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When Co-Active Coaching was first released in 1998, this pioneering work set the stage for what has become a cultural and business phenomenon and helped launch the profession of coaching. Published in more than ten languages now, this book has been used as the definitive resource in dozens of corporate, professional development and university-based coaching programs as wel When Co-Active Coaching was first released in 1998, this pioneering work set the stage for what has become a cultural and business phenomenon and helped launch the profession of coaching. Published in more than ten languages now, this book has been used as the definitive resource in dozens of corporate, professional development and university-based coaching programs as well as by thousands of individuals looking to elevate their communication, relationship and coaching skills. This fully revised third edition of Co-Active Coaching has been updated to reflect the expanded vision of the newly updated Co-Active Model and coaching course curriculum at The Coaches Training Institute, the training organization founded and run by the authors for 20 years. The third edition emphasizes evoking transformational change in the client and extends the use of the Co-Active Model into leadership management and its effectiveness throughout organizations. This edition also contains an on-line Coach's Toolkit (replacing the CD of the second edition), several new coaching demonstrations and more than 35 updated exercises, questionnaires, checklists and reproducible forms.


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When Co-Active Coaching was first released in 1998, this pioneering work set the stage for what has become a cultural and business phenomenon and helped launch the profession of coaching. Published in more than ten languages now, this book has been used as the definitive resource in dozens of corporate, professional development and university-based coaching programs as wel When Co-Active Coaching was first released in 1998, this pioneering work set the stage for what has become a cultural and business phenomenon and helped launch the profession of coaching. Published in more than ten languages now, this book has been used as the definitive resource in dozens of corporate, professional development and university-based coaching programs as well as by thousands of individuals looking to elevate their communication, relationship and coaching skills. This fully revised third edition of Co-Active Coaching has been updated to reflect the expanded vision of the newly updated Co-Active Model and coaching course curriculum at The Coaches Training Institute, the training organization founded and run by the authors for 20 years. The third edition emphasizes evoking transformational change in the client and extends the use of the Co-Active Model into leadership management and its effectiveness throughout organizations. This edition also contains an on-line Coach's Toolkit (replacing the CD of the second edition), several new coaching demonstrations and more than 35 updated exercises, questionnaires, checklists and reproducible forms.

30 review for Co-Active Coaching: Changing Business, Transforming Lives

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amy Logan

    This is the definitive textbook on life coaching written by the pioneers in the field who have run their own coaching school for over 20 years called The Coaches Training Institute (CTI). Many other coaching schools use this book as their textbook too. CTI's school and Co-Active model of coaching are considered the gold standard in the industry. It's the only coaching school in partnership with the Institute of Coaching at Harvard Medical School and the only one you can get real college credit f This is the definitive textbook on life coaching written by the pioneers in the field who have run their own coaching school for over 20 years called The Coaches Training Institute (CTI). Many other coaching schools use this book as their textbook too. CTI's school and Co-Active model of coaching are considered the gold standard in the industry. It's the only coaching school in partnership with the Institute of Coaching at Harvard Medical School and the only one you can get real college credit for (if desired) because it's so rigorous. The book itself is easy and enjoyable to read and does a good job explaining this approach to coaching. Since reading it, I've been through CTI's coach training and certification program so I can confidently say that the book is an excellent basis for understanding a tried-and-true method for coaching, but nothing replaces the in-person training and, of course, many hours of coaching! I also think this book is extremely valuable for non-coaches. There is so much to be learned in here about really effective communication, meaningful conversation and transformational relationships, at home or at work, it really should be required reading starting in junior high/middle school. The world would work infinitely better if everyone read this book and followed the Co-Active model for being in relationship with others.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Wainwright

