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Sherlock Holmes enters the nightmare world of H.P. Lovecraft New Tales of Terror! What would happen if Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's peerless detective, Sherlock Holmes, and his allies were to find themselves faced with Lovecraftian mysteries whose solutions lay not only beyond the grasp of logic, but beyond sanity itself. In this collection of original tales, twenty of today's c Sherlock Holmes enters the nightmare world of H.P. Lovecraft New Tales of Terror! What would happen if Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's peerless detective, Sherlock Holmes, and his allies were to find themselves faced with Lovecraftian mysteries whose solutions lay not only beyond the grasp of logic, but beyond sanity itself. In this collection of original tales, twenty of today's cutting-edge writers provide answers to that burning question. Contributors include Neil Gaiman, Brian Stableford, Poppy Z. Bright, Barbara Hambly, Steve Perry, and Caitlin R. Kierman. These and other masters of horror, mystery, fantasy and science fiction spin dark tales within a terrifyingly surreal universe. Includes the Hugo Award-winning story A Study in Emerald by Neil Gaiman. Cover design: David Stevenson Cover Illustration: John Jude Palencar


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Sherlock Holmes enters the nightmare world of H.P. Lovecraft New Tales of Terror! What would happen if Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's peerless detective, Sherlock Holmes, and his allies were to find themselves faced with Lovecraftian mysteries whose solutions lay not only beyond the grasp of logic, but beyond sanity itself. In this collection of original tales, twenty of today's c Sherlock Holmes enters the nightmare world of H.P. Lovecraft New Tales of Terror! What would happen if Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's peerless detective, Sherlock Holmes, and his allies were to find themselves faced with Lovecraftian mysteries whose solutions lay not only beyond the grasp of logic, but beyond sanity itself. In this collection of original tales, twenty of today's cutting-edge writers provide answers to that burning question. Contributors include Neil Gaiman, Brian Stableford, Poppy Z. Bright, Barbara Hambly, Steve Perry, and Caitlin R. Kierman. These and other masters of horror, mystery, fantasy and science fiction spin dark tales within a terrifyingly surreal universe. Includes the Hugo Award-winning story A Study in Emerald by Neil Gaiman. Cover design: David Stevenson Cover Illustration: John Jude Palencar

30 review for Shadows Over Baker Street

  1. 5 out of 5

    Werner

    Doyle's Sherlock Holmes canon and Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos have both long been favorite subjects for pastiches; and given the number of contemporary writers who are fans of both, it's not surprising to find an anthology bringing them together. (The antithetical character of the juxtaposition is more apparent than real: Doyle eschewed the supernatural in his Holmes stories; but as Holmes observes in one of the stories here, we're dealing here with science, not magic --and Doyle's own Holmes sto Doyle's Sherlock Holmes canon and Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos have both long been favorite subjects for pastiches; and given the number of contemporary writers who are fans of both, it's not surprising to find an anthology bringing them together. (The antithetical character of the juxtaposition is more apparent than real: Doyle eschewed the supernatural in his Holmes stories; but as Holmes observes in one of the stories here, we're dealing here with science, not magic --and Doyle's own Holmes stories sometimes find the great detective dealing with matters science-fictional.) Most of the 18 stories here (by 20 writers --two are joint efforts) utilize Watson as a narrator, and all but one include Holmes as a character. (Irene Adler, Professor Moriarty, and Mycroft Holmes also appear, and some stories also incorporate real-life persons or fictional characters/literary references from Holmes' era, such as H. G. Wells and William Hope Hodgson's Carnacki, the Ghost-Finder.) Some of the stories make a passable imitation of Doyle's narrative style, and some employ a suggestion of Lovecraft's purple prose in describing the Cthulhu-like phenomena; but mostly the similarities are of characterizations and concepts, not actual style. A few stories here draw directly on specific Lovecraft originals, but most do not, and the majority of the writers (though not all of them) refrain from existential pessimist sermonizing --which was not always explicit in Lovecraft's own writings, either. All of the stories are shorter than the typical Lovecraft work, and hence aren't developed to the same degree; and compared to the original Holmes canon, Sherlock is actually not called on to do much deducting here --most of the authors simply conveniently assume a prior acquaintance on his part with the Necronomicon. As is usually the case in multi-author anthologies, the quality of the work is uneven. John Pelan's "The Mystery of the Worm," IMO, is the weakest entry, and the one reflecting the least flavor of the originals. In the main, though, these stories succeed well on their own terms, as well-written works of horrific sci-fi with a Victorian ambience --best appreciated by Lovecraft and Doyle fans who recognize familiar characters and premises. While Lovecraft concentrated almost entirely on male characters, some of the writers here, happily, do not: Irene Adler is a major figure in Elizabeth Bear's "Tiger! Tiger!" and Barbara Hambly and Steve Perry also create strong female characters who can handle anything the Great Old Ones can throw at them --these stories are some of the best in the collection. My favorite (like that of some of the other reviewers below) is Neil Gaimann's brilliant alternate-world yarn, "A Study in Emerald." But (besides the ones already mentioned) several others are standouts as well, including Brian Stableford's "Art in the Blood," Richard A. Lupoff's "The Adventure of the Voorish Sign," and James Lowder's "The Weeping Masks."

  2. 4 out of 5

    F.R.

    In the introduction to one of his 'Best New Horror' guides, Stephen Jones writes that the premise of this book - Sherlock Holmes meets H.P.Lovecraft - is one of the silliest in recent times. I disagree. I think the idea of taking the character who believes "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, nust be the truth" to the world of Cthulhu is one filled with possibilities. The style of the stories owes more to Conan-Doyle than to Lovecraft, and only some of t In the introduction to one of his 'Best New Horror' guides, Stephen Jones writes that the premise of this book - Sherlock Holmes meets H.P.Lovecraft - is one of the silliest in recent times. I disagree. I think the idea of taking the character who believes "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, nust be the truth" to the world of Cthulhu is one filled with possibilities. The style of the stories owes more to Conan-Doyle than to Lovecraft, and only some of them are as good as I'd want them to be. Barbara Hambly's 'The Adventure of The Antiquarian's Niece' (which also features Carnacki) and John P. Vourlis's 'A Case of Insomnia' are both gripping tales. But the real star of the show is Neil Gaiman's 'A Study In Emerald'. Definitely worthwhile getting hold of if you're ever liked Holmes or Lovecraft.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    How could this book possibly go wrong? Cthulhu is awesome! Sherlock Holmes is awesome! Put them together, and you ought to get double the awesome. And yet, only a few of the stories managed to strike a balance between the two worlds that actually works. A Study In Emerald, by Neil Gaiman, is by far the best story in the collection and reason enough to buy the book all on its own. Though the other stories tend to pale in comparison, there are a handful more that are worth reading, and a couple tha How could this book possibly go wrong? Cthulhu is awesome! Sherlock Holmes is awesome! Put them together, and you ought to get double the awesome. And yet, only a few of the stories managed to strike a balance between the two worlds that actually works. A Study In Emerald, by Neil Gaiman, is by far the best story in the collection and reason enough to buy the book all on its own. Though the other stories tend to pale in comparison, there are a handful more that are worth reading, and a couple that are so horrible that they aren't worth the paper they're printed on. But the good outweigh the bad, and it's a bizarre enough concept that it's worth owning a book devoted to it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    A wondeful anthology filled to the brim with fascinating and creepy tales. Well worth buying!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Belarius

