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We Are All Weird: The Myth of Mass and The End of Compliance

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We Are All Weird is a celebration of choice, of treating different people differently and of embracing the notion that everyone deserves the dignity and respect that comes from being heard. The book calls for end of mass and for the beginning of offering people more choices, more interests and giving them more authority to operate in ways that reflect their own unique valu We Are All Weird is a celebration of choice, of treating different people differently and of embracing the notion that everyone deserves the dignity and respect that comes from being heard. The book calls for end of mass and for the beginning of offering people more choices, more interests and giving them more authority to operate in ways that reflect their own unique values. For generations, marketers, industrialists and politicians have tried to force us into little boxes, complying with their idea of what we should buy, use or want. And in an industrial, mass-market driven world, this was efficient and it worked. But what we learned in this new era is that mass limits our choice because it succeeds on conformity. As Godin has identified, a new era of weirdness is upon us. People with more choices, more interests and the power to do something about it are stepping forward and insisting that the world work in a different way. By enabling choice we allow people to survive and thrive.


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We Are All Weird is a celebration of choice, of treating different people differently and of embracing the notion that everyone deserves the dignity and respect that comes from being heard. The book calls for end of mass and for the beginning of offering people more choices, more interests and giving them more authority to operate in ways that reflect their own unique valu We Are All Weird is a celebration of choice, of treating different people differently and of embracing the notion that everyone deserves the dignity and respect that comes from being heard. The book calls for end of mass and for the beginning of offering people more choices, more interests and giving them more authority to operate in ways that reflect their own unique values. For generations, marketers, industrialists and politicians have tried to force us into little boxes, complying with their idea of what we should buy, use or want. And in an industrial, mass-market driven world, this was efficient and it worked. But what we learned in this new era is that mass limits our choice because it succeeds on conformity. As Godin has identified, a new era of weirdness is upon us. People with more choices, more interests and the power to do something about it are stepping forward and insisting that the world work in a different way. By enabling choice we allow people to survive and thrive.