    This book thoroughly explains a kind of coaching that uses collaboration between coach and client to activate the client's natural creativity and abilities towards solving the client's problems. While I've never been coached by someone formally trained (by ICF) in this style of coaching, I have been coached in the collaborative style, and found it challenging, invigorating, and highly engaging—qualities that are completely leached out in the dissection and description of it, save a few spots her This book thoroughly explains a kind of coaching that uses collaboration between coach and client to activate the client's natural creativity and abilities towards solving the client's problems. While I've never been coached by someone formally trained (by ICF) in this style of coaching, I have been coached in the collaborative style, and found it challenging, invigorating, and highly engaging—qualities that are completely leached out in the dissection and description of it, save a few spots here and there, chiefly the examples of coach-client conversations. My experience reading this was eerily similar to the one I had reading Non-Violent Communication, whose author states outright that a lot of the humor that comes into play in practice necessarily must be stripped from any explanation, both for brevity and clarity. To be fair, NVC was more of an overview, and this seems more of a textbook, with its lengthy appendices (almost half the book) and additional CD of materials (which I did not look at, and whose material may be lively as all get-out). Ultimately, NVC made me want to learn more about NVC, and this book completely satisfied my interest in coaching (not for me!), so perhaps it did its job better than I know.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    This is considered by many to be the bible of the coaching world. I've read several books about coaching theory as I look to phase out of managed care in order to help people make lasting lifestyle changes. As a clinician, I have over two decades of experience working with patients. I have two degrees and at least a dozen certifications. I have worked in many different areas of the wellness industry, though my 9-5 is as a physical therapist. The book makes a point of differentiating between "coa This is considered by many to be the bible of the coaching world. I've read several books about coaching theory as I look to phase out of managed care in order to help people make lasting lifestyle changes. As a clinician, I have over two decades of experience working with patients. I have two degrees and at least a dozen certifications. I have worked in many different areas of the wellness industry, though my 9-5 is as a physical therapist. The book makes a point of differentiating between "coaching" and "treating" and I get it. I wasn't particularly impressed by the content as much of it was not really earth-shattering, but maybe that is because though I focus on treatment as a medical professional, coaching is inevitably a part of my job even if we don't call it that.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andrea James

    Since I'm delivering training on coaching today, albeit in the context of coaching team member within an organisation as opposed to professional coaching, I figured it might be apt to review this book right now. I think if I had read this book 10 years ago, I would have found some parts too "new age-y". For instance: "When you listen at Level III, you listen as though you and the client were at the center of the universe, receiving information from everywhere at once. It's as though you were surr Since I'm delivering training on coaching today, albeit in the context of coaching team member within an organisation as opposed to professional coaching, I figured it might be apt to review this book right now. I think if I had read this book 10 years ago, I would have found some parts too "new age-y". For instance: "When you listen at Level III, you listen as though you and the client were at the center of the universe, receiving information from everywhere at once. It's as though you were surrounded by a force field that contains you, the client, and an environment of information. Level III includes everything you can observe with your senses: what you see, hear, smell and feel - the tactile as well as the emotional sensations." The words "force field" and the suggestion that I should use my sense of smell when coaching professionally would have seemed out of place to me. But I now read these statements in a different light. The authors are partly articulating what we pick up from experience in first-hand situations and interactions. And the more aware we are about these concepts of actively receiving information through our range of senses, the more we may be able to consciously develop these skills in addition to acquiring them unconsciously. The book recommends a particular style of coaching - the word "co-active" being a key point - where the coach takes an active role in sharing their perspectives on a situation rather than only letting the client come up with the answers themselves (which some other coaching practices advocate). The authors encourage the use of intuition, as suggested in the level III listening quote above. They also suggest that one should not be afraid to get it wrong with the client when using intuition because by trying, and sometimes failing, we build our intuitive skills. If you have no experience in using your intuition and learning how it works, then you may never be able to trust your intuition and will continue to think that it's not a suitable tool that you can use to assess situations. The book has lots of examples of coaching conversations to illustrate the use of various techniques. It is a practical and systematic guide and a useful resource for anyone involved in coaching. It may also be useful if you simply want to improve your interactions and communications with others, personally and professionally.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeremiah Gumm

    Recommended to me as a resource as I serve as a pastoral mentor. Lots of good, practical skills explained and taught. Lector Caveat: Writing can really get "New-Agey" and humanistic at times. A worthwhile reference for those serving as mentors.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Raetz

