web site hit counter Invitation to Biblical Interpretation: Exploring the Hermeneutical Triad of History, Literature, and Theology - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Invitation to Biblical Interpretation: Exploring the Hermeneutical Triad of History, Literature, and Theology

Availability: Ready to download

Bible scholars Andreas Kostenberger (NT) and Richard Patterson (OT) provide seminarians and upper-level collegians a textbook utilizing the "hermeneutical triad" method. This approach to interpretation is based on giving due consideration to both the historical setting and the literary context, as well the theological message. Working through the major genres of Scripture Bible scholars Andreas Kostenberger (NT) and Richard Patterson (OT) provide seminarians and upper-level collegians a textbook utilizing the "hermeneutical triad" method. This approach to interpretation is based on giving due consideration to both the historical setting and the literary context, as well the theological message. Working through the major genres of Scripture and showing how their method applies to each one, they provide interpretive examples to guide the student in proper exegesis. In addition to the examples, each chapter concludes with exercises and assignments. Also included is a helpful "Building a Biblical Studies Library" appendix.


Compare

Bible scholars Andreas Kostenberger (NT) and Richard Patterson (OT) provide seminarians and upper-level collegians a textbook utilizing the "hermeneutical triad" method. This approach to interpretation is based on giving due consideration to both the historical setting and the literary context, as well the theological message. Working through the major genres of Scripture Bible scholars Andreas Kostenberger (NT) and Richard Patterson (OT) provide seminarians and upper-level collegians a textbook utilizing the "hermeneutical triad" method. This approach to interpretation is based on giving due consideration to both the historical setting and the literary context, as well the theological message. Working through the major genres of Scripture and showing how their method applies to each one, they provide interpretive examples to guide the student in proper exegesis. In addition to the examples, each chapter concludes with exercises and assignments. Also included is a helpful "Building a Biblical Studies Library" appendix.

30 review for Invitation to Biblical Interpretation: Exploring the Hermeneutical Triad of History, Literature, and Theology

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Pindak

    Excellent! Highly recommend for anyone wanting to be a pastor and anyone wanting to better understand how to interpret the Bible! A little long with a lot of charts. 4.5/5 🌟

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elliot

    First there was the hermeneutical circle. Then there was the hermeneutical spiral. Now, in Invitation to Biblical Interpretation: Exploring the Hermeneutical Triad of History, Literature and Theology, Andreas J. Kostenberger and Richard D. Patterson give us the hermeneutical triad. The hermeneutical triad, as the subtitle indicates, consists of history, literature and theology. History and literature are at the two lower points of the triangle, and they build up to theology. This book looks at e First there was the hermeneutical circle. Then there was the hermeneutical spiral. Now, in Invitation to Biblical Interpretation: Exploring the Hermeneutical Triad of History, Literature and Theology, Andreas J. Kostenberger and Richard D. Patterson give us the hermeneutical triad. The hermeneutical triad, as the subtitle indicates, consists of history, literature and theology. History and literature are at the two lower points of the triangle, and they build up to theology. This book looks at each of them in turn, but spends the most time exploring three subsets of literature: canon, genre and language. It closes with a chapter on application and proclamation, since that is the ultimate goal of interpretation. The greatest strengths of this book are its readability and comprehensiveness. Though it is a mammoth textbook, I found that it is not a chore to read. It is well-organized and well-written. And it truly is a one-stop shop for anyone interested in biblical interpretation. The reader learns about historical backgrounds, different schools of interpretation, literary genres, exegetical fallacies, and more. It pulls together things that I was exposed to in different classes at different times of my seminary education. The only thing I wish the authors had done differently is spend a little more time interacting with other hermeneutical approaches---even approaches the authors disagree with. I understand that things must be left out even in such a large book, but it was a bit frustrating that in their brief overview of the history of hermeneutics, some approaches were dismissed with little more than a wave of the hand and a footnote. In spite of that, this book is well worth the time spent reading it. It gives a solid method for interpretation of the biblical text, and it is so wide-ranging that it is almost a seminary-level biblical studies education in itself. It is very well suited as a textbook for a college or seminary level biblical hermeneutics course. It includes key words, study questions, assignments and bibliographies at the end of every chapter.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    On balance a helpful and very detailed book. The concept of the hermeneutical triad I think is a useful addition to hermeneutical method. The authors argue all texts in Scripture must be interpreted in light of history, literature, and theology, with history and literature supporting the theological application of the text. Two small concerns: first, as with much hermeneutical material, there is a tendency to multiply special terms for describing sub genres, types of narrative, types of oracles, On balance a helpful and very detailed book. The concept of the hermeneutical triad I think is a useful addition to hermeneutical method. The authors argue all texts in Scripture must be interpreted in light of history, literature, and theology, with history and literature supporting the theological application of the text. Two small concerns: first, as with much hermeneutical material, there is a tendency to multiply special terms for describing sub genres, types of narrative, types of oracles, etc. Some of these have merit but I wonder if on the whole the multiplication of special terms detracts from the simple act of being an attentive reader of the text. Second, and more significant, there was no section in this book on a Christ centered hermeneutic, especially when applying and interpreting the Old Testament. I think that is a significant oversight in a book of this size. But still, a good introductory volume.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Vaclav