30 review for We Are All Weird: The Myth of Mass and The End of Compliance

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    As awesome as I wanted this manifesto to be, it just doesn't get there. Weirdly enough, I'm a victim of the concept of this book: it's not for everyone, but will be perfect for some. Chris Anderson wrote "The Long Tail", this book tells you what to do about it. This is my first selection for the book club I'm starting at Cramer. It'll provide some interesting conversation I'm sure, but falls short of Tribes and Linchpin. My reviews are usually brief, but there's a story that goes along with this As awesome as I wanted this manifesto to be, it just doesn't get there. Weirdly enough, I'm a victim of the concept of this book: it's not for everyone, but will be perfect for some. Chris Anderson wrote "The Long Tail", this book tells you what to do about it. This is my first selection for the book club I'm starting at Cramer. It'll provide some interesting conversation I'm sure, but falls short of Tribes and Linchpin. My reviews are usually brief, but there's a story that goes along with this book that I want to share here. SG had a teleconference about this book that I listened in on. In the first half, he went through the arc of the book, and in the second half fielded questions from listeners who theoretically had read it (I had not yet). There weren't many people asking questions, and I thought of this as an opportunity to ask on of my personal heros a question. So from what I learned at the top half of the hour, I hit *6 and asked Seth Godin the following: "What's your take on the American Education system in the context of all this? We talk about white collar factories, but high school is another kind of conveyor belt. If I was born 300 years earlier, and my father was a blacksmith, I would have become an expert blacksmith -- getting training from an early age and becoming great. Now all kids take the same curriculum, a very 'normal' education, and are expected to excel." Seth's answer was this (best I can remember): "Thanks for the question. The US education system isn't going anywhere because the country relies heavily on normal, mainstream people. So, as parents we have to capitalize on the hours between 3:00-10:00, and teach our kids about leadership and get them to solve interesting problems. Show them how to become outliers. We should tell our kids that school is important, but point out it's flaws too. Because the system isn't going to change anytime soon. You can change one kid much easier than the whole system." Well said, sir.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Seth Godin writes in sound bites. This is the second of his slim “manifestos” that I’ve read, and that seems to be his approach. It’s scatter shot, random, off-the-cuff. He talks around his points, never quite making a linear argument or delving deeply into anything, just skimming across the surface of his topics with many broad thoughts from a wide spectrum of influences. It almost feels like he’s doing pointillism artwork, hoping if he throws out enough thought splatters they will land just ri Seth Godin writes in sound bites. This is the second of his slim “manifestos” that I’ve read, and that seems to be his approach. It’s scatter shot, random, off-the-cuff. He talks around his points, never quite making a linear argument or delving deeply into anything, just skimming across the surface of his topics with many broad thoughts from a wide spectrum of influences. It almost feels like he’s doing pointillism artwork, hoping if he throws out enough thought splatters they will land just right to make a coherent whole. While I did in the other, I don’t feel he succeeds in this one. He brings up lots of thoughts, but instead of expanding them or working them over, he skips off to something else before the thought is ever complete. It’s superficial “google” writing instead of sustained thinking. I often had lots of interesting thoughts in response to what he said, wanted to engage his ideas, but then they’d flit away with his writing before any substance developed. It’s interesting, but I’m not sure it amounts to anything. In the interest of hoping it does amount to something with more time to cogitate, I’ll attempt to process a few things. Godin writes: This is a manifesto about the end of the mass market. About the end of mass politics, mass production, mass retailing, and even mass education. Although it’s a book on marketing and spends most of its time on business considerations, he says, My ulterior motive in bringing you this manifesto has little to do with helping you sell more stuff and more to do with allowing (all of us) to embrace the freedom we have. The freedom to choose. The freedom to choose to be weird. That may be so, but it felt like a book on marketing to me. He spent a few pages near the end on education and on ethics, but it could have been so much more. There was the basis for looking at all kinds of things as they relate to the ideas of “normal” and “mass.” Things that matter. He didn’t really go there, as far as I’m concerned, when he should have. Because ultimately it’s a book about respecting individuals as individuals and finding ways to work that respect into our daily operating procedures. As a librarian, my thoughts turned to the library. In times when budgets are tight, there is more push to market ourselves to the public and budget makers. So what does it mean for the library to market ourselves to the “weird” instead of the “mass?” Representing many diverse points of view is one of our key tenets, along with equal access of information for everyone, as part of our philosophy of the freedom of information. We like to say a good library collection has something to offend everyone. It seems to me we’re a natural fit for the “weird,” that we provide a place for people to explore their particular interests and passions. Two quotes struck me: The challenge of your future is to do productive and useful work for and by and with the tribe that cares about you. To find and assemble the tribe, to earn their trust, to take them where they want and need to go. And: The reason that people are walking away from mass is not so that they can buy more stuff. Material goods and commerce are not the goal, they are merely a consequence. The goal is connection. Who is the library “tribe” and how do we help them achieve “connection?” It’s something to ponder. ----- One other bit that I want to pull out to revisit later. I think it has a lot of potential ramifications that he left unexplored. Rich is my word for someone who can afford to make choices, who has enough resources to do more than merely survive. You don’t need a private plane to be rich, but you do need enough time and food and health and access to be able to interact with the market for stuff and for ideas. Particularly when coupled with: Researchers report that the ability to be weird, the freedom to make choices, and the ability to be heard are the factors most highly correlated with happiness around the world. Regardless of income or race or geography, when we let people choose among things that are important to them, they become happier. More varieties of jeans doesn’t necessarily make people happier, of course, but the opportunity to live where they want, say what they feel, express their desires, and choose a path certainly does. ----- I’m tempted to give this three stars simply because it made me think a bit, but I think I’ll stick with two.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Arie