    A nice overview of the coaching process with some very helpful examples of dialog and documents/exercises/etc. to use. My main criticism is the fundamental assumption the authors make that every participant in coaching is willing to do the right thing or is an ethical person. They are a bit optimistic about the breadth of experience within human nature, in my opinion, so they don't include any information or discussion of how to screen the people you work with for fit, how to determine what your A nice overview of the coaching process with some very helpful examples of dialog and documents/exercises/etc. to use. My main criticism is the fundamental assumption the authors make that every participant in coaching is willing to do the right thing or is an ethical person. They are a bit optimistic about the breadth of experience within human nature, in my opinion, so they don't include any information or discussion of how to screen the people you work with for fit, how to determine what your coaching style is or what to do if you are working with someone who turns out to be ethically challenged or otherwise not someone you want to help. They seem to believe these people don't exist. I think they are a minority, certainly, but they do exist and this book should have acknowledged this and addressed it. I would also like to have seen an in-depth case study or two of coaching clients from start to finish. Otherwise, this is a very accessible, well written introduction to coaching.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    The person as coach is the subject of this book. There are no coaching models within here; instead, the focus is on the presence you need to have as a coach. It's the most detailed review of the personhood of the coach that I've seen so far. Evaluating your current level of listening against the descriptions of Level 1, 2, and 3 listening is a beneficial exercise.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marcos Moret

    Some decent advice, but it's all a bit too new-agey for my tastes.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Diane Law

    A really good resource. I will return to it as a reminder of the models and practices

  10. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Johnson

    Good foundation for coaches.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    Loy Machedo’s Book Review – Co-Active Coaching by Laura Whitworth, Phillip Sandahl, Karen & Henry Kimsey-House Now before I dwell into the book review of Co-Active Coaching, let me confess something - I am a student of Co-Active Coaching. I have spent around a year taking courses and attending the workshop related to Co-Active Coaching and yes, I have met a few training colleagues who are into this field and discipline. But be warned – though I am a student, does not mean I am going to speak all Loy Machedo’s Book Review – Co-Active Coaching by Laura Whitworth, Phillip Sandahl, Karen & Henry Kimsey-House Now before I dwell into the book review of Co-Active Coaching, let me confess something - I am a student of Co-Active Coaching. I have spent around a year taking courses and attending the workshop related to Co-Active Coaching and yes, I have met a few training colleagues who are into this field and discipline. But be warned – though I am a student, does not mean I am going to speak all the goody stuff. I still have my opinion (isn’t that why I am a wee-bit controversial?) So here goes. What the book offers: 1. The book is an overview of all the techniques used by Co-Active Coaches. 2. It is filled with a lot of coaching examples, tips, suggestions, ideas and yes a very valuable tool kit of great stuff one can use as a coach. 3. It gives a complete overview of everything one would go through when he goes through the Co-Active Coaching Session – which I found to be very though provoking and helpful. 4. The book lays down the step-by-step foundation that a Co-Active Coach needs to undertake if he wants to be a good Coach and yes, hopeful a Great Coach. 5. The good thing about this book is the Bonus DVD that comes along with it with all the good stuff being absorbed into as an Audio Format. 6. I would say this is more of a ‘Workbook’ & Reference Guide for Co-Active Coaches rather than only a book for reading or information. 7. It does deal with a few subjective and very hard to explain concepts like Intuition & Level 3 Listening but then again, at least someone made the effort. What the book does not offer: 1. The book is by no means a substitute for the actual training session. 2. The book can be confusing for those who are not into the Co-Active Training Model. 3. It does not give you solutions rather only offers the process. Who should purchase this book: • Only Co-Active Coaches. Anyone else purchasing this book may either get confused or may not relate to the book. Overall Comments: • Personally, as a Co-Active Coach and Trainer, I found this book helpful. It gave me a wide vocabulary and range of techniques to use and apply. And I feel I would be referring this book from time to time to help me grow as a Co-Active Coach. However, to anyone else, I wouldn’t recommend this book simply because this is not a book one could understand – at least everything. • It is an easy to read and understand book, however I don’t know why but I felt something was still missing. Could be my intuition? Overall Rating: 7 out of 10 Loy Machedo Loymachedo.com