    very good book on the subject of interpretation of the Bible! it was a bit of a labor to read it, but worth it. it's for those who want to get deeper in three essential areas of Bible interpretation: history in its context. literature in different genres in Bible, like law books, history books, wisdom books, prophetical books, gospel books, letters and apocalyptic books. and theology as the analogy of faith, how every truth in the Bible fits and holds together. we all need to be reminded of the very good book on the subject of interpretation of the Bible! it was a bit of a labor to read it, but worth it. it's for those who want to get deeper in three essential areas of Bible interpretation: history in its context. literature in different genres in Bible, like law books, history books, wisdom books, prophetical books, gospel books, letters and apocalyptic books. and theology as the analogy of faith, how every truth in the Bible fits and holds together. we all need to be reminded of the principles on how to read and understand the Bible, but we must not forget that God is the author after all, and we need to pray a lot along side our reading of the Bible, as well as reading and praying the Bible in a community of believers, and arriving to the full knowledge of God together!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bob Hayton

    I have handled my fair share of textbooks over the years. I've also used a variety of Bible commentaries, Bible dictionaries, theology resources and biblical study tools. But I have never come across a more comprehensive and accessible resource for handling the Word of God than "Invitation to Biblical Interpretation: Exploring the Hermeneutical Triad of History, Literature, and Theology" by Andreas J. Köstenberger and Richard D. Patterson. This new 900 page book has truly set a new standard when I have handled my fair share of textbooks over the years. I've also used a variety of Bible commentaries, Bible dictionaries, theology resources and biblical study tools. But I have never come across a more comprehensive and accessible resource for handling the Word of God than "Invitation to Biblical Interpretation: Exploring the Hermeneutical Triad of History, Literature, and Theology" by Andreas J. Köstenberger and Richard D. Patterson. This new 900 page book has truly set a new standard when it comes to Christian academic resources. In its thoroughness and detail, usability and accessibility, scholarship and piety, this work is simply unmatched. And I am not alone in this assessment, the book's opening 13 pages contain no less than 39 endorsements from a wide range of leading evangelical scholars. And the fact that this is a hermeneutics textbook makes such widespread acclaim all the more surprising. While the book is designed for the classroom, I read through the book from the standpoint of an educated layman looking for a resource on interpreting Scripture. This book proved to be more than just a resource tool, it is a virtual stand-alone hermeneutics course in and of itself, with a limitless supply of suggested books and articles for additional reading and self-study. The book unfolds Köstenberger and Patterson's "hermeneutical triad" as an overarching approach to interpretation. This triad consists of history (archeology, culture, manners and customs, and other historical matters), literature (canon, genres, linguistics), and theology (biblical theology). But before getting into the heart of the book, the authors reveal their philosophical approach to interpreting Scripture, which I find incredibly helpful: "[W]e don't start with words; we start with the canon. For example, this is also how we would interpret, say, a play by Shakespeare. We don't just analyze the words in a given sentence; we first try to learn more about Shakespeare, his background, the time in which he wrote, surveying his major works, and so on, before finally settling on a particular play. Even then we might read a good summary before eventually delving in and starting to read the play. When we encounter a given word with which we are unfamiliar, we would not stop reading, because we are more concerned about following the general flow than identifying individual word meanings. Thus we don't start with analyzing the details of the biblical text (word study); we start with the whole (canon). "What is more, we also don't start out pretending the Bible is just like any other book, because we don't believe it is. Rather, our purpose here is not to study just any form of human communication; our purpose is to study the Bible-the inerrant, inspired Word of God.... Ultimately, this is God's canon, conveyed in the genres intended by God, and communication of God's discourses using God's words (without of course denying human instrumentality , style and authorship). Thus, we don't introduce the notion of the Bible being "special" at some point later in the interpretive process (as if it were immaterial to the early stages of general hermeneutics) but put it front and center in the organization of the book." (pg. 25-26) I hold that both of these points are incredibly important. We have to encounter God's Word from a big picture approach that pays attention to authorial intent, but we also have to recognize the Divine Author behind the text. After explaining their method, the authors more right into focusing on each element of the triad. A brief overview of the history of hermeneutics is given and then the matters of history, archeology and the historical context of the times of the Bible are discussed at a fairly high level, but with many particular examples. This is helpfully fleshed out in a "sample exegesis" section which concludes most chapters. The research into how the Canaanites viewed the god Baal (the god of storms) helps us appreciate what is at stake when Elijah announces that Yahweh has suspended all rain (and all storms). After discussing the role that history plays, the authors then devote the lion's share of the work to the discussion of literature. The canon, its development and current