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X-Men: From the Ashes

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Can the Phoenix rise - again? Mutants are all around us. Some are good, others unspeakably evil. But they are all gifted - gifted with a unique X-Factor in their genetic make-up that makes them living weapons, manifesting itself through wondrous powers. And, even within this special community, there is a group that has distinguished itself... the Uncanny X-Men... who have h Can the Phoenix rise - again? Mutants are all around us. Some are good, others unspeakably evil. But they are all gifted - gifted with a unique X-Factor in their genetic make-up that makes them living weapons, manifesting itself through wondrous powers. And, even within this special community, there is a group that has distinguished itself... the Uncanny X-Men... who have honed their awesome abilities and pledged them in service of mankind. One of their number - Jean Grey - had unwittingly attained power beyond conception. As Phoenix, her merest shrug could incinerate a world and as Phoenix she died. But now a new woman, Madelyne Pryor, appears who could be Jean Grey's twin. Can she be the Phoenix reborn? The key to Madelyne Pryor's identity will either unlock the mutants' buried hearts or destroy them - utterly. Collects Uncanny X-Men #168-176.


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Can the Phoenix rise - again? Mutants are all around us. Some are good, others unspeakably evil. But they are all gifted - gifted with a unique X-Factor in their genetic make-up that makes them living weapons, manifesting itself through wondrous powers. And, even within this special community, there is a group that has distinguished itself... the Uncanny X-Men... who have h Can the Phoenix rise - again? Mutants are all around us. Some are good, others unspeakably evil. But they are all gifted - gifted with a unique X-Factor in their genetic make-up that makes them living weapons, manifesting itself through wondrous powers. And, even within this special community, there is a group that has distinguished itself... the Uncanny X-Men... who have honed their awesome abilities and pledged them in service of mankind. One of their number - Jean Grey - had unwittingly attained power beyond conception. As Phoenix, her merest shrug could incinerate a world and as Phoenix she died. But now a new woman, Madelyne Pryor, appears who could be Jean Grey's twin. Can she be the Phoenix reborn? The key to Madelyne Pryor's identity will either unlock the mutants' buried hearts or destroy them - utterly. Collects Uncanny X-Men #168-176.

30 review for X-Men: From the Ashes

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    3.5 Stars Fifty shades of Jean Grey?! Don't worry, Kids. It's perfectly PG-13 stuff. But Why is Jean here? Wasn't she killed during Dark Phoenix story arc? Wait, so you are telling me she is not Jean Grey, but Madelyne Pryor, a woman who looks exactly like Jean Grey? Additionally, she was the sole survivor of a plane crash that happened on the same day as Jean died? ------------*comics*-------------- From the ashes features the introduction of Morlocks: underground mutants who read H G Wells, t 3.5 Stars Fifty shades of Jean Grey?! Don't worry, Kids. It's perfectly PG-13 stuff. But Why is Jean here? Wasn't she killed during Dark Phoenix story arc? Wait, so you are telling me she is not Jean Grey, but Madelyne Pryor, a woman who looks exactly like Jean Grey? Additionally, she was the sole survivor of a plane crash that happened on the same day as Jean died? ------------*comics*-------------- From the ashes features the introduction of Morlocks: underground mutants who read H G Wells, the marriage of Wolverine, Rogue's defection from evil mutants to X-Men and return of Jean Grey(?) Great Scotts! The story starts with a pissed off Kitty Pryde. she gets transferred from the main X-Men team to a new team of young mutants ... or as Kitty calls them "The X-babies"! After that, X-Men get captured by Morlocks while they trying to save a kidnapped ex X-Men member, Angel. Geez, X-Men really get captured a lot in these stories! Nevertheless, Storm owns this story arc with some excellent leadership and action! After that short arc, Rogue joins the team and they travel to Japan to attend Wolverine's wedding. While they were celebrating in Japan, storm meets Yukio, a crazy assassin, and decides to let go and turn super hip. Legend says that Storm wrote this tweet before her makeover! On the background of all these stories, there is a hint of an old dangerous foe lurking around and pulling some serious strings. His plan goes active in second half of the collection which leads to an amazing story featuring Cyclopes and X-men! This particular arc features Cyclopes finest hour as he held off a very confused X-Men from killing him. Truly an epic chapter! Overall, The chapter featuring Cyclopes' survival mode is excellent and rest of the collection delivers some average stories! Chris Claremont did a great job with the character development of his characters, especially Storm, Pryde, and Cyclopes. The art is very much "the 80s" as expected. But it is not as good as Dark Phoenix saga or days of the future past.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael Jandrok

