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Ordinary Life

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In this collection of short stories, the bestselling author of Open House and Talk Before Sleep takes us into the times in women’s lives when memories and events cohere to create a sense of wholeness, understanding, and change. In Ordinary Life, Mavis McPherson locks herself in the bathroom for a week, and no, she isn’t contemplating getting a divorce—she just needs some t In this collection of short stories, the bestselling author of Open House and Talk Before Sleep takes us into the times in women’s lives when memories and events cohere to create a sense of wholeness, understanding, and change. In Ordinary Life, Mavis McPherson locks herself in the bathroom for a week, and no, she isn’t contemplating getting a divorce—she just needs some time to think, to take stock of her life, and she comes to a surprising conclusion. In Today’s Special,a woman recognizes the solace she finds in the simple, timeless fare and atmosphere of the local diner and, ultimately, the harmony within her own spirit that familiar comforts can evoke. In White Dwarf, the secrets of a marriage are revealed as a couple passes the time with a seemingly insignificant word-association game. And in “Martin’s Letter to Nan,” the unforgettable husband and wife from Berg’s novel The Pull of the Moon engage in a new correspondence in which a different aspect of their marriage is revealed.


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In this collection of short stories, the bestselling author of Open House and Talk Before Sleep takes us into the times in women’s lives when memories and events cohere to create a sense of wholeness, understanding, and change. In Ordinary Life, Mavis McPherson locks herself in the bathroom for a week, and no, she isn’t contemplating getting a divorce—she just needs some t In this collection of short stories, the bestselling author of Open House and Talk Before Sleep takes us into the times in women’s lives when memories and events cohere to create a sense of wholeness, understanding, and change. In Ordinary Life, Mavis McPherson locks herself in the bathroom for a week, and no, she isn’t contemplating getting a divorce—she just needs some time to think, to take stock of her life, and she comes to a surprising conclusion. In Today’s Special,a woman recognizes the solace she finds in the simple, timeless fare and atmosphere of the local diner and, ultimately, the harmony within her own spirit that familiar comforts can evoke. In White Dwarf, the secrets of a marriage are revealed as a couple passes the time with a seemingly insignificant word-association game. And in “Martin’s Letter to Nan,” the unforgettable husband and wife from Berg’s novel The Pull of the Moon engage in a new correspondence in which a different aspect of their marriage is revealed.

30 review for Ordinary Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Connie G

    This collection of short stories mainly deals with relationships, especially in marriages. There were also several mother/daughter stories that I especially enjoyed. Another story that I found touching was a coming-of-age story about a young girl helping an immigrant woman learning to speak English. I had read the novel, The Pull Of The Moon, about a woman having trouble dealing with aging when she turned fifty, and going off on a trip by herself to sort things out. Her husband's response to the This collection of short stories mainly deals with relationships, especially in marriages. There were also several mother/daughter stories that I especially enjoyed. Another story that I found touching was a coming-of-age story about a young girl helping an immigrant woman learning to speak English. I had read the novel, The Pull Of The Moon, about a woman having trouble dealing with aging when she turned fifty, and going off on a trip by herself to sort things out. Her husband's response to the letters that Nan sent him on her trip is one of the stories in this collection, "Martin's Letter to Nan." Overall, this was an enjoyable book about how ordinary people relate to each other.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    There were several good stories in this collection, but my favourite was Martin’s Letter to Nan. This short story was written in response to readers who had read The Pull of the Moon, and wondered, as I did, how Martin felt when menopausal Nan suddenly took off on a trip by herself, leaving Martin a note to say she didn’t know when she’d be back. As his wife never let him know where she was, The Pull of the Moon was one-sided in its focus on Nan’s letters to Martin, and the journal entries she m There were several good stories in this collection, but my favourite was Martin’s Letter to Nan. This short story was written in response to readers who had read The Pull of the Moon, and wondered, as I did, how Martin felt when menopausal Nan suddenly took off on a trip by herself, leaving Martin a note to say she didn’t know when she’d be back. As his wife never let him know where she was, The Pull of the Moon was one-sided in its focus on Nan’s letters to Martin, and the journal entries she makes throughout the novel. I would recommend Ordinary Life for this one story alone. Perhaps some men might not find it realistic; I’d be curious to know. But for me, it struck a chord so deep, I read it several times. I found much truth in what Martin had to say; truth that wasn’t always easy to accept. And once you’ve read that story, you’ll want to read and enjoy the rest of Ordinary Life.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Book Concierge

