web site hit counter The Predator - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Predator

Availability: Ready to download

Marco never wanted to be an Animorph. He never wanted the ability to change into any animal he touches. He just wants to chill. Whatever happens, happens.


Compare

Marco never wanted to be an Animorph. He never wanted the ability to change into any animal he touches. He just wants to chill. Whatever happens, happens.

30 review for The Predator

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    The Predator is strangely named. I've been sitting here for twenty minutes trying to figure out who exactly the predator is in this book, and I still don't have a definite answer. This book is nominally about the Animorphs trying to carry out Ax's plan of luring a Yeerk ship to the ground, stealing it, and then hightailing it back to Andalite space (where, theoretically, he can send reinforcements back to the Animorphs), but really, it's about Marco finally committing to the mission. Until now, h The Predator is strangely named. I've been sitting here for twenty minutes trying to figure out who exactly the predator is in this book, and I still don't have a definite answer. This book is nominally about the Animorphs trying to carry out Ax's plan of luring a Yeerk ship to the ground, stealing it, and then hightailing it back to Andalite space (where, theoretically, he can send reinforcements back to the Animorphs), but really, it's about Marco finally committing to the mission. Until now, he's been the most reluctant of the group, only going along at times due to wanting to help Jake, being shamed by Rachel or Cassie, because something drastic happened that he could help with in the moment, or simply because he saw a mission as low risk or fun. But now on the two year anniversary of his mom's death with his father still devastated emotionally, he realizes that he can't keep going and risk that his dad will have two family members to mourn instead of one. I was looking forward to our first Marco book particularly, because he was my favorite character when I was a kid. I found his inane jokes and inability to be serious quite charming and hilarious. (I seem to remember there will be an incident with a Baby Ruth thrown into a pool in our near future?) I knew theoretically that Marco's humor was a coping mechanism, but it's only now reading through the eyes of an adult that that idea actually holds resonance for me. In fact, part of the reason I'm only rating this one 3.5 stars is because I don't think Applegate hit that nail hard enough. The beginning of the book especially is curiously light on Marco introspection, and even after the big reveal at the end, he never really comes out and says what he's feeling. Maybe Marco is just more cagey than the others, but I really thought the first four books did a much better job of tying the POV characters' emotional arc to what was happening in the plot. And things did pick up in that respect by the end. The first half of the book is them having wacky adventures with Ax, basically. They take Ax to the mall (to visit Radio Shack! RIP) so he can get the parts to build the fake Yeerk distress beacon that will hopefully call down a Yeerk ship from the sky, but he can't control his human morph yet. He keeps running off to buy food (he discovers the sense of taste for the first time and FREAKS OUT--also, this book was published before Starbucks was mainstream, and Applegate actually clarifies that it's a coffee place, which I find adorable). Ax also won't shut up making mouth sounds because he's never had a mouth before. I found his behavior unbelievably hilarious as a young person, but reading it now I was just like AX BE COOL PEOPLE ARE LOOKING. And then, they have to somehow find a z-space transponder, which does not come standard packaging at Radio Shack, so they decide to break in to Chapman's secret basement and steal one of his, using brand new ant morphs. IT IS AN EXCELLENT PLAN. The ant incident is yet another example of ways this series takes it to a level you don't expect in a children's book series. The kids are horrified by the experience of being ants, not least because Applegate portrays being in an ant's mind as being existentially terrifying. They have no sense of self, because they are hive insects. And on top of that, as they are escaping Chapman's house, they are attacked by thousands of ants from an enemy colony and almost die. Like, limbs ripped off, eyes gouged out, almost bitten in half died for real. I know it is a children's book series so I should probably cut it some slack for not going more in depth on this incident, but as much as I like the idea of it, I wasn't totally sold on the execution. It happened too fast for me to really feel that terror that so badly traumatizes the kids, and they are traumatized. All of them have nightmares, Rachel has a full on PTSD breakdown in the cafeteria the next day, and Marco solidifies his decision to quit the group after this last mission. Until, that is, their plan (view spoiler)[goes to shit, because it turns out the Yeerks aren't as incompetent as the kids hoped, and spot the trickery immediately, turning the Animorphs' trap into a trap of their own. They are taken captive and brought onto the Yeerk mother ship up in space (which leads to a neat moment where all of them except Ax realize they are in space for the first time, and look down upon Earth). Visser Three plans to parade them in front of Visser One to gain points, because apparently they are rivals and hate each other a ton. I actually really like that they are caught. They are still new at this, and even Ax is just a kid. It would be completely unbelievable if all of their plans worked and they thwarted the Yeerks all the time. They are inexperienced, and it shows. (Their capture also makes clear that having Ax around is handy for showing the Yeerks that they are in fact Andalites, and potentially staving off any questioning that they might be other than Andalite, if they play it right.) Anyway, so Visser One turns out to be Marco's mom. This revelation BLEW MY MIND when I first read this book. I would complain about it being a convenient way to get Marco's head in the game, but it was clearly planned from the beginning, and also, it doesn't just work as shock value. It gives Marco hope to keep fighting, and it sets the stage for some interesting future developments. I mean, it's even potentially more interesting of a revelation that Visser One and Visser Three are enemies than it is that Marco's mom is Visser One. None of the other Animorphs except Jake recognize Marco's mom, and he wants to keep it that way. But all of them understand the significance of that rivalry, especially when Visser One releases them from custody (making it look like an escape) just to hurt Visser Three's cred. I mean, either she's very stupid, or very confident. Although, I guess the "Andalite Bandits" are a pretty low threat at the moment, but it won't stay that way for long. It also tells us something about the Yeerk mindset, that their petty rivalry could actually get in the way of making smart tactical decisions for the good of the group. (hide spoiler)] We've now had POV books for all of the characters except for Ax, but if I remember correctly, the table is essentially set, and future books really start to play around. [3.5 stars]