    Shadows Over Baker Street presented me with a real dilemma, because I felt as though such a scattershot mix of stories couldn't really be boiled down to one rating. In the end, however, the sheer number of bad stories simply tipped things in favor of a two-star rating. For the uninitiated, the book is a collection of short stories in which the formulaic "mythos fiction" of H.P. Lovecraft and others collides with the world of Sherlock Holmes. We are, in principle, to expect Holmesian deductive rea Shadows Over Baker Street presented me with a real dilemma, because I felt as though such a scattershot mix of stories couldn't really be boiled down to one rating. In the end, however, the sheer number of bad stories simply tipped things in favor of a two-star rating. For the uninitiated, the book is a collection of short stories in which the formulaic "mythos fiction" of H.P. Lovecraft and others collides with the world of Sherlock Holmes. We are, in principle, to expect Holmesian deductive reasoning to be pitted against unfathomable eldrich forces, a face-off that (while hardly literature) promises to at least be good 'popcorn' reading. To be clear, a handful of the stories are actually excellent. The principle piece ("A Study In Emerald") is very strong, but it can be acquired for free elsewhere in a much classier format, weakening the case for the anthology somewhat. While a number of other stories rise to the occation ("Tiger! Tiger!", "The Weeping Masks", and "Art In The Blood" were all entertaining), most are mediocre or worse. The crux of the problem is that "The Mythos" and "Holmes Fiction" are two very specific sub-genres that follow well-established patterns. The cliche of Holmes deducing the character of his client at a glance during the opening is well known to fans of the Detective, as is the horror-narrative-told-through-the-lens-of-a-diary trope familiar to Mythos fans. These create expectations on the part of the reader. It is, for example, easy to tell a Sherlock Holmes story wrong, which a distressing number of stories included do. The Holmes formula requires the story be told by Watson in the first person: failure to do so simply feels wrong. A clever story can dodge this bullet and innovate, but a clumsy story cannot. At the same time, however, having to satisfy both formulas simultaneously presents a different problem: overly predictable storytelling. If you're familiar with the Deep Ones, you'll know the ending of various stories even as they begin. Indeed, the very approach Lovecraft took in his writing (slowly, through implication, building up to a shocking and otherworldly reveal) has largely been abandoned by writers who make the crucial mistake of re-using the same monsters and gimmicks. Few stories have that element of surprise precisely because the fans who will be drawn to this premise will be the best-equipped to identify the tired old monsters that have been recycled well past the point of horror, into the realm of cartoons and mockery. Or, for more than a couple of stories, the lowest tier of fiction: fanfic. (As an aside, I feel I should point out that Lovecraft himself relied on a narrative formula rather than a consistent setting. He rarely used the same antagonist more than once. Consequently, most of his imitators in this collection and otherwise have spectacularly missed the point of "cosmic horror.") The bottom line is that this collection is, for the most part, a team composed of cripples, with the exception of a handful of genuine athletes. Finishing the collection (a requirement I held myself to before reviewing it) was a chore, and not one I would wish upon others. Absolutely, read "A Study In Emerald" (available from the link above, or in the collection Fragile Things), but otherwise give this bundle a pass.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Harrison

    I'd love to give it 5 stars, but I feel there's only so much pastiche can achieve, even if it is as inspired as the short stories in this collection. Now, that said, if they were all on par with Neil Gaiman's "A Study in Emerald", I'd be whining that I couldn't go up to 6 stars & begging for another installment. When I first read this collection about a year ago I liked it well enough, being much more well-versed on the Lovecraft side of the equation than the Holmes. But credit the Guy Richie fil I'd love to give it 5 stars, but I feel there's only so much pastiche can achieve, even if it is as inspired as the short stories in this collection. Now, that said, if they were all on par with Neil Gaiman's "A Study in Emerald", I'd be whining that I couldn't go up to 6 stars & begging for another installment. When I first read this collection about a year ago I liked it well enough, being much more well-versed on the Lovecraft side of the equation than the Holmes. But credit the Guy Richie film adaptation and a slew of Granada television dramatizations (with the excellent Jeremy Brett) for rekindling my interest in London's best (& only) consulting detective. With a little more Holmes under my belt, both from the original sources and the distillations, I have to say I like "Shadows Over Baker Street" even better than before. (Being a fan of marginalia & asides, I especially like being able to better pick up on throwaway references to other famous cases, such as the infamous & never-discussed giant rat of Sumatra, as well as better appreciate "extended cast" characters such as Irene Adler.) As I re-read this, I have a suspicion it might even get bumped up to a full 5 stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    After starting out brilliantly, this turned into more and more of an endless slog, like I was trapped in a wicked artifact from a Lovecraftian story: a neverending volume that steadily sucks the reader's soul dry. That's not to say that it's uniformly awful, but many of the stories have an intriguing build-up that is quickly rushed when the author realizes they're running out of space. Writing action-driven short stories well takes a specific set of skills, and this collection throws Lovecraft a After starting out brilliantly, this turned into more and more of an endless slog, like I was trapped in a wicked artifact from a Lovecraftian story: a neverending volume that steadily sucks the reader's soul dry. That's not to say that it's uniformly awful, but many of the stories have an intriguing build-up that is quickly rushed when the author realizes they're running out of space. Writing action-driven short stories well takes a specific set of skills, and this collection throws Lovecraft and Conan Doyle's rare talent for doing so into sharp relief. The main exception is "A Study in Emerald". I'm not a fan of Neil Gaiman (American Gods is probably the most pretentious piece of drivel I've ever read), but this story is truly brilliant and deserves five stars on its own. "A Study in Emerald" is really the only must-read story, but if you really find the theme intriguing, I recommend the following stories: A Case of Royal Blood The Adventure of the Antiquarian's Niece The Horror of the Many Faces A Case of Insomnia The Adventure of the Voorish Sign Give all the others a miss, and definitely don't waste your money buying the book. You can find "A Study in Emerald" on Neil Gaiman's website with even prettier formatting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Oh man. I love "A Study In Emerald". Love it. I've read some of the other stories in the book and have liked them pretty well, but I love "A Study In Emerald". In case you don't know this is basically a collection of stories that break down to being Sherlock Holmes vs. Cthulu. And the first story is "A Study In Emerald" by [author:Neil Gaiman}. It's brilliant. It shows why Neil Gaiman is a master of his craft. It's chilling and thought provoking and just great. Like I said I've read a few of the ot Oh man. I love "A Study In Emerald". Love it. I've read some of the other stories in the book and have liked them pretty well, but I love "A Study In Emerald". In case you don't know this is basically a collection of stories that break down to being Sherlock Holmes vs. Cthulu. And the first story is "A Study In Emerald" by [author:Neil Gaiman}. It's brilliant. It shows why Neil Gaiman is a master of his craft. It's chilling and thought provoking and just great. Like I said I've read a few of the other stories but since I don't really have any history with Lovecraft stories I don't really have any point of reference. Which is one of the reasons I like "A Study In Emerald" so much. You don't really have to know much about the Elder Gods to get it. I know that they're terrible monsters from the edge of sanity and I know that Sherlock Holmes is a detective that uses logic and sanity to solve his cases. Therefore the combination of the two is really rather brilliant all around.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nathanielk