    Digital audiobook narrated by Laura Hicks. 4**** This is a collection of short stories exploring the role of women and their relationships in contemporary America. Berg writes wonderfully about these women. I understand their frustrations and share their hopes, empathize with their pain and disappointments, and celebrate their triumphs and joys. There are moments that are laugh-out-loud funny, and moments that quiet my soul and cause me to reflect. Some scenes are almost unbearably tender, and a Digital audiobook narrated by Laura Hicks. 4**** This is a collection of short stories exploring the role of women and their relationships in contemporary America. Berg writes wonderfully about these women. I understand their frustrations and share their hopes, empathize with their pain and disappointments, and celebrate their triumphs and joys. There are moments that are laugh-out-loud funny, and moments that quiet my soul and cause me to reflect. Some scenes are almost unbearably tender, and a few made me feel uncomfortably like a voyeur. Her characters are familiar; we all know (or actually are) women like this. Their lives may be “ordinary” … the stories, and this collection, are NOT. I could not help but think of my late friend Sally, who first introduced me to Berg years ago. I can picture her sitting on my patio during book club and exclaiming, “You haven’t read Elizabeth Berg!?!” Thank you, my friend; I miss your recommendations, but at least I have plenty more of Elizabeth Berg’s books to read. The audiobook is performed by Laura Hicks, who does a marvelous job. She really brings these characters to life.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette (Now on StoryGraph)

    There is some really beautiful writing in these stories. I love Elizabeth Berg. I suppose some people would consider her chick lit, but she has so much more depth than that. She has a way of capturing everyday feelings and thoughts we all share but don't know how to express. There is some really beautiful writing in these stories. I love Elizabeth Berg. I suppose some people would consider her chick lit, but she has so much more depth than that. She has a way of capturing everyday feelings and thoughts we all share but don't know how to express.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sterlingcindysu

    I like short stories and appreciate how a writer can get in a mood/setting/characters so quickly. But forewarned, if you haven't been married a long time or over a certain age, these may not appeal to you. In some of the stories, the women talk about clothing such as nylons, slips and girdles--such historical artifacts now! I sure didn't like washing slips and always questioned why I needed to (until that photo of Diana in the sunlight, before her marriage) but I can still remember one with pink I like short stories and appreciate how a writer can get in a mood/setting/characters so quickly. But forewarned, if you haven't been married a long time or over a certain age, these may not appeal to you. In some of the stories, the women talk about clothing such as nylons, slips and girdles--such historical artifacts now! I sure didn't like washing slips and always questioned why I needed to (until that photo of Diana in the sunlight, before her marriage) but I can still remember one with pink rosebuds and chiffon ruffles.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brandee Shafer

    The stories in this book are about relationships: what a pain in the hind end they are, how often full of drudgery, and how we want to quit all of them at one point or another, although perhaps slightly less so the ones with the crazies who raise--or are raised by--us. I could relate to so many little details in the stories, but they're not the sorts of things one wants to own up to in a review; they're embarrassing, intimate. Berg nailed it: the ordinary life-thing, or at least, my ordinary lif The stories in this book are about relationships: what a pain in the hind end they are, how often full of drudgery, and how we want to quit all of them at one point or another, although perhaps slightly less so the ones with the crazies who raise--or are raised by--us. I could relate to so many little details in the stories, but they're not the sorts of things one wants to own up to in a review; they're embarrassing, intimate. Berg nailed it: the ordinary life-thing, or at least, my ordinary life. Mostly I read along thinking I'd give the book four stars, in part because I've been a little generous (loose, even) with stars, lately, but there was a story toward the back that made me do this ugly sort of gasping thing in the tub, where I was reading, and I thought: well, that's five stars, dammit. I'd tell you which story; again, it feels too intimate. But if you know me at all and read the book, you'll probably figure it out right away.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sheri Howard