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    FIRST REVIEW / MAR 9, 2015 "I AM INCAPABLE OF BEING OBJECTIVE ABOUT ANIMORPHS IN GENERAL AND MARCO IN PARTICULAR": A Life. Except that I do think this one is a very good book due to their experience morphing ants (hands down one of the most terrifying moments in the entire series IMO, has lodged itself in my memory forever), and the lobster (also a moment which I thought of every time I eat lobster, whoops), and the twist at the end. Just, so good. So gutting, and sets in motion a really long-term FIRST REVIEW / MAR 9, 2015 "I AM INCAPABLE OF BEING OBJECTIVE ABOUT ANIMORPHS IN GENERAL AND MARCO IN PARTICULAR": A Life. Except that I do think this one is a very good book due to their experience morphing ants (hands down one of the most terrifying moments in the entire series IMO, has lodged itself in my memory forever), and the lobster (also a moment which I thought of every time I eat lobster, whoops), and the twist at the end. Just, so good. So gutting, and sets in motion a really long-term arc. And now he's got his motivation, too. --------------------------------- SECOND REVIEW / JAN 28, 2020 Marco was my favourite Animorph when I first read this series as a kid, and even his very first book quickly reminds me why, and why he's still so near-and-dear to my heart now: his way of using humour as a deflecting defense mechanism, his sharp sense for strategy and tactics, his love for his father and attempts to keep his diminished family together (even struggling with poverty in a way that Jake, Rachel, and Cassie don't). The way he tries to quit the team, because he's already had enough -- and how can you blame him, considering the absolute horror of his near-death as a dolphin in the previous book, and the lobster and ant experiences in this book -- and the way the war sucks him back in, in the most gutting and life-ruining way possible. The Message underscored the importance of Cassie's presence on the team as its heart and conscience and empathetic understanding, but this book also highlights the importance of Marco's role as the comedic relief: he works hard to keep their spirits up, to keep the mood jolly even when they're staring down the barrel of an awful, awful death. It's his own way of coping with the circumstances they're in, but it's such a necessary ingredient within the group, too: each Animorphs occupies such a crucial spot within the team, all their personalities a carefully-calibrated gyroscope. The team would fall apart if they were missing just one of them. I got especially verklempt at anything to do with Marco's father; plus Marco's emotional vulnerability about his mother, and the way he's already had to shoulder a burden that no pre-teen should have to. He might cultivate an immature facade with his jokes and joshing around, but he's anything but. I love him!!! Favourite quotes moved to Google Docs.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Marie

    How on earth did I ever forget THAT?? #plottwist

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kara Babcock

    We arrive at the last of the introductions to the original five Animorphs: Marco, no last name (as usual). He is, in our Animorph boy band, the Funny One (not the Pretty One, though he might try to sell you on that). (Debate which of the other Animorphs are which boy band stereotype in the comments!) He has spent the past four novels providing comic relief, sometimes at the most inopportune times, and generally being a dick to Tobias and Rachel, because he is scared shitless the Yeerks will kill We arrive at the last of the introductions to the original five Animorphs: Marco, no last name (as usual). He is, in our Animorph boy band, the Funny One (not the Pretty One, though he might try to sell you on that). (Debate which of the other Animorphs are which boy band stereotype in the comments!) He has spent the past four novels providing comic relief, sometimes at the most inopportune times, and generally being a dick to Tobias and Rachel, because he is scared shitless the Yeerks will kill him and leave his dad alone. OK, we didn’t learn that last part until now, so I guess we should cut Marco some slack. Seriously though, dude’s mom just vanished two years ago. No body. No note. We learn why—turns out she is Visser Freaking One, or at least that’s the rank of the Yeerk in her head. And now she is back on Earth, or at least parked in orbit, apparently just to rile up the incompetent but deadly Visser Three in an intergalactic game of “Come at me, bro.” The whole Visser One/Visser Three power struggle subplot is both hilarious and painful. I get what Applegate is trying to do. It’s clever and definitely done in a way kids will understand. But I still don’t quite see what the objective is for Visser One. She claims she has come back to check up on the invasion of Earth, and then she has her personal Hork-Bajir guard let the Animorphs escape from Visser Three’s Bladeship to embarrass him … and then what? What is her game plan? Oh, god, Applegate has me hooked and asking questions just like a teenage kid. You win this time, Katherine. I’m sure that the “Visser One is Marco’s mom” is a twist that past!me never saw coming. Even reading it now, it isn’t obvious—from the way Marco recounts his mother’s disappearance, the reader might assume she was taken as a Controller. But even once Ax breaks the news that Visser One is in town, the connection isn’t there until they are aboard the Bladeship. Speaking of Ax, let’s talk about our newest boy band member (I guess he’s the Alien One?). I love human!Ax and his obsession with food, and the confusion that he creates in his first-ever trip to the mall is hilarious. Despite comic relief not coming from Marco, Ax displays the warning signs of being a plot device for Applegate’s use (TVTropes), when it turns out that he just so happens to know how to build a Yeerk distress transmitter out of spare parts. I’m not saying it’s improbable, just that it’s very convenient. Also, in the ongoing lexicon of dated references, they went to Radio Shack. That was still a thing. (Note that I live in Canada; Radio Shack abandoned us in 2004, morphing into “the Source by Circuit City” and generally sucking even more. I hear it isn’t doing great in the States these days either.) Lastly, the ants. Applegate deserves a lot of credit here for continuing to push the envelop of how she explores morphing ability. It’s not enough for the Animorphs to just turn into animals. She’s always trying to find new ways to describe the experience, and in the end, to explore what it means to be human, as opposed to being a different creature. Her depiction of the Animorphs’ time as ants here is amazing in its breadth and creepiness. From their Kafkaesque horror as they find themselves subsumed into the hive mind of the ant colony instincts to the existential terror as they are nearly torn limb-from-limb by other ants, the Animorphs do not have a good time. And that’s before Visser Three captures them and nearly discovers their secret. So the Animorphs get captured (because their brilliant plan goes horribly awry and none of us could have seen it coming)—boo! But they get away—yay! But Marco’s mom is Visser One—boo! But Ax is a pretty human who likes food—yay! But everyone is psychologically scarred from trying to morph ants—boo! But Marco’s dad seems to have snapped out of his pity-fest and is trying to get his old job back—yay! Next time, Jake becomes a Controller, and shit gets real. We’ll look at the Animorphs’ first real grapple with the moral complexities of war and what, I would argue, is their first real victory. My reviews of Animorphs: ← #4: The Message | #6: The Capture →

