they sit flat on the pages like a picture of a trophy, impressive but with no explanation of method. In a field so focussed on process and creativity, this book lacked detail into either.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    This is a short book packed with awesome tid bits about creativity and marketing. I read it cover to cover. At times, the book was so spot on and insightful that I slammed it shut with anxiety. Holy cow, this is so good it's scary. Right after I was done reading it, I pulled out a notepad and began shooting out ideas. This is a short book packed with awesome tid bits about creativity and marketing. I read it cover to cover. At times, the book was so spot on and insightful that I slammed it shut with anxiety. Holy cow, this is so good it's scary. Right after I was done reading it, I pulled out a notepad and began shooting out ideas.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    This book was horrible and the only saving grace is that it reminded me that choosing not to work in advertising was a wise move. I picked this up at the bookstore because I'd seen it on many "essential reading" lists for designers. I opened it to #86: Keep up the fight against racism, no matter what the cost. That struck me as unusually down-to-earth for a design book, so I bought it. Lois fakes inclusiveness and seeks to push back against the way the public views advertising after binging seven This book was horrible and the only saving grace is that it reminded me that choosing not to work in advertising was a wise move. I picked this up at the bookstore because I'd seen it on many "essential reading" lists for designers. I opened it to #86: Keep up the fight against racism, no matter what the cost. That struck me as unusually down-to-earth for a design book, so I bought it. Lois fakes inclusiveness and seeks to push back against the way the public views advertising after binging seven seasons of Mad Men. There are some fair tips about graphic communication, but everything was framed as a stunning innovation by Lois. While he talked about pushing the envelope and giving your all to your work, and pulling of wild stunts with clients, all I could think about is that he was praised for it because he was a white man in the sixties. Lois seems unable to acknowledge his privilege. He also is speaking to men—one of his tips is literally to not screw your secretaries. I disagreed with Lois a lot. I don't think you need to give your all at every workday so you collapse at the end. (I have friends and family and hobbies, thanks.) I don't think you should reduce your sleep to make more time for work. And I don't think advertising is the high art he claims it is. Elitism seeped out of the book. I'm sure some peoples' opinions will be well, I'll never be excellent if I don't make the sacrifices Lois did, but also Lois had a lot going in his favor. He thanked twenty-five "master communicators" in the back of the book and dedicated this work to them. Yes, they are all men. Lois made some attempt to pretend he was speaking to a diverse audience (occasionally adding a "(or her)" after a male pronoun) but he's not walking the walk. Skip this. You'd be better off spending your time working on something. Or if you read it out of curiosity, be prepared for disappointment.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Marie

    This book is a great motivator. It boasts a clean, fun design, it's easy to read (in one sitting or spread out over a week where you really need a kick in the pants), and is straightforward. George knows what he knows and that's all there is to it. At first, I was thrown off by the numbered list format of the book-- I was expecting something more traditional-- but it was great. It made it very light and easily digestible. George's writing style is aggressive, in your face, and matter-of-fact-- s This book is a great motivator. It boasts a clean, fun design, it's easy to read (in one sitting or spread out over a week where you really need a kick in the pants), and is straightforward. George knows what he knows and that's all there is to it. At first, I was thrown off by the numbered list format of the book-- I was expecting something more traditional-- but it was great. It made it very light and easily digestible. George's writing style is aggressive, in your face, and matter-of-fact-- so if you're in the market for hand-holding or cheerleading, this is not for you. Of course, George subscribes to the "my way or the highway" train of thought, so there are some tips and pieces of advice that aren't quite for me. But, overall, I found inspiration from 98% of what George was saying. Some dogeared pages, some underlined sentences, and I feel refreshed and ready to go!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