    As with many short-story collections, my rating is an average. Individually, some would have gotten more...some less. Overall, this collection gave me an appreciation for her writing. I'm not sure I would take the time to actually read one of her novels (already too many others on my want-to-read list), but I'd like to find one as an audio-book. As with many short-story collections, my rating is an average. Individually, some would have gotten more...some less. Overall, this collection gave me an appreciation for her writing. I'm not sure I would take the time to actually read one of her novels (already too many others on my want-to-read list), but I'd like to find one as an audio-book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    V.S. Kemanis

    One of my readers gave me Ordinary Life: Stories, and mentioned that the themes in the book reminded her of my collection Dust of the Universe, tales of family. I'm so thankful for this gift. Each story in this collection reflects exactly what the title says, ordinary life. So simple, yet so deep, these stories touch on the exquisite moments we all experience and can relate to. Elizabeth Berg reawakens us to the small things that make us human, make life worth living. She reminds us to be gratefu One of my readers gave me Ordinary Life: Stories, and mentioned that the themes in the book reminded her of my collection Dust of the Universe, tales of family. I'm so thankful for this gift. Each story in this collection reflects exactly what the title says, ordinary life. So simple, yet so deep, these stories touch on the exquisite moments we all experience and can relate to. Elizabeth Berg reawakens us to the small things that make us human, make life worth living. She reminds us to be grateful for the routine and commonplace events that give us comfort, delight, and yes, magic. The opening and closing stories in this collection are perfect bookends to the theme. In the opening piece, “Ordinary Life: A Love Story,” a woman of 79 takes a week-long timeout from her husband to reflect on her life. The memories and images of people, possessions, and family milestones tumble out in a free flow of association. At this stage of her life, she wonders where the time went and what’s next. “How could she have known that ordinary life would have such allure later on?” The closing story, “Today’s Special,” is about how good it feels to eat in a diner. Is there anything more mundane? It’s an extraordinary piece of writing! The author tells us in the afterword that this is one of her earliest stories, a reflection on what she might tell a friend who is suffering from depression. It’s a wonderful description of the comfort food and the people in the diner, along with a list of other everyday images, ending with this: “Isn’t it those small things that add the necessary shape and meaning to our lives? And don’t we miss seeing them if we look too hard for big things?” Many of the relationships in these stories have suffered a gradual erosion from the tedium of everyday life. This is something we all struggle with. Underlying the weight of years is the yearning for something BIG, the revelation of a grand plan. Habits and patterns of behavior become ingrained and hurtful to others. “We all return to what’s familiar to us… Even if it’s not so wonderful, it’s what we know,” a man tells his wife, who struggles with the anger she feels toward her emotionally distant, verbally abusive father. (I love the name of that story: “One Time at Christmas, in my Sister’s Bathroom”!) The story that really hit me was “Take this Quiz.” It concludes with a metaphor that’s a bit too obvious, but its placement at the end and the truth it reveals runs deep. The implicit message is clear and applies to every relationship, whether casual or intimate: Once the words are out of your mouth, it’s too late to take them back. Each story is a compact little gem with a lesson to learn or a nugget for inner reflection. The stories move toward something. In their struggles with interpersonal relationships, Berg’s characters always make a transition toward self-knowledge, acceptance, or revelation.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Agosta

