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Avatar: The Last Airbender - The Promise, Part 1

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The war is over...but the adventure has just begun! Picking up exactly where Avatar: The Last Airbender left off, The Promise takes Aang to a Fire Nation colony in the heart of the Earth Nation, where tensions between neighbors threaten to shatter the world's newfound peace—putting the Avatar on a collision course with one of his closest friends, Fire Lord Zuko! The war is over...but the adventure has just begun! Picking up exactly where Avatar: The Last Airbender left off, The Promise takes Aang to a Fire Nation colony in the heart of the Earth Nation, where tensions between neighbors threaten to shatter the world's newfound peace—putting the Avatar on a collision course with one of his closest friends, Fire Lord Zuko!


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The war is over...but the adventure has just begun! Picking up exactly where Avatar: The Last Airbender left off, The Promise takes Aang to a Fire Nation colony in the heart of the Earth Nation, where tensions between neighbors threaten to shatter the world's newfound peace—putting the Avatar on a collision course with one of his closest friends, Fire Lord Zuko! The war is over...but the adventure has just begun! Picking up exactly where Avatar: The Last Airbender left off, The Promise takes Aang to a Fire Nation colony in the heart of the Earth Nation, where tensions between neighbors threaten to shatter the world's newfound peace—putting the Avatar on a collision course with one of his closest friends, Fire Lord Zuko!

30 review for Avatar: The Last Airbender - The Promise, Part 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    April (Aprilius Maximus)

    1.) The Promise ★★★★.5 2.) The Search ★★★★.5 3.) The Rift ★★★★ 4.) Smoke and Shadow ★★★★.5 5.) North and South ★★★★.5 ----------------------------------------------- 4.5 stars This is so great - it really tackles a lot of things that we can really relate to in our world too. It mainly deals with colonialism and the aftermath of a city that is not fire nation and not earth kingdom, but both, and what this means for the future of this world. I also really liked how they included something similar to the 1.) The Promise ★★★★.5 2.) The Search ★★★★.5 3.) The Rift ★★★★ 4.) Smoke and Shadow ★★★★.5 5.) North and South ★★★★.5 ----------------------------------------------- 4.5 stars This is so great - it really tackles a lot of things that we can really relate to in our world too. It mainly deals with colonialism and the aftermath of a city that is not fire nation and not earth kingdom, but both, and what this means for the future of this world. I also really liked how they included something similar to the whole 'my culture is not a costume' movement that happened a few years ago (and that some people still need to learn about tbh). That being said, if Aang and (view spoiler)[Katara (hide spoiler)] call each other sweetie one more time, I'm gonna puke. Original review - Avatar is everything and if you don't think so, bite me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    MY BABIES 😍😍😍😍 This was exactly as precious and adorable and nostalgic as I expected it to be, and I'm just sad that I didn't read it a long time ago. As someone who has been a diehard A:TLA fan since literally the world premiere of s01e01, I was a little bit apprehensive about finally picking this up, but it holds up the values and humor of the show SO WELL and it was just so delightful to see my little bendy babies growing up a little. Plus, Zuko was his usual conflicted cinnamon roll self 😍 If MY BABIES 😍😍😍😍 This was exactly as precious and adorable and nostalgic as I expected it to be, and I'm just sad that I didn't read it a long time ago. As someone who has been a diehard A:TLA fan since literally the world premiere of s01e01, I was a little bit apprehensive about finally picking this up, but it holds up the values and humor of the show SO WELL and it was just so delightful to see my little bendy babies growing up a little. Plus, Zuko was his usual conflicted cinnamon roll self 😍 If you'll all excuse me, I'm pretty sure the next few days are just going to consist of me binge-watching my DVDs of the show (for the eighteenth time).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sana