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: A model of coaching in which coach and client actively collaborate to accomplish the clients needs, and the cornerstones, contexts, and core principles to realize those outcomes. There are a variety of models for coaching and versatile coaches draw upon different models to meet the needs of their clients. In reading this book, what I found, which is described as a model, really seems to be a description of the ethos of coaching, the framework of practice within which a coach teams with h Summary: A model of coaching in which coach and client actively collaborate to accomplish the clients needs, and the cornerstones, contexts, and core principles to realize those outcomes. There are a variety of models for coaching and versatile coaches draw upon different models to meet the needs of their clients. In reading this book, what I found, which is described as a model, really seems to be a description of the ethos of coaching, the framework of practice within which a coach teams with his or her clients to accomplish the client's goals. That's not surprising since the authors (one now deceased) have been involved in coaching work since the 1980's. This work was first published in the late 1990's and is now in its fourth edition (my review is of the third edition). The "co-active" refers to the kind of relationship that exists between coach and client, in which each actively collaborates to accomplish the client's goals. Coaches are fully engaged in attentive listening, drawing upon their own curiosity and intuition. Clients are fully engaged in identifying their goals and aspirations, and doing the work that coach and client identify are necessary to pursue those goals. The authors talk about a "coaching power triangle" consisting of the coach, the client and the coaching relationship. It is the coaching relationship that is powerful, not the coach, and the power each grants to the relationship is directed to the empowering of the client. It strikes me that this is what all good coaching strives for, whether under the "co-active" label or not, but the term highlights the shared agency of both parties. The model works around four cornerstones, five contexts, and three core principles  The four cornerstones provide the structure for the co-active relationship: 1. People are naturally creative, resourceful, and whole. The assumption here is that clients are capable of discovering and implementing actions toward their goals. 2. Focus on the whole person. While there may be a problem to solve or a business goal to attain, the client brings all of who they are, and the most effective coaching relationships address that whole person. 3. Dance in this moment. This is to be fully present with the client in the moment, to what is happening in the conversation. 4. Evoke transformation, not just "ahh" but "aha"--deeper awareness and expanded capacity to act in the client. The five contexts are aspects of the coach's contact or presence with the client: 1. Listening: There are three levels of listening. Internal is the coach listening to their own internal dialogue, focused is the coach attentively listening to the client, and global goes beyond what is said, to everything around that, the subtle nuances and the total context of the client. Good listening is at the latter two levels. 2. Intuition: This synthesizes attentive listening, subtle cues, and our experience, and often presents as a gut sense or hunch. 3. Curiosity: Asking questions, exploring in open, inviting, playful, and companionable fashion that creates the sense of safety to explore even the dark and unknown spaces. 4. Forward and deepen: "Forward" refers to moving the client forward in action. "Deepen" emphasizes learning that goes beyond the action to core principles of the client. 5. Self-management: Mostly this means the ability of the coach to not make it about them but about the client. It's not about being right about insights and hunches. It is about the client The three core principles have to do with the whole life of the client: 1. Fulfillment: what the client values and how they define their purpose in life. In co-active coaching, the "wheel of life" exercise is one tool used to help people identify the degree of fulfillment they are experiencing in different areas of life. 2. Balance: often clients get stuck being out of balance. Coaching opens up new perspectives, helps clients choose a different perspective, figure out what to say no and yes to, to act out of that new perspective, and commit to that plan. 3. Process: It is easy to focus only on results in coaching and lose sight of the process occurring in the coaching relationship, celebrating the person the client is, and is becoming along the way. A chapter of the book is devoted to each of the five contexts and three core principles with coaching dialogues that illustrate each of these as well as many personal examples from the authors' coaching practice. Additional resources are offered throughout the book in an online Coaches Toolkit that may be accessed for free and used freely at: http://www.coactive.com/toolkit--a huge resource for coaches. What I liked in this book is the emphasis on coaches bringing their full selves, including their intuitions and curiosity to the coaching relationship. I also appreciated the idea of clients as creative, resourceful, whole people, who often know far more than the coach about the situation in which they are being coached. I also appreciated the focus on the whole person and not just business problems or goals. The generous resources of the online Coaches Toolkit are another asset. What I would have liked more help with is how one negotiates the focus on the whole person with the business goals, particularly if it is an organization, and not the individual who has hired you. This book also seems to play down the role of fluency in the types of organizational or business situations one is coaching in (start-up versus large organization, local business versus global, etc.). It focuses on the "soft" versus "hard" skills of coaching, it seems, and I wonder if some caveats here might be helpful. As I commented above, I think, of the several books I've read (I'm by no means an expert in this area), I thought this book did the best job describing the ethos or fundamental nature of coaching. The authors provide a helpful description of the environment of a good coaching relationship, the nature of coaching and what transformation looks like for the client. It left me more excited about the coaching aspects of my own work.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Barry Davis

