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The Thought of Pope Benedict XVI new edition: An Introduction to the Theology of Joseph Ratzinger

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Aidan Nichols' timely book is the first full-scale investigation of Joseph Ratzinger's theology, from the 1950s to the present day. It presents a chronological account of the development of Ratzinger's writing that reflects a wide range of historical and theoretical interests. A comprehensive introduction to a figure who is in his own right, quite apart from his significan Aidan Nichols' timely book is the first full-scale investigation of Joseph Ratzinger's theology, from the 1950s to the present day. It presents a chronological account of the development of Ratzinger's writing that reflects a wide range of historical and theoretical interests. A comprehensive introduction to a figure who is in his own right, quite apart from his significance in the politics of the Church, a major German Catholic theologian of the twentieth century. This new edition amplifies existing chapters by reference to books by Ratzinger between 1986/1987 and his election as Pope in 2005, and includes two new chapters - Judaism, Islam and other religions, and the secularization and future of Europe.


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Aidan Nichols' timely book is the first full-scale investigation of Joseph Ratzinger's theology, from the 1950s to the present day. It presents a chronological account of the development of Ratzinger's writing that reflects a wide range of historical and theoretical interests. A comprehensive introduction to a figure who is in his own right, quite apart from his significan Aidan Nichols' timely book is the first full-scale investigation of Joseph Ratzinger's theology, from the 1950s to the present day. It presents a chronological account of the development of Ratzinger's writing that reflects a wide range of historical and theoretical interests. A comprehensive introduction to a figure who is in his own right, quite apart from his significance in the politics of the Church, a major German Catholic theologian of the twentieth century. This new edition amplifies existing chapters by reference to books by Ratzinger between 1986/1987 and his election as Pope in 2005, and includes two new chapters - Judaism, Islam and other religions, and the secularization and future of Europe.

45 review for The Thought of Pope Benedict XVI new edition: An Introduction to the Theology of Joseph Ratzinger

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Estabrook

    Great stuff...i wish our ecclesiology professor would have read this...or anything by BXVI for that matter...as well as the rest of our seminary faculty...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Pessoa

    I am not a Catholic or Ratzinger fan but I share his dislike of relativism. Of course, Christianity doesn’t praise relativism in general, but Ratzinger has been especially adamant against it unlike his successor Francis I. Francis I is universally praised by many liberals as the most progressive pope. Being progressive is nice, yet it doesn’t necessarily translate into being right. Ratzinger has a point when he emphasizes that relativism undermines the common Ground in society. His diagnosis is I am not a Catholic or Ratzinger fan but I share his dislike of relativism. Of course, Christianity doesn’t praise relativism in general, but Ratzinger has been especially adamant against it unlike his successor Francis I. Francis I is universally praised by many liberals as the most progressive pope. Being progressive is nice, yet it doesn’t necessarily translate into being right. Ratzinger has a point when he emphasizes that relativism undermines the common Ground in society. His diagnosis is right. On April 13, 2018, while I was reading this book, the US launched airstrikes against the Syrian regime led by Bashar al-Assad under the dubious accusations that he had used chemical weapons. It didn’t make sense, especially because he was winning the war and killing 40 civilians with chemical weapons was too stupid and ineffective. Radical Islamist rebels flaunted the victims by sharing their videos. There was not a single proof that Assad did it despite the ready availability of technology on rebels’ hands to document it. Years ago, Iraq under Saddam Hussein was accused of having weapons of mass destruction, and the US invaded the country using that lie as a pretext and never found a single weapon of mass destruction. Similarly, the US took the action in Syria without waiting for the investigation to produce a preliminary report. The New York Times supported the airstrikes and didn’t mention that there was not a single solid proof against Assad. Even the comments by readers they cherry-pick supported the airstrikes. This is the insidious result of relativism. Everything can matter therefore you can obfuscate truths you don’t like. One of the most trusted news sources in the world easily censors a simple truth without repercussions. A lie is no less valuable than truth. The Enlightenment sought truth in turbulent seas. It made mistakes, it blundered a lot, but it was earnest. It pursued truth. Today’s liberals stare at waves and think that’s all that matters. Therefore the papacy of Benedict XVI was a breath of fresh air. He stood against The New York Times and their ilk. Nichols writes, “He [Ratzinger] finds the illuminating comparison he is seeking in the history of philosophy where such thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, 'remain the originating figures of an enduring approach to the Ground of what is.'” A search for a common ground is important because “Pluralist democracy has not shown itself capable of uniting citizens in a deep-rooted adhesion to a common form of life. Economic crises bring it to a precipice, shifts in the life of the spirit threaten to remove the ground from beneath its feet.” (p. 187) Pope Benedict XVI dared to do an extraordinary thing for our age. His quest was to weaken diseased relativism. That is why he always looked like an angry circus clown. Toward the end of the book, Nichols notes Kierkegaard's celebrated analogy for the Christian preacher, an apt description of Benedict XVI: “A circus clown was desperately trying to deliver a deadly serious message. When he found that people took his warning about a forest fire as knock-about, he got even more worked up - which only made his hearers laugh the more until in the end their village and they themselves were engulfed in flames.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    suggested by a student at école Cathédrale very clear

  4. 5 out of 5

    Neil Bakker

  5. 5 out of 5

    Steve Walker

  6. 5 out of 5

    Josh B

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jan Kristensson

  8. 5 out of 5

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  9. 4 out of 5

    Jean

  10. 5 out of 5

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  11. 5 out of 5

    Anita

  12. 4 out of 5

    Estefano Kvastek

  13. 5 out of 5

    James Wurzler

  14. 4 out of 5

    EMIL ANTON

  15. 4 out of 5

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  16. 5 out of 5

    Augustin Francis

  17. 5 out of 5

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  18. 5 out of 5

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  20. 5 out of 5

    Brett Salkeld

  21. 4 out of 5

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  22. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Visperas

  23. 4 out of 5

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  24. 4 out of 5

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  26. 4 out of 5

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  27. 5 out of 5

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  28. 4 out of 5

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  30. 5 out of 5

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  31. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Blosser

  32. 5 out of 5

    Brian Reagan

  33. 5 out of 5

    Vikk Simmons

  34. 4 out of 5

    Simon

  35. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  36. 5 out of 5

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  37. 4 out of 5

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  38. 4 out of 5

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  39. 5 out of 5

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  40. 5 out of 5

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  41. 5 out of 5

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  42. 5 out of 5

    David Williams

  43. 5 out of 5

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  44. 5 out of 5

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  45. 5 out of 5

    Jan-Jaap van Peperstraten

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