    The ultimate pastiche: Sherlock Holmes meets the denizens of H.P. Lovecraft's sinister universes. Two writers who have not only been imitated, but whose characters/settings have been used by countless others. The combo is even better. A Study in Emerald is just one of the many little gems in this book. Probably best that you have read at least one Cthulu mythos tale first though: just to know what is being lampooned or venerated. The ultimate pastiche: Sherlock Holmes meets the denizens of H.P. Lovecraft's sinister universes. Two writers who have not only been imitated, but whose characters/settings have been used by countless others. The combo is even better. A Study in Emerald is just one of the many little gems in this book. Probably best that you have read at least one Cthulu mythos tale first though: just to know what is being lampooned or venerated.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Snail in Danger (Sid) Nicolaides

    This is so very fanfic-ish, in concept at least. (And sometimes in execution. Please note that that's not meant as an insult. While some fanfic is bad enough to make run screaming into the streets, some of it is of pro or near-pro quality.) It's a pretty cool idea, but I started losing interest after a few stories. The Neil Gaiman piece at the beginning was excellent. I know that's a "really going out on a limb there" thing, but ... Neil Gaiman doesn't push my readerly buttons that much. (I know This is so very fanfic-ish, in concept at least. (And sometimes in execution. Please note that that's not meant as an insult. While some fanfic is bad enough to make run screaming into the streets, some of it is of pro or near-pro quality.) It's a pretty cool idea, but I started losing interest after a few stories. The Neil Gaiman piece at the beginning was excellent. I know that's a "really going out on a limb there" thing, but ... Neil Gaiman doesn't push my readerly buttons that much. (I know, that makes me a comparative rarity. >.> This might be the best thing by him that I can recall reading.) The Elizabeth Bear story that followed was almost as good. After that, the stories gradually began to seem very similar. It probably didn't help that I'm not that familiar with the Holmes canon.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie Sloan

    I liked this book but it's a little bit like too much of a good thing.I think I made the mistake of trying to read this book through when I would have been better set to read a story or two a day.I got kind of sick of Sherlock and Watson. That said this is a fun book with a good premise.I am always looking for some good Mythos stories and this book has quite a few of them. I think if you want to fully appreciate this book you will read it along with another book so that you look forward to Sherloc I liked this book but it's a little bit like too much of a good thing.I think I made the mistake of trying to read this book through when I would have been better set to read a story or two a day.I got kind of sick of Sherlock and Watson. That said this is a fun book with a good premise.I am always looking for some good Mythos stories and this book has quite a few of them. I think if you want to fully appreciate this book you will read it along with another book so that you look forward to Sherlock and not dread him like I did. I got this book at the library and I am glad I read it but won't be shelling out $30 for a copy from Amazon.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Davie