shape, is explored as to how that should shape our interpretation, and a brief theology of the OT and the NT are sketched. The minor prophets offer an example where both the message of the books themselves need to be understood as well as their particular literary arrangement as "the book of the twelve". I really appreciated this emphasis on canonical interpretation, which the authors define as: "a faithful effort to hear the way in which God addresses his people in and through the text of Scripture as it testifies to God in Christ" but it is not so much a method as "a practice of theological reading" (pg. 157). The discussion of Genre covers OT historical narrative, poetry and wisdom literature, prophecy, NT historical narrative, parables, epistles and apocalyptic literature. Some genres are covered more in depth than others, with epistles and prophecy perhaps getting pride of place. The discussions give numerous examples and flesh out the why and how in an extremely clear and careful manner. Wise cautions and helpful insights abound. No real theological biases are detectable except perhaps a bias against full preterism. The authors don't rush to make judgement calls on how everyone must read prophecy or view Revelation, either. At times I felt they must be historic premil, yet they stressed the symbolic nature of Revelation, as per its genre. The discussions take care to root themselves as much as possible in analysis of the biblical text rather than forcing foreign genre considerations onto textual data. I found the dicsussion of parables extremely helpful and balanced, not advocating a rigid "one-point" approach to parables yet not aiming for a no-holds-barred allegorical free-for-all, either. The discussion on analyzing the language of literature was extraordinarily helpful. The authors emphasize looking at how the larger sections of the text relate to one another (discourse analysis) rather than just doing word studies. They give a helpful overview of some technical points of Hebrew and Greek (as well as English) grammar, and even point out occasional problems with the lexical approach of even such classic works as Kittel's TDNT, and stress the role of context and semantic range in determining meaning. They also include a helpful section covering 12 exegetical fallacies with plenty of examples to illustrate the discussion. They also discuss figurative language and how we can recognize and interpret it. The book then shows how to put everything together. The third tier of the triad, theology actually begins this process by stressing that we make our theological connections based on the text, which is the essence of biblical theology. After discussing the nature and method of biblical theology, the book closes with an exceedingly helpful chapter that offers a method for preaching through the various genres and applying the message of the text to the lives of people today. This chapter includes a discussion of Bible software tools and commentaries and other resources, but spends the bulk of the time discussing how to preach through all the various genres that were discussed earlier in the book. Cautions, challenges, methods, and sample outlines make this section especially practical and useful in the context of a daily ministry. An appendix is also included that has a short list of the best commentaries to get on each book of the Bible as well as other important resources to have handy. My biggest critique of the book would be that it doesn't go on to cover in detail absolutely everything I would want it to! But that is hardly fair, and it would make for a more unmanageable and unwieldy tool. I do have one bit of criticism, however. I would have liked to see the "how to" section at the end, with the example of how to preach through the genres more clearly called out from the sections covering the genre. For example, the section covering Proverbs in the chapter on Wisdom literature doesn't deal with some of the pastoral concerns such as whether proverbs apply universally to all situations or not. Yet this concern is addressed in the how to section in the last chapter. I think a clearer link would have served those of us who will use the book more as a reference work than a seminary text book. My only additional quibble is that the assignments and bibliography from the previous chapter blend right in with the introductory objectives and outline for the next chapter. The formatting of the book just seems a bit odd in that regard. Mentioning the bibliographies leads me to one more positive feature of the book. Each chapter has a selected bibliography for additional reading, and then in the footnotes, specific articles or books are called out that will be pertinent to the topic at hand. The footnotes and bibliography are usually helpful and accessible, rather than merely technical and scholarly. As the book closes, the authors warn their readers against just putting this book on the shelf and ignoring this material. Instead the reader is encouraged that this book can "serve as a point of departure for a lifetime of studying and preaching or teaching the Bible" (pg. 727). I would most heartily concur. This book deserves pride of place on the shelf of anyone studying, preaching or teaching the Bible. Even where one may have a different theological bent or a disagreement with the authors, the book still will prove useful. "Invitation to Biblical Interpretation" truly is a must-read, need-to-get book. It is evangelical scholarship at its best, and cannot be ignored. If you are not employing the techniques and practices put forth in this book, you owe it to yourself, at the very least, to read it and justify why you are not. This book can't do the hard work of faithful exegesis for you, but it can set you in the right direction and prevent you from stumbling at all the wrong places. You really need to get this book! Disclaimer: This book was provided by Kregel Publications for review. I was under no obligation to offer a favorable review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason Gardner