    Ordinary Life is a collection of short stories by one of my favorite contemporary authors, Elizabeth Berg. The first story alone, "Ordinary Life; a Love Story" is worth the price of admission. It captures the small moments that really make our lives, as Mavis locks herself in the bathroom for a week and takes out her memories to thumb over. So many of those memories spoke to me - being young and sharing a bed with a sister, sitting and talking with that same sister later when you are married and Ordinary Life is a collection of short stories by one of my favorite contemporary authors, Elizabeth Berg. The first story alone, "Ordinary Life; a Love Story" is worth the price of admission. It captures the small moments that really make our lives, as Mavis locks herself in the bathroom for a week and takes out her memories to thumb over. So many of those memories spoke to me - being young and sharing a bed with a sister, sitting and talking with that same sister later when you are married and dealing with so many things, all the belongings we used to have - pink bras, colored mixing bowls. Ms. Berg paints these lovely, exquisitely select pictures, and brings our own emotions into focus. "Caretaking" is a sad but touching story of a mother fading away into Alzheimer's. "Martin's Letter to Nan" is the rebuttal to one of Ms. Berg's earlier novels, "The Pull of the Moon", which I really loved because I felt it was the one unfinished part of that novel and reading this short story made the novel feel more complete. It also said a lot of honest things. "One Time at Christmas in My Sister's Bathroom" almost handed me my past on a platter, except my own story with my own father did have a more satisfying resolution. Each of the other stories in the collection were enjoyable to read, some are bound to touch you more than others. As always, after reading one of Ms. Berg's works, I feel spiritually lifted, more able to see important truths in small things. I'm glad to be able to read her words.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    This is a collection of short stories. No story is longer than 12 pages, and most are significantly shorter. But typical of Elizabeth Berg, she packs a great deal of honesty and emotion into each of her stories. Three stories in the beginning are shadowed by cancer. "Departure from Normal" gives a realistic description of how surreal a cancer diagnosis feels. Many of the stories are about marriages -- how they endure and survive in the midst of the tediousness of daily life. The stories from the This is a collection of short stories. No story is longer than 12 pages, and most are significantly shorter. But typical of Elizabeth Berg, she packs a great deal of honesty and emotion into each of her stories. Three stories in the beginning are shadowed by cancer. "Departure from Normal" gives a realistic description of how surreal a cancer diagnosis feels. Many of the stories are about marriages -- how they endure and survive in the midst of the tediousness of daily life. The stories from the husband's points of view ("Martin's Letter to Nan" and "White "Dwarf") made me consider how much consideration I give my own husband/marriage (not enough). The opening story ("Ordinary Life: A Love Story") illustrates that each us needs our own space at times, but that ultimately we are created for relationships that are committed and enduring.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jo Dunn

    Ordinary Life: Stories, Elizabeth Berg's collection of short stories, will speak to those of us who have experienced marriage, disappointment, child-rearing, joy, despair, childhood, fear, illness, humor, disillusionment and enduring love . . among other emotions evocative of the human condition. There was not a single story (of the fourteen) that I couldn't relate to - in one way or another. Ms. Berg is another author I "stumbled upon" - only to find that I'd found a gifted wordsmith with an am Ordinary Life: Stories, Elizabeth Berg's collection of short stories, will speak to those of us who have experienced marriage, disappointment, child-rearing, joy, despair, childhood, fear, illness, humor, disillusionment and enduring love . . among other emotions evocative of the human condition. There was not a single story (of the fourteen) that I couldn't relate to - in one way or another. Ms. Berg is another author I "stumbled upon" - only to find that I'd found a gifted wordsmith with an amazing ability to paint (amazing!) pictures with her words. Ms. Berg's short stories revolve around "everyday/ordinary" people . . we all have family, friends and neighbors who will come to mind as each story unfolds. This was a short read . . almost too short, simply because I enjoyed them - one and all. Highly recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sydney Avey

    Elizabeth Berg is one of my favorite authors. I have commented on all of these stories on my blog posts 365 Short Stories at http://sydneyavey.com/blog. In her last story, Today's Special, every scene depicts what is special about the ordinary. Want comfort for your body and soul? Head to your locally owned diner where “Gossip isn’t sharp or malicious—it’s necessary, human reporting, and we listen with ears far more sympathetic than critical." As a writer, I study Berg for the way she introduces Elizabeth Berg is one of my favorite authors. I have commented on all of these stories on my blog posts 365 Short Stories at http://sydneyavey.com/blog. In her last story, Today's Special, every scene depicts what is special about the ordinary. Want comfort for your body and soul? Head to your locally owned diner where “Gossip isn’t sharp or malicious—it’s necessary, human reporting, and we listen with ears far more sympathetic than critical." As a writer, I study Berg for the way she introduces characters as people we would like to know. She is a writer I trust to leave me feeling better about humanity, not worse.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    At first I was frustrated by the short story format -- I would get really caught up in a character and then it was over. If I was still teaching creative writing, it would be a great example of character stories to build on. Author's note -- "Martin's letter to Nan" is the answer to What was Martin's response? to The Pull of the Moon novel about 50 yr old woman dealing with menopause and aging. It's a story of self-discovery and self-acceptance. Women say they keep it by their bed. Need to read At first I was frustrated by the short story format -- I would get really caught up in a character and then it was over. If I was still teaching creative writing, it would be a great example of character stories to build on. Author's note -- "Martin's letter to Nan" is the answer to What was Martin's response? to The Pull of the Moon novel about 50 yr old woman dealing with menopause and aging. It's a story of self-discovery and self-acceptance. Women say they keep it by their bed. Need to read The Pull of the Moon.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Angie Rhodes