    I read this book while I was backpacking through Europe right after I finished 5 years of Architecture school. I was in a place where you realize you've been pushed into the real world and you barely know how to swim. You haven't figured anything out yet. This book gave me 'Damn Good Advice' that I still go through at times when no one else can say the right thing. It's fresh and in-your-face. I loved how clear and to the point his writing style is. No BS, just like talking to the author in his l I read this book while I was backpacking through Europe right after I finished 5 years of Architecture school. I was in a place where you realize you've been pushed into the real world and you barely know how to swim. You haven't figured anything out yet. This book gave me 'Damn Good Advice' that I still go through at times when no one else can say the right thing. It's fresh and in-your-face. I loved how clear and to the point his writing style is. No BS, just like talking to the author in his living room, sitting right across from him. I'm glad I bought this book, very randomly, when I picked it out of a few hundred books. It struck me as BOLD at first sight. Mind you, I spent a couple of hours in the book store before I made my choice.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jasia

    A book I would recommend to anybody going into any creative field. Clear, specific, bold advice for making things happen in your career and feeling good about yourself. Written by George Lois, who can only be described as the original Mad Man... He vehemently denies any connection to the show, but if you subtract the philandering, drinking in the workplace and other generally frowned-upon activities, some of the stories Lois tells could be right out of the T.V. show. Brilliant and inspiring word A book I would recommend to anybody going into any creative field. Clear, specific, bold advice for making things happen in your career and feeling good about yourself. Written by George Lois, who can only be described as the original Mad Man... He vehemently denies any connection to the show, but if you subtract the philandering, drinking in the workplace and other generally frowned-upon activities, some of the stories Lois tells could be right out of the T.V. show. Brilliant and inspiring words from a truly brilliant man.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Siegel

    Damn Good Advice isn't exactly a guidebook to achieve advertising success like its author George Lois has - it's more like advice to shore up your general life fundamentals. In that regard this book definitely hit the mark for me, and its clean design made for enjoyable skimming. Lois definitely doesn't shy away from tooting his own horn, but based on his body of work, a bit of fanfare doesn't seem inappropriate. A fine addition to the shelf of a creative. Damn Good Advice isn't exactly a guidebook to achieve advertising success like its author George Lois has - it's more like advice to shore up your general life fundamentals. In that regard this book definitely hit the mark for me, and its clean design made for enjoyable skimming. Lois definitely doesn't shy away from tooting his own horn, but based on his body of work, a bit of fanfare doesn't seem inappropriate. A fine addition to the shelf of a creative.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Slim

    Damn ! A great book !

  11. 5 out of 5

    Diana Stefanescu

    As an advertising professional, I can only admit being completely mesmerized by George’s attitude, work and accomplishments. Nevertheless, I do believe his advice belongs to a different advertising age. The field is constantly changing and very few things are universally correct. Putting that aside, I had a great time reading this and I ended up feeling more in love with my job than ever.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Pola Changnon

    Perfect for start of the year! A recommitment to instinct, experience and good creative. Thx George. Only 3 because it’s a bit thin.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Keely

    Picked this up yesterday afternoon while in the library aimlessly looking for inspiration and ended up reading the whole thing. Lois shares his advice on creativity, hard work and big ideas, gleaned over a 50+-year career in advertising. He claims to take the show Mad Men as a personal insult, but it's hard not to be reminded of just a teensy little bit of Don Draper while reading Lois' thoughts on having absolute confidence in your work and selling your ideas. Anyway, it's a visually striking b Picked this up yesterday afternoon while in the library aimlessly looking for inspiration and ended up reading the whole thing. Lois shares his advice on creativity, hard work and big ideas, gleaned over a 50+-year career in advertising. He claims to take the show Mad Men as a personal insult, but it's hard not to be reminded of just a teensy little bit of Don Draper while reading Lois' thoughts on having absolute confidence in your work and selling your ideas. Anyway, it's a visually striking book to go through, and many of Lois' tips and proclamations resonated with me. Here are a few favorites: "Think long. Write short"..."Everybody believes in co-creativity--not me. Be confident of your own, edgy solo talent"..."Work is worship"..."Research is the enemy of creativity--unless it's your own 'creative' research (heh-heh)"..."Never eat shit. (If it looks like shit, and it smells like shit, and it tastes like shit...it's shit.)"..."hop out of bed each day thrilled about the prospects of doing great work"..."Write everything, do everything, as well as it can be done."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dan Nietsche