    Interesting but repetitive

  4. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    How sweet of Seth Godin to write my biography. ^_~ I loved this book b/c it makes such a great case for the people who live and thrive outside of the norm, outside of the masses. My fav thing while reading this book was people's reactions to the title when I told them what I reading. I started to judge people based on that reaction and only want to associate with people who vibe with the title... How sweet of Seth Godin to write my biography. ^_~ I loved this book b/c it makes such a great case for the people who live and thrive outside of the norm, outside of the masses. My fav thing while reading this book was people's reactions to the title when I told them what I reading. I started to judge people based on that reaction and only want to associate with people who vibe with the title...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cora

    I just skimmed through this one. I thought it was going to be funny but it's just a manifesto with some interesting points. I found myself talking to the book trying to explain why he's wrong on a few points, especially on education. Everyone has to do things they don't want to do, it's part of life. Get educated, get a job and you can then find time to pursue your weirdness. I just skimmed through this one. I thought it was going to be funny but it's just a manifesto with some interesting points. I found myself talking to the book trying to explain why he's wrong on a few points, especially on education. Everyone has to do things they don't want to do, it's part of life. Get educated, get a job and you can then find time to pursue your weirdness.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marie-Therese

    A 3 page magazine article bloated into a trite, repetitive, poorly argued book. Not worth the pixels used to create it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    I had really mixed feelings about this book. I agreed with his general premise that weird is good, but I was a bit skeptical of the connection between being "weird" and the emphasis on consumption. To be fair, this book is about marketing and getting people to spend money and the potential benefit to marketing to groups on the fringes. For one, he's all about normalizing "weird". Cool but if that's what happens then "weird" loses its "weird" status and becomes mass...the very thing he criticizes I had really mixed feelings about this book. I agreed with his general premise that weird is good, but I was a bit skeptical of the connection between being "weird" and the emphasis on consumption. To be fair, this book is about marketing and getting people to spend money and the potential benefit to marketing to groups on the fringes. For one, he's all about normalizing "weird". Cool but if that's what happens then "weird" loses its "weird" status and becomes mass...the very thing he criticizes and says is passé. The relationship to marketing and mass production and consumption as I see it and understand it is marketing professionals find a product that they think many people will like and purchase...sometimes they are a the forefront of this process..in that marketing campaigns convince people to buy..or they follow the process. (Borrowing from Malcolm Gladwell's "The tipping point" marketers discovering after the fact that Airwalk had become popular and might have mass appeal beyond the specialized "weird" group of people who might ordinarily buy the shoes.) The unspoken assumption though, is that consumption (at least enough to attract the attention of marketers) validates your "weird" interest which I found to be problematic.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jacki

    Seth Godin makes the case for Weird in this brief manifesto. With Weird being defined as choosing something, whether it be movie genre's, hobbies, reading material, or food, outside the choices presented as "normal", We Are All Weird, discusses how this culture of Weird has come into existence and how it is growing. Seth Godin books have always come highly recommended to me, so finding We Are All Weird in the Kindle Lending Library encouraged me to finally jump into Godin's world. I was highly di Seth Godin makes the case for Weird in this brief manifesto. With Weird being defined as choosing something, whether it be movie genre's, hobbies, reading material, or food, outside the choices presented as "normal", We Are All Weird, discusses how this culture of Weird has come into existence and how it is growing. Seth Godin books have always come highly recommended to me, so finding We Are All Weird in the Kindle Lending Library encouraged me to finally jump into Godin's world. I was highly disappointed. Touted as a genius, Godin only seem to repeat the same sentence over and over again and nothing he stated seemed like anything new to me. Surrounded and immersed in Geek Culture, all Godin's points are nothing new, including the reasons he presents for why Weird is growing. Perhaps this was not the best of Godin's work, but quite honestly, if felt like a waste of his time to write and a waste of my time to read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    Not as good or inspiring as some of Godin's other books, but at least his books are short. Godin raises some good points here, I won't deny. In the past, marketers and producers made money by trying to sell to the center of the bell curve, and it worked. When there are only 3 TV networks, you might still make good programming, but it also doesn't really matter when you have a captive audience. These days, however, we have a cornucopia of choice, so rather than trying to market to as many people Not as good or inspiring as some of Godin's other books, but at least his books are short. Godin raises some good points here, I won't deny. In the past, marketers and producers made money by trying to sell to the center of the bell curve, and it worked. When there are only 3 TV networks, you might still make good programming, but it also doesn't really matter when you have a captive audience. These days, however, we have a cornucopia of choice, so rather than trying to market to as many people as possible, one should find their niche and embrace it. Or at least that's what I got out of it. I rated this 3 stars because in his epilogue, Godin says, "[if you've] come to the conclusion that you need to spend more time going after niche markets, I fear we both have failed." Perhaps we did, as the rest of his epilogue really sounds like he thinks you should find and embrace your niche market. Meh. I still enjoy his work and would gladly read another.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lain

