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Articles on African American Autobiographies, Including: Slave Narrative, My Bondage and My Freedom, Up from Slavery, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Hephaestus Books represents a new publishing paradigm, allowing disparate content sources to be curated into cohesive, relevant, and informative books. To date, this content has been curated from Wikipedia articles and images under Creative Common Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Hephaestus Books represents a new publishing paradigm, allowing disparate content sources to be curated into cohesive, relevant, and informative books. To date, this content has been curated from Wikipedia articles and images under Creative Commons licensing, although as Hephaestus Books continues to increase in scope and dimension, more licensed and public domain content is being added. We believe books such as this represent a new and exciting lexicon in the sharing of human knowledge. This particular book contains chapters focused on African American autobiographies, and Slave narrative.


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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Hephaestus Books represents a new publishing paradigm, allowing disparate content sources to be curated into cohesive, relevant, and informative books. To date, this content has been curated from Wikipedia articles and images under Creative Common Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Hephaestus Books represents a new publishing paradigm, allowing disparate content sources to be curated into cohesive, relevant, and informative books. To date, this content has been curated from Wikipedia articles and images under Creative Commons licensing, although as Hephaestus Books continues to increase in scope and dimension, more licensed and public domain content is being added. We believe books such as this represent a new and exciting lexicon in the sharing of human knowledge. This particular book contains chapters focused on African American autobiographies, and Slave narrative.

18 review for Articles on African American Autobiographies, Including: Slave Narrative, My Bondage and My Freedom, Up from Slavery, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Wilcox

    The diaries of Frederick Douglas and Harriet Jacobs can be regarded as one of the most credible, primary sources for what life was like for African American slaves during the anti slavery movement. The intricate stories that surround both of these characters are unique in their perspectives and shed light on a specific period of history where the rights of slaves were beginning to be in question. There are specific issues surrounding both Douglas as a man and Jacobs as a women that are worthy of The diaries of Frederick Douglas and Harriet Jacobs can be regarded as one of the most credible, primary sources for what life was like for African American slaves during the anti slavery movement. The intricate stories that surround both of these characters are unique in their perspectives and shed light on a specific period of history where the rights of slaves were beginning to be in question. There are specific issues surrounding both Douglas as a man and Jacobs as a women that are worthy of examination to better discern this time in history.Although there can be notable similarities seen in the experiences between Douglas and Jacobs, the evidence is clear that life for African American women slaves appears to be more difficult. In both accounts given supporters of slavery use ulterior motives such as religion to push their agendas and keep slavery. Scripture was often used as a method to promote a type of manifest destiny mentality to convince culture to protect slavery. Jacobs writes of a pastor quoting the bible: His text was, “Servants, be obedient to them that are your masters according to the flesh, with fear and trembling, in singleness of your heart, as unto Christ.” Jacobs herself was not convinced writing: “They seem to satisfy their consciences with the doctrine that God created the Africans to be slaves. What a libel upon the heavenly Father, who ‘made of one blood all nations of men?” Both Douglas and Jacobs give comparable narratives detailing the hardships of being oppressed and in bondage to a manifest destiny type of mentality. With scripture having great value in the hearts of wealthy plantation owners this mentality would build the foundation for what was considered normal. The idea that God had intended slaves to submit and be obedient to their slave owners would sway most people in the south to hold on to those values because it was Gods will. Though a difficult time as war approached, both Douglas and Jacobs understood and could interpret the truth of scripture and would continue to battle against the threat of inequality. The similarities of sharing the pain of slavery in general is residual in nature compared to the monstrosities of being a slave woman and can be agreed upon in both accounts. Slave owners thought that they had the right to their slave women often in times resulting in rape, phycological trauma and severe whippings. Some of these occurrences could be linked to the out of context idealisms of obedience and submission found in the bible. Although Adultery was frowned upon in monogamous relationships, marital rape was not illegal at the time even in white marriages. So the thought of raping a slave woman to some men was no less a crime or something considered wrong than what they may have done to their own wife. The whippings however, could be fatal causing serious physical damage to the body. Frederick Douglas gives the chilling account of his own aunt who would regularly be whipped: “The louder she screamed, the harder he whipped. He would whip her to make her scream, and whip her to make her hush.” No matter how hard they begged, screamed or prayed the whippings would continue for slave women. Phycological damage would come as a result of the punishment inflicted upon them making the movement for change inevitable. For some slave women the deep routed fear would resonate long after slavery was abolished. Again Douglas notes a specific incidence of a slave woman named Caroline in St. Michaels Maryland who was sold with the sole intentions of breeding more slave offspring. For a whole year she would have forced intercourse with another married slave man because both were thought to be strong laborers. Douglas writes: “Such was his joy, and that of his wife, that nothing they could do for Caroline during her confinement was too good, or too hard, to be done. The children were regarded as being quite an addition to his wealth." Women slaves were seen as objects that could be molded into whatever the white masters wanted. For White women the only thing that separated them from being in the same position was the color of their skin. The fight for gender equality would be sluggish in its infancy and distracted by the slow progression of emancipation. Being a woman during the mid 18th century was difficult enough but the problem was two-fold if you were not only a woman but a black woman. This would unite both early women’s activist together with great abolitionist to spark grass roots movements that would change the course of American history. Frederick Douglas himself would stand up in the middle of a small church giving a speech to help support Elizabeth Cady Stanton in her efforts to push Women’s rights. However it was the resilient story of Harriet Jacobs that would serve as proof for the ardent slave women who endured the brunt of the pain associated with Americas slave trade. The continual passionate pursuit of other women slaves makes her stand out as a revolutionary standing beside Harriet Tubman. She was unlike the rest of the women population because of the sacrifice and jeopardy Her story tells. Her journey speaks of women slaves seen but not heard, minds scarred forever but never cared for, yet whipped but not broken.

  2. 4 out of 5

    tracey trotman

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda Dorsey

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jones Murphy

  5. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vanita

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rkeeler

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gary Power

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tianajackson

  10. 4 out of 5

    shakashia sharda Houston

  11. 4 out of 5

    Juanita Johnson

  12. 4 out of 5

    LORRAINE

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rosa Espinoza

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mark Gaulton

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carla Toles-Anthony

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joao

  17. 5 out of 5

    Robert Glover

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eunyce Hall

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