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"Simply the most powerful and moving book that has emerged on this topic." UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL The national bestseller that tells the truth of about Vietnam from the black soldiers' perspective. An oral history unlike any other, BLOODS features twenty black men who tell the story of how members of their race were sent off in disproportionate numbers and the special t "Simply the most powerful and moving book that has emerged on this topic." UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL The national bestseller that tells the truth of about Vietnam from the black soldiers' perspective. An oral history unlike any other, BLOODS features twenty black men who tell the story of how members of their race were sent off in disproportionate numbers and the special test of patriotism they faced. Told in voices no reader will soon forget, BLOODS is a must-read for anyone who wants to put the Vietnam experience in historical, cultural, and political perspective. Cited by THE NEW YORK TIMES as One of the Notable Books of the Year "Superb." TIME


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"Simply the most powerful and moving book that has emerged on this topic." UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL The national bestseller that tells the truth of about Vietnam from the black soldiers' perspective. An oral history unlike any other, BLOODS features twenty black men who tell the story of how members of their race were sent off in disproportionate numbers and the special t "Simply the most powerful and moving book that has emerged on this topic." UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL The national bestseller that tells the truth of about Vietnam from the black soldiers' perspective. An oral history unlike any other, BLOODS features twenty black men who tell the story of how members of their race were sent off in disproportionate numbers and the special test of patriotism they faced. Told in voices no reader will soon forget, BLOODS is a must-read for anyone who wants to put the Vietnam experience in historical, cultural, and political perspective. Cited by THE NEW YORK TIMES as One of the Notable Books of the Year "Superb." TIME

30 review for Bloods: An Oral History of the Vietnam War by Black Veterans

  1. 4 out of 5

    Claire Reads Books

    An excellent, excellent read in which journalist and veterans advocate Wallace Terry collects the oral histories of 20 black men who served in Vietnam. In doing so, he captures the voices and vital stories of an often overlooked group of soldiers who, despite sharing similar experiences of racial discrimination, represent a rich variety of geographic backgrounds, military experiences, and attitudes toward the war. The men profiled here recount often brutal truths—including some of the most unfil An excellent, excellent read in which journalist and veterans advocate Wallace Terry collects the oral histories of 20 black men who served in Vietnam. In doing so, he captures the voices and vital stories of an often overlooked group of soldiers who, despite sharing similar experiences of racial discrimination, represent a rich variety of geographic backgrounds, military experiences, and attitudes toward the war. The men profiled here recount often brutal truths—including some of the most unfiltered and unsettling descriptions of bodily trauma I’ve encountered in literature—and many of their accounts are not particularly happy ones (for several, returning to America after the war presented a whole new set of struggles). But scattered throughout are moments of triumph that upend expectations and insights that get at the heart of what these men have seen and experienced and endured. This book is the real deal and a must read for anyone interested in the Vietnam War.

  2. 4 out of 5

    April

    Bloods: Black Veterans of the Vietnam War: An Oral History by Wallace Terry is one of the most powerful and moving books from the point of view of the soldiers who fought the battles day in and day out. Terry is the renowned authority on the African American soldier and experience in Vietnam. He was on the ground with the troops, interviewing them, creating the only documentary from the battlefield entitled Guess Who’s Coming Home: Black Fighting Men Recorded Live in Vietnam, released in 1972. Th Bloods: Black Veterans of the Vietnam War: An Oral History by Wallace Terry is one of the most powerful and moving books from the point of view of the soldiers who fought the battles day in and day out. Terry is the renowned authority on the African American soldier and experience in Vietnam. He was on the ground with the troops, interviewing them, creating the only documentary from the battlefield entitled Guess Who’s Coming Home: Black Fighting Men Recorded Live in Vietnam, released in 1972. The African American men in Bloods tell their story in their own words, the way they experienced it. Their dialects show through the written speech. Each chapter is more moving and emotional than the next, dragging the reader down into the depths of war, creating an emotional investment in each person mentioned. But the stories are not only about the battle on the front lines but the battle inside themselves, behind the lines, and back at home. Each soldier discusses their views on the Civil Rights movement that is happening while they were away and its impact on them while they are at war. The emotions are still heavy as they tell stories of black, white, Hispanic, Asian, an American soldier is a brother. Others run into different scenarios of racism behind the line and sometimes their abilities to overcome it. Even though Bloods was originally published in 1984, many words of the men who told their stories can still ring true today. Armchair historians, military fans, young adults, and anyone interested in a true horror story should read this oral history, but a minor amount of previous knowledge of the Vietnam War and the Civil Rights movement is recommended for true comprehension. These men should be honored for being willing to share with the world their experiences in such a sensitive and life-changing time period. No doubt the rapport and trust built between the men and Terry while they were in the battlefield contributed greatly to their willingness to be interviewed after their return stateside. It is through that bond of trust that the public is graced with a rich primary resource such as Bloods. For more information, please visit Wallace Terry’s website To purchase Bloods, please click here.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Oakes