    Disappointing. Not sure I agree with the idea that there is no "normal" any more. There are some things most people want - a safe neighborhood, clean water, laundry detergent that gets your whites whiter... I also long for FEWER choices in some areas of my life - Like on the detergent aisle. I don't care if my laundry smells spring fresh or mountain fresh, I just don't want to spend my limited time thinking about it. I'd rather have one 'normal' choice that worked. Also, more choice does not mak Disappointing. Not sure I agree with the idea that there is no "normal" any more. There are some things most people want - a safe neighborhood, clean water, laundry detergent that gets your whites whiter... I also long for FEWER choices in some areas of my life - Like on the detergent aisle. I don't care if my laundry smells spring fresh or mountain fresh, I just don't want to spend my limited time thinking about it. I'd rather have one 'normal' choice that worked. Also, more choice does not make us happier- that's been proven time and time again by social scientists. So maybe we need to be less weird so we can be happier? PS I found the cover off-putting.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amy Hafer

    Had flashbacks of managers telling me to read the Long Tail. Sometimes I don't feel smart enough to read Godin's books...but this one was worth it when I got to what I felt was the point: "What I care a great deal about, though, is each human's ability to express her art, to develop into the person she is able to become. I care about the connections between people and our ability to challenge and support each other as we create our own versions of art. And I care about freedom, the ability to exp Had flashbacks of managers telling me to read the Long Tail. Sometimes I don't feel smart enough to read Godin's books...but this one was worth it when I got to what I felt was the point: "What I care a great deal about, though, is each human's ability to express her art, to develop into the person she is able to become. I care about the connections between people and our ability to challenge and support each other as we create our own versions of art. And I care about freedom, the ability to express yourself until it impinges on someone else's happiness." Well said.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    This seems to me Godin’s take on Chris Anderson’s “The Long Tail”. Godin describes how the society is splitting into little tiny interest groups, or tribes, and how the mass of the mass market is shrinking. If you aren’t paying attention to the niches, or the weird, you might miss your next area of growth. I listened on audio, and Godin’s reassuring voice explaining his concepts helps you believe in them. I’d heard much of this before, and more straightforward, but Godin’s way to tell the story This seems to me Godin’s take on Chris Anderson’s “The Long Tail”. Godin describes how the society is splitting into little tiny interest groups, or tribes, and how the mass of the mass market is shrinking. If you aren’t paying attention to the niches, or the weird, you might miss your next area of growth. I listened on audio, and Godin’s reassuring voice explaining his concepts helps you believe in them. I’d heard much of this before, and more straightforward, but Godin’s way to tell the story is interesting to me. And the shortness of the book kept it relatively fresh.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rares Sfirlogea

    Limited and in my opinion flawed view upon how society began to change in the latest years. Lots of assumptions, almost no proper argumentation.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Majuchan