    This anthology of short stories revolve around a central theme of Sherlock Holmes…with a twist, an H.P. Lovecraft twist. Every tale involves the supernatural and it's an intriguing mix of the feel of Holmes' England and Watson's companionship. The disconcerting aspect is not the supernatural as much as it’s the individual authors creating future histories for each man and none of those histories connect. As I read, I couldn't understand what happened to that second marriage or how the various au This anthology of short stories revolve around a central theme of Sherlock Holmes…with a twist, an H.P. Lovecraft twist. Every tale involves the supernatural and it's an intriguing mix of the feel of Holmes' England and Watson's companionship. The disconcerting aspect is not the supernatural as much as it’s the individual authors creating future histories for each man and none of those histories connect. As I read, I couldn't understand what happened to that second marriage or how the various authors reconciled Holmes' disappearance between 1893, his apparent death at Reichenbach Falls and 1903 when he reappears. A minor note amidst the otherwise very captivating stories. Neil Gaiman's A Study in Emerald (1881) refers to the case Holmes investigated involving the German word "rache" although this one's definition incorporates more than revenge. I loved the ads Gaiman incorporated into the story…just making sure the reader understands its supernatural aspects as he creates a fantasy world with its alien monarchy...eeeee... Elizabeth Bear's Tiger! Tiger (1882)'s claim to Holmes is its use of Irene Adler as one of the shooters on a tiger hunt in India. A good story in its own right, I was frustrated with it as I kept hunting for its association to Holmes. Bear's rendering left too many questions to be satisfying. Steve Perry's Case of the Wavy Black Dagger (1884) includes a Spice Islands priestess, a kris, and the Old Ones. Steven-Elliot Atlman's A Case of Royal Blood (1888) involved the Dutch court with its ghostly stalking of its remaining blood royal, the Princess Wilhelmina. James Lowder's Weeping Masks (1890) tells the true tale of Watson's debilitating experiences in Afghanistan when he comes up against the Weeping Ones. Lowder provides just enough information to be creepy but much too insufficient to inform. Brian Stableford's Art in the Blood (1892) is a confusing tale of old blood activating through objects. Only if one were enthused of the sea would the curse begin to transform one's body. Poppy Z. Brite and David Ferguson's Curious Case of Miss Violet Stone (1894) involves a botched communication. Barbara Hambly's Adventure of the Antiquarian's Niece (1894) is a true Hambly-esque tale of magic and tragedy with a truly creepy though practical ending. Eeeee… John Pelan's Mystery of the Worm (1894) was another of those frustrating tales involving "Egyptian" artifacts and a deluded scientist willing to risk anyone and anything to live forever. Paul Finch's Mystery of the Hanged Man's Puzzle (1897) involves the sewers and a plot to dose all of London and eventually the world into evolving into a newer, more amphibious species. Tim Lebbon's Horror of the Many Faces (1898) is the ghoulish tale of an alien scientist exploring the structure of mankind…internally. Michael Reeves Adventure of the Arab's Manuscript (1898) illuminates more of Dr. Watson's Afghan adventures with the appearance of Miriam, the daughter of a tribal chief who nursed Watson back to life. Supposedly, she is hunting the Kitab al-Azif, one of the complete versions of the Necronomicon to keep it safe. Caitlín R. Kiernan's Drowned Geologist (1898) takes the form of a letter written by Dr. Logan, a paleontologist with the American Museum of Natural History, imploring Dr. Watson to investigate the connections between three ammonites discovered in shales outside of their expected time period and Phoenician and/or Irish gods and the drowning death of Sir Elijah, a geologist, whom Logan had met earlier. A letter expressing expectations of a future. A letter written shortly after the theft of the one ammonite still in public hands and one day before his "suicide". John P. Vourlis' A Case of Insomnia (1899) felt like a crossover with Elizabeth Peters' Amelia Peabody with its Egyptian curse of the stone and the otherworldly beastie attempting its recovery. Richard A. Lupoff's Adventure of the Voorish Sign (1899) combines gypsies with the otherworldly as it combines magical "religious" observances with otherworldly architecture to create a doorway between worlds. I do wish Lupoff had given closure to Lord Fairclough. I did like the description of the Anthracite Palace, a truly remarkable sounding edifice. F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre's Adventure of Exham Priory (1902) provides a supernatural explanation of what actually happened at Reichenbach Falls in 1893 when Holmes grappled with Moriarty and they fell. This particular story, Adventure of Exham Priory, involves a blood curse and the Elder Gods. A curse restricted to a particular family that only activates on contact with an otherworldly doorway. MacIntyre cracks me up with his so very solemn revelation of Moriarty's greatest regret...it's not surprising to learn he grew up in Australia! David Niall Wilson and Patricia Lee Macomber's Dead Did Not Become Him (1902) involves greed and an easy path for the son of a Jewish rabbi who misuses his religion's science and golems to thwart a tontine. Unfortunately for the perpetrator, the doctor who signed Michael Adcott's death certificate is Dr. Watson. Simon Clark's Nightmare in Wax (1915) refers to the wax cylinder which Professor Moriarty uses to record his triumph in uncovering the drowned village of Burnston up Yorkshire way. It seems he stumbled across a copy of the Necronomicon and intends to use its secrets to rule the world. It's a gruesome tale as Moriarty calmly sits by as the evolved inhabitants of the village destroy and eat his workmen. Clark's is a frustrating story as we start the tale in 1915 when government officials ask Watson to identify the voices on the cylinder while the end of the story is supposedly in 1903 when Holmes, I'm guessing, hands the wax cylinder over to the Home Office. Further confusion is created because Watson mentions [in the beginning] that he received the critical telegram three weeks ago in, I can only assume, 1903 although it is currently 1915. I mention this because Watson concludes the story with his concern over whether he should have mentioned that only one day after he received the 1903 telegram, Holmes telephoned him with a warning about Moriarity having recovered the book Holmes had tossed out. We are also led to believe that it's been 12 years since Watson, or anyone, has seen Holmes. Very irritating and not at all the enticement I assume Clark was attempting. The Cover Kris Tobiassen's cover art is a lovely comic reflection of the supernatural with its ghostly Holmes, eerie, faced skeletal trees, slavering demon dogs, and menacing figures hinted in the distance with the shivery title superimposed over all.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Arthur O'dell

    Just a lot of fun. It’s uncanny how well Doyle and Lovecraft go together. As an anthology of short stories, it is a little uneven, but the weakest stories are merely adequate rather than bad. And the standouts, particularly Neil Gaiman’s “A Study in Emerald”, and Elizabeth Bear’s “Tiger, Tiger” are outstanding.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Riju Ganguly