    I recently reviewed “The Dark Phoenix” graphic novel from Marvel Publishing. I own one of the first compilations with no frills and no extras and the truly awful coloring of the original comics. It seemed to me that a worthy follow-up to that effort would be to meander to what I consider to be the next more or less “world-shaking” installment in the X-Universe, the “From the Ashes” graphic novel that brings together issues 168-176 of the original X-Men comic book. If you’re interested in how I f I recently reviewed “The Dark Phoenix” graphic novel from Marvel Publishing. I own one of the first compilations with no frills and no extras and the truly awful coloring of the original comics. It seemed to me that a worthy follow-up to that effort would be to meander to what I consider to be the next more or less “world-shaking” installment in the X-Universe, the “From the Ashes” graphic novel that brings together issues 168-176 of the original X-Men comic book. If you’re interested in how I felt about “The Dark Phoenix” edition, you are welcome to check that out here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... “Dark Phoenix” was an absolute classic in terms of relevance and execution. It stands as one of the most important episodes in the history of not only the X-Men, but of the Marvel Comics Universe as a whole. Now I’ll say right up front that “From the Ashes” is nowhere near as monumental an achievement as “Phoenix” was, but it’s still an important story arc and it introduces one of the more important ongoing characters in the X-Universe in the form of Jean Grey clone Madelyne Pryor. In point of fact, the Madelyne Pryor angle is the glue that holds “From the Ashes” together as a narrative, as the book is really a set of different stories joined by a shared theme of change and upheaval. The story begins when Scott Summers, also known as the X-Man Cyclops, first encounters Ms. Pryor in Alaska, where she works as a tour pilot in the wake of a horrible air disaster where she was the only survivor. Stunned by her resemblance to the deceased Jean Grey, Scott quickly learns that she is not the same person, although he does harbor some doubts, especially when he learns that her accident in the air occurred at the exact same moment that Jean Grey died on the moon. This connection will haunt him until the end of the novel, where his apprehension takes center stage in the final battle with the bad guy. But you also get a whole lot more out of “From the Ashes.” I’ll try my best to give you a good rundown: You get the first appearance of the Morlocks, a group of mutants who live a thousand feet under the streets of Manhattan. The Morlocks are mostly a bunch of misfits, but the leaders seem to have some level of mutant powers beyond what the general rabble have. They are led by the wily Callisto, a young lady with a definite persecution complex and a power that gives her enhanced stamina and strength. Callisto has kidnapped the former X-Man Angel in an attempt to coerce him to marry her. But Storm and the rest of the X-men have descended into the sewers in chase, where Storm eventually settles matters in her own unique way. This is a pretty good methodology of introducing the Morlocks, who periodically play a part in the X-Universe to this day. As a bonus, you also get the first look at Storm in her punk guise, all blonde Mohawk and leather biker duds and studs galore. You get the transition of Rogue from charter member of the Evil Brotherhood of Mutants to newest probationary member of the X-Men. Rogue has decided to seek out the X-Men in an attempt to control her power of identity transference, which seems to have gone completely out of her control. Professor X accepts her into the school and the team in order to assist her, after he does a full mental scan to make sure that she is sincere, of course. This is a huge development, as Rogue has since gone on to become one of the most popular and important members of the X-men over the decades. This episode also has a great appearance from Carol Danvers, the former Ms. Marvel from whom Rogue stole her powers permanently. Now calling herself Binary, Ms. Danvers manages to shake things up in a bit in her inimitable fashion. You get a visit to Japan to witness Wolverine’s star turn when his wedding to Yakuza kingpin Mariko suddenly goes sour. This may be the only time that I can remember that we see Logan spill a tear, and the whole thing is kinda heartbreaking to see play out. Mariko rejects Wolvie even after the machinations of the bad guy have been revealed, but in the end the entire episode just feels like it was the right move for everybody involved. This was the true beginning of Wolverine as a major player in the X-men franchise. He went from a second-banana side man playing a bench role for Nightcrawler to a true star in a matter of months. You get the first kiss between Kitty Pryde and Colossus. ‘Nuff said. You get the reappearance of Mastermind, the