    The tragedy of this book is that of a man who continually tells you to have the 'big idea' or go home actually sells you old rope. The book is what I'd consider quite 'American'. It's flashy, it's loud, it's PERFECT for advertising. But the man is so clearly a product of his time. He shuns teamwork - it's all about the (great) ego, which I suppose is his'. As I apparently don't know the man, I couldn't verify it, but he comes across as a massive douche. Now, not a lot in this book is factually wr The tragedy of this book is that of a man who continually tells you to have the 'big idea' or go home actually sells you old rope. The book is what I'd consider quite 'American'. It's flashy, it's loud, it's PERFECT for advertising. But the man is so clearly a product of his time. He shuns teamwork - it's all about the (great) ego, which I suppose is his'. As I apparently don't know the man, I couldn't verify it, but he comes across as a massive douche. Now, not a lot in this book is factually wrong, there is a lot of sense in there, but you will have to get rid of the added bombast. There are valid points in here, but please take your time and your mind whether you want to be that kind of 'creative'. An no, not being out for a cheap, sensationalist, quick solution to everything does not make you 'mediocre'.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Kelly

    This is the book version of George Lois. Short, sweet, blustery, tons of ego and a couple of nuggets if you're not too turned away from his confidence. There's been some criticism over the years of him claiming authorship/work that he only had a small part producing. Anyone can see that is not an impossible scenario by reading thru this book. He represents an old method of cranking out effective advertisements - his logos tend to make me cringe a bit - but by being so singularly focused, he lose This is the book version of George Lois. Short, sweet, blustery, tons of ego and a couple of nuggets if you're not too turned away from his confidence. There's been some criticism over the years of him claiming authorship/work that he only had a small part producing. Anyone can see that is not an impossible scenario by reading thru this book. He represents an old method of cranking out effective advertisements - his logos tend to make me cringe a bit - but by being so singularly focused, he loses a bit of nuance. Is that good or bad? I don't know. It's easy to be a critic, but hard to produce the amount of good work this guy did. Love him and/or hate him, George Lois doesn't give a fuck.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Afnan

    This is a GREAT book for readers interested in design and specifically advertising. However, it also contains worthy general advice. The writer's passion for his field is spilled all over the pages which provides a great inspiration for the reader. George Lois mentions his own experiences and the secrets to the success of many of his work. As for myself, My mind started thinking like advertiser and I started drafting ideas right away. I'm very glad I had purchased this book and I plan to read it This is a GREAT book for readers interested in design and specifically advertising. However, it also contains worthy general advice. The writer's passion for his field is spilled all over the pages which provides a great inspiration for the reader. George Lois mentions his own experiences and the secrets to the success of many of his work. As for myself, My mind started thinking like advertiser and I started drafting ideas right away. I'm very glad I had purchased this book and I plan to read it again every once in a while.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    George Lois is an American art director, designer, and author. In Damn Good Advice , Lois offers a guide to creativity and success heavily influenced by his time spent working in advertising. While the book's advice heavily leans towards design work and advertising skills, there are pointers and advice that can benefit anyone working in a creative field. George Lois is an American art director, designer, and author. In Damn Good Advice , Lois offers a guide to creativity and success heavily influenced by his time spent working in advertising. While the book's advice heavily leans towards design work and advertising skills, there are pointers and advice that can benefit anyone working in a creative field.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Fa6amie

    This book was pretty good, but I didn't enjoy it as much as I wanted to because I couldn't relate to it. It was more targeted for people that could use their creativity at work; artists, marketing, graphic design, etc. It talked mostly about advertising & how to stand out with your ideas through creativity. This book was pretty good, but I didn't enjoy it as much as I wanted to because I couldn't relate to it. It was more targeted for people that could use their creativity at work; artists, marketing, graphic design, etc. It talked mostly about advertising & how to stand out with your ideas through creativity.

  19. 4 out of 5

    C.A.