    "Shadows over Baker Street" is an ingenious (if not singular) attempt by Ballantine Books to superimpose the gigantic persona of Sherlock Holmes upon the weirdly menacing landscape of Cthulhu, under the editorship of Michael Reaves and John Pelan. The authority of these two as well as the host of authors invited by them to undertake this `mission' is irreproachable. But to an aficionado of either genre, the crux of the matter is to find out who has been disparaged by whom (although the outcome o "Shadows over Baker Street" is an ingenious (if not singular) attempt by Ballantine Books to superimpose the gigantic persona of Sherlock Holmes upon the weirdly menacing landscape of Cthulhu, under the editorship of Michael Reaves and John Pelan. The authority of these two as well as the host of authors invited by them to undertake this `mission' is irreproachable. But to an aficionado of either genre, the crux of the matter is to find out who has been disparaged by whom (although the outcome of the confrontation was `known' to all, since, had the Lovecraftian monsters succeeded surely we would not be here to contemplate over global warming and other trivia). But now, I better come to the point. The penmanship of the stories constituting this book vary along-with the focus of the authors. Some of these works are about Yog-Soggoth, some about the Colour beyond Space, some about other paranormal and psychological phenomena that would have stumped the author of the famous line: "This agency stands flat-footed upon the ground, and there it must remain. The world is big enough for us. No ghosts need apply." [The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire]. The stories are: 1. "A Study in Emerald" by Neil Gaiman is one of the finest pastiches that I have ever come across. It is about events very similar to those in "A Study in Scarlet" happening in a post-Cthulhu London occupied by some of the most well-known characters of fantastic Victoriana, where the events are narrated by `once crack-shot' Col. S. M, the murder is solved by a consulting detective who is the author of "Dynamics of an Asteroid" and has been pressed into action by Inspector Lestrade, the murderer is an ex-Army Doctor who has been to Afghanistan and the murder is planned & implemented by an extremely talented amateur actor Sherry Vernet!!! 2. "Tiger! Tiger!" by Elizabeth Bear is a breathtaking adventure of hunting, international politics and a sorcerer who chants "Ia! Ia Hastur cf'ayah 'vugtlagln Hastur!" in Malwa plateau involving Colonel Sebastian Moran and Irene Adler. 3. "The Case of the Wavy Black Dagger" by Steve Parry recounts Holmes' meeting with the woman of his dreams (NOT IRENE ADLER)! 4. "A Case of Royal Blood" by Steven-Elliot Altman is an adventure concerning some of the dark secrets of the royal family in Netherlands, where Holmes is accompanied and assisted by H.G. Wells. 5. "The Weeping Masks" by James Lowder is Watsonian reminiscences of what could have actually taken place after the battle of Maiwand and how Murray saved him from otherworldly doom. 6. "Art in the Blood" by Brian Stableford is a solid effort that aims at bringing not only Sherlock Holmes, but also Mycroft Holmes and his Diogenes Club into the Cthulhuian world. 7. "The Curious Case of Miss Violet Stone" by Poppy Z. Brite and David Ferguson is a rather flat story involving mind-travel, somehow clinging to the Lovecraftian postulates. 8. "The Adventure of the Antiquarian's Niece" by Barbara Hambly is a purely Cthulhuian pulp-action, with not only Holmes but also Carnaki the ghost-finder. It was racy and horrifying. 9. "The Mystery of the Worm" by John Pelan is a worthy attempt to convert the tantalizing reference left by Conan Doyle into a Wold-Newton adventure bringing Dr. Nikola and Cthulhu mythos onto 221B Baker Street. 10. "The Mystery of the Hanged Man's Puzzle" by Paul Finch is a superb adventure where Holmes and Watson encounter the legacy of Innsmouth, Massachusetts! 11. "The Horror of the Many Faces" by Tim Lebbon is a disturbing study in psychology that only uses the trappings of the mythos. 12. "The Adventure of the Arab's Manuscript" by Michael Reaves is an adventure where Watson comes across a fragrance from his past and feels the putrid odor of Cthulhu only at the climax. 13. "The Drowned Geologist" by Caitlin R. Kiernan is a neat story of Holmes coming across artifacts from Cthulhu during "the Hiatus". 14. "A Case of Insomnia" by John P. Vourlis is another Lovecraftian story of a `portal' through which otherworldly creatures may come visiting, esp. in darkness. 15. "The Adventure of the Voorish Sign" by Richard A Lupoff is a story of signs and designs that may allow us to venture into the perilous (mildly speaking) world of Cthulhu. 16. "The Adventure of the Exham Priory" by F. Gwynplaine Macintyre is a chilling story of Moriarty acting as the agent of Yog-Soggoth and how he almost managed in snatching Holmes away forever. 17. "Death Did Not Become Him" by David Niall Wilson and Patricia Lee Macomber is a biblical story of `Golem' set amidst Lovecraftian incantations and Holmes-Watson. 18. "Nightmare in Wax" by Simon Clark recounts Moriarty's efforts to usher the inmates of Cthulhu into the world as we know it, and how Holmes foiled it in nick of time (or, did he?)! To summarize, this book would be a good companion to you irrespective of your inclinations towards Holmes or Cthulhu in particular. Go ahead and read the book. All the best!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    I don't know if I've ever felt more like a book was written specifically for me. This was a series of short Sherlock Holmes adventures set in the world (and/or inspired by the world) of H.P. Lovecraft, two of my greatest nerd loves. I would have never thought these two would blend together so well but I suppose it makes sense. Holmes is the the detective who needs to know everything and Lovecraft posits that to know everything is to be driven mad. The best of the bunch is probably "A Study in Eme I don't know if I've ever felt more like a book was written specifically for me. This was a series of short Sherlock Holmes adventures set in the world (and/or inspired by the world) of H.P. Lovecraft, two of my greatest nerd loves. I would have never thought these two would blend together so well but I suppose it makes sense. Holmes is the the detective who needs to know everything and Lovecraft posits that to know everything is to be driven mad. The best of the bunch is probably "A Study in Emerald" the opening story by Neil Gaiman. It won a Hugo Award for short fiction when it came out and it is easy to see why. That being said, the entire collection is extremely strong. There are even references in many of the stories to other stories within the same collection, even though every story is written by different authors. I credit the two editors with this and it makes the whole experience all the richer. This definitely isn't for all tastes but if you love Holmes and Lovecraft this will blow your mind.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    An anthology of modern writers inventing new tales that set Sherlock Holmes as a consulting detective in the world of H.P. Lovecraft. If you enjoy X-files, Lost or any other blend of mystery and the supernatural this should strike a cord.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    needed to take a break on this one - hopefully i come back to it!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Shadows Over Baker Street By Michael Reaves, John Pelan, Neal Gaiman, Elizabeth Bear, Steve Perry, Steven Elliott Altman, James Lowder, Brian Stableford, Poppy Z. Brite and David Ferguson, Barbara Hambly, Paul Finch, Tim Lebbon, Caitlin R. Kiernan, John P. Vourlis, Richard A. Lupoff, F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre, David Niall Wilson and Patricia Lee Macomber, and Simon Clark Publisher: DelRey Published In: New York , New York Date: 2003 Pgs: 446 Summary: What would happen if Conan Doyle’s detective was to f Shadows Over Baker Street By Michael Reaves, John Pelan, Neal Gaiman, Elizabeth Bear, Steve Perry, Steven Elliott Altman, James Lowder, Brian Stableford, Poppy Z. Brite and David Ferguson, Barbara Hambly, Paul Finch, Tim Lebbon, Caitlin R. Kiernan, John P. Vourlis, Richard A. Lupoff, F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre, David Niall Wilson and Patricia Lee Macomber, and Simon Clark Publisher: DelRey Published In: New York , New York Date: 2003 Pgs: 446 Summary: What would happen if Conan Doyle’s detective was to find himself and his allies faced with mysteries whose solutions lay beyond logic’s reach and the border of sanity itself. A Study in Emerald-Neil Gaiman ~ Gaiman’s portrayal of the great detective’s sidekick is a bit on the naïve side despite a tour in Afghanistan and a wounding in a cavern there. Love the idea of the Old Ones arising and taking the place of both the gods and royalty in the Middle Aged world and ruling through to the Industrial Age. And great twist. Gaiman is freakin’ awesome. The Weeping Masks-James Lowder ~ Many of these stories seem to take their roots in Watson’s military service in Afghanistan and his wounding there. The elder gods are watching from the dark. Their supplicants are everywhere. The darkest darkness is waiting. Art in the Blood-Brian Stableford ~ The Brothers Holmes stare into the Abyss brought to their attention by a curse visited on three sailors with the sea in their blood. The Adventure of the Antiquarian’s Niece-Barbara Hambly ~ This was a good story. Not as good or immersive as the previously reviewed ones. But not forgettable like some of the others have been in this collection. The Mystery of the Hanged Man’s Puzzle-Paul Finch ~ The way this one is written makes it read most like a true Holmes adventure with Lovcraftian undertones. There are fantastic elements. But at heart, it’s a hero’s journey wrapped in mystery. The Horror of the Many Faces-Tim Lebbon ~ This one is worth a comment mainly for the tragedy of it...the way it leaves Holmes at the end. Very sad. A Nightmare in Wax-Simon Clark ~ This might have been the prefect closing note for this collection. Most of the second half of the book were good stories, but they didn’t rise to the quality of those mentioned above. Nightmare showcased an great interpretation of Watson, Holmes, and Moriarity. Loved the format of this tale too. Usually, I don’t like the “unending” story, but this one worked well. The game is, most assuredly, afoot. Genre: Mystery, Horror, Short Stories Main Character: Sherlock Holmes Favorite Character: Watson Least Favorite Character: Holmes is my favorite character. He’s just so cool. That is communicated well in the majority of these short stories. Favorite Scene: Watson’s convalescent scene in The Weeping Masks when the priest comes to pray for him. The scene in Art in the Blood where Sherlock tries to describe to Mycroft what he saw in the cavern at St. Aldhelm’s Head. Watson’s revelation at the end of Nightmare in Wax. Plot Holes/Out of Character: Nothing nagging left hanging in these short stories. Last Page Sound: A big self-satisfied sigh. Author Assessment: Those mentioned above, I’d say definitely give them another chance. The ones in the book that didn’t rise to get their own mentions, I’d give them a look. Disposition of Book: Return it to the Irving Public Library in Irving, TX. And possibly at some future point, revisit it...especially the stories that I mentioned above. Why isn't there a screenplay?: The only way you could get a screenplay out of this mixed fandom project would be in a League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Adoptry