    Wallace Terry was a well-known, African-American journalist who interviewed and compiled the accounts of several African-American soldiers in the Vietnam war. These men tell it like it was on a number of topics, but most striking are the stories of how they were treated on arriving home after the war, in the midst of a strong anti-war climate, and the fact that several of them really were down on the powers that be for ending the war and handing Vietnam to the people they'd been fighting against Wallace Terry was a well-known, African-American journalist who interviewed and compiled the accounts of several African-American soldiers in the Vietnam war. These men tell it like it was on a number of topics, but most striking are the stories of how they were treated on arriving home after the war, in the midst of a strong anti-war climate, and the fact that several of them really were down on the powers that be for ending the war and handing Vietnam to the people they'd been fighting against for years. As one person noted (169): "Why wait ten years and thousands upon thousands of lives later to just turn it over to the Communists? We could have done that at the very beginning." This particular sentiment is echoed throughout the book. Many discuss the racial issues both before, during and after their time in Vietnam. The author did personal interviews with 20 vets, officers and enlisted personnel, but it's never really stated whether or not the veterans were encouraged just to tell their stories or if they were being questioned specifically about their experiences. However, the stories themselves were eye-opening, and aside from me wondering about the method of interviewing, the book held my interest until I finished it. Originally published in 1985, and now, some forty years after the Vietnam war, it's still quite worth the time and effort to read this small book, especially for those who maybe want a different take on that conflict. I would most definitely recommend it, especially to those who are interested in the personal side of the Vietnam war and its aftermath. Overall, very well done; at times heartbreaking, especially the reception that these men got when returning home.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kelly B

    This is thesis reading, but it's so good. To read specifically about the experiences of black soldiers in Vietnam as different from that of white soldiers is necessary. Funny in some parts, and of course, touching and sad in many. This period in American history is one that has always fascinated me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I had read this book several times in middle school and had forgotten about it until I came across a copy in a used book store. Fantastic read that pulls no punches and tells not only a fascinating story about Vietnam from the view of black veterans..but looks at how society treated blacks in the military/society at the time of the Vietnam war.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David

    Blacks got the shaft during the Vietnam War. . . who knew? Naw, this book was actually the basis for the film "Dead Presidents" and does quite a good job showing the way black men were treated as cannon fodder (always assigned to be point men, doing recon, etc.) without being too preachy or in-your-face. The men who share their stories are often equally critical of their own communities and the people in them who dismissed them upon their return to the States. A quick, but not easy read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Not enough history books discuss the Black Vietnam soldier. This is an interesting collection of various voices from the soldier on the front line to the POW. This book is not for the weak, it is definitely up close and honest.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jonfaith