    Subtitled “Changing Business, Transforming Lives.” Builds interactive coaching process around what the authors call the 4 cornerstones: 1. People are naturally creative, resourceful, and whole. 2. Focus on the whole person. - Analysis, logic, and spirit (transcendence). 3. Dance in this moment. - Moving forward collaboratively. 4. Evoke transformation. - Assist in expanding capacity to reach one’s potential. Using a 5 point star to demonstrate the co-active process, the authors cite 5 contexts: Li Subtitled “Changing Business, Transforming Lives.” Builds interactive coaching process around what the authors call the 4 cornerstones: 1. People are naturally creative, resourceful, and whole. 2. Focus on the whole person. - Analysis, logic, and spirit (transcendence). 3. Dance in this moment. - Moving forward collaboratively. 4. Evoke transformation. - Assist in expanding capacity to reach one’s potential. Using a 5 point star to demonstrate the co-active process, the authors cite 5 contexts: Listening, Intuition, Curiosity, Forward and Deepen, and Self-management. Providing sample dialogues and examples throughout each chapter, they end each with a series of exercises to promote application of the information. The final part of the book deals with the principles and practices of co-active coaching: Fulfillment, Balance, Process, and Putting It All Together. A practical book on the coaching process, with a mind towards a collaborative, results-oriented approach to engaging with the client to enable them to discover their own resources for improvement.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marko

    The book lays out the Co-Active coaching model clearly and concisely. I found it to be a great framework for approaching coaching conversations. The book provides both dispositions and concrete actions that a coach can take. Part 1 explains the fundamentals of the Co-Active coaching model approach. Part 2 dives deeper into the contexts: listening, intuition, curiosity, forward and deepen, and self-management. Part 3 explores the three principles and practices: fulfillment, balance, and process. The book lays out the Co-Active coaching model clearly and concisely. I found it to be a great framework for approaching coaching conversations. The book provides both dispositions and concrete actions that a coach can take. Part 1 explains the fundamentals of the Co-Active coaching model approach. Part 2 dives deeper into the contexts: listening, intuition, curiosity, forward and deepen, and self-management. Part 3 explores the three principles and practices: fulfillment, balance, and process. I appreciated the inclusion of brief coaching conversations to highlight the main point of each chapter. At the end of some chapters, the authors include exercises to extend the skill. Overall, I thought that it was well written, and provides valuable information that I will use in future coaching conversations.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Richard Fitzgerald

    This book is logically laid out. It provides a good balance between theory and practical instruction, and it provides useful practice exercises to help with the coaching skills under consideration. I highly recommend this well written book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Kieffer

    I had to read this book for work. I found some sections of it to be helpful with some really great tips and sample dialogues. But, I didn't have any super revelations from reading his book. It was helpful, but nothing extraordinary.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kat Robey

    Solid skill based book for coaches and listening professionals—AND would be great skill builder for people who manage, parent, listen for, support, and bring out the best in others (from the best in self/listener)—in any sort of relationship; work, family, friendship.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Candi

    I’m working on becoming a coach. I feel like this is a great listen to learn some tips on how to ask questions and how to listen. I love the example dialogue to help understand the techniques suggested. I would like to buy this book as a reference.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ruby

    A re-read from my coaching training days, great to see how far you've come :)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tammy Hibler

    As Stephen R. Covey appropriate quotes the book is the bible of coaching. I have used it as my main reference for years.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Miranda

    Required reading for my coach training program. Wouldn't recommend it otherwise.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sunil Nair

    Some new content but still the same. Loved it still!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wes Martin

