web site hit counter The First Seven Ecumenical Councils (325-787): Their History and Theology - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The First Seven Ecumenical Councils (325-787): Their History and Theology

Availability: Ready to download

This unique work - no other work yet available in English treats this subject - illustrates the contribution of these Councils in the development and formulation of Christian beliefs. It then shows how their legacies lingered throughout the centuries to inspire - or haunt - every generation.


Compare

This unique work - no other work yet available in English treats this subject - illustrates the contribution of these Councils in the development and formulation of Christian beliefs. It then shows how their legacies lingered throughout the centuries to inspire - or haunt - every generation.

30 review for The First Seven Ecumenical Councils (325-787): Their History and Theology

  1. 4 out of 5

    Josef Muench

    Davis does an admirable job condensing an extremely dense history - both politically and theologically - into 325 pages (a number which is surely unintentional, but symbolically satisfying). Of course, any work attempting to condense this much information into an accessible volume will have to make certain generalizations and not give abundant detail, but that can easily be forgiven. Strangely, I found the chapters on Nicaea I and Constantinople I the hardest to follow, even though they are most Davis does an admirable job condensing an extremely dense history - both politically and theologically - into 325 pages (a number which is surely unintentional, but symbolically satisfying). Of course, any work attempting to condense this much information into an accessible volume will have to make certain generalizations and not give abundant detail, but that can easily be forgiven. Strangely, I found the chapters on Nicaea I and Constantinople I the hardest to follow, even though they are most familiar to me. The complicated nature of the political situation and theological controversies no doubt makes it challenging to present in a straight-forward manner. Another great bonus is the slightly annotated bibliography David gives at the end of each chapter, covering every major topic within that chapter. Overall, this is a great resource and a helpful primer to the ecumenical councils and their theology with which any serious theologian should be familiar.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Luke Schmeltzer

    As far as ecclesiastical histories go, this was one of the more exciting ones. While Davis is a Jesuit scholar and has a number of emphases I would see differently, this book is a phenomenal study of the topic. The seven ecumenical councils are presented in order with theological, political, and social factors in mind. This work is a must-have for anyone interested in the creeds and councils of the early Church.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    Bookstore find. My train of thought: "Huh. Interesting. I should write this down for later. Wait, will there ever be a later? Bet the library doesn't have it. Probably ridiculously priced on Amazon. Screw it, I'll get it. Could be ammunition against a crazy fundamentalist. I'll know more about early church history than they will. Ha! Now, where's the atheism shelf?" Bookstore find. My train of thought: "Huh. Interesting. I should write this down for later. Wait, will there ever be a later? Bet the library doesn't have it. Probably ridiculously priced on Amazon. Screw it, I'll get it. Could be ammunition against a crazy fundamentalist. I'll know more about early church history than they will. Ha! Now, where's the atheism shelf?"

  4. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    This is an invaluable overview of the major figures, ideas, and events behind the Seven Ecumenical Councils (325 - 787). There is no better survey in English than this one, by the late (+2014) Jesuit professor Leo Donald Davis. It seems like an impossible task, but Davis succeeds admirably. He is well-read and organized enough to take the reader through confusing periods of political history and even more confusing periods of theological controversy without drowning him or her in too many detail This is an invaluable overview of the major figures, ideas, and events behind the Seven Ecumenical Councils (325 - 787). There is no better survey in English than this one, by the late (+2014) Jesuit professor Leo Donald Davis. It seems like an impossible task, but Davis succeeds admirably. He is well-read and organized enough to take the reader through confusing periods of political history and even more confusing periods of theological controversy without drowning him or her in too many details. While Davis does cover the events of the councils themselves - that is, the records of what the council fathers did and said, which usually includes amusing anecdotes of famous arguments and outlandish behavior - he also supplies more than adequate pre- and post- council background history and theology. This work is helpful because it situates the councils both within history and within Christian theology. After all, the seven councils did not take place in a vacuum but in the political and social worlds of earthly kingdoms: the Roman Empire, the Eastern Roman Empire, the Byzantine Empire, and the Carolingian Empire; and, within the theological worlds of such luminaries as Athanasius, the Cappadocians, Cyril, and Maximus Confessor. Overall Davis's book will give the reader a much better grasp of particular Church Fathers' positions in relation to other Church Fathers. For example; Augustine's thought exerted little influence on any council, though Cyril and Leo the Great exerted considerable influence - even long after their deaths. Origen's thought was a sticking point all along the way, culminating in anathemas at the Second Council of Constantinople (553). Athanasius and the Cappadocians were always consulted, their positions being regarded as sacrosanct. The popes were respected for their Petrine authority and occasionally their theological acumen, but Eastern theologians and statesmen were always wary about Roman interference in the East. This book is also laid out well, with timelines and select bibliographies following every chapter, giving the reader starting points for further research. This is one of the finest books of historical theology I've ever read for its organization, scope, and clarity.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Coleen Dailey