    Read this on my own at university. Gripping views on alterity and social justice.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I love good oral history. The absolute immediacy of learning about events from the mouths of people who were actually there makes historical events more real and more powerful. Bloods is an oral history of the Vietnam War as told by black veterans and it is a powerful read. The stories are as diverse as their tellers - from volunteers who saw the service as a way to get ahead to draftees who just wanted to get in and get out, absolute heroes to borderline war criminals - this book provides over I love good oral history. The absolute immediacy of learning about events from the mouths of people who were actually there makes historical events more real and more powerful. Bloods is an oral history of the Vietnam War as told by black veterans and it is a powerful read. The stories are as diverse as their tellers - from volunteers who saw the service as a way to get ahead to draftees who just wanted to get in and get out, absolute heroes to borderline war criminals - this book provides over a dozen unique perspectives on what happened before, during and after. It's good to note that blacks suffered 12.5% of the deaths in Vietnam at a time when the percentage of blacks of military age was 13.5% of the total population. Many people who were against the Vietnam War were against it because the draft tended to put poorer people in combat since they were less likely to be able to afford the kinds of deferments that were given to college students. This reflection is buried in these interviews with man after man talking about graduating high school, wanting to go to college, but not being able to afford it and ending up in Vietnam. A couple of these interviews stand out for me. Edgar Huff. At the time of his retirement, Huff was the senior enlisted man in the entire US military and the first black sergeant major in the Marine Corps. He remembers the Marine Corps before and after its segregation. He fought at Guadalcanal, Korea, and Vietnam. This is a true hero who served his country with dedication and honor, yet after his retirement white Marines from Camp Lejeune threw phosphorous grenades into the yard where he and his family were having a meal screaming, "Nigger!" Unreal. I was also moved by the story of Fred Cherry, who was a fighter pilot shot down in 1965 and held in the Hanoi Hilton until 1973. His story of survival and friendship and his dispassionate recitation of atrocities suffered by himself and other prisoners was particularly moving. There are many other stories here that will stay with you - men who came back and ended up in prison and used that time to improve things not just for themselves but for other black veterans, men who made lives upon their return despite being haunted by the war, and men who never quite returned. Their stories are meaningful and important for an understanding of war in Vietnam. My only criticism of the book is that I wish their had been some written history by the author connecting and contextualizing the interviews. I think this extra big of work would have greatly heightened the story this book is telling.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    Bloods is an important book - if you want to understand the African American experience in Vietnam. And frankly, if you want to really understand the Vietnam War, it's good to understand the divisions within the SEATO/South Vietnamese alliance. African Americans went to Vietnam in numbers larger than their 12% of the General American Population, and had difficulties becoming qualified for the technical positions that would keep them out of Combat units. Thus a larger number went into front line Bloods is an important book - if you want to understand the African American experience in Vietnam. And frankly, if you want to really understand the Vietnam War, it's good to understand the divisions within the SEATO/South Vietnamese alliance. African Americans went to Vietnam in numbers larger than their 12% of the General American Population, and had difficulties becoming qualified for the technical positions that would keep them out of Combat units. Thus a larger number went into front line units. Wallace Terry the author/compiler does a good job of seeking out all sorts of stories for this book, so we get both typical and atypical experiences, from "Grunts" to Technical experts in the Navy to an Air Force Pilot who flew missions - and then spent years in the Hanoi Hilton as a POW. All the while - compelling stuff and well worth the read. The armed forces of the 60s and 70s- were considered a good career for a young African American male. The Army had started integrating in the Forties, so it was seen as very progressive- for the period. Of course Casual and Overt racism were still massively evident- as almost every one of these Oral Histories will show. Really takes you back to a time when White Americans were just beginning to realize how badly they had treated their fellow citizens. The strong character of these young men was called on time and time again to deal with slights both large and small. Some of them cracked under the pressure- most did not. Great stories- well told. This might be a tough read for those Junior readers under about 11- there are some graphic passages and adult themes- but its well worth it- especially for children of colour. For the Gamer/Modeller/Military Enthusiast- its a more nuanced lode. There are a few descriptions of contacts and scenes that might work for Scenario and Diorama development, but in the main this is a book to read to get the feel of the period- more than to improve your gaming/modelling. I certainly found myself respecting the services of the men who tell their stories here even more than I did when I started this book- And I was pretty damn respectful to begin with. A strong recommendation for this Classic.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Wallace Terry came to my college to speak in the 80s. He was an entertaining speaker and this book was very entertaining. It brought insights into the black experience and highlighted some of the more dramatic stories, such as prison uprisings in military prisons in Vietnam. He could veer into the territory of playing to stereotypes. For example, one story he told was of black marines firing machine guns in between the refrain of "Ain't to proud to beg" in the jungle. Yeah. So, if you want stori Wallace Terry came to my college to speak in the 80s. He was an entertaining speaker and this book was very entertaining. It brought insights into the black experience and highlighted some of the more dramatic stories, such as prison uprisings in military prisons in Vietnam. He could veer into the territory of playing to stereotypes. For example, one story he told was of black marines firing machine guns in between the refrain of "Ain't to proud to beg" in the jungle. Yeah. So, if you want stories like this, this is a good book to look at. It also had plenty of "non-rock and roll stories" that traced where the kids came from, how they found themselves in Vietnam and what they experienced when they went home. One memorable passage featured a black veteran explaining how the experience as a soldier helped his career as a petty criminal after he got back from Vietnam. "For instance, we knew that if someone was pointing a shotgun at you from more than 25 yards away, they might as well shove that gun up their ass."