    I LOVE THIS SO MUCH, I CAN LITERALLY SCREAM ABOUT THIS FOR ETERNITY. This book literally picks up right after the show ends (I was wrong about the other comic) and it's fucking intense as hell. Full review to come because I'm too busy binging the rest of the books in this series and that ending was fucking INSANE. I LOVE THIS SO MUCH, I CAN LITERALLY SCREAM ABOUT THIS FOR ETERNITY. This book literally picks up right after the show ends (I was wrong about the other comic) and it's fucking intense as hell. Full review to come because I'm too busy binging the rest of the books in this series and that ending was fucking INSANE.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Avatar: The Last Airbender (The Promise, #1), Gene Luen Yang, Bryan Konietzko, Michael Dante DiMartino, Gurihiru (Illustrator) The events of The Promise begin immediately after the last episode of the original series, "Avatar Aang", before jumping forward one whole year. It is followed by Avatar: The Last Airbender – The Search. Part One: Following Fire Lord Ozai's defeat and the conclusion of the Hundred Year War, the Harmony Restoration Movement is established to remove the Fire Nation Colonies Avatar: The Last Airbender (The Promise, #1), Gene Luen Yang, Bryan Konietzko, Michael Dante DiMartino, Gurihiru (Illustrator) The events of The Promise begin immediately after the last episode of the original series, "Avatar Aang", before jumping forward one whole year. It is followed by Avatar: The Last Airbender – The Search. Part One: Following Fire Lord Ozai's defeat and the conclusion of the Hundred Year War, the Harmony Restoration Movement is established to remove the Fire Nation Colonies in the Earth Kingdom and relocate the colonists to the Fire Nation. Having become the new Fire Lord, Zuko makes Aang promise to kill him, should he turn out like his father. ... Part Two: Aang and Katara travel to the city of Ba Sing Se to meet with Kuei. Upon arriving in the metropolis, Aang learns that an Avatar Aang fan club has been set up to honor him. Aang briefly enjoys the company of his fans, since they remind him of his old life among the Air Nomads. ... Part Three: Returning to Yu Dao, Aang and Katara learn that the people of the city have formed the Yu Dao Resistance, in response to the Earth Kingdom protesters, with Sneers as one of the members. Aang also encounters the Yu Dao chapter of the Avatar Aang Fan Club, who had been informed of the approaching conflict by the Ba Sing Se chapter, but becomes offended when he sees the members wearing airbending master tattoos, considering this an insult against his culture. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز نهم ماه فوریه سال 2021میلادی از این مجموعه کتابهای زیر نیز به فارسی ترجمه منتشر شده اند عنوان: آواتار مه سایه: آخرین باد افراز؛ نویسنده برایان کنیتزکو؛ ویرایش تصاویر هشام میرکریمی؛ مترجم سمیه موسوی؛ تهران، آوای ونداد، 1395؛ در 40ص؛ مصور، رنگی؛ شابک 9786007139592؛ موضوع داستانهای فکاهی مصور از نویسندگان ایالات متحده آمریکا؛ سده 21م عنوان: مه و سایه: آخرین باد افراز (آواتار دو)؛ نویسنده جین اوئن یانگ؛ ویرایش تصاویر هشام میرکریمی؛ مترجم سمیه موسوی؛ تهران، آوای ونداد، 1395؛ در 36ص؛ مصور، رنگی؛ شابک 9786007139578؛ آواتار: آخرین بادافزار، سری تلویزیونی پویانمایی «آمریکایی»، در سبک اکشن-ماجراجویی، و فانتزی است، که توسط «مایکل دنت دیمارتینو»، و «بریان کنیتزکو»، تهیه شده ‌است، و در سه فصل، میان سال‌های 2005میلادی، تا 2008میلادی، از شبکهٔ تلویزیونی «نیکلودئون» پخش می‌شد؛ داستان مجموعه، در دنیایی می‌گذرد، که برخی از افراد، می‌توانند، یکی از چهار عنصر کلاسیک («آب»، «باد»، «خاک» یا «آتش») را، با ترکیب هنرهای رزمی «چینی»، و تواناییهایی، کنترل کنند؛ قهرمانان داستان، پسری دوازده ساله، به نام «آنگ»، و دوستان او هستند، که باید با شکست دادن فرمانروای «آتش»، صلح را به دنیا برگردانند؛ مجموعهٔ افسانهٔ «کورا»، دنبالهٔ این سریال، به ‌شمار می‌رود؛ مجموعه کمیکهایی هم درباره ی چند سال پس از اتمام این مجموعه، منتشر شده است؛ دنیای این داستان، به چهار بخش اصلی تقسیم شده ‌است که شامل «قبایل آب»، «حکومت خاک»، «کشور آتش» و «عشایر باد» است؛ در این سرزمین‌ها، برخی از مردمان، می‌توانند عنصر ملی خود را، کنترل کنند، و به «افزارش» درآورند، که به آنها «عنصر افزار» گفته میشود؛ سبک نبرد هر ملت، برگرفته از، یک سبک رزمی شرقی است؛ در این میان، آن که «آواتار» نامیده می‌شود، می‌تواند هر چهار عنصر را، کنترل کند، و مسئول برقراری صلح، و سازش، میان ملل، و همچنین میان دنیای فیزیکی، و دنیای ارواح است؛ در هر لحظه، تنها یک «آواتار»، می‌تواند وجود داشته باشد، و در صورت مرگ، در قالب شخص دیگری، از ملت بعدی (به ترتیب در چرخهٔ «باد»، «آب»، «خاک»، «آتش»)، دوباره به دنیا می‌آید؛ نخستین فرد، که نام «آواتار» به خود گرفت، «آواتار وان» بود، که به یاری «راوا (نوعی روح)»، توانست هر چهار عنصر را، کنترل کند، و بزرگ‌ترین دشمنش «واتو (نوعی روح خبیث)» را، شکست دهد، و در اعماق جنگل زندانی کند: در فصل دوم «آواتار کورا» هم با چنین داستانی روبرو خواهید شد؛ پس از مشخص شدن، به عنوان «آواتار»، او تحت تعلیم عنصر تولد خود، و سه عنصر دیگر، به ترتیب چرخهٔ «آواتاری»، به علاوه، تربیت روحانی قرار می‌گیرد؛ چون روح «آواتار»، نامیراست، هر «آواتار»، می‌تواند با «آواتارهای» گذشته ی خود، رابطه برقرار کند، و از نصایح، و تجربه‌ های آن‌ها، بهره گیرد؛ همچنین «آواتار»، مجهز به «حالت آواتار» است، که یک سازوکار دفاعی بوده، و با کمک روح «آواتار»، و دانش گذشتگان خود، می‌تواند، اعمال طاقت‌فرسای افزارشی، یا حتی فیزیکی را، با آسانی انجام دهد، ولی اگر، در این حالت کشته شود، چرخهٔ «آواتاری» می‌شکند، و روح «آواتار»، نابود می‌شود، و دیگر زاده نمی‌شود به طور کلی، این داستان (و همچنین دنباله اش)، بسیار از فرهنگ شرق، برگرفته شده، و همچنین اشارات بسیاری، به مسائل معنوی دارد (البته به دین خاصی اشاره ندارد)؛ اگرچه در این سریال، تنها نقش «آواتار»، شکست دادن به یک فرمانروای ظالم است، اما با تماشای دنباله ی این سریال، متوجه خواهید شد، که در واقع، یک «آواتار»، به معنای کامل، برقرار کننده ی تعادل است؛ بین ارواح، و انسانها، عناصر خوبی و بدی و...؛ همچنین از نظر جنسیت، و شخصیت، «آواتار»ها مدام گوناگون، و متضاد همدیگر، ظاهر میشوند، تا تعادل، برهم نخورد؛ همانطور که به راحتی، میتوان تفاوت «آنگ» و «کورا» را احساس کرد در این سریال، به ارزشها، و مسائل شخصیتی، اشارات بسیار، و ظریفی شده است، که در بین کارتونهایی از این قبیل، به ندرت یافت میشود؛ در واقع میتوان گفت، که ایده و داستانِ چندان نوآورانه ای، ندارد، و بیشتر، بر شخصیت پردازیهای جذاب، تمرکز شده است تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 21/11/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mrinmayi