prime baddie from the original “Dark Phoenix” epic. He reprises his role here as Jason Wyngarde in an attempt to use Madelyne Pryor as an illusional stand-in for the Phoenix. Mastermind had gone into the funny farm at the end of the “Dark Phoenix” arc, and he’s back here in a wounded fashion, certainly not clearly healed from his mind-bending stretch into Godhood at the hands of Jean Grey. I really never liked Mastermind much as a villain, but I’ll concede that his two appearances in these twin sagas made him a more compelling character in terms of his motivations and nuances. Thankfully, there is no…..I repeat no….appearance by Dazzler. Pretty sure she was cutting her teeth as the lighting director for Madonna around this time. Or something. Finally, you get the marriage of Scott Summers and Madelyne Pryor, an event that would shake things up in the X-Universe for quite some time and send all sorts of ripples up the time stream. The book ends with a solo adventure with the newlyweds as they embark on a honeymoon at sea. Walt Simonson and John Romita, Jr. do a decent job on the pencils for the graphic novel. Bob Wiacek’s inks looks pretty sharp. The only real downside is the horrible coloring job that was translated from the original comics that appeared on the racks. That old four-color process looks really weak and bland here and none of the pages stand out as anything special. All in all, though, “From the Ashes” is a clear win in terms of impact and storytelling. All of the plot lines get tied together and wrapped up in a satisfying manner and the book ends on a hopeful note as Scott and Madelyne quite literally go flying off into the sunset. It’s a worthwhile addition to your Marvel collection, especially given the fact that a lot of these plot points will have an impact on the X-Men and the Marvel Comics Universe for literally decades to come. It’s not quite as important in the grand scheme of things as the original “Phoenix” and “Dark Phoenix” arcs were, but it’s close enough for my money. In that light “From the Ashes” should be an essential part of your Marvel graphic novel collection.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    All hail this masterclass in how the serialised comic ought to be written. This too-short era of X-Men often gets some attention for the fine work of artist Paul Smith who subtly modernised the feel of the comic whilst still presenting classic portrayals of classic characters and there are also some famous moments in famous stories. Kitty Pryde notoriously calls Xavier a Jerk, Rogue joins the team, Storm has a personality overhaul when fighting the Morlocks, Wolverine is jilted at the altar and, All hail this masterclass in how the serialised comic ought to be written. This too-short era of X-Men often gets some attention for the fine work of artist Paul Smith who subtly modernised the feel of the comic whilst still presenting classic portrayals of classic characters and there are also some famous moments in famous stories. Kitty Pryde notoriously calls Xavier a Jerk, Rogue joins the team, Storm has a personality overhaul when fighting the Morlocks, Wolverine is jilted at the altar and, of course the whole Madeline Pryor/Dark Phoenix reincarnation Shennanigans, during which Cyclops has an epic confrontation with his former teammates (yeah, Cyclops is still a permanent feature in the comic despite leaving the team some 30 issues or ago!) It's deserving a five star grade for all of these wonderful things, and yet, yet again what intrigued me the most was Claremont's mastery of long form storytelling, whether it's the small introductions to bigger storylines that he quietly weaves in 6 months previous to their occurring, or brilliantly in this case, the interplay between the Uncanny X-Men storylines, the superb Wolverine mini-series and characters introduced in The New Mutants comic. It's not close to being a full blown crossover and each stands alone, but an understanding of the events in each title adds to the pleasure that can be gained from reading each one, which ultimately means 3x the fun as it's so great to see these situations and dramas bouncing around from comic to comic without any degradation of storyline. This is Uncanny X-Men at its very best. I strongly doubt I'll read much better. For the first time in a while I've been page-turning and getting excited at the possibility of picking up and reading on. The resurrection of Jean Grey story in particular left me gasping to find out how the situation would be resolved, A scene with Madeline slapping Scott Summers, after he confronts her with possibility of actually being Phoenix (her appearance was, it seems, uncanny!) was particular affecting as Scott had been agonising about this for many issues. And then SLAP! And a terrific cliffhanger... And maybe for the only time in the history of comics, Wolverine cries. And I felt moved.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nick Marino