  12. 5 out of 5

    Carol Storm

    It's important to realize that most of America's classic war memoirs, particularly those celebrating the United States Marine Corps such as WITH THE OLD BREED by E.B. Sledge and A RUMOR OF WAR by Philip Caputo, focus only on white troops. This collection focuses on the experiences of black combat troops in all four branches of the service in the Vietnam War. It is a must read for its truthfulness, tension, poignant honesty, and power. This is the Marine Corps southern die-hards like William Styr It's important to realize that most of America's classic war memoirs, particularly those celebrating the United States Marine Corps such as WITH THE OLD BREED by E.B. Sledge and A RUMOR OF WAR by Philip Caputo, focus only on white troops. This collection focuses on the experiences of black combat troops in all four branches of the service in the Vietnam War. It is a must read for its truthfulness, tension, poignant honesty, and power. This is the Marine Corps southern die-hards like William Styron didn't want to serve in. This is the Marine Corps modern conservatives ignore. This is the real Marine Corps of today, the "New Breed" that fought in Vietnam and went on to serve in Iraq and Afghanistan.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Saeed

    I had to read this for a history class in college and it was a very captivating read. As I was reading the book I realized that several of the stories in this book were the basis for the movie Dead Presidents which is one of my favorite movies.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dachokie

    A Perspective Worth Looking At … I remember seeing this book as a teenager over 30 years ago in a local mall’s Walden Bookstore. I’m sure I passed on the book in favor of a World War II book. All these years later, I immediately recognized the cover of this book (a Soldier/Marine throwing a grenade) in a list of suggested Vietnam books and felt compelled to finally read it … I’m glad I did. The first book I ever bought about the Vietnam War was Al Santoli’s “Everything We Have”. I loved the format A Perspective Worth Looking At … I remember seeing this book as a teenager over 30 years ago in a local mall’s Walden Bookstore. I’m sure I passed on the book in favor of a World War II book. All these years later, I immediately recognized the cover of this book (a Soldier/Marine throwing a grenade) in a list of suggested Vietnam books and felt compelled to finally read it … I’m glad I did. The first book I ever bought about the Vietnam War was Al Santoli’s “Everything We Have”. I loved the format of that book because it let 33 veterans tell their stories … in their own words. BLOODS follows the same format. Wallace Terry provides the (very) personal stories of 20 Black American servicemen who served in Vietnam. Like Santoli’s book, BLOODS offers a wide perspective of experiences … different service branches and ranks, draftees, career-military, varying degrees of combat experience and as prisoners of war. As diverse as the individual stories are, they all share a common denominator: being black and fighting for a country that was still predominantly segregated as they served and sacrificed. Wallace Terry provides a perspective of the American serviceman during the Vietnam War that has been touched-on, but never presented in such a personal manner. Rather than summarizing the accounts of these men, he lets them tell their stories in their own words, literally. Chock full of colloquialisms/jargon/slang representing the era, the stories read like each of the 20 men are actually speaking directly to the reader. Most all the men account for experiencing the horrors of combat (some of the stories are quite graphic and disturbing), but also recount a degree of racism that puts todays rampant use of the word to shame. It is hard not to read the book and wonder why these men felt compelled to fight for America at all … it certainly didn’t seem to be a worthy cause. What I liked about BLOODS was that it wasn’t all combat, but of lives interrupted by war, surviving that war only to come home and surviving a different type of war. The pathetic homecoming experienced by Vietnam veterans has been thoroughly documented; it was clearly worse for black veterans. There were several instances in the book where these men returned home only to be shunned by the black community for serving a country that treated their race so poorly. To a degree, the details of these veterans’ post war lives are more interesting than the wartime experiences and on some occasions, worse than the war itself. While there are accounts of postwar successes, many of these men succumbed to hardship and all of them struggled at some level (emotionally or physically). One of these stories become the basis for the film “Dead Presidents” (about a black Vietnam who seeks to better his life by robbing a bank). Unfortunately, Wallace Terry did not live to deliver a follow-up edition to show how these men fared in their later years (however, I’m sure an internet search can probably reveal details on some). If you are truly interested in the Vietnam War and/or American History, I believe BLOODS is a vital ingredient in better understanding the complexity and controversial nature of the American experience in Vietnam. The integrated US military had significant problems within and this book sheds light on that issue. The stories are raw and painful to read, but reading about the experiences of these men shows how far America has come over the years. It’s shameful how the country treated Vietnam veterans in general, but after reading BLOODS, there are some veterans who had a worse “homecoming”. Wallace Terry’s vision of exposing the experience of black servicemen in Vietnam is a hard punch to the reader’s stomach.