  5. 5 out of 5

    Claire Chibi

    Rating: 4.5 Marco is easily my favourite character now, (Rachel was my favourite as a child, she's still awesome buuuuuuut...) I actually love that he's significantly more pessimistic, selfish (and by selfish I that mean he has a much higher sense of self-preservation), and outwardly afraid than the others. These kids are in such a dangerous and terrifying situation, I feel that it's a good thing to have a character who acknowledges this and isn't just super brave all the time. Because it's ok to Rating: 4.5 Marco is easily my favourite character now, (Rachel was my favourite as a child, she's still awesome buuuuuuut...) I actually love that he's significantly more pessimistic, selfish (and by selfish I that mean he has a much higher sense of self-preservation), and outwardly afraid than the others. These kids are in such a dangerous and terrifying situation, I feel that it's a good thing to have a character who acknowledges this and isn't just super brave all the time. Because it's ok to not be brave all the time. I feel like a book like this would never fly today. It depicts some pretty graphic violence towards the characters while they're in animal form, which is quite interesting (is that the right word?). If the kids had been in human form during those scenes, even in the 90s, I'm sure this book wouldn't have made it to publishing. I feel like if this series came out recently, PETA or something would have a lot to say about how we treat the suffering of humans so differently from other animals 😂 (view spoiler)[I read 20+ of these books when I was a kid. I knew that Marco's mother was Visser One. BUT I SOMEHOW TOTALLY FORGOT? It took me until Marco putting heavy emphasis on his mother having gone missing (rather than being confirmed dead) to remember this. Tfw a series manages to get you with the same plot twist 2 times 😂 (hide spoiler)]

  6. 5 out of 5

    Fox

    Animorphs was the defining series of my childhood. More than any other this book series shaped me into the person I would become, it ignited the interest in animals that is my driving force to this day, and instilled within me the moral groundwork that defined my values as an adult. Animorphs was everything to me - and now for the first time since the books were published I'm doing a full reread of the series. Thank you, Clara. Marco was one the Animorphs that I least related to when I first read Animorphs was the defining series of my childhood. More than any other this book series shaped me into the person I would become, it ignited the interest in animals that is my driving force to this day, and instilled within me the moral groundwork that defined my values as an adult. Animorphs was everything to me - and now for the first time since the books were published I'm doing a full reread of the series. Thank you, Clara. Marco was one the Animorphs that I least related to when I first read through the series. I enjoyed his wisecracks - everyone did - but his hesitancy to be part of the team was something that frustrated me. It's only upon rereading that I truly appreciate the position Marco found himself in. His mother drowned two years ago, the body never found. Losing his wife broke his father, and his father has been wasting away at menial work since then. Marco's poor, having to fend for himself. His father couldn't stand losing his son in addition to losing his wife - could he? It's a delicate situation and written better than I ever gave it credit for being written. The plot of this book is relatively simple enough. Ax wants to go home. The Andalite homeworld is approximately 82 light years from where they are now... they'll need to steal a Yeerk ship to get to it. Ax seems to think this will be a simple enough task, after all. He can build a device that will send out a distress call and they can hijack it. What could go wrong? Turns out... everything. From Ax being distracted by the newfound sense of taste in his human morph to them realizing belatedly that they'll need to steal a piece of technology for the device that humans just haven't invented yet. This is the book with the ant morphs. The terrifying awful ant morphs that have haunted me all these years. This is the book with a twist that was so satisfying and upsetting that I'd pushed it out of my head. This is a solid Animorph book and one that I'm surprised didn't stick with me better after so much time. Can't wait to read more.

  7. 4 out of 5

    robbie cowman

    H O L Y F U C K These books have ALWAYS impressed me, but this one. Oh my FUCKING dog..........So good. Marco is a gem and 100% my favorite character at this point.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nemo (The Moonlight Library)