    If you guys see continuous Avatar updates....don't think I have gone crazy!!!*laughs Azula style* I am OFFICIALYY ADDICTED to this series..and I will be bingeing it Will write the memes reviews later😅 Till then..enjoy these memes!! Sokka is my soul twin bro(?) or is it twin soul bro(?) *confused Mrin*!! Update 1 HELP!!!! HELP!!!! This comic illiterate aka Mrin needs help I am so confused how to start this series Do I directly start with "THE PROMISE" ???!! Or do I need to read any other comic before it?? If you guys see continuous Avatar updates....don't think I have gone crazy!!!*laughs Azula style* I am OFFICIALYY ADDICTED to this series..and I will be bingeing it Will write the memes reviews later😅 Till then..enjoy these memes!! Sokka is my soul twin bro(?) or is it twin soul bro(?) *confused Mrin*!! Update 1 HELP!!!! HELP!!!! This comic illiterate aka Mrin needs help I am so confused how to start this series Do I directly start with "THE PROMISE" ???!! Or do I need to read any other comic before it??!! Because each book has 3 parts right??! But they are one book(?) Someone mind helping me understand the reading order???!! GR list doesn't help!! It got me even more confused!! Cause it has added some single volumes *confusion level increased 284734*

  6. 5 out of 5

    ✨ jamieson ✨

    Aaaaaahh I love my babies so much I MISS THE GAANG EVERYDAY Avatar is ?? the highest quality tv show of All Time and thats the tea Anyway this was super fun and I just loved getting back in the world even if it's only in a small way. I definitely think this tackles an important and massive problem within the Avatar verse to the concept and theming were great. I also think the character voices were so well written it felt very in character and I could hear the characters voices Aang is my son I'd p Aaaaaahh I love my babies so much I MISS THE GAANG EVERYDAY Avatar is ?? the highest quality tv show of All Time and thats the tea Anyway this was super fun and I just loved getting back in the world even if it's only in a small way. I definitely think this tackles an important and massive problem within the Avatar verse to the concept and theming were great. I also think the character voices were so well written it felt very in character and I could hear the characters voices Aang is my son I'd protect him with my life GOD they all make me so emo

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mrinmayi

    When Aang call Katara "sweetie" Sokka(in Kiyoshi warriors uniform): Mrin( Chilling with Toph) : When Aang call Katara "sweetie" Sokka(in Kiyoshi warriors uniform): Mrin( Chilling with Toph) :

  8. 5 out of 5

    may ➹

    even beyond the show Zuko’s arc is still 👌👌👌👌👌👌👌👌👌👌

  9. 4 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    Sokka's "oogies" reminds me of Mean Girls 🤦😂 I love the characters already! One of the best artwork ever in graphic novels. I am sure the show is good but I will to the graphic novel series as for now. Fire Lord, I am obsessed with this character. Love his character. He has a legacy to maintain and keep up. So much more is coming up. The only thing I don't like at all is what makes Sokka to overuse his "oogies" - the unwanted PDA between the Avatar and his girlfriend. It's annoying when it becomes to Sokka's "oogies" reminds me of Mean Girls 🤦😂 I love the characters already! One of the best artwork ever in graphic novels. I am sure the show is good but I will to the graphic novel series as for now. Fire Lord, I am obsessed with this character. Love his character. He has a legacy to maintain and keep up. So much more is coming up. The only thing I don't like at all is what makes Sokka to overuse his "oogies" - the unwanted PDA between the Avatar and his girlfriend. It's annoying when it becomes too cheesy 🤦 The characters are intense. The character development is so damn good. The plot is too good. The other side characters have a voice of their own. Conflicts. Politics. Magic. Fantastical elements. Romance. Friendship. Promises to keep. Martial arts 🖤 my heart's blackness shines! Ends on a cliffhanger though. The real fight is coming up!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Connor