    This anthology brings the world's favourite detective into the realm of Cthulhu. Unlike the original canon in which there was no mystery that had any occult or paranormal elements (with Holmes going so far as to say that he doesn't believe in such phenomena), every story in this book brings Holmes into direct conflict with paranormal entities. Most of the stories are very well written (I personally didn't really like the last couple of them) and successfully create an eerie background to the stor This anthology brings the world's favourite detective into the realm of Cthulhu. Unlike the original canon in which there was no mystery that had any occult or paranormal elements (with Holmes going so far as to say that he doesn't believe in such phenomena), every story in this book brings Holmes into direct conflict with paranormal entities. Most of the stories are very well written (I personally didn't really like the last couple of them) and successfully create an eerie background to the story. The "explanations" for the paranormal make sense within the context of the Cthulhu mythos and I recommend this book to those who are fans of SH and Lovecraft.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    Stuff I Read - Shadows Over Baker Street ed. Michael Reaves Review I think this book was recommended to be because I read Dracula vs Sherlock Holmes, and once I saw that there was an entire anthology of the world's greatest detective taking on the creeping madness that is the Cthulhu Mythos, I was intrigued. What I found when I opened the volume, though, is what I've found with a great many anthologies, which is to say something of a mixed bag. There are some that are very good, and some that rea Stuff I Read - Shadows Over Baker Street ed. Michael Reaves Review I think this book was recommended to be because I read Dracula vs Sherlock Holmes, and once I saw that there was an entire anthology of the world's greatest detective taking on the creeping madness that is the Cthulhu Mythos, I was intrigued. What I found when I opened the volume, though, is what I've found with a great many anthologies, which is to say something of a mixed bag. There are some that are very good, and some that really had me struggling to stay awake through. The volume mostly delivers on the premise, though, telling Lovecraftian tales in the style of Sherlock Holmes. And that was perhaps my largest problem with the collection, that it is definitely rooted in the styles of the time, in the way Doyle told his stories. Which can be a bit dull. Some of these especially, combining the Holmes slow mystery with the Lovecraftian mundane contrasting the unreal, were just really slow and not much happened. There was a definite tendency to tell a story in which Holmes gets brought into a mystery and discovers something strange and then by the end nothing is really illuminated. It makes for a less interesting story, because though the reader can see the connections, it fails to really be either truly Holmesian or truly Lovecraftian. The best examples are the stories that break the tired ways of telling the stories and instead use the characters and the setting to tell some interesting pieces that don't try to wrap everything else and that don't just let Holmes off the hook with a "best not explained." There are a few, like the train ride through a dreamscape and the Gaiman story where the world has been taken over by part-monsters, that really do some good work, that were original despite borrowing from two different authors. Perhaps I just find the older style more taxing, but I think the ones that weren't quite so slave to the setting and premise really did more in terms of telling innovative stories. Otherwise there isn't all that much to say about this collection. The stories are mostly good, and where they aren't good they are at least passable. Nothing really stuck out as bad, but it could drag at times, and I had to put the anthology down a few times when I started to nod off. I liked it, definitely, but it was a little hit or miss, and in the end it became something of a wash, a good collection with some very good stories, but not all that I was hoping for, and as such I'm giving it a 6.75/10.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Oakes

    Sherlock Holmes meets Cthulhu! Not really, but that might be a subtitle to grab the attention of readers who enjoy both Sherlock Holmes pastiches and those stories that follow the tradition of HP Lovecraft in the mythos. A very fun book, but as always, when you have an anthology of stories to read, there are some that will be really good, some that will be okay, and some that you read just because they're in the collection. Funny thing, though, everyone who reads this book is going to like somet Sherlock Holmes meets Cthulhu! Not really, but that might be a subtitle to grab the attention of readers who enjoy both Sherlock Holmes pastiches and those stories that follow the tradition of HP Lovecraft in the mythos. A very fun book, but as always, when you have an anthology of stories to read, there are some that will be really good, some that will be okay, and some that you read just because they're in the collection. Funny thing, though, everyone who reads this book is going to like something different. Among my favorites are: 1) A study in emerald, by Neil Gaiman (yes, THAT Neil Gaiman) in which history is a bit twisted around; 2) A Case of Royal Blood by Steven-Elliot Altman, in which Holmes and Watson team up with HG Wells to solve a strange mystery of a poltergeist at the Dutch court; 3) The Curious Case of Miss Violet Stone, by Poppy Z. Brite, in which our heroes must solve a mystery of a young woman who has not eaten for three years but manages to stay alive; 4) The Adventure of the Antiquarian's Niece by Barbara Hambly in which Holmes and Watson enlist the help of Carnaki the Ghost Finder to get to the bottom of evil doings at an isolated chateau; 5) The Adventure of the Arab's Manuscript, by Michael Reaves which features the Necronomonicon; 6) A Case of Insomnia, by John P. Vourlis, in which Holmes and Watson try to solve the mystery of why everyone in a certain English town has not slept since the last lunar eclipse, 7) The Adventure of the Voorish Sign by Richard Lupoff in which Holmes & Watson travel to a manor called Anthracite Hall to find a woman's lost brother and 8) The Adventure of Exham Priory, by F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre, where we meet up once again with Professor Moriarty. I would love to see a Volume II put into print. I will say that if you have not read the basic HPL stories concerning Innsmouth, Cthulhu and the Necronomicon, you may be lost; there isn't a whole lot of explanation here and the authors seem to take it on faith that you know what they're talking about. Overall, a very fun collection to spend a few hours with -- the reading goes really quickly. Highly recommended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    tom bomp