    A quick read that really does offer good advice. A legend in the advertising world for his provoking ads, he offer uncompromising advice. His focus in on the jobs in advertising, but his advice works for anyone attempting to make a living with meaning in the arts.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    I am a big fan of these books. I have been given this and 'It's not how good you are, it's how good you want to be' as gifts. Great quick reads for short journeys to inspire. I also like giving these books as gifts to fellow creatives and those in creative industries. I am a big fan of these books. I have been given this and 'It's not how good you are, it's how good you want to be' as gifts. Great quick reads for short journeys to inspire. I also like giving these books as gifts to fellow creatives and those in creative industries.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Patrick DiJusto

    I have a strange weakness: I'm attracted to the genre of "How To Be Creative" books. I don't know why -- they're all exactly the same, and they're all exactly useless. I have a strange weakness: I'm attracted to the genre of "How To Be Creative" books. I don't know why -- they're all exactly the same, and they're all exactly useless.

  22. 5 out of 5

    G.A.

    A no BS examination of creativity and how to unleash/master it. Lois is gruff, perhaps even rude at times, but when he knows what has to be done, he gets it done. I'd work for him. A no BS examination of creativity and how to unleash/master it. Lois is gruff, perhaps even rude at times, but when he knows what has to be done, he gets it done. I'd work for him.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anggia Widhi

    for people in the advertisement agency especially

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ray

    I first started reading this book sometime early/mid-2017 and couldn’t get past the 1st 30 pages for his “humor” and style of writing just didn’t appeal to me at all. I felt like in a way he was more of attacking the reader not advising them and I was repulsed by it. The words he used and the style was just so different from any book I have read before in this same category. Or maybe that was just my mindset at the time, but I put it back on my bookshelf and didn’t come near it again. Fast forwar I first started reading this book sometime early/mid-2017 and couldn’t get past the 1st 30 pages for his “humor” and style of writing just didn’t appeal to me at all. I felt like in a way he was more of attacking the reader not advising them and I was repulsed by it. The words he used and the style was just so different from any book I have read before in this same category. Or maybe that was just my mindset at the time, but I put it back on my bookshelf and didn’t come near it again. Fast forward to this week, I have decided to take on the entrepreneurial road and figured I need a good dose of motivation and also advice from books and people who have been down a similar road. So I went first to check my small book library to find any type of books that I can munch on until my more specialized books’ delivery gets here. And A Damn Good Advice was still sitting there among other books, I had to give it a try because, well, I like to think I’m talented and I sure as hell needed the advice. I picked the book and was going to start from where I last stopped, thinking I cannot really endure rereading those pages again, I got through them with a miracle! But then my other, enhanced, motivated version thought, well that’s exactly why I will start from the beginning. Now I’ll be reading with a different mindset and a different purpose. First time it was just another self help book, now I’m actually trying to learn something. I will learn something from this book whether or not I like the guy and his odd style. I started reading around 11 AM and I did not move until it was finished at around 3 PM (does that make me a slow reader?). To my surprise, at some point into the reading I started laughing at his humorous style, after a while I realized I was actually enjoying the read, instead of just going through it because i feel like I have to, I was looking forward to what will be on the next page, the advice and the jokes. And I realized his weird and “in-your-face” kind of way is just an acquired taste, one had to get used to it first to be able to appreciate it. Certainly a rich book, it is mainly focused on the advertisement business as he takes us on this ride of his career and his achievements, the people he met and collaborated with, but he pulls a lesson out of every one of those experiences that could very much apply to any other creative field. And some you can even apply to your own life regardless of your career or your field. I was especially moved by the last few pages where he mentioned his stand with Mohammed Ali and Carter’s case and his movement fighting injustice and racism. To be honest that is not a feeling I was expecting to get reading this type of book. But I did and it was refreshing and it made me like the guy and love the book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Helsy Flores