    My Video Review: https://youtu.be/kH_vuaoXI2A I definitely think this is the edition that people should read these comics out of with all of the extra behind the scenes notes. I already wrote out my notes to do a video on this, so it'll be posted here when it's done. I love Avatar though, so expect some mild gushing. My Video Review: https://youtu.be/kH_vuaoXI2A I definitely think this is the edition that people should read these comics out of with all of the extra behind the scenes notes. I already wrote out my notes to do a video on this, so it'll be posted here when it's done. I love Avatar though, so expect some mild gushing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    shi ❦

    Aaargh the ending was not very satisfying to me but it was still so good!! But seriously. My Zuko deserves better than this. Hmpf. Here's a few Zuko appreciation GIFs just because. (Also I’m a fire sign (Aries) and my Chinese zodiac sign is a dragon 🐉 - just sayin’ that maybe that’s what this is partially coming from 😂) I mean... And now, the best for last. People explaining to me that Zuko is a fictional character. Zuko to me: Aaargh the ending was not very satisfying to me but it was still so good!! But seriously. My Zuko deserves better than this. Hmpf. Here's a few Zuko appreciation GIFs just because. (Also I’m a fire sign (Aries) and my Chinese zodiac sign is a dragon 🐉 - just sayin’ that maybe that’s what this is partially coming from 😂) I mean... And now, the best for last. People explaining to me that Zuko is a fictional character. Zuko to me:

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brigid ✩

    After reading: Oh ... whoops, I still need to review this. Heh heh. Before reading: Well OF COURSE I WILL READ THIS. I HAVE TO KNOW WHAT HAPPENS AND STUFF. So yeah, for those of you who don't know, there are going to be these two graphic novels which basically fill in the gaps between The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra (which comes out ... who knows when, but sometime next year). So like, hopefully stuff will be explained. And yeah. I'm so tired I can't even think right now. But YAAAY I'M EX After reading: Oh ... whoops, I still need to review this. Heh heh. Before reading: Well OF COURSE I WILL READ THIS. I HAVE TO KNOW WHAT HAPPENS AND STUFF. So yeah, for those of you who don't know, there are going to be these two graphic novels which basically fill in the gaps between The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra (which comes out ... who knows when, but sometime next year). So like, hopefully stuff will be explained. And yeah. I'm so tired I can't even think right now. But YAAAY I'M EXCITED. It still won't be the same as having the TV show, and I'll still be drooling like a rabid dog waiting for TLOK, but OH WELL it's better than nothing. Or than watching the original series fifty billion times. (JK, actually ... watching the original series fifty billion times is awesome. It never gets old.) ANYWAY, I read a leak from this book via Tumblr. (Sorry, I had a link but it doesn't work anymore ... It was probably taken down.) So yeah, I'm not really sure if I'm excited or pissed off. I guess it depends on how everything turns out. Basically, these are the spoilers as revealed by the leak: (view spoiler)[ - Characters like Roku, Mai, Suki and the Kyoshi Warriors, Ty Lee, and the Freedom Fighters will be making an appearance YAY. BRIGID HAPPY. - Zuko asks Aang to “end him” should he ever get out of hand like his father Kind of clichéd, but .... *sighs* still very Zuko-like. Also if Aang kills Zuko, that would be, well, kind of stupid. - Roku agrees that Aang’s responsibility to the world is greater than his friendship Wow, Roku. You're a nice guy. - Yes…Aang and Katara refer to each other as “sweetie”. OKAYYYYYY. I ... just .... I don't even know what to say. If you read the excerpt, you'll see what I mean. Look, I'm a total Kataang supporter, but really, it's a little too much. Or maybe way too much. It's kind of overkill. Like, alright, I get that they're an item now, but the whole "sweetie" thing just feels uncharacteristic of both of them. It really weirds me out. - The colonies are indeed in a state of unrest, and there have been riots agains the peace movement Woohoooo. MORE VIOLENCE. - ZUKO RECLAIMS CROWN AS MASTER OF BAD DECISIONS AND GOES TO HIS FATHER FOR HELP IN THE LAST STINKIN PANEL. Oh, Zuko. You never learn ANYTHING, do you?! (hide spoiler)] Well, that's all I've got to say right now. And thus ends my nerdy little rant.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

    I LOVED THIS SO MUCH!! ❤️️ I finished watching ATLA on Sunday, and I'm SO glad I had the comics to dive straight into because I needed (and still need) more. This was PERFECT! It feels exactly like the show (the vibe, the humour, the characters, everything). All ATLA fans must read this!! So flippin' excited to get to The Search I LOVED THIS SO MUCH!! ❤️️ I finished watching ATLA on Sunday, and I'm SO glad I had the comics to dive straight into because I needed (and still need) more. This was PERFECT! It feels exactly like the show (the vibe, the humour, the characters, everything). All ATLA fans must read this!! So flippin' excited to get to The Search