    Pretty average, except for A Study in Emerald, which works as an affectionate tribute to Sherlock Holmes with a decent twist. It plays a bit loose with Lovecraft but in a good way - some of the stories don't seem to get Lovecraftian horror at all. The big problem is that the Holmes format and Lovecraft format are totally at odds with each other. Lovecraft stories end with a horror ending where people lose their sanity, nothing is understandable and there's no hope for the future. In a Holmes stor Pretty average, except for A Study in Emerald, which works as an affectionate tribute to Sherlock Holmes with a decent twist. It plays a bit loose with Lovecraft but in a good way - some of the stories don't seem to get Lovecraftian horror at all. The big problem is that the Holmes format and Lovecraft format are totally at odds with each other. Lovecraft stories end with a horror ending where people lose their sanity, nothing is understandable and there's no hope for the future. In a Holmes story the ending is (usually) happy, everything is resolved and everything is explained as being entirely logical, while clues throughout the story make the ending satisfying. These stories typically follow a pretty unhappy medium. Even attempts to portray some permanent effect on Holmes' or Watson's mind falls flat when the next story has them yet again baffled and confused about the idea of Lovecraftian cults existing, despite them having just confronted them. Obviously that's somewhat unavoidable in a short story collection like this but it is a little silly. Most of the stories have unpleasant things happen to the characters yet Holmes and Watson escape mostly unscathed. Multiple stories seem to have a very loose handle on Holmes' character and speaking style, which is pretty jarring. One story dedicates pages to a lovingly described firefight in the London sewers, which is neither very Lovecraftian or Sherlockian. One story is based on Moriarty recording his plans to control the world on a wax cylinder, live, while he's doing them. There's a story that featured something from Jewish folklore that almost felt anti-semitic because of the weird way it was handled. I feel like more stories could have done with trying to break away from some of the Lovecraft mythology while still keeping some of the spirit. Some of them quote Lovecraft stuff but make it incredibly mundane. I guess I feel most of the stories failed to work as either a Lovecraft story or a Holmes story and ended up not making much of an impact. It was alright enough but just not exciting and too much repetition of basic story premises.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Todd

    Overall, I enjoyed this collection. There has been a trend in Mythos anthologies to find stories that try to break the 'old school' mode or only use Lovecraft or the Mythos genre as inspiration. These may be good stories on their own, but do not make good Mythos stories or collections in my mind. In contrast, I thought the Sherlock Holmes setting fit perfectly with the 'Cthulhu by Gaslight' atmosphere. Many fit the classic Mythos trope of the investigators falling into something man was not mean Overall, I enjoyed this collection. There has been a trend in Mythos anthologies to find stories that try to break the 'old school' mode or only use Lovecraft or the Mythos genre as inspiration. These may be good stories on their own, but do not make good Mythos stories or collections in my mind. In contrast, I thought the Sherlock Holmes setting fit perfectly with the 'Cthulhu by Gaslight' atmosphere. Many fit the classic Mythos trope of the investigators falling into something man was not meant to know, but in others it's Watson keeping up with Holme's previously withheld knowledge. The stories ran the gamut from pastiche, to 'the new weird tale' to solid omage. Personal favorites include: "Nightmare in Wax" by Simon Clark, "The Mystery of the Hanged Man's Puzzle" by Paul Finch, "A Study in Emerald" by Niel Gaiman, "A Case of Royal Blood" by Steven-Elliot Altman, Art in the Blood" by Brian Stableford, "The Adventure of the Voorish Sign" by Richard Lupoff and "The Adventure of the Antiquarian's Niece" by Barbara Hambly. I had expected Hambly, Lupoff and Gaiman to impress me based on past experience, but the other authors were a pleasent surprise. The other stories were generally solid and atmospheric but often felt rushed, possibly to fit a length limit imposed by the editor. There were a couple of examples as well that read as if they had been written previously and had the Sherlock Holmes elements tacked on for submission to this collection. Those were by far the minority, though. I would recommend this volume for the Mythos enthusiast who enjoys a turn of the century feel to classic 'investigators stumble upon...' Mythos tales.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brenna

    Mixing Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and H.P. Lovecraft is just a fascinating premise. While a few of the stories fall short, this collection is entertaining and well worth the read. My favorite stories in the collection are as follows: "A Study in Emerald," Neil Gaiman - This is the story that made me buy the collection. I read it in Gaiman's book Fragile Things, and thoroughly enjoyed it. The ending is excellent and while the story is pure Gaiman, it is also an excellent homage to the writers honored Mixing Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and H.P. Lovecraft is just a fascinating premise. While a few of the stories fall short, this collection is entertaining and well worth the read. My favorite stories in the collection are as follows: "A Study in Emerald," Neil Gaiman - This is the story that made me buy the collection. I read it in Gaiman's book Fragile Things, and thoroughly enjoyed it. The ending is excellent and while the story is pure Gaiman, it is also an excellent homage to the writers honored in the collection. "A Case of Royal Blood," Steven-Eliot Altman - With an ending worthy of Tim Burton's Sleepy Hollow, this story is, to me, one of the creepier ones in the book. With Holmes having a man named Welles as his sidekick, rather than the usual Watson, it provides a slightly different point of view that works well for the story. "The Curious Case of Miss Violet Stone," Poppy Z. Brite and David Ferguson - Not only does this story include a classic scene of Holmes demonstrating his deductive reasoning just by glancing at a person, this story is significantly less sinister than others, which provides some nice relief about a third of the way through the collection. "A Case of Insomnia," John P. Vourlis - One of those nice stories which provides enough clues to potentially solve the case before Holmes reveals the truth of the matter to Watson

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Elsensohn

    The idea, of course, is astonishing. However did you come up with it? It’s obvious, when you know what to observe. A mere few decades before the usual Lovecraftian tales, in the gaslight period. A reserved demeanor in the face of cosmic terrors. The irresolvable confrontation between logic and chaotic madness. It leads with the well-known gem by Neil Gaiman, “A Study in Emerald”, in which the protagonist’s genius is challenged by a secretive thespian… in a world where the stars already have been r The idea, of course, is astonishing. However did you come up with it? It’s obvious, when you know what to observe. A mere few decades before the usual Lovecraftian tales, in the gaslight period. A reserved demeanor in the face of cosmic terrors. The irresolvable confrontation between logic and chaotic madness. It leads with the well-known gem by Neil Gaiman, “A Study in Emerald”, in which the protagonist’s genius is challenged by a secretive thespian… in a world where the stars already have been right. Elizabeth Bear takes us on safari with Miss Adler. Steve Perry’s “The Case of the Wavy Black Dagger” is among my favorites, where a mysterious woman confronts Holmes in his hotel room in New York City, and shows herself to be his equal in intellect. Brian Stableford’s “Art in the Blood” comes quite close to a common theme in the Mythos, where Mycroft encounters a man tainted with an ancient bloodline. I feel that the book is rather front-loaded, as some of the latter stories are less coherent and riveting, or simply not quite up to the quality of both Holmes and the terror level of the Mythos. Yet there are a number of terribly good tales, for those in love with this flavor of vintage, confessional first-person narrative. I daresay if you delight in Doyle, you’ll appreciate the addition of that which cannot be rationalized. If you like Lovecraft, you should be fond of this kind of storytelling, although it focuses more upon persistent characters brushing against the Mythos rather than Lovecraft’s tendency to dissolve the narrator into madness.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Isabel (kittiwake)