    It's weird. Full review to follow. It's weird. Full review to follow.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Surath Giri

    So repetitive. What could have been said in an article has been forcefully stretched into a book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John

    The Internet Age did bring people the availability of information. However, the downside is it also brought about a large signal to noise ratio with it. Seth Godin right is one of the better people out there with the ability to “filter” through it all. There is a lot being said about how the Internet is ruining things for people. In this book, he states that the Internet has ended what we know as the “central mass market”. There is no longer “One size fits all” model that can work for anything. The Internet Age did bring people the availability of information. However, the downside is it also brought about a large signal to noise ratio with it. Seth Godin right is one of the better people out there with the ability to “filter” through it all. There is a lot being said about how the Internet is ruining things for people. In this book, he states that the Internet has ended what we know as the “central mass market”. There is no longer “One size fits all” model that can work for anything. The way to help people in a better way is to give them the ability to make more choices. The Internet should not be looked at in terms of just economics. In should be looked at as a way to create for “opportunities for individuals”. People taking what makes the unique or in this book referred to as “weird” and build their “tribes” around it. It is about making connections based on quality rather than quantity. This book is filled with examples that make you take notice of how the Internet has shifted things. And also that time and progress have always been moving things too. There was a time when fishing would never be called a “sport” or a “hobby”. In fact, if you have the time and resources to even have a “hobby” then you have some degree of “affluence” The Internet has pointed out that “Too big to fail” is the model that will fail. If your business model is not adjusting then you have made yourself obsolete. Case in point, Napster. 80% of the music downloaded via the program was music that No Record Label was distributing at all. People were given a choice and they were searching for new music to listen to. They wanted flexibility to find what they wanted to listen to.Radio station are failing because they are narrowing down there playlists. Lowering shipping costs has expanded who can participate in the market. Seth Godin is an author who should be listened to more. However, the “Mass” is not going to make it easy for him. Luckily, today we have the Internet to get around the “Mass” and get to him. The future (which is now) is not necessarily the “gloom and doom” that being portrayed by the media and the politics. People should be looking at this like Seth Godin. It is really about “challenges and opportunities” and the choices we get to make. It is about what we have and how to share it. A chance to participate.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sandra (Page by Page)

    Check my bookblog for complete review, pagebypage-sc.blogspot.com. I had a hard time to decide the rating for We Are All Weird, whether it’s one star or two stars. Because, although I really like the main idea from Godin in this book, it is a tremendously BORING book to be read. Is it the writing style? I don’t know. Is it because I read the translation version instead? I’m not sure. I guess I’m not going to be as much bored if I listen to the audiobook version or maybe listen to Godin himself gi Check my bookblog for complete review, pagebypage-sc.blogspot.com. I had a hard time to decide the rating for We Are All Weird, whether it’s one star or two stars. Because, although I really like the main idea from Godin in this book, it is a tremendously BORING book to be read. Is it the writing style? I don’t know. Is it because I read the translation version instead? I’m not sure. I guess I’m not going to be as much bored if I listen to the audiobook version or maybe listen to Godin himself giving a presentation about We Are All Weird. I’m just feeling this book is not a reading material (ouch!). I really want to like this book more because it begins with such a unique idea that is delivered very well, but when I read on, the same or similar ideas are elaborated repeatedly with bunch of different analogies. I know myself, the writing construction from specific idea to more general is just not working for me (so it’s not entirely the book’s fault). From the first chapter, I guess I already understood what’s Godin trying to say over this book, but as the more pages I turned, my understanding about the whole idea was getting blurrier and blurrier, so I could say I actually am not really sure what’s the point anymore. The sad thing is, it’s even not one of those thick and brains-out books (104 pages for Indonesian edition) but yes, I dragged myself to finish this.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Yoly

