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You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!: A Self-Help Book for Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder

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With "You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!, " Kelly and Ramundo bring together their considerable personal and professional experiences to create the essential guide to identifying, understanding and managing the dynamics of ADD in adults. With "You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!, " Kelly and Ramundo bring together their considerable personal and professional experiences to create the essential guide to identifying, understanding and managing the dynamics of ADD in adults.


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With "You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!, " Kelly and Ramundo bring together their considerable personal and professional experiences to create the essential guide to identifying, understanding and managing the dynamics of ADD in adults. With "You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!, " Kelly and Ramundo bring together their considerable personal and professional experiences to create the essential guide to identifying, understanding and managing the dynamics of ADD in adults.

30 review for You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!: A Self-Help Book for Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michele Harrod

    Thanks. This is all I can say to these authors. Talk about pick a book up, and suddenly understand your whole life. And yes, I did think that, and yes, I have since been tested ADHD positive, at my ripe old age of 44. Never even knew such a thing existed in Adults. The discovery and the journey of self understanding, forgiveness and learning new ways to live, have been utterly life changing and amazing. Wow, I really wasn't lazy, crazy or stupid! Very cool. Thanks. This is all I can say to these authors. Talk about pick a book up, and suddenly understand your whole life. And yes, I did think that, and yes, I have since been tested ADHD positive, at my ripe old age of 44. Never even knew such a thing existed in Adults. The discovery and the journey of self understanding, forgiveness and learning new ways to live, have been utterly life changing and amazing. Wow, I really wasn't lazy, crazy or stupid! Very cool.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marley

    Kind of ironically, I'm going to call this one too scattered. I get that when they started, this was a work by not-so-professionals trying to get the word out when zero other material existed on the market, so they tried to cover absolutely everything. However: SO many anecdotes thrown in for a paragraph at a time and then referred to 300 pages later, so many that you kind of lose track of anything so many different types of "ADDers" are actually supposed to have in common with each other. So man Kind of ironically, I'm going to call this one too scattered. I get that when they started, this was a work by not-so-professionals trying to get the word out when zero other material existed on the market, so they tried to cover absolutely everything. However: SO many anecdotes thrown in for a paragraph at a time and then referred to 300 pages later, so many that you kind of lose track of anything so many different types of "ADDers" are actually supposed to have in common with each other. So many different angles at trying to boost one's self-esteem that don't all match up with each other. And so many different kinds of listmaking that they seem to suggest you do all at once (thus overwhelming the easily-overwhelmed ADHD types!). All that said, some very valuable nuggets of gold for the newly diagnosed or the probably-about-to-be-diagnosed. (money line here:) I think the string of quotations I scribble into my commonplace book are going to be infinitely more valuable than this book as I experienced it in real time. The final 4 chapters of the revised edition, written after 10 years of experience as ADD life coaches and thus filled with much more concrete suggestions, might end up my favorite parts. All the stuff on meditation, exercise, pulling it together when having "an overwhelm," and ADD-specific ways to fight negative self-talk (c.f. my "Feeling Good" review) actually seem pretty useful. Hold on for my next review, which will cover a book on this subject that so far is proving far more consistent and digestible and interesting to me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    James Oliver