    I loved the book,of short stories by Elizabeth Berg, my favourite one? well it would have to be,Ordinary Life, where Mavis,locks herself in the bathroom, complete with food, blankets, pillows books, orange juice. Elizabeth s books, have the wonderful dream like quality, that grabs you,and doesn't let go, is it one I would reread? Hell yes! I loved the book,of short stories by Elizabeth Berg, my favourite one? well it would have to be,Ordinary Life, where Mavis,locks herself in the bathroom, complete with food, blankets, pillows books, orange juice. Elizabeth s books, have the wonderful dream like quality, that grabs you,and doesn't let go, is it one I would reread? Hell yes!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alina de Teresa

    I liked a lot. It is a tribute to daily life and how our relationships make our lives worth living.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This is a collection of short stories. I probably have not read a short story since college and actually found it to be something I've missed. My rating is an average of the individual stories. Some were good and a few were excellent. My favorite was "Martin's Letter to Nan". Since reading it, I have found that is story is in response to a full length novel that Elizabeth Berg has written and of course, I feel like I must read that now. But this story in particular was so raw and honest, I had t This is a collection of short stories. I probably have not read a short story since college and actually found it to be something I've missed. My rating is an average of the individual stories. Some were good and a few were excellent. My favorite was "Martin's Letter to Nan". Since reading it, I have found that is story is in response to a full length novel that Elizabeth Berg has written and of course, I feel like I must read that now. But this story in particular was so raw and honest, I had to reread it again. I hope to find another collection of short stories and not wait so long to read them.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Belinda Fry

    A book of short stories. Loved it, read it in a day. There's one short story where this husband writes his wife a letter. I have to admit, I asked my husband something that was mentioned and he said, "yeah, I agree"......with the husband in the story. Anyway, there's one story about Alzheimer's and I cried. But all in all, it was just the best reading!! A book of short stories. Loved it, read it in a day. There's one short story where this husband writes his wife a letter. I have to admit, I asked my husband something that was mentioned and he said, "yeah, I agree"......with the husband in the story. Anyway, there's one story about Alzheimer's and I cried. But all in all, it was just the best reading!!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ye'Vell Hopkins

    A wonderful collection of short stories for you to reflect on. Ordinary People is a great title, because, as E.B. stated, “ordinary people are the most interesting people.” These stories are a finely tuned reflection of the things we feel, the ways in which we communicate with those around us and a good reminder that we are all Ordinary People in the most beautiful way.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Betsy Wolf

    I was in the mood for a short story collection and had read another one of Berg’s a long time ago. I think short story writing is difficult but she manages to pull me in with just enough information to picture the scenes and know the characters.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anita

    Ordinary Life by Elizabeth Berg is a collection of short stories. To me, Berg’s simple & spare writing is like walking past the old Christmas windows at Marshall Field’s - you get a glimpse into a scene from someones journey. My favorites were “Ordinary Life” where 79-year old Mavis McPherson takes snacks & magazines into her bathroom for a week-long retreat to contemplate her life, and “Martin’s Letter to Nan” where a husband gives his side of the story. 3.5 stars

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sonia

    Some really good short stories centred around relationships. I enjoyed them.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    Most of these stories are melancholy but so very real and riveting in an everyday kind of way. I still think Berg is one of the most talented authors out there.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jenifer Jacobs

    Fantastic short stories. Poignant and they ring true to life. I think I’ve found a new author to love.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Luce Cronin

    Elizabeth Berg really nails it in this superb collection of short stories - Berg always delivers the best .