    Uhm... I'm going to say I liked it, but it was more of an "ok" but maybe a bit more than just "ok". I thought this would be similar to Permission Marketing: Turning Strangers Into Friends And Friends Into Customers or Unleashing the Ideavirus: Stop Marketing AT People! Turn Your Ideas into Epidemics by Helping Your Customers Do the Marketing thing for You. but for niche markets. I liked what he was saying (which was nothing new, but it's Seth Godin and I can listen to him talk about anything) an Uhm... I'm going to say I liked it, but it was more of an "ok" but maybe a bit more than just "ok". I thought this would be similar to Permission Marketing: Turning Strangers Into Friends And Friends Into Customers or Unleashing the Ideavirus: Stop Marketing AT People! Turn Your Ideas into Epidemics by Helping Your Customers Do the Marketing thing for You. but for niche markets. I liked what he was saying (which was nothing new, but it's Seth Godin and I can listen to him talk about anything) and then he says that if we're still thinking about marketing to niche markets after reading this book we're wrong. Lost me completely right there. So I'm not so sure what I read anymore.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Duty

    Something funny happens to me with Godin books. I always start thinking "This is lame... I'm WAY too advanced for this" and then the second half of the book surprises/inspires/schools me. For this book, the second half of the thought process never happened. I thought the book was boring. I agree with everything he says, and the concepts are quite sound. If anything, the consumption of this book, for me, was a 'maintenance'/'reinforcement' book. I didn't learn anything new, but I strengthened idea Something funny happens to me with Godin books. I always start thinking "This is lame... I'm WAY too advanced for this" and then the second half of the book surprises/inspires/schools me. For this book, the second half of the thought process never happened. I thought the book was boring. I agree with everything he says, and the concepts are quite sound. If anything, the consumption of this book, for me, was a 'maintenance'/'reinforcement' book. I didn't learn anything new, but I strengthened ideals I already had. If you've never read a Godin book, this may do something for you. If you're like me and have already read Lynchpin, Tribes, Purple Cow, Free Prize Inside, Permission Marketing... you won't find anything new here.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    This book really resonated with me -- especially the chapter on education. Seth Godin is not a great reader (I listened to the audio edition), and I had to get used to the fact that the book sounds like a bunch of his short pieces on this topic that he gathered together (without much stitching them together) for the book. That said, I ended up buying it on Kindle so I can re-read it, mark it up, and quote it. Just as relevant the second time around. Creepy, even, how much more important it is for This book really resonated with me -- especially the chapter on education. Seth Godin is not a great reader (I listened to the audio edition), and I had to get used to the fact that the book sounds like a bunch of his short pieces on this topic that he gathered together (without much stitching them together) for the book. That said, I ended up buying it on Kindle so I can re-read it, mark it up, and quote it. Just as relevant the second time around. Creepy, even, how much more important it is for us all the be "weird" in these conservative compliance-building times.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Simsim

    This is a book written for people with the attention span of Donald Trump (could not think of a better example). It's just short paragraphs not really connected between each other, not really saying anything, not really worth cutting trees for these ideas that are not even "blog worthy". And when I read that he has 18 best selling books I really flipped. Luckily it had only around 100 pages and even those heavily spaced to make this seem to worth your money. Thank god I borrowed this book. This is a book written for people with the attention span of Donald Trump (could not think of a better example). It's just short paragraphs not really connected between each other, not really saying anything, not really worth cutting trees for these ideas that are not even "blog worthy". And when I read that he has 18 best selling books I really flipped. Luckily it had only around 100 pages and even those heavily spaced to make this seem to worth your money. Thank god I borrowed this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ian D