    It's the first book I read on ADD so I guess the initial favourable impression was just a kind of 'ah, at last I am not alone' kind of recognition. However, I've liked it less as time passes. It is badly organised and set out with far too many exclamation marks and EMPHASIS!!! It's a real 'victim' book. One thing that is good is that it outlines the various 'sub-types' of ADDers - ADD symptoms manifest themselves in different kinds of behaviours among different types of people. It's not just cra It's the first book I read on ADD so I guess the initial favourable impression was just a kind of 'ah, at last I am not alone' kind of recognition. However, I've liked it less as time passes. It is badly organised and set out with far too many exclamation marks and EMPHASIS!!! It's a real 'victim' book. One thing that is good is that it outlines the various 'sub-types' of ADDers - ADD symptoms manifest themselves in different kinds of behaviours among different types of people. It's not just crazy tartrezine-fueled kids running around causing chaos. I think Driven to Distraction is a better and ultimately more helpful book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    Well, who knows if I have ADD or not, but certainly the strategies I have in place so I can cope with life are exactly the same strategies the authors recommend for ADD. (Except meditation. I read a lot of books that suggest meditation, and I'm so resistant to the idea and I do not know why.) But to some extent aren't these just strategies that all adults use to get stuff done and keep sane? SCHEDULE! Time track. Use notebooks to record everything (Evernote is the greatest invention in the world) Well, who knows if I have ADD or not, but certainly the strategies I have in place so I can cope with life are exactly the same strategies the authors recommend for ADD. (Except meditation. I read a lot of books that suggest meditation, and I'm so resistant to the idea and I do not know why.) But to some extent aren't these just strategies that all adults use to get stuff done and keep sane? SCHEDULE! Time track. Use notebooks to record everything (Evernote is the greatest invention in the world). Keep a routine. Make room for quiet time. Get enough sleep. Find balance (still one I have trouble with). What I actually wanted the book for - strategies for working with a co-worker with ADD - not actually so useful, because the focus is on developing personal self-management routines, rather than things I can do in the workplace to make life easier for them and make us productive when working together. So much is variable that I'm going to have to ask them what they prefer (but not over the telephone! So that was one good tip). I can't judge how good this book would be for the target market, but it seems really comprehensive, I liked the authors' writing style, and I enjoyed reading it. I think this would also work for people who are just temporarily overwhelmed with stuff, and not only for people with ADD. 3.5 stars rounded down.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

    Finally, I'm not alone. For years I thought I was crazy. I thought if I tell anyone what its like inside my head, surely they'll have me committed. So I kept quiet. It wasn't until my kids were diagnosed with ADHD and my daughter explained to me what its like in her head, that I realized I had ADD. I still wasn't sure what that meant, so I went looking for books. The title of this one immediately caught my attention, but I was sure the information contained inside couldn't possibly live up to th Finally, I'm not alone. For years I thought I was crazy. I thought if I tell anyone what its like inside my head, surely they'll have me committed. So I kept quiet. It wasn't until my kids were diagnosed with ADHD and my daughter explained to me what its like in her head, that I realized I had ADD. I still wasn't sure what that meant, so I went looking for books. The title of this one immediately caught my attention, but I was sure the information contained inside couldn't possibly live up to the title that I so easily related to. I was wrong. This book has been a savior, in a head that is constantly cluttered, streaming, and screaming for peace, now I know I'm not alone. I know I can manage what sometimes feels like an uphill battle, in 10 feet of snow, without my shoes on. The book is funny, well organized, and easy to read for someone who tends to read several books at one time because I can't keep my head in just one. I'm in the process of reading all of Kate and Peggy's books on ADD.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Inge

    This was a disappointment for me. Too focussed on ‘recovery’ as if adhd ever disappears, scattered and pretty outdated in certain aspects. I actually dnf-ed this one before deciding to give it another shot. I initially decided to end because in one of the first chapters it told me to follow the twelve steps of AA for adhd recovery and to ‘believe that a Power greater than myself could restore me to sanity’ - uh excuse me what. AD/HD is not insanity and has nothing to do with a ‘Power greater tha This was a disappointment for me. Too focussed on ‘recovery’ as if adhd ever disappears, scattered and pretty outdated in certain aspects. I actually dnf-ed this one before deciding to give it another shot. I initially decided to end because in one of the first chapters it told me to follow the twelve steps of AA for adhd recovery and to ‘believe that a Power greater than myself could restore me to sanity’ - uh excuse me what. AD/HD is not insanity and has nothing to do with a ‘Power greater than myself’ it’s neurological?! As this was mentioned as a good resource on AD/HD I decided to give it another shot. I could’ve spared myself the effort. This may have been a good resource twenty years ago, but it does not hold up - even with the updates. The majority of the given strategies or bits of advice weren’t workable. Not everyone can just switch careers, or would be better off being a stay at home-mom... And can we stop telling people with AD/HD to ‘work’ on it? Yes, sometimes you might need certain strategies to cope because you struggle with certain aspects of society due to how your brain works, but ‘working’ on AD/HD or ‘recovery’ suggest that we can overcome it and it’s all bad. The authors do advocate acceptance and the fact that AD/HD also has its good sides, but the language in this book contradicted that at least once per page. I also wonder whether anyone has ever explained what gender actually is to the authors... and confronted them with their ideas about the role of women, as well as their ideas about romantic relationships and having kids. (which both seem to be presented as something we all need to achieve ASAP)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amy Rhoda Brown