    Brought to you by The Moonlight Library! In Book #5, newly rescued Andalite cadet Ax decides he’d like to go home, so the group decide to hijack a Yeerk Bug fighter. Marco’s first time narrating an Animorphs book is another one you really don’t want to miss. There are two stand-out sequences: one is when the Animorphs morph ants to infiltrate Chapman’s house and steal a piece of equipment so stranded Andalite Ax can make a Yeerk distress beacon and steal a Bug ship to go home to the Andalite home Brought to you by The Moonlight Library! In Book #5, newly rescued Andalite cadet Ax decides he’d like to go home, so the group decide to hijack a Yeerk Bug fighter. Marco’s first time narrating an Animorphs book is another one you really don’t want to miss. There are two stand-out sequences: one is when the Animorphs morph ants to infiltrate Chapman’s house and steal a piece of equipment so stranded Andalite Ax can make a Yeerk distress beacon and steal a Bug ship to go home to the Andalite home world. Sounds convaluted, but focus on the ant part. Previously, Marco had morphed a lobster to escape detection and almost been boiled alive. The ant is ten times worse – no, a hundred times worse. The ants have no individual consciousness, and the complete and utter take over of their minds leaves the Animorphs shattered. not only that, but on the return journey they are attacked by an army of ants whose colony they don’t belong to. It’s a pretty horrific sequences, and even though it only lasts a few pages, it makes a memorable impact. This is Applegate’s strength in these books: what it’s like to be a human mind in an animal as animal things happen. Because, let’s face it, ant wars happen every day. The other sequence that stands out is when Marco finds out his missing-presumed-deceased mother is in fact the host body for Visser One, the most powerful Yeerk outside of the Council of Thirteen. Because this is Marco’s first book, we get a strong look at how he and his dad have dealt with Eva’s death. Marco’s dad hasn’t coped, which is why Marco is so reluctant to be an Animorph. But this is the moment that changed his mind. Like with Rachel in Book #2, the fight has now become personal. The Yeerks took Marco’s mother away and in the process tore a family apart, leaving his dad with severe depression and forcing Marco to grow up very quickly. While it’s sad that it takes making the war personal for Marco to fight, I do understand where Applegate is coming from. Not everyone can be as heroic as Jake, or as brave as Rachel. All of the Animorphs have their own issues to deal with, and with this book we’ve finally found them all. Although Marco is considered the ‘funny one’ of the group, there is always a lot of humour when Ax morphs a human, and this is our first glimpse at how he reacts to the new sense of taste. It’s hilariously funny, if a little scary at times, and well worth the read. For continuity purposes, you’d be better off not skipping this one.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    March 2, 2020 re-read:    Time for our fifth and final human Animorph to find his reason to fight! Marco has always been reluctant to be an Animorph, and now we learn why: his mother died two years ago at sea. Her death destroyed his dad, sending him into a deep depression, and Marco knows that if anything were to happen to him, his dad would never recover (not that he can really call his dad “recovered” from his mom’s death, not by any real stretch). Missions gone awry one after another in this March 2, 2020 re-read:    Time for our fifth and final human Animorph to find his reason to fight! Marco has always been reluctant to be an Animorph, and now we learn why: his mother died two years ago at sea. Her death destroyed his dad, sending him into a deep depression, and Marco knows that if anything were to happen to him, his dad would never recover (not that he can really call his dad “recovered” from his mom’s death, not by any real stretch). Missions gone awry one after another in this book (not to mention from the previous books) only reinforce for Marco just how much he doesn’t want to be doing this – from nearly getting boiled alive as a lobster to the terror that is the ant colony mind (and one of the few times we get to see what an actual Animorph nightmare is like), he’s ready to be out after this next mission to try and help Ax contact the Andalite homeworld. Well, I don’t accept [the inevitable]. That’s what they want. This book also sees Ax be a member of the team for the first time – well, more a member apart than an integrated member. It’s interesting to see what Marco observes of him, right down to interpreting what ‘surprise’ looks like on an Andalite. It’ll be interesting to see as books go on who notices Ax’s facial/emotional expressions, as the main one we’d seen until this point is just “smiling with the eyes”, and I don’t remember how much detail we usually get describing Ax’s expressions beyond that (if any?). There’s also still a fair amount of world-building going on. This time, we get to see more of the Yeerk hierarchy and even a dash of their internal subversive politics. We also get to see a bit more of why Marco is the jokester of the team – because it’s better to laugh than be sad, a lesson he learned from his mom and has taken to heart. And a lesson that is going to prove itself helpful and so very important time and again as this series progresses. I also am continuing to enjoy noticing the little indications scattered here and there which note the team’s dynamics, even the little things like wolf-Cassie leaning into tiger-Jake, or Marco realizing that Tobias has to worry about other predators in life in addition to the Yeerk battle, or when Ax pulls off a good battle move and Marco thinks, “I decided right then – I kind of liked Ax.” (page 143). The latter is also further support for what Michael Grant made canon following a tweet on the subject – that Marco is bisexual. They say the devil’s in the details, but some of the best stuff is also in the details – the details give us the nuances, the depth, and set things up to come. And I love every minute of it. Quotable quotes: Here’s what Rachel’ll say whenever we decide to do something so dangerous […] “I’m in! Let’s go! Let’s do it!” – page 12 Andalite surprise: main eyes widen, stalk eyes stretch to maximum height – page 20 [Ax] had found a piece of Cinnabun. – page 37 – Ah, the addiction starts early… Lots of people think only humans fight wars. That only humans are murderous. Let me tell you something – compared to ants, human beings are full of nothing but peace, love, and understanding. – page 92 [The nightmare ant experience] had gotten to all of us. […] It was too much. This wasn’t how life was supposed to be. One of us would snap. One of us would lose it. It could happen, even to strong people. – page 94 I looked, as the dracon beams formed […] each armed with a Dracon beam. -- page 114 – I think that first “dracon” should actually be capitalized. Maybe it is in the re-issue; I’ll have to check it out at some point. [Cassie said to Ax, < ] Nothing is your fault. > It was true. But sometimes, when everything hits the fan, you don’t want the truth. You just wanted someone to blame. – page 125 Ax said, < My people have a saying – grace is the acceptance of the inevitable. > < Yeah? > I said suddenly. < Well, I don’t accept. That’s what they want. They want the entire human race to lie down and accept the inevitable. > -- page 136 (this is also the preclude to the first quote under the cut for my 2015 review) Original Review: April 21, 2015     This time, it is Marco's turn to narrate, and to find his reason to fight, or not fight. He has every reason not to -- he's all his dad has left.     Ax is a good infusion of humor -- between Marco and Ax, there's not going to be any lack of humorous moments, even when things get really rough.     Some quotes that stood out to me:     If Klingons were real, they would be scared of Hork-Bajir. -- page 112     < The higher the danger, the higher the honor, > Ax said. < Is this not true? >     I gave Rachel a sidelong look. "I think we've found your future husband." -- page 20     "So far, so good," Jake said as we headed into the mall.     I rolled my eyes. "Jake? Do me a favor. Don't ever say 'so far, so good.' The only time anyone ever says 'so far, so good' is right before everything blows up in his face."     "So far. So far. Farrrrr. Faaaar," Ax said, trying out the sounds. "So. Sssso far so so so good."     "Oh, man," I said. -- page 29     "Sticky," Ax said. "Must I carry this?" he asked, indicating his empty coffee cup.     "No, you can just throw it away."     Bad choice of words. Ax threw the coffee cup. He threw it hard. It hit one of the cashiers in the head. -- page 36     "Jake, I don't want to be a bug. I've been a gorilla, an osprey a dolphin, a seagull, a trout, of all things, a lobster ... and I'm probably forgetting a few. Gorilla was fun. Dolphin was fun. Osprey was fun. Ant? Not fun. Basically, bugs are a bad idea."     Jake shrugged. "I was a flea. That was no big thing." He grinned like he'd made the world's funniest joke. "Seriously, it was like nothing. I couldn't see anything. I could barely hear anything, just vibrations. All I knew was I liked warm bodies and whenever I got hungry I just poked a hole in some warm skin."     "And sucked blood."     He looked a little uncomfortable. "Well, it was Rachel's blood. Kind of. I mean, okay, it was cat blood, but Rachel was morphing the cat."     "Jake? Do you ever listen to yourself?"     "I try not to think about it," he admitted. -- page 66     < These are excellent eyes! > Ax said. < Far better than your human eyes. Even better than my Andalite eyes. >     < Yes, birds of prey usually have great daytime vision, > Tobias said. < I think mine may actually be a little better than yours, though. >     < I doubt that, > Ax said. < It is hard to imagine better vision than this. >     < Remember the good old days? > I asked. < When we used to argue over who had the best jump shot? Now it's who has the best bird eyes. > -- page 104-105     If something deadly can ever be beautiful, it's a tiger.     < Bet I could kick your butt, > I said to Jake.     < Yeah, monkey boy? I don't think so. >     < Hey, I could stomp both of you, > Rachel said. She walked closer, swinging her trunk and flaring her ears out. A moving mountain.     < This is so mature, > Cassie said. < Arguing over who could beat who. >     < Hah. You're only saying that because we can all kick your butt, wolfie, > I pointed out.     < As if! > Cassie protested. < You'd have to catch me first. And I could still be running long after the three of you were worn out and fast asleep. > -- page 109     More under the spoiler: (view spoiler)[     Ax said, < My people have a saying -- grace is the acceptance of the inevitable. > [...]     [Marco said] < I have a saying for you. I got it from a fortune cookie. 'Fall down seven times, get up eight.' You know what that means? That means you don't ever just lie there. You always get up. You always come back for more. You never surrender. Maybe you die, but you never surrender. > -- page136-7     < Ahhhhhhh! >     < Rachel! > I heard Tobias cry.     < It's okay. I found the drop shaft. I am ... dropping. >     < What is it?> I asked.     < An elevator without a floor, > Rachel answered. -- page 144     It's better to laugh than to cry, don't you think?     I do.     Even when the world is scary and sad. Especially when the world is scary and sad. That's when you need to laugh. -- page 149 (hide spoiler)]