    one of the best. my friend stole it and i want it back! Paul Smith pages with an Art Adams cover, it doesn't get much better. one of the best. my friend stole it and i want it back! Paul Smith pages with an Art Adams cover, it doesn't get much better.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Taneysha forsyth

    This book reprints Uncanny X-Men 168-176 (from 1983), featuring the introduction of Madelyne Pryor, the first appearance of the Morlocks, the story of how Rogue joined the X-Men, the almost-wedding of Wolverine and Mariko Yashida, and the ongoing subplot of Madelyne's uncanny resemblance to Jean Grey: is she the Phoenix reborn? The story, which is a sequel to the epic "Dark Phoenix" saga from 1980, draws to a conclusion in the double-length issue 175, featuring one of the most gripping X-Men bat This book reprints Uncanny X-Men 168-176 (from 1983), featuring the introduction of Madelyne Pryor, the first appearance of the Morlocks, the story of how Rogue joined the X-Men, the almost-wedding of Wolverine and Mariko Yashida, and the ongoing subplot of Madelyne's uncanny resemblance to Jean Grey: is she the Phoenix reborn? The story, which is a sequel to the epic "Dark Phoenix" saga from 1980, draws to a conclusion in the double-length issue 175, featuring one of the most gripping X-Men battles ever, as one lone X-Man fights against his teammates and friends for a love that may never be. This is all masterfully told by Chris Claremont, with illustrations that are simultaneously simple and magnificent by Paul Smith and Bob Wiacek, with a little help from John Romita Jr. and Walt Simonson. This is X-Men adventures at their best. You can get this at the public libary.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lulu (the library leopard)

    Okay, that was actually quite fun! Rogue joins the X-Men, Storm gets a cool punk look, Wolverine goes to Japan and gets dumped at the altar, some trippy stuff involving the maybe-reincarnation of the Phoenix, Cyclops almost gets eaten by a shark on his honeymoon.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dang Ole' Dan Can Dangle

    Lots going on in these issues. Punk Storm, Rogue joining the X-Men, Wolverine's wedding (and tears), Madelyne Pryor, and what serves as a sort of third Phoenix Saga. Chris Claremont's writing is about as fine as it usually is here, and Paul Smith's pencil certainly proves his competence. Lots of great art in here and the panels and page layouts are at an all-time best. Favorite issues: To Have and Have Not (#173), Phoenix! (#175) Best Cover Art: Professor Xavier is a Jerk! (#168), Decisions (#176 Lots going on in these issues. Punk Storm, Rogue joining the X-Men, Wolverine's wedding (and tears), Madelyne Pryor, and what serves as a sort of third Phoenix Saga. Chris Claremont's writing is about as fine as it usually is here, and Paul Smith's pencil certainly proves his competence. Lots of great art in here and the panels and page layouts are at an all-time best. Favorite issues: To Have and Have Not (#173), Phoenix! (#175) Best Cover Art: Professor Xavier is a Jerk! (#168), Decisions (#176) Rating: 3.20 out of 5 My other X-Men reviews: The X-Men, Vol. 1 The X-Men, Vol. 2 The Uncanny X-Men, Vol. 1 X-Men: Proteus The Uncanny X-Men, Vol. 2 X-Men: The Dark Phoenix Saga X-Men: Days of Future Past X-Men: From the Ashes

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    It's interesting...this collection is from just over two years after X-Men: Days of Future Past but it feels almost from a different era. This is more the X-Men I'm used to--both the writing feels more modern and the characters more like the versions I remember from when I started reading. I haven't read the issues between the two, so I can't pinpoint when the change occur. Okay, this may only be interesting to me. One difference from between from more modern graphic novels is that this trade is It's interesting...this collection is from just over two years after X-Men: Days of Future Past but it feels almost from a different era. This is more the X-Men I'm used to--both the writing feels more modern and the characters more like the versions I remember from when I started reading. I haven't read the issues between the two, so I can't pinpoint when the change occur. Okay, this may only be interesting to me. One difference from between from more modern graphic novels is that this trade is not a single long story, but a collection of shorter stories. Most arcs are resolved in two or three issues. However, in typical Chris Claremont fashion, there is a plethora of ongoing story lines and character arcs, some of which don't get resolved here.