    Starting right from the awkward title, this book is showing its age. Written back in the nineties (when it was apparently the only ADD book) it tries to cover all the conceivable angles of the ADD life in one dense tome. It's text heavy, with narrow margins and clunky visual design, leavened only by some unattractive and often irrelevant cartoons. It's 2016 and you can now read books — or at least articles —about every conceivable concern for people with AD/HD: AD/HD in the workplace, AD/HD in th Starting right from the awkward title, this book is showing its age. Written back in the nineties (when it was apparently the only ADD book) it tries to cover all the conceivable angles of the ADD life in one dense tome. It's text heavy, with narrow margins and clunky visual design, leavened only by some unattractive and often irrelevant cartoons. It's 2016 and you can now read books — or at least articles —about every conceivable concern for people with AD/HD: AD/HD in the workplace, AD/HD in the bedroom, AD/HD for women, men, boys and girls, AD/HD on vacation, AD/HD and personal grooming, AD/HD and pets... I can keep going as long as I can think of things to Google. You definitely do not need to slog your way through this book. It was, no doubt, an amazing resource in its time, but now it can safely be retired.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ayla

    3.5 stars Self help book on understanding ADHD and implementing strategies on how to successfully live with it. Easy to read and fun pictures to break up the chapters keeping you motivated to finish! Found much that I related to while some parts not so much.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    I can see why this was recommended to me by so many people. It's a good, friendly guide for people who've been diagnosed with ADHD as an adult. Occasionally it's a bit dated, especially some of the organizational advice, but overall I found it super helpful and appreciated the cheerful tone. I can see why this was recommended to me by so many people. It's a good, friendly guide for people who've been diagnosed with ADHD as an adult. Occasionally it's a bit dated, especially some of the organizational advice, but overall I found it super helpful and appreciated the cheerful tone.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Note: This review refers to the eAudiobook, a 2-hour-long abridgment of the original book. I don't believe I have ADD, but I thought the book might have some useful strategies for dealing with procrastination and disorganization. Perhaps the full-length book does include that type of content, but this abridged edition did not. Perhaps this audiobook would serve as a useful refresher if you had read the full-length book. It is not useful as standalone material. Most of the information did not seem Note: This review refers to the eAudiobook, a 2-hour-long abridgment of the original book. I don't believe I have ADD, but I thought the book might have some useful strategies for dealing with procrastination and disorganization. Perhaps the full-length book does include that type of content, but this abridged edition did not. Perhaps this audiobook would serve as a useful refresher if you had read the full-length book. It is not useful as standalone material. Most of the information did not seem specific to ADD and it was explained too superficially to be useful. For example, active listening and the use of "I" statements were covered in only a minute or two each. Fairly early in the recording, they recommend tracking, in great detail, how you spend your time for 2-3 weeks, then analyzing your records to plan your time for an upcoming week. This advice sounds nearly impossible for anybody to follow, let alone somebody who struggles to sustain attention. And then they go on to say that your plan will probably fail!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marti Dumas