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Pongratz

    Five animal-morphing stars for this one! This is the fifth book in KA Applegate's series Animorphs and this time we continue the adventure in Marco's POV. I have to say, Marco is probably my least favorite character so far due to his constant skepticism, but I have to say, his personality is consistent and understandable given his family situation. This time around, Ax comes up with a plan to steal a Bug Fighter ship from the Yeerks in hopes of escaping Earth to warn the Andalite world about how Five animal-morphing stars for this one! This is the fifth book in KA Applegate's series Animorphs and this time we continue the adventure in Marco's POV. I have to say, Marco is probably my least favorite character so far due to his constant skepticism, but I have to say, his personality is consistent and understandable given his family situation. This time around, Ax comes up with a plan to steal a Bug Fighter ship from the Yeerks in hopes of escaping Earth to warn the Andalite world about how severe the situation on Earth is. The Animorphs' quickly set on this impossible mission, with new terrifying near-death experiences to boot. Will the Animorphs' achieve their goal, or are they in over their heads? The action was spot on this time around. The plot took turns that were very unpredictable, and I just love that about this series. Every time I think I know what's going to happen, BAM! Sudden right turn! Although Marco is still my least-favorite character, this book helped me understand why he is the way he is in such a short time. Pretty hard to pull that off. Nothing but mad respect for the author and this crazy roller coaster ride that I'm on. Definitely worth a read!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ash

    wow!! im sad!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Trin

    Two amazing things happen in this one: First, there's a lot of Ax. I love Ax. Give me all the non-humans having to pretend to be human. Give it to me all day. Thank you. Second, Jake has to explain what a Starbucks is. He has to clarify for Marco (and the reader) that it is a coffee place. Wow! The '90s were such an innocent time, man. Less innocent: already, these kids. Only five books in and I'm pretty sure every single one of them already has PTSD. Two amazing things happen in this one: First, there's a lot of Ax. I love Ax. Give me all the non-humans having to pretend to be human. Give it to me all day. Thank you. Second, Jake has to explain what a Starbucks is. He has to clarify for Marco (and the reader) that it is a coffee place. Wow! The '90s were such an innocent time, man. Less innocent: already, these kids. Only five books in and I'm pretty sure every single one of them already has PTSD.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Re-reading the series up to where I left off, then finishing the series off. I can't believe how short these books are compared to how long they felt when I read them in elementary school! Re-reading the series up to where I left off, then finishing the series off. I can't believe how short these books are compared to how long they felt when I read them in elementary school!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lo

    MARCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dichotomy Girl

    (view spoiler)[ The second they reiterated that the body of Marco's Mom had never been found I was like...I see what's going on here... (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[ The second they reiterated that the body of Marco's Mom had never been found I was like...I see what's going on here... (hide spoiler)]