    Köstenberger and Patterson (hereafter K/P) have written this book “to teach a simple method of interpreting the Bible,” (23) presumably the purpose for anyone who has ever written a hermeneutics text. There is a distinct difference, however, in the approach that K/P have taken. They call it the “hermeneutical triad,” which is comprised of history, literature, and theology (24). These are the components used to construct the grid through which the reader is to read the biblical text. As the autho Köstenberger and Patterson (hereafter K/P) have written this book “to teach a simple method of interpreting the Bible,” (23) presumably the purpose for anyone who has ever written a hermeneutics text. There is a distinct difference, however, in the approach that K/P have taken. They call it the “hermeneutical triad,” which is comprised of history, literature, and theology (24). These are the components used to construct the grid through which the reader is to read the biblical text. As the authors note, they are not the first to use this grid (they give appropriate nods to Longman, Dillard, Wright, and Vanhoozer), but the first to describe it with a specific name. K/P also claim to take a rather novel approach to the interpretive process, namely moving from specific hermeneutics to general (25). So rather than starting with words (i.e. syntax), they start with canon, particularly looking at the bigger picture of Scripture. They take this approach because of “the common linguistic premise that the discourse context is primary for determining word meaning” (26). You might already decide the track the authors will take simply by their names and the associations that attend them. They are upfront that they look at scripture as “the inerrant, inspired Word of God” and that this conviction underpins the entirety of their work. While this is repellant to some, it would be unfair to immediately dismiss this work so simply. K/P begin by offering a bit more detail to their triad. History (=historical context) is critical because all scripture is rooted in real-life history—it wasn’t produced in a vacuum. Second, the bible is literature. K/P state that literature (at least concerning scriptural literature) has three components—canon, genre, and language and these components are the object of their literary analysis (27). The third component is theology. Interpreting the scripture as God’s self-disclosure demands that it be rightly understood if God himself if to be understood rightly. Is this triad effective as a hermeneutical approach? In this review, I hope to answer this quest thoughtfully and humbly. Concerning the format, each chapter begins with a list of objectives (see here), a modest outline of the contents, and a visual “road map” of sorts. These are rather common elements in textbooks and will prove to be helpful to some, not as much to others. Each chapter also concludes with a list of guidelines that succinctly reiterate the main points of the chapter, a short glossary of key terms and a list of study questions. These elements can be helpful if one takes opportunity to take advantage of them. There are also helpful appendixes in the back for building a biblical studies library and a glossary, as well as scripture, person, and subject indexes. Though I do not plan to summarize each chapter here (there are 16!), I will speak generally of its three-part history-literature-theology division. Chapter 1 sets the stage for the task at hand and introduces the reader to the discipline of interpretation by discussing two different aspects of biblical interpretation, namely what it is and why it should be done properly, and a condensed history of hermeneutical approaches spanning from the Old Testament to modern theories and practices. As stated, this history is quite brief, but helps to understand how various methods have come and gone and how we got to where we are. Now that introductory matters are introduced, one can feast on the real meat of this book—the hermeneutical method itself. Part one of the book is concerned with the historical-cultural background of the bible and (obviously) begins with the OT. K/P essentially offer a historical synopsis of the major historical events and persons that we might say help define the OT era and set the stage for the arrival of the Christ. K/P also briefly discuss the Second Temple period (or intertestamental period) for its now-recognized importance in better understanding the historical-religious atmosphere of the NT era. The remainder of the chapter is a discussion of primary and secondary sources and their importance for understanding the historical background of the text. One of the helpful features that this book includes (and other hermeneutics texts as well) is a sample of how the features previously discussed figure into the hermeneutical process. Here both OT and NT examples are provided and aptly demonstrate how historical background is helpful and necessary to rightly begin the interpretive process. Part two focuses on literature and there is much to feast upon here. This part is comprised of three subsections: canon, genre and language, topics that are continually at the center of study and debate. In their discussion of the OT canon, they introduce readers not only to the concept of canon, but also canonical interpretation. This approach typically evokes one name—Brevard Childs—and they spend a few pages discussing his method and that of Christopher Seitz, whom they credit with forwarding Childs’ work. While their contribution is hardly even a primer on the subject, it is enough to help the hermeneutical novice get a bearing on an important interpreter’s contribution to the field. The discussion of law and covenant are helpful here, particularly in light of more recent research on the various types of covenants in the ANE. While much of what K/P discuss is typical of introductory hermeneutics texts, they distinguish themselves somewhat by tackling matters that aren’t typically included, such as the Exodus and the development of messianism. The Exodus may seem an odd subject to discuss hermeneutically, but K/P clearly believe events such as the Exodus to be actually historical events and thus it is necessary to know its place in the development/evolution of the Israelite people and the scriptures they produce. The bulk of part two, as one might expect, is concerned with the myriad features of the various types of literature, e.g. narrative, prophecy, poetry, wisdom, apocalyptic, etc. I was pleased to discover that the canonical book of Revelation is given an entire chapter’s devotion. Few books frustrate and fluster bible readers more than Revelation and it’s not hard to see why. However, both novice and more learned students of the scripture will gain from K and P’s contribution. One of the more challenging sections to plow through is poetry. Even in English poetry is difficult to me, partly because of its esoteric vocabulary. Certainly every subject that has been scrutinized by scholars has yielded its own brand of highly specialized terminology, but poetry is one that I’ve had a harder time fully grasping because of this. K/P don’t hold back and offer the reader a number of technical terms in this section, such as aposiopesis, apophthegm, dactylic, anapest, and amphibrach to name a few. While they provide brief definitions (thankfully!), poetry is inherently contrary to most readers’ use of language and these kinds of terms will certainly not help the beginning interpreter. Part three of the book, while comparatively short, is perhaps one of the most helpful sections for beginning readers (more learned folk might learn something as well!). Here the authors tackle the issue of language, and no current hermeneutics text would be complete without it. K/P address initially some important aspects of Greek (genitive, the article, word order), yet do not address Hebrew specifically. K/P also introduce the reader to discourse analysis, an area that has received much more attention in recent years and is making its way into more texts such as this one. The twenty pages devoted to exegetical fallacies is also a helpful, especially to those new to the task (but we more experienced interpreters aren’t immune, so this is a good refresher on some basics, though certainly less extensive than Carson’s work). The final chapter of this unit deals with figurative language, an element that continues to befuddle many and spark plenty of debate. K/P do a fine job of acclimating the interpreter to the shallower waters of discerning the meaning behind figurative language, though one will have to look elsewhere for more comprehensive treatment. The final unit of the book concerns theology and thus rounds out K and P’s hermeneutical triad. Unfortunately, this section was the least stimulating for me personally. Why? Mostly because it’s quite short in comparison. Naturally I expect a hermeneutics text to be concerned primarily with historical and literary features and issues, but given the attention paid to theology in interpretation in recent years, I really hoped for more here. But that’s not to say this sections isn’t good, because it is. I appreciate and resonate with the authors very strongly here because they argue for a theology that is derived from the bible, rather than imposing one’s own viewpoints onto the scripture. Essentially this is known as a biblical theology, to which they give attention in the following pages, specifically the issues, methods, and history of biblical theology. Not surprisingly, K/P discuss the theology of the NT (though briefly) and the use of the NT in the OT, another topic that has received a healthy share of scholarly attention in recent years. This unit on theology is concluded with a seemingly logical end—the dispersion of theology, or a chapter on preaching/teaching the scripture as a result of examining the text through this hermeneutical triad. Because not all interpreters of scripture are necessarily teachers and/or preachers, this final chapter will be of less value to some than others. In sum, I am confident to say that Köstenberger and Patterson have produced an immensely helpful volume that will certainly become the standard biblical hermeneutics text for many (if the endorsements are any indication) and a valuable companion resource to many others. While Invitation to Biblical Interpretation treads plenty of very familiar ground, its inclusion of more recent research will set it apart from other similar texts, as will the vastness of the terrain it surveys and samples of the method at work. I can highly recommend this volume to the uninitiated who have only begun the potentially perilous journey of biblical interpretation, as well as to the well-traveled sojourners who have covered many miles in their exploration of the canonical landscape. Αυτω η δοξα