    "The simpler alternative to our broken system of education is to embrace the weird. To abandon normal. To acknowledge that our factories don't need so many cogs, so many compliant workers, so many people willing to work cheap. It's simple but it's not easy. My proposed solution is simple. Don't waste a lot of time and money pushing kids in directions they don't want to go. Instead, find out what weirdness they excel at and encourage them to do that. And then, get out of the way." Αυτό. "The simpler alternative to our broken system of education is to embrace the weird. To abandon normal. To acknowledge that our factories don't need so many cogs, so many compliant workers, so many people willing to work cheap. It's simple but it's not easy. My proposed solution is simple. Don't waste a lot of time and money pushing kids in directions they don't want to go. Instead, find out what weirdness they excel at and encourage them to do that. And then, get out of the way." Αυτό.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lee Konecke

    A great case for why embracing your weirdness is the basis for the new economy, as well as ones authenticity and happiness.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marcel Lamothe

    Perfect - a manifesto encouraging us all to embrace our weirdness (and everyone else's). A little gem of a book. Perfect - a manifesto encouraging us all to embrace our weirdness (and everyone else's). A little gem of a book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    A very interesting manifesto, the basic tenets of which resonated with me. That being said, I would appreciated a more linear argument.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mihai Rosca

    We Are All Weird is more a manifesto than a book per se, as Godin also refers to it. Although, in all honesty, this guy can write a manifesto better than most people can most people can write about their own lives. This book is about the downfall of the mass media and mass marketing. I remember reading Tim Ferriss when I found the term "the New Rich". He describes like this people that have enough to pretty much go wherever they want and live their life there at a satisfying level. Then, various We Are All Weird is more a manifesto than a book per se, as Godin also refers to it. Although, in all honesty, this guy can write a manifesto better than most people can most people can write about their own lives. This book is about the downfall of the mass media and mass marketing. I remember reading Tim Ferriss when I found the term "the New Rich". He describes like this people that have enough to pretty much go wherever they want and live their life there at a satisfying level. Then, various books kept popping in my hand that hinted the same thing. Books like Outliers and The Tipping Point or Duct Tape Selling, they all tell the same story: that it's a new world out there. Not only that but, I see everywhere I go people that have started to read more, to follow their passions more and to dare to be different. What do you think the Hipster current is all about? People are trying somehow - some, admittedly, more tasteful than others - to express the fact that they want to make a choice regarding their lifestyle, may it be agreeable with others or not. So, the message here is not to start yelling at new niche markets but rather start making an impact on people based on their value system and to be authentic. Find your own spot in this world where tribes keep popping up based on common interests. Once you do that, think about the needs of those people. You may not get the masses, but you will get a big share of the people that really want to buy from you and, who knows, maybe you'll be more satisfied too.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Arielle88

    I was in a bookstore this morning and picked up this book. After the first few pages, I was hooked and ended up finishing it. Unfortunately, the book as a whole didn't quite meet the promise of its introduction. We Are All Weird had an intriguing point to make: that the mass market is on its last legs, and the niche is becoming the new norm. The rise of the internet has made it easier for people to find like-minded subcultures, making the products, trappings, and habits that once composed the "no I was in a bookstore this morning and picked up this book. After the first few pages, I was hooked and ended up finishing it. Unfortunately, the book as a whole didn't quite meet the promise of its introduction. We Are All Weird had an intriguing point to make: that the mass market is on its last legs, and the niche is becoming the new norm. The rise of the internet has made it easier for people to find like-minded subcultures, making the products, trappings, and habits that once composed the "norm" increasingly marginal - and as a result, less profitable for companies to market to. Godin's a good writer and breaks this down in a funny and engaging way. Problem is, this book could have been a twenty pages. It almost feels like Godin took an essay-length idea and turned it into a book-length text so he'd have a product to sell. The middle is very repetitive, with most of the meat stacked in the first two chapters. At one point Godin says that he doesn't intend for the reader takes this book as a primer on how to market to subcultures. Instead, he encourages the reader to become engaged in our era by picking a tribe and working enhance it through effort and authentic self-expression. I wish Godin had produced a bit more of an authentic product by either making the book shorter, or extending and deepening his analysis to justify its length.

  28. 5 out of 5

    B.