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    A powerful, historically-significant oral history of black soldiers in the Vietnam war. Terry presents the stories of twenty men who served in Vietnam in their own words. The accounts are raw and personal, and range the gamut of emotions and experiences. Most of the men included saw combat, although the year and precise military job varies quite a bit: there are more gung-ho, career military types who served in the early years of the war, plus draftees in 1969-1970 who were already disillusioned A powerful, historically-significant oral history of black soldiers in the Vietnam war. Terry presents the stories of twenty men who served in Vietnam in their own words. The accounts are raw and personal, and range the gamut of emotions and experiences. Most of the men included saw combat, although the year and precise military job varies quite a bit: there are more gung-ho, career military types who served in the early years of the war, plus draftees in 1969-1970 who were already disillusioned before they arrived; there are front-line infantrymen, LURP-team members, pilots, and a few rear-echelon types; most are enlisted men, but there are officers and senior NCOs. All in all the experience is broad and encompassing. The men all comment on the experience of being black in America, both before and after the war, as well as on inter-racial experiences during their tours. Here, again, the blunt and casual racism that these men faced is simultaneously unsurprising and shocking. I give the book 4 stars and not 5 only because Terry elects (wisely, in one sense) simply to present the experiences of his twenty soldiers without comment or analysis. While those accounts are incredibly moving, it would have been nice, too, for Terry to have provided more framing, summing up, and/or analyzing. I realize that would make for a different kind of book, one that might dilute the raw power of the accounts presented here, but the lack of framing presentation (aside from a 2-3 page intro) is noticeable, at least to me. Must reading for anyone interested in either the Vietnam War or the sad and still-incomplete attempts of the US to eliminate racism.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    The year is 1975, you may have returned from Hanoi that year, or a few years prior. Saigon had fell to the Communist insurgency , your efforts wasted. The bloodshed, physical sacrifice , psychological trauma and injury you suffered through, was all in vain. You get home, you're not guaranteed a job . Some of your comrades are addicted to smack . You're disrespected by anti-war protestors,militants , citizens ,even friends and family. You endured racism during and after the war as a black man who The year is 1975, you may have returned from Hanoi that year, or a few years prior. Saigon had fell to the Communist insurgency , your efforts wasted. The bloodshed, physical sacrifice , psychological trauma and injury you suffered through, was all in vain. You get home, you're not guaranteed a job . Some of your comrades are addicted to smack . You're disrespected by anti-war protestors,militants , citizens ,even friends and family. You endured racism during and after the war as a black man who had hopeful intentions of American citizenship . You got through all the heartbreaking , gut wrenching terror of war , just to question why you, a black man, was in a foreign country fighting some damned war you had no real idea about. Though not monotonous, each chapter of this book- which are the true accounts of returning Black Vietnam war veterans- share a common thread. Wallace Terry was able to properly transmit the lived experiences of Black Vietnam War veterans via written word as they told oral tales of horror, grief , despair , anger and more. This book is a must read for any study on the Vietnam War or any US military conflict ,as it tackles the intersection of race and class in the Armed Services , which echoes certain experiences that are lived today.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    This book presents the stories, experiences and reflections of a series Black veterans of the Vietnam War. This covers a wide range of compelling personal stories recalled by young volunteers, recruits, senior enlisted men and officers representing all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. The stories describe tough engagements with North Vietnamese fighters, friendly villagers, specific battles, casualties, POW experiences and difficult adjustments to life back home. Several stories are uplifting This book presents the stories, experiences and reflections of a series Black veterans of the Vietnam War. This covers a wide range of compelling personal stories recalled by young volunteers, recruits, senior enlisted men and officers representing all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. The stories describe tough engagements with North Vietnamese fighters, friendly villagers, specific battles, casualties, POW experiences and difficult adjustments to life back home. Several stories are uplifting and others are brutal. All in all I found the book to be a valuable addition to my understanding of the war's impact.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bamm