    It is a book that gets your mind excited and eager to go out there and do something great - right now! The design is clean and makes it easy and enjoyable to read. However, it should be noted that Lois is from another time, from the old school. He might have been a genius for something he did back then, but that same thing wouldn’t work or be enough today. It was easier then because advertising was just beginning, almost any idea you had was new and hadn’t been done before, there weren’t thousan It is a book that gets your mind excited and eager to go out there and do something great - right now! The design is clean and makes it easy and enjoyable to read. However, it should be noted that Lois is from another time, from the old school. He might have been a genius for something he did back then, but that same thing wouldn’t work or be enough today. It was easier then because advertising was just beginning, almost any idea you had was new and hadn’t been done before, there weren’t thousands of brands being created every day, and the market wasn’t oversaturated with millions of Facebook Ads, Instagram Ads, etc. - making it extremely hard to get your brand to stand out in such a huge ocean with so many fish. Concretely, there are three things I didn’t like. First, his hatred towards Mad Men, especially when he states the campaigns shown in the series are dumb. Mad Men is a masterpiece, I have found great inspiration in it, and there is absolutely no denying that the cinematography is outstanding. Second, the part where he says we should all start sleeping one hour less than we currently sleep. If you sleep 8 hours, by all means, you can sleep 7. But suggesting that if you sleep 5, you should sleep 4? That’s unnecessary and even irresponsible. Imagine a person who sleeps 4 hours everyday, then gets into a car in that state, putting everyone around him in danger? And lastly, and most importantly, his God complex. When you are great, when you do great work, it speaks for itself. Having to throw flowers at yourself ruins the book as you only end up like a show-off. Which he actually is. I did some reading afterwards and many people have accused him of taking all the credit and glory for work he did not come up with on his own. There’s even a campaign on the book which he makes it look like was his, when in fact it wasn’t. Upon going back to re-read it, I noticed he never explicitly says it’s his, but without this information, the reader assumes it’s his. In conclusion, the book is inspiring and I will probably read it again sometime, but it doesn’t actually give you advice, it’s more like a collection of Lois’s victories.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cristian Iancu

    I'm halfway through the book, swimming in a sea of cliches and truisms, spruced with a little bit of nonsense here and there, still trying to find the DAMN GOOD ADVICE, but the waves are strong. While I do not question the success of this guy's career, as this is the only thing he talks about, how awesome he is and how we can grow up to be just like him, he makes HIS experiences sound like some kind of recipe for success. Like any other successful person telling their stories and being full of t I'm halfway through the book, swimming in a sea of cliches and truisms, spruced with a little bit of nonsense here and there, still trying to find the DAMN GOOD ADVICE, but the waves are strong. While I do not question the success of this guy's career, as this is the only thing he talks about, how awesome he is and how we can grow up to be just like him, he makes HIS experiences sound like some kind of recipe for success. Like any other successful person telling their stories and being full of themselves, he fails to take into account the sheer amount of randomness in the Universe, the amount of luck that he had and the fact that he lived in another era of graphic design and advertising. Shades of the Tim Ferris type of a-hole, I am God, I am smart, if you don't do it like me, you're wrong. And stupid. I feel that the only thing that Lois does different from Ferris is that he is even more ostentatious! I'm no pansy, by any means, but he makes me puke a bit. Nobody likes a-holes. Do yourself a favor, do not pick up this book, unless you wanna hear this guy bragging about how amazing he is. There may be no time for that. P.S.: Advice no. 9 says "ALL creativity should communicate in a nanosecond". Then, advice no. 42 reads "To create great work, here's how you must spend your time: 1% Inspiration, 9% Perspiration and 90% Justification". I am definitely missing something here. To the trash bin!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    I would not recommend this book. George Lois has had an excellent advertising career. This book discusses some of those successes and gives advice/lessons that Lois has learned from his experience. This advice is inconsistent at best and flat out contradictory at worst. In example, one sections says, "you can never learn anything from a mistake....never give your failures a second thought." Then later in the book there is a passage that says, "...Those who cannot remember the past, are condemned to I would not recommend this book. George Lois has had an excellent advertising career. This book discusses some of those successes and gives advice/lessons that Lois has learned from his experience. This advice is inconsistent at best and flat out contradictory at worst. In example, one sections says, "you can never learn anything from a mistake....never give your failures a second thought." Then later in the book there is a passage that says, "...Those who cannot remember the past, are condemned to repeat it. You can't create the future without knowing what came before." I find this to be contradictory because learning from the past implies observing previous successes and mistakes from other people. This directly conflicts with the idea you can never learn from a mistake. Also learning from mistakes would contradict the idea of never giving mistakes a second thought. The book is filled with inconsistencies. Though, there are some interesting pieces of advice in the book. I do not recommend this book to anyone.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Cruz