    This book just seems like a rehash of the 20th Century platitude that an aisle-full of every imaginable kind of breakfast cereal is good for freedom, except now its platitude + Internet. Marketers who ignore "weird", will lose out in the end because the "mass" (the middle of the bell curve) is flattening out towards the edges (towards "weird"). However, "weird" is not the new "mass", he says. I say as long as "weird" is marketable, it is "mass". I can't say I put a lot of thought into this book This book just seems like a rehash of the 20th Century platitude that an aisle-full of every imaginable kind of breakfast cereal is good for freedom, except now its platitude + Internet. Marketers who ignore "weird", will lose out in the end because the "mass" (the middle of the bell curve) is flattening out towards the edges (towards "weird"). However, "weird" is not the new "mass", he says. I say as long as "weird" is marketable, it is "mass". I can't say I put a lot of thought into this book (it doesn't require it, frankly), but my biggest criticism would be that he only sees the "weird" that is saleable. I say, the truly "weird" exists outside of the markets: the "weird" make their own stuff, buy it second-hand, borrow it from friends or community hangouts, or don't try to acquire it at all and move on to something else. To make *that* marketable, you have to be "fake weird", as Godin says. But fake weird is not real weird and, so, is not what he's saying, he says, after he explains that it is real. Sigh. In the conclusion, he says that if all you took away from the book is that his message is platitude + Internet, then you just don't get it. But he makes no effort to summarize or explain why its not platitude + Internet, so, I guess I just don't get it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Seth Godin writes a manifesto to argue that the idea of mass (or "masses") was a misperception of group behavior during the industrial era, it has a legacy of group think or compliance which inhibits individual behavior or "weirdness", and that the contemporary moment (circa 2011) is best understood as a global social movement of individuals realizing their weirdness--and that this current trend is positive for quality of life as well as social change. The audiobook is read by the author. Some r Seth Godin writes a manifesto to argue that the idea of mass (or "masses") was a misperception of group behavior during the industrial era, it has a legacy of group think or compliance which inhibits individual behavior or "weirdness", and that the contemporary moment (circa 2011) is best understood as a global social movement of individuals realizing their weirdness--and that this current trend is positive for quality of life as well as social change. The audiobook is read by the author. Some readers might find the book's balance of a communication theory with a contemporary marketing critique supported by contemporary social issue examples to be unintelligible or too broad to use in their life. Other readers might find the novel definition of individual (or small group) behavior of "weird" to be a helpful starting point to understand post mass-media communication and its implications for marketing or leadership. Proud Illinoisans might be amused to read the shout-out to Normal, Illinois. What is most memorable to me is the argument that US education is an industrial complex which the author would prefer to see reorganized to focus on individual, rather than group, outcomes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    The world is changing. We all know it. We see it every day. There’s simply no denying it. So why are marketing departments so adverse to this change? Why do salesmen still want you to buy a product or service that clearly is not designed around your unique needs? Seth Godin — both as author and narrator — takes a critical look at the state of marketing and sales and suggests one thing that neither party wants to hear… that it’s time to change. No longer is the mass of people the normal state of b The world is changing. We all know it. We see it every day. There’s simply no denying it. So why are marketing departments so adverse to this change? Why do salesmen still want you to buy a product or service that clearly is not designed around your unique needs? Seth Godin — both as author and narrator — takes a critical look at the state of marketing and sales and suggests one thing that neither party wants to hear… that it’s time to change. No longer is the mass of people the normal state of being. We are all weird and unique and particular and desiring of something more suited to our needs. And marketers and salespeople need to recognize this. I first picked this book up about two or three years ago not realizing what it was all about (I think it was a $1 daily deal on Audible) and realized it wasn’t what I wanted to listen to at that time. So I “shelved” it and picked it back up a week ago. While it’s still a lot more modern than most market think these days, it already feels a little dated. I’m curious is Godin is going to revisit this book and push out a new edition.

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