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Elend Wolf

    "When you are in a position of power, you must put the needs of the world above your own." I need this so much I've watched Avatar: The Last Airbender twice in my life, one when I was little and the second a couple of weeks ago, and that has been enough to know that it will forever be one of my favorite TV shows. So when I discovered that these comics existed I just had to get my hands on them. That's a decision for which I'm pretty grateful. The comic has the same feel that the show did, "When you are in a position of power, you must put the needs of the world above your own." I need this so much I've watched Avatar: The Last Airbender twice in my life, one when I was little and the second a couple of weeks ago, and that has been enough to know that it will forever be one of my favorite TV shows. So when I discovered that these comics existed I just had to get my hands on them. That's a decision for which I'm pretty grateful. The comic has the same feel that the show did, and since it picks up from where the show left off you don't miss anything. The characters were just as awesome as always and I was already needing to see my baby Zuko again. So far we have just gotten a little glimpse of Iroh for what I'm a bit disappointed, but oh well. The plot centers around the difficult period that the world enters after the end of a 100 years war and how everyone will adjust at the same time that some hard decision must be made and compromises met. Everything is complicated since you have to try help people make peace with a nation that had been oppressing them for so long, and seeing both sides of any agreement is.... hard. Zuko shines in this and proves to be somewhat wiser than the rest -with a little help- and is starting to see a problem that everyone was trying to either ignore or most people don't even see. Yes, nobody knows what to do yet-I have an inkling thanks to The Legend of Korra which I've not seen but know about- and I know that when they reach that understanding is not gonna be easy to keep. The ending has me nervous though, Zuko go to Iroh I'm pretty sure he will have a great idea of how to help! " 'You ready sweetie?' 'I'm ready sweetie.' " This cracked me up so badly! To be honest it was a bit too cheesy. I'll get right to the next issue now!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sonja ✧・゚。★・゚☾

    If you're a fan of Avatar: The Last Airbender, I recommend checking out this graphic novel! Why You Should Read The Promise:• The comic is set just after the end of ATLA, so this is the perfect book to read if the ending of the series left you wanting more! • The artwork is stunning, it feels like watching an ATLA episode! • Toph is a badass as usual • Zuko is the Fire Lord™️ • And the promise is quite intriguing too. Buddy read with my brother Siamak If you're a fan of Avatar: The Last Airbender, I recommend checking out this graphic novel! Why You Should Read The Promise:• The comic is set just after the end of ATLA, so this is the perfect book to read if the ending of the series left you wanting more! • The artwork is stunning, it feels like watching an ATLA episode! • Toph is a badass as usual • Zuko is the Fire Lord™️ • And the promise is quite intriguing too. Buddy read with my brother Siamak

  16. 4 out of 5

    Henny

    I still wish there would be a 4th season but maybe these comics will answer my questions and still my cravings for more of this fantastic universe and characters!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Zahra

    Just finished re-watching the show. And instead of dealing with the sadness that threatened to consume me whole I ignored my feelings and immediately went in search of more Avatar content because that's a totally healthy way to deal with things. Just finished re-watching the show. And instead of dealing with the sadness that threatened to consume me whole I ignored my feelings and immediately went in search of more Avatar content because that's a totally healthy way to deal with things.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Caz (littlebookowl)

    Rating: 4.5 stars

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lanni

    The great thing about this book is also the worst thing about this book. The characterization. Sokka's quips about 'oogies' and general obnoxious-ness are perfectly in character. Toph's rather rude nicknames for her students are perfectly Toph. Even Ty Lee's facial expressions (in the two panels she appears in) are perfect, and somehow Aang and Katara calling each other 'sweetie' seems like exactly the thing they would do. But Aang's agreement with Zuko (a major plot point) is so out of characte The great thing about this book is also the worst thing about this book. The characterization. Sokka's quips about 'oogies' and general obnoxious-ness are perfectly in character. Toph's rather rude nicknames for her students are perfectly Toph. Even Ty Lee's facial expressions (in the two panels she appears in) are perfect, and somehow Aang and Katara calling each other 'sweetie' seems like exactly the thing they would do. But Aang's agreement with Zuko (a major plot point) is so out of character that it ruined the book for me. If Aang refused to kill Ozai, an evil, evil man who had caused so much destruction and pain and death, then he would never even consider killing one of his friends, no matter how evil that friend became. *spoiler alert* Zuko going to his father for advice at the end of the book was also glaringly out of character. I know that his character struggled with doing the right thing throughout the series, and I know that he often relapsed into being the bad guy, but by the end of the TV series, he had gotten past that, and to send him to Ozai for advice instead of Uncle Iroh cheapens his character development. Overall, The Promise is a fun, quick read, but if you're as attached to the characters as I am, it'll probably be a disappointment to you.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    A very solid continuation of the cartoon. The Promise starts out with the Fire Nation relocating all of the colonies they established in the Earth Nation. But problems arise when the older colonies do not want to leave. They've lived there for over a hundred years now and members of Fire and Earth Nation have combined into new families consisting of both. Yang does a good job of capturing the characters from the show. Gurihiru's art is very anime influenced. It's pretty good most of the time but A very solid continuation of the cartoon. The Promise starts out with the Fire Nation relocating all of the colonies they established in the Earth Nation. But problems arise when the older colonies do not want to leave. They've lived there for over a hundred years now and members of Fire and Earth Nation have combined into new families consisting of both. Yang does a good job of capturing the characters from the show. Gurihiru's art is very anime influenced. It's pretty good most of the time but can get overly hammy in places. Received a review copy from Dark Horse and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Delores

    This was well written and the illustrations were spectacular. I loved the Avatar and all the characters. I liked the message of peace and I can't wait to read more! This was well written and the illustrations were spectacular. I loved the Avatar and all the characters. I liked the message of peace and I can't wait to read more!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Leah Waters