    This was a very interesting read about the early history of the church and the break between the Eastern and Western church. It took a while to read, trying to keep track of all the different leaders in both groups as well as the various emperors but it does help explain the beginning of the long history of differences between the two churches.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    Extremely informative, and comprehensive, however it was not the best written (very dry) and often the author appears to state his own editorial theological opinions, without any notice or anticipation of such

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hoyt

    Great book. Focused, logical, and rather comprehensive. This book not only describes the results of the various councils but also religiously political purposes for them. Included is the infighting, the playing off of each other, and a greater understanding of the Great Schism. As a low-church Protestant, I find the information in this book interesting and useful in understanding Roman Catholic and Byzantine approaches to both our common faith, and the workings of the "church." Davis does a great Great book. Focused, logical, and rather comprehensive. This book not only describes the results of the various councils but also religiously political purposes for them. Included is the infighting, the playing off of each other, and a greater understanding of the Great Schism. As a low-church Protestant, I find the information in this book interesting and useful in understanding Roman Catholic and Byzantine approaches to both our common faith, and the workings of the "church." Davis does a great job of illustrating the first seven councils and then suggests that perhaps East and West could resolve to use these councils in their pursuit of realigning with each other. While I understand the teaching that ecumenical councils are recognized as establishing faith issues, this book illustrated to me that there was a bit more going on than a bunch of pious priests praying and discerning together. As a result, while a council's decisions may be usable in its immediate wake, I'm not sure that their history supports much more than that. Given that various bishops could accept or dismiss various aspects of council decision, it largely depends on whose court you're in as to whether any particular council applies to you. Aside form that though, this book is a great read and resource for anyone interested in church history.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    What an excellent primer for the subject! This will be a keeper and something to reference in the future for certain. There are essentially 8 chapters, and introductory chapter and seven further chapters each outlining one of the first seven ecumenical councils. The chapters after the introduction generally break down into sections covering the questions raised leading to the council, the council itself, the significance of the council, aftermath, a historical chronology of what was going on dur What an excellent primer for the subject! This will be a keeper and something to reference in the future for certain. There are essentially 8 chapters, and introductory chapter and seven further chapters each outlining one of the first seven ecumenical councils. The chapters after the introduction generally break down into sections covering the questions raised leading to the council, the council itself, the significance of the council, aftermath, a historical chronology of what was going on during that time, followed by a select bibliography. The last to me is invaluable as I would like to delve deeper into some of the councils. It was a great read and a book I would highly recommend to those like me just starting out in researching the councils.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

    Good read, especially about the political and personal conflicts surrounding the decisions affecting doctrine over the first Seven truly Ecumenical Councils. This demonstrates the continuing difficulty of critiquing the process of the development of orthodox doctrine, and the subsequent interpretation of the product of the councils. It does not help one respond to the question "What has orthodox doctrine to do with my faith?" Good read, especially about the political and personal conflicts surrounding the decisions affecting doctrine over the first Seven truly Ecumenical Councils. This demonstrates the continuing difficulty of critiquing the process of the development of orthodox doctrine, and the subsequent interpretation of the product of the councils. It does not help one respond to the question "What has orthodox doctrine to do with my faith?"

  10. 4 out of 5

    G Walker

    I was underwhelmed... a lot of high praise for this volume. A bit ambitious in scope for how small of a book it is. He does a good job overall, but smacks too much of being Latinized. Not bad but not great... perhaps as a primer or supplemental work to a growing field of works on the subject.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Nichols

    Outstanding. Davis takes us through the history of each council and the issues that were at stake, the discussions of the council itself, and the implications of the decisions they made. If you're reading one book about the early councils, read this one. Outstanding. Davis takes us through the history of each council and the issues that were at stake, the discussions of the council itself, and the implications of the decisions they made. If you're reading one book about the early councils, read this one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    Very, very dry. But so much of this history is usually brushed aside that this book is worth plowing through.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Clayton Brannon

    If you have an interest in early church history this is the book for you. A lot of history & church philosophy is in these few pages.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jared Cox

    Very good book, provides a great deal of detailed information and background about the councils.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris Heren

    One of the best books to summarize the Christological controversies of the early church. I would recommend it for any theologian/seminarian, and would require it if I taught a course on the subject.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bart

    Very well-written and researched, but some rather strange sympathies for the Nestorians.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vsncruz

    A succinct introduction before one plunges into the riches of any council (e.g., Acts 15). Especially when posed with Jesus' question, "Who do you say I am?"(Mark 8:29). A succinct introduction before one plunges into the riches of any council (e.g., Acts 15). Especially when posed with Jesus' question, "Who do you say I am?"(Mark 8:29).

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emad

    i am very like religion christian book i hope to read this book also (the council of chalcedon re examined)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Succinct yet thorough and very important. This book covers how interpretations of Church doctrines became fundamental. These are things that any inquisitive, intellectual Christian should know about.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mark McReynolds

  21. 4 out of 5

    Clarke Owens

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joel

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mickey W. Cantrell II

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joe Dantona

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bernard

  26. 5 out of 5

    Debbi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Fr. Photios

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tximo

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jonas

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Perez

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.