    The book was well-organized and the voice was genuine. If I had read it when it was originally published years ago, I probably would have found it informative. Unfortunately, I was hoping to gain some insight into ADD for adults and I didn't learn anything that I didn't already know. I'd give it 2 stars because the Goodreads label says 2 stars= "It was okay," but that seems like a pretty low rating for a book that does have pertinent information despite not being helpful for me. The book was well-organized and the voice was genuine. If I had read it when it was originally published years ago, I probably would have found it informative. Unfortunately, I was hoping to gain some insight into ADD for adults and I didn't learn anything that I didn't already know. I'd give it 2 stars because the Goodreads label says 2 stars= "It was okay," but that seems like a pretty low rating for a book that does have pertinent information despite not being helpful for me.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne Campbell

    It's been 19 years since I read this book but I know it helped me understand who I am and how my brain works. It was wonderful to read a book that made sense to me. I could totally relate! When you've spent most of your life either being told or believing you are lazy, crazy or stupid...it's a wonderful relief to know you are not alone. And no, I'm not Lazy, Crazy, or Stupid! It's been 19 years since I read this book but I know it helped me understand who I am and how my brain works. It was wonderful to read a book that made sense to me. I could totally relate! When you've spent most of your life either being told or believing you are lazy, crazy or stupid...it's a wonderful relief to know you are not alone. And no, I'm not Lazy, Crazy, or Stupid!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    This is not a book. It's a joke really. Looks like the author cut out an article or two from COSMOPOLITAN and then paid someone a few hundred dollars to increase the number of total words so she could have it published as a book. Utter waste of time (and money). This is not a book. It's a joke really. Looks like the author cut out an article or two from COSMOPOLITAN and then paid someone a few hundred dollars to increase the number of total words so she could have it published as a book. Utter waste of time (and money).

  14. 4 out of 5

    Pharrisbrown

    Overall, I think this is a valuable resource for people trying to understand how either they or someone they love can be so many contradictory things at once. Scattered, but then hyperfocused on a new passion. How an intelligent person can be brillant in one moment, then unable to collect his/her thoughts enough to figure out what to make for dinner. As a professional, I recommend the book, although different people respond better than others. Some can soar through it, amazed by the insights int Overall, I think this is a valuable resource for people trying to understand how either they or someone they love can be so many contradictory things at once. Scattered, but then hyperfocused on a new passion. How an intelligent person can be brillant in one moment, then unable to collect his/her thoughts enough to figure out what to make for dinner. As a professional, I recommend the book, although different people respond better than others. Some can soar through it, amazed by the insights into their life, while others slog through it and get bogged down by its wordiness. The title itself can be a great conversation starter about the emotional and social impact this issue has on many individuals.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    OMG! This is the BEST book ever for anyone with ADD/ADHD! And especially for those with ADD who have been reading self-help books for years, attempting to improve themselves. The authors cover everything associated with this disorder and give practical advice on dealing with everyday life; i.e. organization, sexual functioning, medication interactions, memory training, etc. Even if you are not personally affected with the disorder, you probably know a loved one or a friend who is and it will cer OMG! This is the BEST book ever for anyone with ADD/ADHD! And especially for those with ADD who have been reading self-help books for years, attempting to improve themselves. The authors cover everything associated with this disorder and give practical advice on dealing with everyday life; i.e. organization, sexual functioning, medication interactions, memory training, etc. Even if you are not personally affected with the disorder, you probably know a loved one or a friend who is and it will certainly help you to better understand them and their idiosyncracies. It makes a great reference book - think ADD Bible. ^_^