    I ADORED this graphic novel! I love seeing Aang's and Katara's relationship, and I love knowing that the story goes on. This series is everything. I ADORED this graphic novel! I love seeing Aang's and Katara's relationship, and I love knowing that the story goes on. This series is everything.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    I am a huge fan of the TV series. When it ended, I was left with a gaping hole in my heart because I had to bid farewell to the Avatar universe, the diverse characters which had captivated me so and to the wise words of General Iroh. I was so glad when I found out that there were graphic novels of the series. The Promise picks up right after the end of the TV series finale. The book serves as an extended epilogue, following the events that occurred after the war. Zuko faces his first great task I am a huge fan of the TV series. When it ended, I was left with a gaping hole in my heart because I had to bid farewell to the Avatar universe, the diverse characters which had captivated me so and to the wise words of General Iroh. I was so glad when I found out that there were graphic novels of the series. The Promise picks up right after the end of the TV series finale. The book serves as an extended epilogue, following the events that occurred after the war. Zuko faces his first great task as a Fire Lord, which may lead to another war. Kudos to the team behind this graphic novel to have pulled this off. Both the writing and art are similar to that of the TV series. The characters also retain their trait and attributes, which is a relief as adaptations really tend to mess that up. The book is far from being epic, but it is lots of fun and captures the essence of the TV series perfectly.

  24. 4 out of 5

    (inactive)

    my heart is so fucking full rn.

  25. 4 out of 5

    nivedha

    a great return to the atla world. it balances humour and drama perfectly, creating an enjoyable and engaging read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Umairah | Sereadipity