    This was given as a history assignment, and I dreaded it. War is not typically a subject I enjoy reading or watching, I'm a fiction/horror fan all the way. However, being married to a veteran, I have a great deal of respect for a soldier's experience. This book really was good. It gave an insight into this war people just don't hear or talk about. I cried and laughed with these guys, and am heart broken that anyone should have to endure such a test of a character. These guys were absolutely amaz This was given as a history assignment, and I dreaded it. War is not typically a subject I enjoy reading or watching, I'm a fiction/horror fan all the way. However, being married to a veteran, I have a great deal of respect for a soldier's experience. This book really was good. It gave an insight into this war people just don't hear or talk about. I cried and laughed with these guys, and am heart broken that anyone should have to endure such a test of a character. These guys were absolutely amazing, and overall, this read makes me rethink letting a war story in on occasion.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Thorsen1nk

    With Spike Lee's interesting-looking June 12 Netflix joint DA 5 BLOODS getting so much hype, I suggest first reading BLOODS, one of the finest books I've ever read on the Vietnam War. Raw, uncompromising, intimate, moving. The range of experiences is astounding. One guy never left his supply base and traded PX supplies for drugs and whores, another had to march 20 miles on a shattered ankle and stab North Vietnamese children to death so they wouldn't give away his position on long-range recon. O With Spike Lee's interesting-looking June 12 Netflix joint DA 5 BLOODS getting so much hype, I suggest first reading BLOODS, one of the finest books I've ever read on the Vietnam War. Raw, uncompromising, intimate, moving. The range of experiences is astounding. One guy never left his supply base and traded PX supplies for drugs and whores, another had to march 20 miles on a shattered ankle and stab North Vietnamese children to death so they wouldn't give away his position on long-range recon. One of the stories was also the basis for the 1995 movie DEAD PRESIDENTS.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm Montgomery

    When most people think about veterans that came out of Vietnam they think about people who have become hippies or just plain crazy. In Bloods by Wallace Terry not only are the stories real and gory, but diverse and full of different experiences and viewpoints on the war. From the first story all the way to the last any person-both young and old will enjoy the book. Those that are willing to seek facts and truth about a perilous time in the history of the U.S. can read this book. Overall I gave t When most people think about veterans that came out of Vietnam they think about people who have become hippies or just plain crazy. In Bloods by Wallace Terry not only are the stories real and gory, but diverse and full of different experiences and viewpoints on the war. From the first story all the way to the last any person-both young and old will enjoy the book. Those that are willing to seek facts and truth about a perilous time in the history of the U.S. can read this book. Overall I gave this book a 4.7/5.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Draken

    The most educational, enlightening, painstaking, heartwrenching, thought provoking books I've ever read. I experienced so many emotions reading this book including laughter. When they were funny, they were FUNNY. I even walked away with a sense of pride in reading these stories because no matter what they put our people through, they will rise. To live to tell this story, you are nothing short of a miracle. Keep these Veterans and all Veterans and their families in your prayers.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Hunter

    The stories told by the combat veterans in Bloods will disturb you, anger you, inspire you and break your heart. Some of the oral histories are candid about the atrocities committed during the war. Nearly every veteran discussed the racism they endured in the service. By far one of the best narratives of the Vietnam War.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Celine

    An important history that reflects how truly complex and complicated the Vietnam War was for Black Americans. There is no commentary included, only the stories of those who lived through the experience. I wish there was more of this kind of history-telling.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    It feels strange to rate something such as the personal histories of these men, and the hardships they had to go through because of American Imperialism sending them to a country that didn't want them there. I learned a lot of things through these men's stories.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    Gruesome and uncensored, "Bloods" is the most emotionally captivating books of the Vietnam War.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Rutherford

    Good black history title.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Camille

    perspectives, plural. a major key.

  28. 4 out of 5

    carol

    Tough.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mitch Cloke

    Absolutely harrowing when you delve into some of the atrocities recounted in the book. A must read. Did cause a nightmare or two.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rafael Suleiman

    A very good account of the history of Black soldiers in Vietnam.

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