  16. 4 out of 5

    Matthew MacKay

    For someone who recently self-diagnosed themselves with the condition, the book has been nothing short of miraculous. The relatibilty to the characters exemplified so well in the book, the easy to understand breakdown of the strengths and weaknesses (pitfalls) of the condition, and the numerous suggestions the book gives for solutions to problems the ADDer has in life, make this book one of my favorites—if not, my favorite. If you have ADD/ADHD, or believe you do, I HIGHLY recommend you read thi For someone who recently self-diagnosed themselves with the condition, the book has been nothing short of miraculous. The relatibilty to the characters exemplified so well in the book, the easy to understand breakdown of the strengths and weaknesses (pitfalls) of the condition, and the numerous suggestions the book gives for solutions to problems the ADDer has in life, make this book one of my favorites—if not, my favorite. If you have ADD/ADHD, or believe you do, I HIGHLY recommend you read this brilliantly written book!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ariane

    The most helpful things about this book were the extensive case studies and examples of people and how ADD affected their lives in many different ways. I think also the drug sections and therapy possibilities were interesting and brief. However, the book could have benefited from some serious editing. And the strategies to help ADDers with organization and other areas where they need help were not well organized or nearly extensive enough.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Crazy Uncle Ryan

    I really found this book to be helpful. This book taught me a lot about ADD and I found out that much of what I had been told about the condition when I was first diagnosed as a kid had been proven wrong. I also liked the simple, practical advice it provided.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    I absolutely love this book. It is one of the first that really spoke to my ADD issues.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ken Lukken

    I’m not entirely sure who this book is written for—someone recently repatriated from a jungle? It’s full of ostensibly ADHD-focused “life advice” that vacillates exclusively between “way too generalized to be remotely useful” and “so highly overspecific that it comes off sociopathic.” It also has a weird relationship with the word “work”: it’s always trying to drive home the importance of “working on your ADHD” and that it’s “hard work” and you’re going to really need to “buckle down,” but then I’m not entirely sure who this book is written for—someone recently repatriated from a jungle? It’s full of ostensibly ADHD-focused “life advice” that vacillates exclusively between “way too generalized to be remotely useful” and “so highly overspecific that it comes off sociopathic.” It also has a weird relationship with the word “work”: it’s always trying to drive home the importance of “working on your ADHD” and that it’s “hard work” and you’re going to really need to “buckle down,” but then it spends part of a chapter taking about how you may want to consider putting in less hours at your job, if that helps you? It’s not that these two concepts are opposed just because they share a set of common words, but, I don’t know, couldn’t you have thought of another way to frame the management of ADHD in a way that probably wouldn’t trigger the same feelings of inadequacy you go way out of your way to highlight in ADHD workers? It doesn’t help that the authors never waste an opportunity to say something simple idiomatically, perhaps especially because the belabored folksiness is straight out of the mid-90s and has aged like an episode of Friends. Look, it’s hard to fault the book if it actually gave you something valuable or helped you come to terms with your ADHD or made you feel less alone. But it didn’t do any of those things for me, and one man’s pedagogy is another man’s condescension.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Williams

    Written with Sympathy Anyone who thinks s/he has ADD/ADHD, anyone who knows s/he has ADD/ADHD, and anyone who is close, personally or professionally, with someone who has ADD/ADHD can benefit from this book. It's a great first step to understanding the possible symptoms and effects of the disorder. It's a great first step to admitting you might be affected by the disorder. It's a map for getting help and helping yourself. What makes it so valuable is the fact that it's written by two women who ar Written with Sympathy Anyone who thinks s/he has ADD/ADHD, anyone who knows s/he has ADD/ADHD, and anyone who is close, personally or professionally, with someone who has ADD/ADHD can benefit from this book. It's a great first step to understanding the possible symptoms and effects of the disorder. It's a great first step to admitting you might be affected by the disorder. It's a map for getting help and helping yourself. What makes it so valuable is the fact that it's written by two women who are themselves ADD-abled and who are now life coaches for those living with such differences. And it's real - these women aren't always waving pom-poms, claiming the work you'll have to do, the challenges you face, are not really a big deal. They admit the process of learning to truly live with ADD/ADHD can be frightening and hard. Bu they are convincing that the struggle is worthwhile. Another reviewer pointed out that the medical sections are outdated. That is a very practical and true observation. But the general point that someone with ADD/ADHD shouldn't automatically reject medication is nonetheless valid. Lauren Williams, Owner, Casual Uncluttering LLC, Woodinville, WA, USA