    Team Avatar is back! But I can't handle Katara and Aang calling each other 'sweetie' it's unbearable! Team Avatar is back! But I can't handle Katara and Aang calling each other 'sweetie' it's unbearable!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Story There are several story arcs going throughout the book; the main plot is the story of Yu Dao, but there's also the stories of Toph's academy and the Avatar Fan Club, all of which have further events on a more personal level which relate to characters' development. All in all, quite a lot goes in this book. That much is indeed, true, but the pacing of the story flows amazingly well and doesn't lag too much. Even if Part 2 is basically filler, sub-plot and set-up for Part 3, it still feels pa Story There are several story arcs going throughout the book; the main plot is the story of Yu Dao, but there's also the stories of Toph's academy and the Avatar Fan Club, all of which have further events on a more personal level which relate to characters' development. All in all, quite a lot goes in this book. That much is indeed, true, but the pacing of the story flows amazingly well and doesn't lag too much. Even if Part 2 is basically filler, sub-plot and set-up for Part 3, it still feels part of the greater narrative and the time it takes for characterisation is great to go through and doesn't feel like detracting anything from the main plot. The presentation of all three Parts in one hardcover definitely helps in this regard, as they read much better together as a single book. As for the story itself, one major theme presented is colonialism and its effects, which Yang deals with very realistically. This is an issue particularly close to my heart due to my country’s history. After about 170 years under British rule, most Maltese were indeed afraid of being separated from their colonisers due to their daily interaction with them and the fact that their livelihood often depended on the British services stationed here. Yu Dao is a great reflection of the human realities long-term colonisation and inter-cultural integration result in, which should be there considering the length of the War. Having Kunyo in there was also a great way of symbolising the residual resentment at anti-colonialism common Fire Nation citizens may feel. After a hundred years of war and colonialism, it makes not to have everyone suddenly change overnight. While on the issue of inter-cultural relations, it was also interesting to see Yang tackling the issue of cultural appropriation within the framework of the Avatar world. The fan club is shown to be well-meaning and genuinely interested in Air Nomad culture, but their enthusiasm as fans gets the better of them and they offend Aang with their lack of understanding. I also like the fact that the issue makes Aang reflect on his role as the last Airbender. He takes on the responsibility of guardian of his people’s culture and takes it upon himself to ensure it survives by founding the Air Acolytes through the fan club. I also like the way The Promise deals with the conflict between one’s ideals and their relationships. In the post-war Avatar world, the ideal would mean a separation of the nations as they were before the War, but the human reality of the people of Yu Dao has to result in compromise. Sneers starts out trying to live up to his ideals, but when faced with the choice of living with his loved one, he has to give it up for the sake of his human relationship with Kori. Kuei likewise decides not to retake Yu Dao when seeing how people live there together. This point is further beautifully illustrated by paralleling the potential fate of Yu Dao with Aang and Katara’s own future. It was a smart move which raised the stakes by making the issue more personal. Moreover, I like how Yang manages to intertwine and collect all story threads and sub-plots together, even the most seemingly divergent ones. Kunyo is emboldened to re-take his dojo from Toph due to Zuko retracting his support from the HRM. Even the Avatar Fan Club plot, whose origin does not owe anything to the main plot, becomes the catalyst for further reflection by Aang on inter-cultural relations and integration and the larger inter-nation scale. The way Aang perceived stronger nations just taking on some aspects of weaker nations’ culture as a costume was a great way to tie in the issues of colonialism and integration. In interviews Yang explains that he was chosen to pen the sequel/s to the original show because he is a fan – referring his webcomic criticising the live-action film in particular - and it shows. Despite Nick perhaps wanting to target a younger demographic, Yang tries to imbue it with the same complexity of the original, and he does succeed (with help from Mike and Bryan, of course), as seen above. He also manages to get in some in-continuity jokes only fans would know, such as Sokka lamenting the loss of his space sword or commenting how Toph’s touchy about normal-sighted people complaining about the dark. Even Toph’s meteorite bracelet is brought back and becomes an interesting (though minor) plot device. Yang clearly reveres the original show enough to want to make a worthy successor. In fact, the only major plot point which admittedly disappointed me was the climax. More than anything else, it’s not the actual story point per se, but the execution which irked me a bit. In two and a half books we were being told a battle was coming, but when it came, I was rather unimpressed. It just ended too soon before I was given a chance to take it in and get the sense of loss and destruction such a battle should have. The whole sequence just a felt a bit rushed and headed to a peaceful conclusion – which happens off-screen - too quickly. I get it that 'The Promise' is about the eponymous promise, but I would have also liked to see the actual meeting between Kuei and Zuko to see how much the two have learned from the experience. My first impression upon reading the ending was that I had basically gone through an inflated prelude to 'The Search'. While it makes sense that Yu Dao does not instantly become the Republic City we know of in 'The Legend of Korra' (and it will continue to evolve in that direction in future installments of the graphic novel series), it would have been better to get a holistic sense of closure with just a hint of things to come. This in no way takes away from the other merits of the story, but it leaves me hoping some threads are picked up again in future. Characters First of all, I’d like to point out that all returning characters’ voices are written such that they really do capture those of the original series. I had no problem projecting the original voice actors’ performances onto their respective character’s dialogue in my head. While all characters get the same treatment in that regard, The Promise is squarely focused on Aang and Zuko dealing with and moving on from the legacies of their respective predecessors (I’m sure you’ve deduced it already from the cover). Aang tries to live up to his responsibilities as the Avatar in the post-War world and avoid Roku’s regrets and mistakes, thus accepting to make the promise to Zuko. In the end, however, he chooses not to live up to his promise because of their friendship, and to go on his own path. His relationship with Roku also changes in parallel with this realisation, which is just a pleasure to watch. Roku was marked by the fact that his leniency towards Sozin as a friend was not returned in kind and led to the War. I don’t know how Aang initially expected Roku to go past that, considering how he already had told him to kill Ozai and saw Zuko’s promise as a moment of clarity. Seeing Aang realise this and decide to break off his link to Roku was heart-wrenching, as it should have been with the loss of a mentor and friend. Aang has already shown himself to favour his relationships to the traditional detachment expected of the Avatar in 'The Guru', so it’s great to see that trend continue here. He actually goes further when he comes to accept this fact about himself and that he doesn’t want to change it, even if future (and past) Avatars may want to. Aang first missing his culture and then realising he’s responsible for its survival was also a great step forward for his character (as has been discussed above). Here we also get to see Aang as Katara’s boyfriend; well, I have to agree with Sokka about the oogies on that one. They’re naturally still going through the initial lovey-dovey phase of their relationship, something I’ve seen quite often with my own friends. I’m quite willing to let it pass as it is realistic, just as long as we see them move on in future to a point where they don’t have to call each other ‘sweetie’ so often. Zuko is in a similar situation, trying to live up to his newfound responsibilities as Fire Lord without turning into his father. Much like Aang, the pressures of the throne and the expectations it carries lead him to search the advice of his predecessor. I’ve seen some fans criticise this development as a regression of the character, but I couldn’t disagree more. Being the leader of the Fire Nation places Zuko in a situation where he must protect the interests of his people against the interests of other sovereigns. Irrespective of his ideals – and here I remember Iroh calling him an idealist in the show’s finale - he must fulfil his duties as a statesman. The only person who can really