  7. 4 out of 5

    Craig Hurst

    Ask the average Christian today what hermeneutics is and you might receive more blank stares than informed answers. We wonder how so many Christians come to interesting and sometimes crazy interpretations of Scripture but the answer is staring us in the face. The church has not equipped them to be faithful interpreters. Needless to say, many pastors wish the members of the congregations would willingly take an introduction to hermeneutics. Unfortunately, most will not. That is why it is so import Ask the average Christian today what hermeneutics is and you might receive more blank stares than informed answers. We wonder how so many Christians come to interesting and sometimes crazy interpretations of Scripture but the answer is staring us in the face. The church has not equipped them to be faithful interpreters. Needless to say, many pastors wish the members of the congregations would willingly take an introduction to hermeneutics. Unfortunately, most will not. That is why it is so important for the academy and church to produce books on hermeneutics for the layperson – at least those who will read them. I am glad to say that Invitation to Biblical Interpretation: Exploring the Hermeneutical Triad of History, Literature, and Theology by Andreas Kostenberger and Richard Patterson is one of those books. Though it will most likely be used in colleges and seminaries for intro to hermeneutics classes, there is enough of this book that is accessible to the layperson that everyone should have it. As the subtitle states, this book explores hermeneutics through the triad of history, literature and theology. The authors defend this three-fold method by stating: Since Christianity is a historical religion, and all texts are historically and culturally embedded, it is important that we ground our interpretation of Scripture in a careful study of the relevant historical setting. Since Scripture is a text of literature, the bulk of interpretive work entails coming to grips with the various literary and linguistic aspects of the biblical material. Finally, since Scripture is not merely a work of literature but inspired and authoritative revelation from God, the goal and end of interpretation is theology. (p. 66) Part One: Historical Context/Setting Part one deals with the historical context of Scripture in both Old and New Testaments. The authors lay out a brief overview of the chronology of the Bible from Genesis to Revelation The role of archeology is discussed and it is concluded that archeology has done nothing but verify what we have already known from Scripture to be true about persons, places and events in the past. There is a brief overview of the primary and secondary sources for historical-cultural background studies. While the authors highly regard the importance of background information of the historical setting of the text (eg. Ancient Near Eastern Studies), “it should never override what is stated explicitly in the text” (p. 94). In recent decades ANE studies have tended towards letting the comparative results control our understanding of and interpretation of the text to the point where the uniqueness of the text is lost. Kostenberger and Patterson have not fallen into this trap but have retained a balance in their approach to ANE studies as useful for biblical interpretation. Part Two: Literary Focus There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to interpreting the books of the Bible. There are several different genres and each has its own unique features. Here the authors have divided up this section into several areas. First, the canon of the Old and New Testament are discussed. For the OT the authors discuss the role, types, application and transmission of Law in the OT. The historical event of the Exodus is discussed. The significance of the covenants is discussed with the definition and explanation of each type in the OT. Further, a number of coordinating themes in the OT are discussed such as the relationship of the Messiah to everything previously discussed. For the NT the issue of getting the gospel from the Gospels is discussed along with the theological contribution of Acts for the NT canon, the placement of the Epistles within the book of Acts and the culmination of Revelation as apocalypse. Second, the many genres of the Bible are laid out in a thorough and easy to understand way. The section on genre is divided into a discussion of OT narrative, Poetry and Wisdom literature, OT Prophecy, NT Historical Narrative, the Parables, Epistles and Apocalyptic literature. While the literary features of each genre can seem overwhelming at times the authors do a good job of simplifying the features of each while avoiding oversimplification. This section is worth the price of the book alone. The best parts are on the OT & NT Narratives, the Gospels and the Apocalypse (as well as the complimentary section on Interpreting Figurative Language in chap. 14). Third, the unique features of the languages (Hebrew & Greek) are laid out. Here the many aspects of the grammar, syntax and discourse are discussed. The importance of the grammatical foundations of each language is explained as well as a helpful discussion of discourse analysis with four examples. What is so good about this section of the book is that, unlike any other intro to hermeneutic, it discusses the languages of the Bible in a way that does not require the reader to know Greek or Hebrew in order to glean from it. I have always believed that if a layperson knew their English grammar well they could do grammatical analysis of the text (especially the Epistles as well as the Narrative sections of the OT & NT). While nothing can replace the knowledge of Greek and Hebrew, most people will not learn them but you don’t need to learn to read it (in terms of vocabulary and translation) in order to apply much of this section to reading your English translation of choice. One section that stands out is the twelve fallacies of determining word meaning (p. 631-50). This is something that plagues too much of contemporary exegesis and preaching. Part Three: Theology The third part of the hermeneutical triad is how we get our theology from the Bible. Unfortunately, theology for the church has fallen on