  9. 5 out of 5

    James Zanghi

    My first X-Men Graphic novel, which I got to read just after watching X2, is a great little story about the aftermath of the Dark Phoenix Saga and the Wolverine Mini-Series. It holds a special place in my heart, so I give it a solid four stars. A great job by Chris Claremont, the scribe of Days of Future Past.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    Jean Grey was a founding member of the X-Men, her original powers were telekinesis and telepathy, and she was the only female in the original group. Her original code name was Marvel Girl. Later, she was transformed into the Phoenix, with far greater powers. Her fellow member of the original X-Men, Scott Summers, known as Cyclops, was her husband and since he is the leader of the X-Men, he has double responsibility in dealing with the powerful new entity. As Phoenix, Grey was even powerful enou Jean Grey was a founding member of the X-Men, her original powers were telekinesis and telepathy, and she was the only female in the original group. Her original code name was Marvel Girl. Later, she was transformed into the Phoenix, with far greater powers. Her fellow member of the original X-Men, Scott Summers, known as Cyclops, was her husband and since he is the leader of the X-Men, he has double responsibility in dealing with the powerful new entity. As Phoenix, Grey was even powerful enough to defeat Galactus. The continuing story in this book takes place after Grey became the Phoenix and has apparently died. However, applying a word like that to a being as powerful as her is always a questionable action. Scott Summers continues to grieve while the group known as the X-Men is in a state of flux. Both in terms of their intergroup relationships and their personal relationships with their significant others. The group is forced to battle several different foes, including an old one from the first few issues of the original X-Men comic. The story follows several paths, including Charles Xavier in a new body and struggling to master the art of walking again. He is assisted by Lilandra, his love and perhaps in the future it will be necessary to call her his lost love. The story is long, convoluted, complicated and a joy to read. It is always preferable to read the entire story rather than having to read it one comic issue at a time. While having mutant powers complicates your life in the general world, they can also make your personal life difficult as well. If you are not a mutant with powers, think how difficult it would be to live with someone that had them. Relationships between normal humans are complicated enough, it is the personal relationships and the problems with them that help make this a great story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alazzar

    Far better than the last graphic novel I read (The Infinity Gauntlet), because this was more than just gratuitous combat--there was actually fun stuff like the elusive "character development." (Gasp!) Still, I'm really not sure if the comic was good, or if it just reminded me of my childhood watching the X-men cartoon--nostalgia can be a powerful force. (There's a part where Rogue and Storm fly off to do something, and it completely reminded me of the mall scene from Night of the Sentinels--my fi Far better than the last graphic novel I read (The Infinity Gauntlet), because this was more than just gratuitous combat--there was actually fun stuff like the elusive "character development." (Gasp!) Still, I'm really not sure if the comic was good, or if it just reminded me of my childhood watching the X-men cartoon--nostalgia can be a powerful force. (There's a part where Rogue and Storm fly off to do something, and it completely reminded me of the mall scene from Night of the Sentinels--my first-ever experience with Marvel comics characters. When the gals took to the air that Saturday morning and Storm used her lightning to summon her costume, I decided that what I was watching was no less than mankind's greatest creation.) Anyway, it was interesting to read (or maybe re-read? I've had this book since I was a kid, and I think I've read it before) some of the "classic" moments in X-history: Storm vs. Callisto, Wolverine's wedding, the introduction of Madelyn Pryor. These are things I've always been vaguely aware of, so it was cool to get some more details about how it all went down (without just reading a Wikipedia summary, I mean). The art is pretty "meh," but I wasn't too worried about it. In the end, I still found myself wanting to jump right into another X-men story, so that's probably an indication of a good, enjoyable read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Crazed8J8

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Amazing art, and several classic stories rolled into this collection. Introducing Madeline Pryor, Callisto, the Morlocks, and having Rogue join the X-Men, this is just chock full of classic stories. A must read! Second read-through update: Having recently read the Ms. Marvel run, the Binary/Rogue portion is a LOT more important now. I better understand Danvers' hatred for Rogue and the team's reluctance to welcome Rogue. I also am learning that I REALLY dislike Mastermind, he is too powerful, too Amazing art, and several classic stories rolled into this collection. Introducing Madeline Pryor, Callisto, the Morlocks, and having Rogue join the X-Men, this is just chock full of classic stories. A must read! Second read-through update: Having recently read the Ms. Marvel run, the Binary/Rogue portion is a LOT more important now. I better understand Danvers' hatred for Rogue and the team's reluctance to welcome Rogue. I also am learning that I REALLY dislike Mastermind, he is too powerful, too manipulative, and overall a douchebag. All said, this collection has some epic movement in the lives of the X-Men and leads right into some more great stories in the next collections. I am curious to see the evolution of Maddy into the Goblin Queen!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Pj