    This book was a quick read with loads of useful advice from a professional in his field. The reason I picked up this book is because I was researching books on creative directors and this was one of the must-reads . I didn't know who George Lois was (though I've definitely heard his name before) until I realized that he is the mastermind behind a lot of ads for famous brands and companies we see today, like Tommy Hilfiger and Aunt Jemima Syrup. The more I read the book, the more I noticed his st This book was a quick read with loads of useful advice from a professional in his field. The reason I picked up this book is because I was researching books on creative directors and this was one of the must-reads . I didn't know who George Lois was (though I've definitely heard his name before) until I realized that he is the mastermind behind a lot of ads for famous brands and companies we see today, like Tommy Hilfiger and Aunt Jemima Syrup. The more I read the book, the more I noticed his strong ego, which didn't end up bothering me in the end since I realized that this man really knows his stuff. You can tell that he's had a lot of experience and has a strong sense of self which I find, you can mistaken for arrogance, when really, he's just trying to showcase what he's learned throughout the years. Overall, I think this was a great read. I've definitely tabbed a number of pages to save for future reference.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nick Green

    8.2/10 I knew nothing about George Lois before reading this book but he sure does love talking about himself and his accomplishments and now I feel like an expert. Not saying that is a bad thing considering his life accomplishments and the fact that he is a legend in the world of advertising and the original “Mad Men”. The book starts off hot and you feel like you are going to be hit with a title wave of motivation but after you find the rhythm of the book you will discover that a lot of the adv 8.2/10 I knew nothing about George Lois before reading this book but he sure does love talking about himself and his accomplishments and now I feel like an expert. Not saying that is a bad thing considering his life accomplishments and the fact that he is a legend in the world of advertising and the original “Mad Men”. The book starts off hot and you feel like you are going to be hit with a title wave of motivation but after you find the rhythm of the book you will discover that a lot of the advice can just be thrown away. I liked advice #106: You can’t teach a crab to walk straight. This advice talks about dealing with fools and how the best thing to do is to walk straight through the door because you can’t change them. While advice #87 was a miss. Get Bob Dylan to write a protest song and then perform a concert at Madison Square Garden. You get a lot of neat stories about the changing world of marketing but the advice won’t change you or the world.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra AE

    Damn Good Advice (for people with talent) (by George Lois) WHAT A GREAT BOOK The book I needed to read. The book you need to read. 120 illustrated tips on how to own your work, unleash your creativity and reach your goals ruthlessly. Listen, I only take advice from people at the top because, clearly, they know how they did it. There are a lot of motivational/craft/advice/etc books out there written by people only known for… publishing motivational/craft/advice/etc books. Clearly, none of those are my Damn Good Advice (for people with talent) (by George Lois) WHAT A GREAT BOOK The book I needed to read. The book you need to read. 120 illustrated tips on how to own your work, unleash your creativity and reach your goals ruthlessly. Listen, I only take advice from people at the top because, clearly, they know how they did it. There are a lot of motivational/craft/advice/etc books out there written by people only known for… publishing motivational/craft/advice/etc books. Clearly, none of those are my jam because why should I trust you, person who’s never achieved the thing I want to achieve? Lois goes straight to the point, and explains in short paragraphs so many useful strategies you’ll end up PUMPED, READY TO CONQUER. Bonus track: the visuals are fun. Buy this book. Devour this book.

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