hard times and the cry of many laypeople, and pastors, is, “Just give me Jesus”, and “rather than viewing theology as nurturing and stabilizing elements in their journey of faith, many today view it as an enemy, or are skeptical at best if not indifferent if not outright antagonistic” (p. 694). This chapter deals specifically with the concept of biblical theology as opposed to systematic or historical theology. A number of issues related to biblical theology are discussed such as the many proposed approaches to the discipline, the use of the OT in the NT and a short history of the discipline. Application & Proclamation The final part of the book deals with addressing the way in which the student of Scripture can utilize the tools available to them in applying the hermeneutical triad to their preaching and study. The authors walk the reader through the many interpretational tools available today in both book and electronic format. They explain how the shape, genre and literary features of a given book or text are to shape your sermon and rightly point out that “the task is to discover our outline, not to come up with one” (p. 741). Guidelines for crafting a sermon based on genre are laid out as well as mistakes to avoid. The appendix has twenty three pages listing the best recommended books to get in terms of general resources (bibliographic aids for building a library), reference works (intros, surveys and background books), biblical languages aids (grammars, textual criticism, lexical and syntactical studies), dictionaries, theologies, hermeneutics and then commentaries for both testaments and each book of the Bible. Reading through the list some readers will feel some books were left out but overall you would be hard pressed to say any of the suggestions should be taken out. The book ends with a glossary of relevant and basic terms every interpreter should be aware of. Conclusion For all that this book has I would have liked to see more on the ANE (Ancient Near Eastern) background of the OT and the Greco-Roman background of the NT. Contemporary ANE studies are running crazy today and this is an issues that deserves more attention by conservative scholars. Also, as W. Randolph Tate has laid out in his book Biblical Interpretation: An Integrated Approach, it would have been helpful to include a chapter on the world of the reader. Laying these caveats aside, Invitation to Biblical Interpretation is a book that I cannot recommend enough. Every pastor should have it on their desk, every seminary and even college student studying for the ministry should have it and I would say that this is one of the standard reference works that every believer should have in their personal library, especially Sunday school, small group or Bible study leaders/teachers. This will probably be the most used text book for intro to hermeneutics classes in college and seminaries in the years to come.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bradley McKenzie

    In truth, it is a helpful book on hermeneutics. If it had not been required reading for a course, I would not have finished it. I learned a lot from it, but I had to come up for air afterward and read other genres. There were numerous typos, but reading it as a hard copy and in Logos, I was able to register the errors, and, hopefully, they will be corrected in subsequent versions. If an expositor of the Bible does not approach the Scriptures historically, grammatically (also in the appropriate g In truth, it is a helpful book on hermeneutics. If it had not been required reading for a course, I would not have finished it. I learned a lot from it, but I had to come up for air afterward and read other genres. There were numerous typos, but reading it as a hard copy and in Logos, I was able to register the errors, and, hopefully, they will be corrected in subsequent versions. If an expositor of the Bible does not approach the Scriptures historically, grammatically (also in the appropriate genre), and theologically this book can be a huge help. If a person is already convinced of this "hermeneutical triad," then it may be a bit tedious. Complete objectiveness when one seeks to understand the Bible is probably impossible, and I felt that even the authors did not achieve that objectivity that helps to preclude placing one's own slant on a passage, instead of allowing the passage to speak for itself. Still, in this life, we will never all come to a complete consensus on the meaning of every Word of God. Therefore, we must skim the cream off of every life we encounter, and in this case, there was much cream to skim.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    I feel like I've climbed Mt. Everest. Or Sinai. Or the Mt. of Olives. What a great book! If you've not yet read this, here are a few reasons to do so: 1. It's a good handbook on how to interpret the Bible, including all the various genre, literary forms, figures of speech, etc. 2. It's full of scholarly warnings to avoid major mistakes and pitfalls that go with the territory. I have been preaching for close to 2 decades now, and found that more than a few of these warnings hit close to home. 3. It i I feel like I've climbed Mt. Everest. Or Sinai. Or the Mt. of Olives. What a great book! If you've not yet read this, here are a few reasons to do so: 1. It's a good handbook on how to interpret the Bible, including all the various genre, literary forms, figures of speech, etc. 2. It's full of scholarly warnings to avoid major mistakes and pitfalls that go with the territory. I have been preaching for close to 2 decades now, and found that more than a few of these warnings hit close to home. 3. It is thoroughly exegetical. I mean the authors don't overtly allow a particular theological tradition to dictate how they interpret the Bible (e.g. Covenant Theology, or Dispensationalism) but over and over again exemplify the discipline of letting the text speak. 4. It is full of insightful gems. Like the very helpful discussion of identifying allusions to the Old Testament in Revelation. 5. It is evangelical and embraces a high view of the inerrancy of Scripture. 6. It consistently exalts Jesus. 7. It will help you be a more faithful preacher.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matt Crawford