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Series of short stories - most of them quite good. One of my favorite stories is a letter from Martin to Nan; who has taken a sabbatical of sorts from her marriage. Martin's perspective is interesting. Couldn't there be some benevolent intention that graced some lives? Martin to Nan: Nan you're worrying about the wrong things. Instead of your thighs, worry about the fact that you've lost your sense of sexual self-assurance. When will you women understand that what turns men on isn't what you thin Series of short stories - most of them quite good. One of my favorite stories is a letter from Martin to Nan; who has taken a sabbatical of sorts from her marriage. Martin's perspective is interesting. Couldn't there be some benevolent intention that graced some lives? Martin to Nan: Nan you're worrying about the wrong things. Instead of your thighs, worry about the fact that you've lost your sense of sexual self-assurance. When will you women understand that what turns men on isn't what you think? Sure, I look at the beautiful girls who walk past our tables.- Don't you know that I'd take a lusty happy, overweight fifty year old woman over one of those skinny miserable navel gazing twenty year olds anytime? I don't know if all men are like this, but I think most of them are; what we want is someone who likes herslef, who finds herself attractive. It gives us ideas. Makes us think maybe we ought to like her and find her attractive too. Mother to daughter: What sight is better than a baby elephant holding on to its mother's tail? Daughter: Me holding on to you? Mother: No; me holding onto you. Girl looking into a microscope: I was astounded. Living in the water that I had imagined was crystal clear were forms of life that were disgusting to behold. It came to me that there was no place on earth that was pure. No person, either. In all of us was this mix of things, and the trick was to focus on the better parts. I could feel hope run free in me again.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    3.5 STARS "In “Ordinary Life,” Mavis McPherson locks herself in the bathroom for a week, shutting out her husband and the realities of their life together—and, no, she isn’t contemplating a divorce. She just needs some time to think, to take stock of her life, and to arrive, finally, at a surprising conclusion. In “White Dwarf” and “Martin’s Letter to Nan,” the secrets of a marriage are revealed with the sensitivity and “brilliant insights about the human condition” (From Amazon) Not every author 3.5 STARS "In “Ordinary Life,” Mavis McPherson locks herself in the bathroom for a week, shutting out her husband and the realities of their life together—and, no, she isn’t contemplating a divorce. She just needs some time to think, to take stock of her life, and to arrive, finally, at a surprising conclusion. In “White Dwarf” and “Martin’s Letter to Nan,” the secrets of a marriage are revealed with the sensitivity and “brilliant insights about the human condition” (From Amazon) Not every author is adept at writing short stories, thank gawd Elizabeth Berg is! A great collection.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    "She is remembering the time she was nine and took apart a jewerly box she loved to see what made the ballerina turn around. Though she paid careful attention to each step, when she tried to reassemble it, it didn't work the way it had before. No one else could fix it either. THe ballerina stayed in place, permanently turned away, oblivious to the music she had danced to before." The way Berg writes fascinates me. Every sentence having deliberate, weighty meaning. "She is remembering the time she was nine and took apart a jewerly box she loved to see what made the ballerina turn around. Though she paid careful attention to each step, when she tried to reassemble it, it didn't work the way it had before. No one else could fix it either. THe ballerina stayed in place, permanently turned away, oblivious to the music she had danced to before." The way Berg writes fascinates me. Every sentence having deliberate, weighty meaning.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Denise Kruse

    I listened to the audiobook version and the reader was more "expressive" than my inner Elizabeth Berg is. Too many of the male characters were made to sound gruff and grumpy and the females a little whiney. I enjoyed much of the perceptive writing; just didn't love it as I normally do this author. I will read her to myself next time. I listened to the audiobook version and the reader was more "expressive" than my inner Elizabeth Berg is. Too many of the male characters were made to sound gruff and grumpy and the females a little whiney. I enjoyed much of the perceptive writing; just didn't love it as I normally do this author. I will read her to myself next time.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    If you like Elizabeth Berg's writing you will like her collection of short stories. This book is a good fast read. If you like Elizabeth Berg's writing you will like her collection of short stories. This book is a good fast read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    A little too ordinary to be entertaining for me

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