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katharine

    3.5 stars, but I will round up because one of the biggest problems with "You Mean I'm Not...." is that it desperately needs to be updated to include reasonably current technology. Originally written in 1993 and updated in 2006, the book goes into detail about helpful suggestions such as purchasing a buzzer intercom to get people's attention on different floors, putting up a color-coded bulletin board calendar with pushpins near the phone so people won't forget appointments, etc. My other problem 3.5 stars, but I will round up because one of the biggest problems with "You Mean I'm Not...." is that it desperately needs to be updated to include reasonably current technology. Originally written in 1993 and updated in 2006, the book goes into detail about helpful suggestions such as purchasing a buzzer intercom to get people's attention on different floors, putting up a color-coded bulletin board calendar with pushpins near the phone so people won't forget appointments, etc. My other problem with "You Mean I'm Not..." is that, while loosely keeping to its chapter subjects, the text jumps around a lot within that subject. So, it is at times exhausting to read and retain the major points without being pulled in multiple directions. That said, "You Mean I'm Not..." does a very good job pinning down basic concepts, symptoms, concerns, and remedies of adult ADD/ADHD and does it's very best to present them in everyday language so that the reader is not intimidated by scientific terminology. A good starter book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Bowling

    I have the first edition of this book. It is really a phenomenal read for any adult with ADHD. If you're already well-read on ADHD it may not produce any information that is life-changing, but the perspectives and humor are very refreshing. Even though the edition I read is a couple decades old, and the references to fax machines, Rolodexes, answering machines, and so on are a bit outdated, you can easily substitute modern technology in the anecdotes. I would give this book 5 stars if it were a I have the first edition of this book. It is really a phenomenal read for any adult with ADHD. If you're already well-read on ADHD it may not produce any information that is life-changing, but the perspectives and humor are very refreshing. Even though the edition I read is a couple decades old, and the references to fax machines, Rolodexes, answering machines, and so on are a bit outdated, you can easily substitute modern technology in the anecdotes. I would give this book 5 stars if it were a bit better organized and less presumptive that all women want to get married and have children. Women with children seemed to dominate a lot of the discussion; I would have liked to have seen more info for college students, entrepreneurs, etc.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Quinn Arruda

    In the forward for the updated edition, the authors talked about how well they felt the original held up (first written in the 1990s). It does not hold up as well as they think. Their work advice largely boils down to "just change careers" and "find ways to live well on less money so that you can go part-time" and...in THIS economy?! Not great advice in 2020. They also use a lot of examples where the person with ADHD is either a stay-at-home parent or has a partner who is (and yes, the stay-at-ho In the forward for the updated edition, the authors talked about how well they felt the original held up (first written in the 1990s). It does not hold up as well as they think. Their work advice largely boils down to "just change careers" and "find ways to live well on less money so that you can go part-time" and...in THIS economy?! Not great advice in 2020. They also use a lot of examples where the person with ADHD is either a stay-at-home parent or has a partner who is (and yes, the stay-at-home person is always a woman in these examples). Some of the strategies in other arenas are useful, but honestly, I didn't get anything out of this book that I hadn't already gotten for free online.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ruchika

    I can see how this might've been revolutionary when it first came out, but in today's era, it comes across as quite dated. Started off promising in some aspects with some of the explainations, but Wanted it to go more in depth with certain things. Lot of it seems like general life advice. Also, when giving advice about inter personal interactions, i didn't like the dont do this, do that way of saying things...felt a little insulting, and might be context specific. Did have a few points that were I can see how this might've been revolutionary when it first came out, but in today's era, it comes across as quite dated. Started off promising in some aspects with some of the explainations, but Wanted it to go more in depth with certain things. Lot of it seems like general life advice. Also, when giving advice about inter personal interactions, i didn't like the dont do this, do that way of saying things...felt a little insulting, and might be context specific. Did have a few points that were helpful or insightful to me..advice (dating, relationships) questionable, patronising, presented things as black and white....liked the scenario w the characters though...the last part about how to managing your own care was generally good advice.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael Potts