    This is an understatement with and thorough volume. It is also thick. There is a lot of information. There are some great examples as well as pointing you in the right direction for direction for additional reading m. But man is it thick! It’s a lot of info to digest in each chapter. The language is easy to understand , there is just a lot of it!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    I have really enjoyed this book! I am so pleased to find such a balanced, conservative book on biblical interpretation. I have been reading quite a few books that have such strange ideas on how to understand Scripture so I always breathed a sigh of relief when I picked this book back up. So solid.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rodrigo D'Cristo

    Leitura obrigatória para todos aqueles que desejam fazer uma interpretação correta das Escrituras. Indispensável para todos que exercem o ministério de ensino. Através desse livro o autor apresenta ferramentas para uma interpretação bíblica segura.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Charity U

    As far as a hermeneutics textbook goes, this one is pretty good. The chapters cover all the various biblical genres, give standards by which to study them, and examples throughout. Pretty good as a backbone book for Bible study - advanced enough for graduate work, but readable enough for anyone.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    LOTS of material but is written in such a way that most is easy to understand. Very helpful for the beginner.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Kamp

    Got real skimmy on this guy, but did indeed finish skimming. Excellent hermeneutical resource.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Deaver

    Read portions

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Svihel

    Since beginning the journey that is biblical studies I have read several introductions to biblical hermeneutics, taken a bible college class in hermeneutics, a Sunday school class, and listened to online lectures covering hermeneutics. That being said, none of them cover either the breadth or the depth of information and techniques that this book does. Although a daunting 900 pages, this book is well organized and easy to reference in such a way that each chapter can be read individually, or as a Since beginning the journey that is biblical studies I have read several introductions to biblical hermeneutics, taken a bible college class in hermeneutics, a Sunday school class, and listened to online lectures covering hermeneutics. That being said, none of them cover either the breadth or the depth of information and techniques that this book does. Although a daunting 900 pages, this book is well organized and easy to reference in such a way that each chapter can be read individually, or as a whole depending on the needs of the reader. Every chapter starts with an outline and the objectives, and ends with summaries, key words, study questions, and assignments. The framework of the book is “the hermeneutical triad of history, literature, and theology.” The authors set out in the first section to explain the importance of historical background in the interpretation of scripture. As throughout the rest of the book, references are given to more in-depth work on any of the given topics discussed in the section. The second section is concerned with understanding the literature of the bible and discusses the topics of canon, and genre. An entire chapter is devoted to each of the major literary genres found in scripture making easy to refer back to when interpretive help is needed. Interpretive examples for each genre are also given making it helpful to see how each of these techniques is worked out practically. Several chapters are also devoted to language dealing with contextual and linguistic features. Finally, the last section deals with the goal of interpretation: theology and practical application. I find it helpful that all of the theoretical aspects of interpretation are brought down to the practical level, as sometimes this can be a difficult connection to make. This book also includes a helpful appendix that includes recommended commentaries and other research materials. Overall this book was well organized, and easy to read without be overly simple. It is a wealth of information in itself with references for those desiring to do more research. Both authors write well and are obviously passionate about what they do. This is a valuable resource I will likely refer to for years to come. Disclaimer: Kregel Publications provided this book for review. I was under no obligation to offer a favorable review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    "Invitation to Biblical Interpretation" Exploring the Hermeneutical Triad of History, Literature, and Theology is a book that is similar to a textbook but is very informative for the average person.Written in an easy to understand manner which emphasizes the history, literature,and theology of the Bible.It gives a clear picture of Bible interpretation. The book is broken down into three parts: 1. Interpretation:The Hermeneutical Triad 2.The Focus of Scripture:Literature 3.The Goal:Theology Each chap "Invitation to Biblical Interpretation" Exploring the Hermeneutical Triad of History, Literature, and Theology is a book that is similar to a textbook but is very informative for the average person.Written in an easy to understand manner which emphasizes the history, literature,and theology of the Bible.It gives a clear picture of Bible interpretation. The book is broken down into three parts: 1. Interpretation:The Hermeneutical Triad 2.The Focus of Scripture:Literature 3.The Goal:Theology Each chapter in the book begins with a chapter objective, then a chapter outline,and wraps up with a key words, study questions assignments and a chapter bibliography.There is a glossary provided as well as scripture index, a subject index, and a person index.For me I actually found the scripture index very helpful because I used it to look up particular verses that I had questions about. Overall if your someone who wants to take your Bible study to the next level and want a book that's going to help you understand what your reading in the Bible then this book is for you. Even though this book is 890 pages don't let the size stop you from using it because it's very easy to navigate.While this book is great for classroom study, its also perfect for personal use, I think every church should have a copy in their library. A complimentary copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Todd Miles