  16. 5 out of 5

    Weathervane

    Here at last is a little taste of Marco, the series' obligatory wisecracker and infusion of levity into what otherwise might be an oppressively dark story. Out of all the Animorphs, he is perhaps the one without which it is hardest to imagine the series. As a kid he was my favourite, with good reason -- he always knew just what wry comment to drop to bring a smile to your face and prevent the group's discussion from traveling in a straight, predictable line. In doing so he came across as cunning Here at last is a little taste of Marco, the series' obligatory wisecracker and infusion of levity into what otherwise might be an oppressively dark story. Out of all the Animorphs, he is perhaps the one without which it is hardest to imagine the series. As a kid he was my favourite, with good reason -- he always knew just what wry comment to drop to bring a smile to your face and prevent the group's discussion from traveling in a straight, predictable line. In doing so he came across as cunning, a bit brighter than the rest, and the type of guy you'd love to hang out and play video games with. What boy wouldn't want to be Marco? Plus, he cut through Jake's ponderous deliberation and Cassie's moralization and Rachel's dumb impulsiveness and Tobias's girly petulant gloominess and Ax's stoic traditionalism like a white-hot knife. He was smart without being over-analytical, aggressive only if necessary, and paid no regard to any type of orthodoxy or unnecessary adherence to convention. He was, in a word, practical. I would say in his thinking he was the most masculine of them all: to Marco, it wasn't that the ends justified the means -- he didn't think about the means, not unless challenged. His focus was about getting the job done. Amorality was both his incredible material strength and his frightening spiritual weakness. There was a difficulty in the plot, though. Applegate and Grant -- her co-writer husband -- were typically very faithful to the characters they created, even if some of the later ghostwriters liked to play it loose. But Marco, being almost stiflingly -- for a writer's job -- practical and self-interested, had a problematic absence of motivation. This wasn't the type of guy who would casually throw himself, again and again, into mortal danger, and especially not simply because his friends were doing it. Initially -- and I suppose even by the end -- the only person in the group Marco was truly close with was Jake. And as much as he loved Jake, Marco wasn't the self-sacrificial type. Moreover, he had to worry about taking care of his dad, who had already lost one part of his family and wouldn't be able to cope with losing the other. So the question is, how do you get this guy to participate in class? Jake is duty-bound and wants to save his brother besides; Cassie has a deep moral conviction -- which does clash with her innate pacifism --; Tobias has nothing left to lose, and the struggle at least provides him with some type of community and purpose; Rachel is addicted to adrenaline and loves the fight for its own sake; Ax, aside from being dutiful like Jake, has a personal vendetta against Visser Three, wants to live up to his brother's memory, and has been inculcated since birth with the values of a warrior culture. Only Marco really lacks the emotional push necessary to throw himself wholeheartedly into the war effort, and that's a challenge for the writers. How do you give Marco a powerful reason to fight that doesn't come across as shoe-horned or hackneyed? And how do you do it without repeating the reasons you've given the other characters? Well, here's one way: Make Marco's presumed-dead mother Visser One. Quaker's Instant Motivation: Just add water! I think this is the first time the series begins to feel a bit too reliant on convenient happenstance, but it certainly isn't the last. Jake's brother being a controller is entirely plausible. Rachel's friend Melissa's dad being Vice Principal Chapman and a high-level Controller -- also reasonable. Marco's missing mother turning up as the military commander of the entire Yeerk force? Come the hell on! What are the chances that this tiny group of kids, in the most populous US state, includes the son of Visser One's human host? As that girl from BoJack Horseman says, "That's too much, man!" But it doesn't end there. We later discover, several books down the road, that Tobias is Ax's brother. Not only that, but the Animorphs were basically hand-picked to be superheroes by a Q-like God-entity named the Ellimist. Now that last bit has always made me wonder: Was this development ad-hoc when Applegate and Grant realized they had strained credulity too much with the past plot twists, or were they gunning for this "divine plan" storytelling from the beginning? It's hard for me to say, but what I can say definitively is that I don't like it. One of the appeals of Animorphs to me is its relatively earthy nature -- the characters are grounded and real. I love the notion of these kids being thrown into an intergalactic conflict by a stroke of bad luck, and their struggle to cope even as they lack the material and emotional resources to do so. This didn't start as a "chosen one" narrative, like Harry Potter or Star Wars or any other story following Campbell's now-overused Hero's Journey. (Yeah, yeah, I know it's a "tale as old as time," but enough is enough. The "special chosen boy who saves the world" is exhausted. How about a group of regular people doing their best with a crappy situation?) Yet as the series progresses, increasingly the importance of free will is overshadowed by fate. These kids didn't just stumble into a war they weren't ready for -- no, they were specially chosen by an all-powerful, all-seeing cosmic being for their specific attributes! This is akin to making God a character in your story, and boy is it lame. The very romance of fate as a concept is that it's something to be wondered about -- are we here for a reason? Can I face the struggles before me? Is there a purpose to my suffering? Is anything worth doing in the grand scheme of things? Having a character pop in to say "yeah, you're here 'cause I said so, don't worry -- I'm omniscient and I picked you for a reason" undercuts the great human questions and places the story entirely apart from reality, from the actual drama of life. (In the final book, Rachel, post-death and on-screen, asks "God" if she mattered. He tells her that she did. I disapprove.) It becomes a work of theology or myth and separates from our lived experience -- who can relate to characters definitively chosen by God? This is fantasy -- wish-fulfillment -- not a mirror to our lives. By eliminating mystery and doubt the universe becomes smaller, and the individual's actions are diminished. This is primarily a matter of taste, admittedly -- I have a feeling many fans love the series precisely for its far-flung space opera aspects, divine intervention included. Applegate's other hit series was Everworld, after all, a story based around gods; and Michael Grant's series Gone was essentially a superhero saga. Some people undoubtedly love every aspect of Star Trek that Animorphs incorporated. I am not one of them. That major complaint aside, this episode is otherwise unobjectionable. As much as I dislike Marco's mom being Visser One, it does bring him fully into the narrative and cements him as part of the team. And Visser One's character is instantly intriguing, putting aside what human he/she uses for a host: they don't like Visser Three! This is the first indication in the series that the Yeerk force is not some single-minded monolith, absent all internal division -- no, they have politics, competing ambitions, and even differing goals and motivations. In other words, the Yeerks are people. This is one of my favourite dimensions of the series and serves as a prime example of why it's so beloved even today: moral and emotional complexity. Shades of gray. A lesser story would paint the Yeerks as irredeemable bad guys fighting the pure-hearted human heroes and the spotless honourable Andalites. And initially, that seems like what it might be going for. But gradually the subtleties are introduced, and the story grows proportionately more thought-provoking. If you want subversion done right, Animorphs is your jam. The plot otherwise is unremarkable. This isn't a memorable adventure, although it is yet another "impossible situation" the gang miraculously gets out of through no skill of their own. I mean, I know storytelling demands you put your characters in tough scrapes, but my belief -- it's constantly being strained. I did particularly enjoy Marco's dad coming out of his funk at the end. It was a nice way to close on a hopeful note, and these characters need all the hope they can get. Almost every character has been introduced with their own book now, with the exception of Ax. It will take a few more books to get to him, but once we do our cuddly blue alien will cap the opening of the series, and with personalities and psychologies established, real development may begin. It's about to get interesting.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

       I was surprised I actually recognized this narrator – Ramón de Ocampo – given how few audiobooks I’ve listened to, especially compared to how many different authors I’ve read in my life. He did a number of the short horror stories Tor gave away free last year in their Come Join Us by the Fire to promote their new horror imprint Nightfire Books. And here he turns his voice talents to the main voice of humor in the Animorphs group: Marco. For my actual book content/plot reviews, check out my p    I was surprised I actually recognized this narrator – Ramón de Ocampo – given how few audiobooks I’ve listened to, especially compared to how many different authors I’ve read in my life. He did a number of the short horror stories Tor gave away free last year in their Come Join Us by the Fire to promote their new horror imprint Nightfire Books. And here he turns his voice talents to the main voice of humor in the Animorphs group: Marco. For my actual book content/plot reviews, check out my paperback review.    While to be nit-picky I’d say I rather expected a not-quite-so-low-pitched voice for Marco, I do think de Ocampo did a good job capturing Marco’s voice. He inserted some emotion into his portrayal of this strategic jokester, complementing the layers we get to Marco in this book as he is about ready to bow out of being an Animorph. Maybe this was because I didn’t have the book open as I listened, but I did have a harder time differentiating when Marco was actually speaking vs his internal monologue at many points, as de Ocampo’s narration did not lend itself to this differentiation.    As for de Ocampo’s portrayals of the other main characters, I have this to say for each of them: I liked his quite low, gravelly voice for Visser Three – not quite as frightening as Michael Crouch/Tobias’, but still a solid villain voice. His Ax was probably the next lowest above Visser Three, but with a nice solid sound to it, and something in his delivery worked to portray a bit of alien stiffness in English. Next up the vocal ladder would be Jake, who I found to have a good amount of inflection and tone differences as the situation called for, and relayed some of Jake’s role as leader. Next up the ladder is Tobias, who I’d say was about a half-tone lower than Marco, but had a nice softness to it which speaks to Tobias as the soft-hearted guy he is. De Ocampo’s Rachel sounds a bit softer than Marco, a tiny bit higher pitched, though not much. Cassie is the highest pitch of the group, with a little more breathy-ness added for good measure. For the most part, once I got used to their different voices, it was easy enough to keep everyone straight. As for the icing on the cake… Visser One’s voice. When Visser One first appears, the voice de Ocampo uses is beautifully haughty, and pitched just slightly higher than his Marco voice.    As in every other Animorphs book, there are some sound effects in this one too, and I just had to share a couple reactions there: when Jake lets loose a tiger roar, my reaction was definitely “…wut?” – it was neither scary nor convincing in the slightest. As for TSEEER, I appreciated that it was actually pitched a bit higher than Crouch’s narration, and it was not whispery which was definitely a good thing – though I’m starting to think TSEEEER will always sound funny no matter what the voice actors/narrators try, just by the nature of trying to imitate such a fierce, loud, high-pitched animal sound without killing the listener’s eardrums or getting too much louder than the reading level.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Juushika