    Thoroughly unhelpful for anyone who has ever put literally any amount of effort into addressing their ADHD, and yet, conversely and somewhat confusingly, I can't imagine that someone newly diagnosed would be able to get anything out of this either. Nearly always rambling and deviating from the point they are trying to make, it is extremely clear as someone who has had ADHD for 20 years that both of the authors do too. I'm sure that this book had an editor at some point in the process of publishin Thoroughly unhelpful for anyone who has ever put literally any amount of effort into addressing their ADHD, and yet, conversely and somewhat confusingly, I can't imagine that someone newly diagnosed would be able to get anything out of this either. Nearly always rambling and deviating from the point they are trying to make, it is extremely clear as someone who has had ADHD for 20 years that both of the authors do too. I'm sure that this book had an editor at some point in the process of publishing, but it's not very evident and it's certainly could have used a considerable amount of tightening up.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    I really struggled with this book and ended up not even being able to finish it. While I am sure it may be helpful for some, I couldn't help but feel like it was providing excuses for individuals who struggle with certain social/cultural norms and expectations. I agree that it is important for each of us to know our worth and be okay with our differences and find ways to maximize our strengths while minimizing our weaknesses. However, I generally enjoy books that are more about taking responsibi I really struggled with this book and ended up not even being able to finish it. While I am sure it may be helpful for some, I couldn't help but feel like it was providing excuses for individuals who struggle with certain social/cultural norms and expectations. I agree that it is important for each of us to know our worth and be okay with our differences and find ways to maximize our strengths while minimizing our weaknesses. However, I generally enjoy books that are more about taking responsibility for our own actions and decisions. Maybe a good book, just not my cup of tea.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julee Smucker

    I read the latest version, which was not this edition. Just finished reading it in January 2021. For someone learning about themselves and AD/HD it us a very good read. Though outdated, it still has very pertinent information and insight. I read this book after other people that have AD/HD suggested it. What I like most of all is thatthe ladiea that wrote it have AD/HD, so it comes from a neurodiverse perspective. Both were professionals when they wrote it, so having someone with knowledge is rea I read the latest version, which was not this edition. Just finished reading it in January 2021. For someone learning about themselves and AD/HD it us a very good read. Though outdated, it still has very pertinent information and insight. I read this book after other people that have AD/HD suggested it. What I like most of all is thatthe ladiea that wrote it have AD/HD, so it comes from a neurodiverse perspective. Both were professionals when they wrote it, so having someone with knowledge is reassuring. A great read with no judgement and very valuable information for a beginner!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    This book could have been written about me. From the very first chapter, I was hooked. I highly recommend this book to any other adult with ADHD, especially women who are left wondering where the "H" in our diagnosis comes into play. One thing I will mention: This was written in the pre-smartphone era. Some of the suggestions on creating order still make a lot of sense, but will need to be tweaked to fit in with our "always on" lives. This book could have been written about me. From the very first chapter, I was hooked. I highly recommend this book to any other adult with ADHD, especially women who are left wondering where the "H" in our diagnosis comes into play. One thing I will mention: This was written in the pre-smartphone era. Some of the suggestions on creating order still make a lot of sense, but will need to be tweaked to fit in with our "always on" lives.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Libby Andrews

    It took me a long time to plough through this book. It was difficult because I don’t have ADD although by the end of the book I was convinced I had. I was reading to learn how to understand and cope with my son’s ADD. The book gave some interesting points about medication and meditation. It also shows you how jumbled the ADD mind is and also how ADD characteristics can benefit the sufferer. The epilogue of a world without ADD was particularly poignant.

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