    An anthology of Sherlock Holmes pastiches, in which the great detective's investigations lead him into the dark world imagined by H.P. Lovecraft. The book starts off well, as "A Study in Emerald" (the only one of the stories I have read before) has a satisfying twist in its tail, and it finishes equally satisfyingly with "A Nightmare in Wax". Holmes faces a wide variety of cases, but it was interesting that more than one author suggested that Dr. Watson had come across the Old Ones before, durin An anthology of Sherlock Holmes pastiches, in which the great detective's investigations lead him into the dark world imagined by H.P. Lovecraft. The book starts off well, as "A Study in Emerald" (the only one of the stories I have read before) has a satisfying twist in its tail, and it finishes equally satisfyingly with "A Nightmare in Wax". Holmes faces a wide variety of cases, but it was interesting that more than one author suggested that Dr. Watson had come across the Old Ones before, during his time as an army surgeon in Afghanistan, and several managed to fit in bees and beekeeping. There is one story featuring Colonel Sebastian Moran and Irene Adler, in which Holmes and Watson don't appear, and there are references in others to characters from other Victorian fantastic fiction, such as Dracula and Caresco Surhomme. The only problem with the book is that I didn't find any of the stories particularly frightening. I suppose that's bound to happen when you involve Sherlock Holmes, since the reader is expecting things to turn out more or less okay in the end, which is not something you can rely on when reading Lovecraft!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    A collection of stories that blend Sherlock Holmes with the Lovecraftian horrors - which is a rather interesting concept, because Holmes is known for deducing the truth while Lovecraftian horror often hinges on the undeductible. That said, it's often true that good detective fiction never really hinges on whether the crimes and mysteries are ultimately plausible or not; it's often the behaviour of people involved in them that is more interesting. And what would be more interesting than to see fa A collection of stories that blend Sherlock Holmes with the Lovecraftian horrors - which is a rather interesting concept, because Holmes is known for deducing the truth while Lovecraftian horror often hinges on the undeductible. That said, it's often true that good detective fiction never really hinges on whether the crimes and mysteries are ultimately plausible or not; it's often the behaviour of people involved in them that is more interesting. And what would be more interesting than to see familiar Holmes conventions put in work against the unspeakable horrors from beyond the stars? Of these stories, the first story, "A Study in Emerald" by Neil Gaiman, is probably the most awesome and inventive one, though little of it can be said without spoilers. "A Case of Royal Blood", "The Adventure of the Antiquarian's Niece", "A Case of Insomnia" and the final story "Nightmare in Wax" also stuck in mind as particularly intriguing examples. Overall, a very cool collection with nice stories.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    As a fan of Lovecraft and the Holmes stories I really wanted to like this more. However, apart from the excellent opening story by Neil Gaiman, I found the quality quite variable and few of the stories have stayed with me. Some authors handled the Holmes material well but didn't have a feeling for Lovecraft while in other stories the reverse was true. On paper the gaslight-tinted world of Sherlock Holmes should work well with the Poe-flavored preoccupations of Lovecraft. Unfortunately this book As a fan of Lovecraft and the Holmes stories I really wanted to like this more. However, apart from the excellent opening story by Neil Gaiman, I found the quality quite variable and few of the stories have stayed with me. Some authors handled the Holmes material well but didn't have a feeling for Lovecraft while in other stories the reverse was true. On paper the gaslight-tinted world of Sherlock Holmes should work well with the Poe-flavored preoccupations of Lovecraft. Unfortunately this book suggests that it is hard to write a Holmes pastiche, even harder to write a Lovecraft pastiche and almost impossible to combine the two. Perhaps there is a simple disconnect here - Holmes universe is analytical, calm and logical and Lovecraft's is constantly teetering on the edge of insanity. A fascinating exercise then, but not an entirely successful one.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic Premise: Sherlock Holmes + Chulhu mythos = AWESOMENESS Obviously, if you've never read anything by Lovecraft you won't understand the brilliance of these stories nearly as well as those who have. I'd recommend at least picking up a basic book of Lovecraft's stories before reading this. I think media uses Holmes enough for most people to be aware of who he is and not have to really have read any of Doyle's work to understand these stories, but doing so certainly would help. These stories ble Basic Premise: Sherlock Holmes + Chulhu mythos = AWESOMENESS Obviously, if you've never read anything by Lovecraft you won't understand the brilliance of these stories nearly as well as those who have. I'd recommend at least picking up a basic book of Lovecraft's stories before reading this. I think media uses Holmes enough for most people to be aware of who he is and not have to really have read any of Doyle's work to understand these stories, but doing so certainly would help. These stories blew my mind- the perfect fusion of horror and detective fiction. In particular, I loved Neil Gaiman's "A Study in Emerald." The price of the hardback was worth it for that tale alone, and there wasn't a bad story in the book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    As with any anthology, this one is a mixed bag of candy. As other reviewers have stated, the first story offered, “A Study in Emerald” is the best written of all. I found my favorite short tale in the middle of the book: “The horror of the many faces” by Tim Lebbon, has Watson witnessing a horrible murder by no less than Sherlock Holmes himself. The outcome is a perfect balance between ACD and Lovecraft’s styles. The book was worthy just for the two stories mentioned above, but I also enjoyed some As with any anthology, this one is a mixed bag of candy. As other reviewers have stated, the first story offered, “A Study in Emerald” is the best written of all. I found my favorite short tale in the middle of the book: “The horror of the many faces” by Tim Lebbon, has Watson witnessing a horrible murder by no less than Sherlock Holmes himself. The outcome is a perfect balance between ACD and Lovecraft’s styles. The book was worthy just for the two stories mentioned above, but I also enjoyed some other immensely: “The curious case of Miss Violet Stone”, “The adventure of the antiquarian’s niece”, “A case of insomnia” and a couple others I don’t recall now. Best to be read spread among winter evenings.

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