    Great collection of classic, early-1980s Chris Claremont-penned X-Men stories. Most of the art is by Paul Smith, likely one of the most underrated talents in the industry. I think he went off to do advertising work or something. Either way, so many essential pieces of groundwork for future stories were laid out here, including the introduction of Madelyne Pryor, Storm's overthrow of the Morlock leader, Wolverine getting stood up at the altar by Mariko and Rogue joining the X-Men. Yeah! Great collection of classic, early-1980s Chris Claremont-penned X-Men stories. Most of the art is by Paul Smith, likely one of the most underrated talents in the industry. I think he went off to do advertising work or something. Either way, so many essential pieces of groundwork for future stories were laid out here, including the introduction of Madelyne Pryor, Storm's overthrow of the Morlock leader, Wolverine getting stood up at the altar by Mariko and Rogue joining the X-Men. Yeah!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Aurora

    Deeply classic. Rogue joins the X-men, introducing Madelyn Prior, Kitty and Colossus first get together, Storm goes all Mohawky. Also Wolverine tries to get married in Japan- I've read more of that story in a different collection, it makes a lot less sense without the other chapters. But it's really pretty great. Deeply classic. Rogue joins the X-men, introducing Madelyn Prior, Kitty and Colossus first get together, Storm goes all Mohawky. Also Wolverine tries to get married in Japan- I've read more of that story in a different collection, it makes a lot less sense without the other chapters. But it's really pretty great.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    When the story began this girl wanted to join the x-men group. But proffesor xavier said no because she is to young. She got pissed and started talking about this with her friend. Her friend was calming her down and told her that she needs to understand. But it took her to the wrong path.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Timothy McNeil

    Lots of important canon in this collection, but the combats are as weak as the zipatone coloring. I'm not one for redoing artwork, but coloration is another matter. I'm not sure Marvel needs to preserve the on-the-cheap look of the original issues. Lots of important canon in this collection, but the combats are as weak as the zipatone coloring. I'm not one for redoing artwork, but coloration is another matter. I'm not sure Marvel needs to preserve the on-the-cheap look of the original issues.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Phelps

    My favorite X-Men team, written at Chris Claremont's peak, Penciled by the incomparable Paul Smith. Smith shows how sequential storytelling should be done, I've read this book a number of times over the last 23 years and he still blows me away with his abilities. My favorite X-Men team, written at Chris Claremont's peak, Penciled by the incomparable Paul Smith. Smith shows how sequential storytelling should be done, I've read this book a number of times over the last 23 years and he still blows me away with his abilities.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ging

    Bought this because I thought it was the Phoenix saga (it isn't). Still enjoyed it though, even if it wasn't what I was expecting. Some memorable stuff: - Kitty and Piotr hook up - Jean Grey clone appears - Rogue joins the X-Men - Storm and Callisto fight - Wolverine cries (really) Bought this because I thought it was the Phoenix saga (it isn't). Still enjoyed it though, even if it wasn't what I was expecting. Some memorable stuff: - Kitty and Piotr hook up - Jean Grey clone appears - Rogue joins the X-Men - Storm and Callisto fight - Wolverine cries (really)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Reyel2107

    a great comeback !!!!!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Fugo Feedback

    Leído de la edición de Vid en dos tomos. El primero lo tengo, el segundo me lo prestó el Wolverine argentino en persona, en una época en la que tenía que escribir una nota al respecto que nunca se concretó... Me gustó bastante pero menos que otros cómics de la época, incluso de los mismos autores.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Knotty

    The beginning of Cyclops + Madelyne Pryor. A lot of Shi'ar, Phoenix undertones, and the fun bunch of X-men like Wolverine, Colossus, Nightcrawler, and Kitty Pryde. The beginning of Cyclops + Madelyne Pryor. A lot of Shi'ar, Phoenix undertones, and the fun bunch of X-men like Wolverine, Colossus, Nightcrawler, and Kitty Pryde.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Frans Kempe

    A real classic with alot of important happenings like Rogue joining the x-men, Madelene Pryor and Cyclops, The Morlocks, Wolverine and Marikos almost wedding and some more bunch. Great read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    James

    First graphic novel that I ever bought way back in high school.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    Wolverine goes to Japan and Storm gets a mohawk after becoming queen of the Morlocks.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Allison Stark

    Storm with the Mohawk. Yukio. Rogue. Viper and the Silver Samurai. This is my personal nostalgic favorite.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    the culmination of the phoenix sage-also super trippy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    Came across some old trades and decided to reread it. Better than I remember

  28. 5 out of 5

    Axion

    The best Uncanny X-men I've read so far; wonderfully crafted narrative, epic settings and angry punk storm. The best Uncanny X-men I've read so far; wonderfully crafted narrative, epic settings and angry punk storm.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Breaux

  30. 4 out of 5

    Thaddeus Rice

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