    I came into the first Marco book fully prepared to find his PoV annoying, and he's still my least favorite character, but: 1) The plot progression is broadcasted and exceptionally angsty, but also a strong emotional counterpoint to Marco's sarcastic personality. 2) This is top-tier body horror. I'm finding that I remember these books surprisingly well, and when ants came up I legitimately closed the book for the evening; and I was right, it's nightmarish as I remember. It's that balance of eleme I came into the first Marco book fully prepared to find his PoV annoying, and he's still my least favorite character, but: 1) The plot progression is broadcasted and exceptionally angsty, but also a strong emotional counterpoint to Marco's sarcastic personality. 2) This is top-tier body horror. I'm finding that I remember these books surprisingly well, and when ants came up I legitimately closed the book for the evening; and I was right, it's nightmarish as I remember. It's that balance of elements, normal kids with angsty arcs exploring the wondrous and awful world of existential/body horror, which is making the series successful--so this turns out to be a solid installment.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Ahahahah. There are some serious scary morph issues in this one, and I predicted the twist at the end. That's not a bad thing, though, because it makes perfect sense and gives Marco a solid motivation to continue. And his had to be REALLY good because he already had a really solid motivation to not continue being an Animorph. Ahahahah. There are some serious scary morph issues in this one, and I predicted the twist at the end. That's not a bad thing, though, because it makes perfect sense and gives Marco a solid motivation to continue. And his had to be REALLY good because he already had a really solid motivation to not continue being an Animorph.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Thomas-James

    Okay now this was one of the best books in the series so far. There’s some really really interesting emotional elements from some of the characters and there’s a massive twist right towards the end that I never saw coming!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carla Sofia Sofia

    A moving look at Marco, a character who definitely required a lot more depth and development up until this book, but ugh, the lobster and ant morphs were so gross. Still a worthy book in the series, but not my favorite one.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kate Crabtree

    Rereading Animorphs has been fascinating so far. I had never really thought about how these first five books really lay out the character motivations as to why they're fighting this war, but they do so quite well. #addicted. 3.5 Rereading Animorphs has been fascinating so far. I had never really thought about how these first five books really lay out the character motivations as to why they're fighting this war, but they do so quite well. #addicted. 3.5

  23. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    The inclusion of Ax to the team is really what makes this book amazing. But for Marco, he finally has a reason to fight!.....It's about time. More reviews at ReadingOverTheShoulder.com The inclusion of Ax to the team is really what makes this book amazing. But for Marco, he finally has a reason to fight!.....It's about time. More reviews at ReadingOverTheShoulder.com