    "Invitation to Biblical Interpretation" is a solid contribution to the field of evangelical hermeneutics joining Osbourne's "Hermeneutical Spiral" and Klein's "Introduction to Biblical Interpretation" as the strongest comprehensive hermeneutics volumes in the field. Strengths: 1) The emphasis on theological presuppositions necessary to accurately interpret the Word of God at the beginning of the book is a necessary starting point. 2) The hermeneutical triad (theology, history, literature) that se "Invitation to Biblical Interpretation" is a solid contribution to the field of evangelical hermeneutics joining Osbourne's "Hermeneutical Spiral" and Klein's "Introduction to Biblical Interpretation" as the strongest comprehensive hermeneutics volumes in the field. Strengths: 1) The emphasis on theological presuppositions necessary to accurately interpret the Word of God at the beginning of the book is a necessary starting point. 2) The hermeneutical triad (theology, history, literature) that serves as the organizing principle of the book gives the volume a logical structure. 3) The biggest strength is the final chapter where the authors work through all the different genres, instructing on the proper methods for developing sermons from each. Their use of examples in this final chapter is particularly strong. 4) The chapter summaries at the end of each (including sample assignments) are particularly helpful. 5) The appendices are a fantastic resource, including commentary and theological library recommendations. 6) Their genre analysis chapters were rich with examples and helpful rules for interpretation and warnings on pitfalls to avoid. Weakness: I would have liked to ahve seen more interaction with contemporary studies in hermeneutics and postmodern challenges - both the good (speech act theory, narrative theology, etc), and the bad (deconstruction, etc.).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nate Claiborne

    I think this is an excellent resource for teachers (like myself) looking to develop a class on hermeneutics or to use as a supplement in an OT or NT survey class. It is also something that an advanced reader could make use of own their own. Outside of an actual school context, I may try to go through this book over the summer with several guys from our city group at church who are interested in learning how to better interpret the Bible. If I do, I'll be sure and let you know how it goes! If you' I think this is an excellent resource for teachers (like myself) looking to develop a class on hermeneutics or to use as a supplement in an OT or NT survey class. It is also something that an advanced reader could make use of own their own. Outside of an actual school context, I may try to go through this book over the summer with several guys from our city group at church who are interested in learning how to better interpret the Bible. If I do, I'll be sure and let you know how it goes! If you're looking for a very useful resource and manual on biblical interpretation, then I think you really ought to check out Invitation to Biblical Interpretation. They build on the shoulders of giants and are about as comprehensive as space allows. The result is a clear, readable, and informative account of approaching the Bible using the hermeneutical triad as your compass for the journey. For the much fuller review, see my blog

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Parker

    This is an excellent, detailed resource on biblical interpretation, and for those who have read Zuck's Basic Bible Interpretation, this is the ideal next step up. The book is extremely in-depth yet mostly digestible, and it is bursting with solid information on how to rightly interpret the Bible. Take time when reading it so its sheer volume of information doesn't become overwhelming, but the reward is worth the reading efforts. This is an excellent, detailed resource on biblical interpretation, and for those who have read Zuck's Basic Bible Interpretation, this is the ideal next step up. The book is extremely in-depth yet mostly digestible, and it is bursting with solid information on how to rightly interpret the Bible. Take time when reading it so its sheer volume of information doesn't become overwhelming, but the reward is worth the reading efforts.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Johnson

    Excellent guide to understanding and applying hermeneutics. I found it more readable than Osborne's "Hermeneutical Spiral," but was glad to see it referenced many times, since it is another excellent resource. But for the one just beginning to study hermeneutics, I would highly recommend this book, for its practical yet in-depth look at how (and why) to accurately interpret God's Word. Excellent guide to understanding and applying hermeneutics. I found it more readable than Osborne's "Hermeneutical Spiral," but was glad to see it referenced many times, since it is another excellent resource. But for the one just beginning to study hermeneutics, I would highly recommend this book, for its practical yet in-depth look at how (and why) to accurately interpret God's Word.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Romans Sendriks

    An excellent book which guides through through the methods of biblical hermeneutics of interpreting rightly the Word of God.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Neil Hess

    A good book on interpreting scripture, but probably more in depth than what the average reader is looking for.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    You can read my review on Amazon.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eric Pruitt

    Great intro to hermeneutics. A bit dry at times but helpful. The structure of the book could be better, some parts don't seem as fluid, but overall you will be sharpened. Great intro to hermeneutics. A bit dry at times but helpful. The structure of the book could be better, some parts don't seem as fluid, but overall you will be sharpened.

  27. 5 out of 5

    JR Snow

    Read this for my Biblical Hermeneutics class at Reformation Bible College

  28. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Kolstad

  29. 5 out of 5

    Seth Nelson

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nikolas Lingle

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.