    This is described as the "bible of coaching guides" by Stephen Covey. I'm inclined to agree with Mr. Covey. This is the most definitive, descriptive, and richest text on coaching I've come across. This book is definitely aimed more towards those who are professional coaches than it is those who are interested in adding the techniques of coaching to their toolkit. However, I like to think of coaching as a way of being in relationship with others and therefore think that anyone seeking positive ch This is described as the "bible of coaching guides" by Stephen Covey. I'm inclined to agree with Mr. Covey. This is the most definitive, descriptive, and richest text on coaching I've come across. This book is definitely aimed more towards those who are professional coaches than it is those who are interested in adding the techniques of coaching to their toolkit. However, I like to think of coaching as a way of being in relationship with others and therefore think that anyone seeking positive change in meaningful relationships would derive value from discovering and applying the co-active coaching approach. (Listened on audiobook while simultaneously reading the paper copy - it's that good!)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    I read the first edition of this book (and went through their complete coaching program) back in 2005. By now, many of the co-active principles and approaches have become second nature in my work as an OD practitioner. Always learning and growing, I picked up this latest edition and continue to have a strong appreciation for the co-active coaching model. It is relevant to a variety of coaching scenarios--from personal to professional/executive. The only thing I miss in this latest edition is the I read the first edition of this book (and went through their complete coaching program) back in 2005. By now, many of the co-active principles and approaches have become second nature in my work as an OD practitioner. Always learning and growing, I picked up this latest edition and continue to have a strong appreciation for the co-active coaching model. It is relevant to a variety of coaching scenarios--from personal to professional/executive. The only thing I miss in this latest edition is the Appendix that had a ton of useful resources. It's now located via a website (must register your email address for access), which I suppose is a sign of the times.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christie Munson Muller

    Originally read this book last summer as part of a Financial Coaching/Training class. I revisited the book in the last few months to complete it. Although I was not taking the class to become a coach, I did find several learning elements in the book quite helpful. One element was the concept of the "coach as the change agent" and the goal should be to enter the coaching relationship without knowing what the outcome will be. The approach is to guide and empower clients to discover their own solut Originally read this book last summer as part of a Financial Coaching/Training class. I revisited the book in the last few months to complete it. Although I was not taking the class to become a coach, I did find several learning elements in the book quite helpful. One element was the concept of the "coach as the change agent" and the goal should be to enter the coaching relationship without knowing what the outcome will be. The approach is to guide and empower clients to discover their own solutions to meet their goals. The book was well written and easy to follow.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    I have been the recipient of co-active coaching, and through this book I have come to appreciate its value even more. This should prove to be very helpful in my work as a mentor, as a manager, and hopefully even in my personal life as a husband and step-dad. I especially appreciated the discussions involving active-listening, and “being present.” I believe those to be crucial to the effectiveness of a co-active coach, and all of us should learn and employ these skills in our everyday life, conve I have been the recipient of co-active coaching, and through this book I have come to appreciate its value even more. This should prove to be very helpful in my work as a mentor, as a manager, and hopefully even in my personal life as a husband and step-dad. I especially appreciated the discussions involving active-listening, and “being present.” I believe those to be crucial to the effectiveness of a co-active coach, and all of us should learn and employ these skills in our everyday life, conversations with family, friends and co-workers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Richard Featherstone

    A very well-written and easy to follow guide on how to coach. It provides both an overview and theory of coaching as well as many good, practical insights on how to coach well. It contains several short example dialogues between a coach and client. This is one of those books that you'll want to read again. The section on using your intuition is fairly unusual in the counseling textbook industry. I like that this book doesn't promote the vapid self-help jargon.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ann Louise Tisdale-Ramos

    Fourth Edition Review - A perfectly explained and in-depth coaching guide. This version is full of clearly explained techniques and relatable examples to learn and practice. I also appreciate the provided tools.As I expand my coaching skills I know I will be referencing this book frequently. And as a plus, it’s an enjoyable read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    A friend recommended this book and I’m glad she did. While I found the book a little unstructured, I also found it to be a useful introduction to the mindset of coaching. For me, that mindset seemed to align well with my appreciative inquiry approach. I also appreciated the sample dialogues the book provided.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rania

    A beautiful resource for coaching.. a book i am definitely happy to have in my small library.. All the concepts, and examples are real and i could easily relate to, also lots of tools shared that will enhance the coaching experience!

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