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Johnson

    Good. Some new extra interesting things happen in this one

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alli Ramsay

    Okay fine. I guess I like Marco.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. **Contains LOADS of SPOILERS** To be honest, I was worried that I was going to dislike this one because I found book 3 to be so bleak. I actually loved it more than any of the others so far. This time, the first-person perspective is that of Marco's. He's the one that can accidentally come off as a bit cocky sometimes, but underneath it all, he's somewhat Play-Doh. What really made me wonder if I was going to dislike this book is that he's the one who's mother was said to be passed away. You find **Contains LOADS of SPOILERS** To be honest, I was worried that I was going to dislike this one because I found book 3 to be so bleak. I actually loved it more than any of the others so far. This time, the first-person perspective is that of Marco's. He's the one that can accidentally come off as a bit cocky sometimes, but underneath it all, he's somewhat Play-Doh. What really made me wonder if I was going to dislike this book is that he's the one who's mother was said to be passed away. You find out in this book in more detail what actually happened; she was on some boat and disappeared at sea, and no body was ever found. His father, understandably, missing his mother very much, but has unfortunately held onto the pain, moroseness, and darkness surrounding her absence. I was afraid that I was heading for some bleak chapters. Praise God. There weren't any. In book 4, Cassie, Jake, Tobias, Rachel, and Marco find a real-life (well, as far as in in this story) Andalite that they later give the nickname of Ax because his really name is messed up by any human language standard (Translation: basically creative and pretty cool). He's the first one that they have encountered since book one (As a side note, I'm still suspicious about this Andalite. They basically have taken his word for it that he was the brother of the Prince, the Andalite in book one, and really don't have any proof of this claim. I'm honestly wondering: "What if it's all huge coverup and Ax isn't who he says it is? I know that it would be farfetched to suggest that he was working with Visser Three, but... maybe not?). This book starts out with Ax, who's been hiding out on Cassie farm, and he announces that he need to steal a Yeerk spacecraft because he wants to go back to his homeworld (That seems a bit sudden to me and also fuels my idea that he may not be who he says he is), which will also require Z-Space deflection to acquire the ability to cloak the ship. For this, Ax decides to make a Z-Space Transponder, which is basically an alien distress signaler, and by signaling it, Ax's plan is to trick the Yeerk's into unsuspectingly aiding in the plan;.... ...but first, they need to get the parts. On Earth, this could be very difficult, but they decide to go to the mall to a store (Radio Shack) and they will pay for whatever Ax needs. Unfortunately for them, but fortunately for us, hilarity ensues. This is the first book where I found myself laughing at so many parts. After arriving at the mall (which can only take place, of course, because Ax has morphed into his multiple-human morph that he acquired from all five of them, and chose to be male), they lose him. Then they find him in a coffee shop where he orders a cup, and I laughed my butt off when Ax misunderstands what to do afterward with the empty cup. Ax interprets "throw it away" as that he should literally throw it. It hits one of the baristas in the head (I'm assuming this was Starbucks). After Marco and Jake apologize, claiming their friend has "out of control spasms," they again lose him, but find him creating a scene by eating any leftover food because he smelled something of which he'd never encountered its equal (that's one long sentence). Then, Ax creates yet another scene by running away from cops that are running after him. Then de-morphs mid-run. One of the cops whispers "Andalite," making Marco realize that they not only need to get away from the cops and the mall, but also the cop controllers (Humans have voluntarily or involuntarily relinquished themselves over to Yeerk mind control). My only criticism of this all is that not even one of the main characters took a second in this story to condemn Ax for freaking DE-MORPHING IN A MALL??? Anyway, the final hilarious moment is when they seek refuge in a grocery store across the street from the mall (side note: I've never actually seen a grocery store across from a mall *shrug*) and find that their best solution to get away from the Yeerk cops is to morph into the lobsters in the tank. They end up startling some woman in her kitchen when they de-morph. This is where my criticism becomes invalid because they would've been hypocrites for condemning Ax when they later potentially sent some innocent lady off to the looney bin. After all of that, things kind of settle down and we get back to the signature style that is the Animorph 5. They start to piece together what they're going to do. It foils very fast and a Hork-Bajir that they "sabotage" doesn't really get "sabotaged." The Yeerk distress signal idea backfires royally and Visser Three shows up. They end up on his ship. On top of that, they've learned that Visser One is on board the mothership (there's somewhere in the ballpark of 47 Vissers, each weaker than the number higher than them). The big shock. Marco's mother is Visser One. That is, I mean to say, that the single most powerful Yeerk was responsible for his mother's disappearance and she didn't pass away as Marco and his father had come to believe. She'd been taken over by a Yeerk. Interestingly, Visser One and Visser Three can't stand each other, so Visser One helps them escape by giving them tips on how to use some escape pods. All they have to do is get passed some Hork-Bajir on the way there. There's a hilarious scene in the tube as they end up startling an alien who didn't expect to see an Elephant, a tiger, a wolf, and a gorilla coming down the tube. Thus ends my synopsis. That was my longest ever synopsis, and I'm going to hide it for spoilers, obviously, and I hope it doesn't get deleted for how revealing it is. I'm mostly doing that for myself so I can look back and review if I need to. I think I better keep a copy of this in case it does get taken down. This is definitely my favorite Animorph book yet. It was very funny in parts, and Applegate really kept me guessing how the heck they were going to get off of freaking Visser Three's ship alive. This series is getting very addicting. My only concern, really, is to read the next one that's from Tobias's POV. The character's are very relatable and you find yourself really rooting for them, and also hoping that Applegate didn't kill any of them off (And, admittedly, that there won't be another one of them that gets stuck in a morph... I'd be afraid there'd be two character POV's that would be bleak, TBH). 5 out of 5 stars. The best so far by a mile.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Wolverinefactor

    Fun fact: one of the bring draws is that we are never told what city the kids live in, as a protective measure. The book takes place in 1996. Starbucks is mentioned here. In 1996 there was only 1015 locations. This drastically cuts the location possibilities down. Factoring in that they are definitely on the West coast narrows it even further. The book itself is the first one through the eyes of Marcos. There’s a huge twist near the end which the series has built up to and it lands so well. There’s Fun fact: one of the bring draws is that we are never told what city the kids live in, as a protective measure. The book takes place in 1996. Starbucks is mentioned here. In 1996 there was only 1015 locations. This drastically cuts the location possibilities down. Factoring in that they are definitely on the West coast narrows it even further. The book itself is the first one through the eyes of Marcos. There’s a huge twist near the end which the series has built up to and it lands so well. There’s a lot of world building too. The structure of the books is wearing a bit thin though. At this point you would think they’d test drive these morphs so they don’t have a freak out at the start of every mission. Also, there’s so many bad decisions here. I mean Jake and Marco literally blow their cover when taking Ax to the mall. They use their names AND talk to Ax while he’s in his natural form. The big plan itself is just a terrible idea too. Still it’s enjoyable and while the morph spazzing is getting old, I love the little animal knowledge were given.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tommy Grooms

    All things being equal, Marco is the best narrator of the series. Following the theme of "why we fight," The Predator features a reveal that gives the most reluctant Animorph his reason to fight. This book was memorable not just for its twist, but for featuring Ax's first human morph shenanigans, a trip to the Yeerk mother ship, and the one morph our heroes agreed never to do again - the humble ant. I was REALLY into ants as a kid, and I remember loving how horrifying they were. All things being equal, Marco is the best narrator of the series. Following the theme of "why we fight," The Predator features a reveal that gives the most reluctant Animorph his reason to fight. This book was memorable not just for its twist, but for featuring Ax's first human morph shenanigans, a trip to the Yeerk mother ship, and the one morph our heroes agreed never to do again - the humble ant. I was REALLY into ants as a kid, and I remember loving how horrifying they were.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    The first five books each address why every Animorph decides to take up the fight. Jake has Tom, Rachel learns of Chapman's sacrifice for her best friend, Tobias has his special connection to Elfangor, Cassie learned the Yeerks will destroy the earth when they take over... but Marco. Marco doesn't want to be an Animorph. Until now. The first five books each address why every Animorph decides to take up the fight. Jake has Tom, Rachel learns of Chapman's sacrifice for her best friend, Tobias has his special connection to Elfangor, Cassie learned the Yeerks will destroy the earth when they take over... but Marco. Marco doesn't want to be an Animorph. Until now.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Fantastic SiFi series for a young reader. I enjoyed reading these with my daughter. The storyline is good and the plot interesting, wouldn't take much to make these great adult SiFi stories. Highly recommended Fantastic SiFi series for a young reader. I enjoyed reading these with my daughter. The storyline is good and the plot interesting, wouldn't take much to make these great adult SiFi stories. Highly recommended

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.