understand this is his father, Ozai, who really does have some “wisdom of experience” (note that he was right about the Earth King’s intentions not to show weakness, for instance). While on the issue of Ozai, I have to say I like the fact that he is somewhat humanised and calmed down in the story. His behaviour and words confirm something that wasn’t delved into in the show: his political thought is Realist. Ozai believes that sovereignty requires amorality for the sake of safeguarding the interests of the state. Whereas the original series showed him to be a more evil character in other aspects of his life to be sure, at least here we get to see some more motivation and understanding for his decisions as Fire Lord apart from his just wanting to ‘take over the world’. These represent much more complex issues of what is right and wrong, which is seen in Zuko’s decision not to ignore his father’s advice completely. Much like Aang begins to see Roku as not completely good, Zuko begins to see his father as not completely evil. Aang moves away from Roku’s absolutes, but Zuko does decide not to let the Avatar decide right and wrong for him, as Ozai told him to do. It’s the intention behind this decision that distances him from his father, as he does have a good moral compass and does want to judge his actions as morally correct. Indeed, Iroh does represent a better mentor for him, as his behaviour and words of encouragement at the end of 'The Promise' are a lot less stifling than Ozai’s and show a lot more faith in Zuko. In fact, it left me asking why Zuko didn’t contact his uncle sooner. I can understand his intentions to give him his well-deserved peace, but Zuko’s stubbornness in the face of his previous respective experiences with his father and uncle is, perhaps, a bit too convenient. With Aang and Zuko being the focus of the story and get fantastic character development, the other main characters are, admittedly, more static. Sokka remains just the same meat and sarcasm guy we all know and love. He cracks jokes, invents names for things, comes up with ideas, and his bickering with his sister is just as fun for us to watch as ever. His interactions with Toph are also fun as the two form an great duo in Part 2. Katara doesn’t do anything of real consequence other than being Aang’s counsel until Part 3, in which she shows his and Zuko’s flawed approaches to Yu Dao. Suki doesn’t get much to do either, apart from that one panel which had so many of us thinking we were going to see something between her and Zuko. Supporters of the strong female characters of the series may not like them being relegated to supporting their male counterparts, but the scope and size of the story couldn’t really leave room for other options. Mai in particular suffered most, as she’s written off rather quickly in what was, in my opinion, a rather out-of-character moment (considering all she went through for the sake of her love for Zuko). Toph, on the other hand, gets the most attention of the remaining main cast. We see her take on the role of teacher as a calling – while still being, well, Toph - and have her first doubts about her teaching methods. Toph was always great for not only being such a fun character, but also for occasionally demonstrating great self-awareness and a human fragility. We get to see more of that here when she doubts if her treatment of the students is simply her inflicting her own pain onto others. It was a great touch to see her visibly moved when everything seemed to work out, even if she had to show her students the affection behind her tough exterior unintentionally to get results. Other minor returning characters’ development varies. Smellerbee and Longshot remain understandably hardened adversaries of the Fire Nation, considering the War recently cost them their leader, Jet. (While on this topic, I would have loved an actual comment from them on Jet’s fate and how they escaped!) Sneers goes through the most development as he comes to terms with the fact that he values his relationship with Kori more than his ideals, gaining a more nuanced vision of the world like other Freedom Fighters before him. Earth King Kuei is shown to have learned from his experiences during the events of the show, and now understandably seems determined not to show the same weakness as before. However, befitting his greatly sheltered life, he is still afraid to lead the troops personally. I find it strange, though, that he did not encounter other towns like Yu Dao during his travels around the world while in exile. So where does this leave the new characters introduced in The Promise? Well, for the most part, are pretty one-dimensional and serve more as agents of the story than actual characters to be developed. Kori remains the same until the end, her most defining feature being her will to protect her home and way of life. In his commentary Yang says he thinks of Toph’s students as personifications of certain vices and compared them to the different Lanterns from Geoff Johns’s 'Green Lantern', which you may agree with. (However, I don’t this comparison does the latter justice as at least all Johns’s characters do develop.) Sure, the students learn to see something else in themselves other than their stereotypes, but we don’t see their newfound self-confidence go much further than allowing them to metalbend. Art I admit that my fist impression of the art was that it is too childish and bright. I had already seen Gurihiru’s art in 'The Lost Adventures', and couldn’t help but feel that others artists featured there would have been better-suited. However, the art grew on me and I came to appreciate it on many points. The covers are brilliant, and can be seen in all their glory in the Library Edition as all lettering and titles are removed. The facial expressions are spot-on, the panels are for the most part arranged with certain dynamism, and I liked the new designs both for returning characters and new ones. There is also a certain attention to detail which could be found in the original series. For instance, Aang subtly ages and becomes taller than Katara over the course of the story, and the metal boar used in Sokka and Toph’s scheme is not discarded but later adorns the entrance of Toph’s school. My only complaint on the art is that I can’t help but feel that the fight scenes and choreography from the show didn’t translate well to graphic novel form. I actually do not blame Gurihiru at all on this count; bending is a fighting style which inspired awe due to a combination of precise movements and sound. Managing to achieve the same style in comic book panels and without the use of sound would be a great challenge for any artist. Library Edition Additions The most obvious addition given the Library Edition is, of course, the actual presentation. Like all similar Dark Horse books, the hardcover is great quality and feels durable. Additionally, the page size presented here is larger then the original paperbacks. Unfortunately I don’t currently have the regular edition of the three separate Parts, so I can’t compare sizes or the images properly. However, it should be noted that, despite the larger size of the page, the actual graphic novel panels are surrounded by a rather wide margin for annotations, so I’d calculate the images being only around 20-25% larger. With regard to the annotations themselves, they’re a great addition to the actual story. They often give insight into the inspiration behind certain concepts, themes and/or the creative process behind certain visual elements. They can give certain trivia, like Yu Dao’s inspiration being partly based on Japanese islands previously under German rule which still produce beer to this day. At other points, the details provided help the reader read into the details of the story more appreciatively, like the place of euthanasia by consent and prayer in Buddhism and the theme of colonialism. Sometimes, Yang includes comments which exude his fan’s glee, like his weirdness at having to revisit the crucial final scene between Zuko and Ozai and his love of all things Toph. The hardcover edition also features some minor edits, often to correct mistakes or goofs found in the original. For instance, the Zukos’s scar from his confrontation with Azula is added to Part 3, among others. The concept art at the end of the book is good, even if nothing ground-breaking. We get to see the character models of the main cast (whose initial designs, it turns out, were actually improved upon), the initial sketches of the covers, and other minor tid-bits of information. While all fascinating, I think they could be improved upon. My guess is that with all the information given in the annotations throughout the book, not much was actually left for the final pages. Verdict Even if with The Promise is not a perfect return to form for 'Avatar: The Last Airbender', it is most definitely a welcome one. Despite its flaws, it gets a definite recommendation from me. Avatar fans will love getting to see their favourite characters again. To non-Avatar fans, I'd recommend seeing the series first to enjoy the book as much as possible.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ronyell

    Introduction: Now, I am a huge fan of the “Avatar: The Last Airbender” TV series and when I heard that there was going to be a comic book series that would continue from where the TV series last ended, I was so excited that I had to pick up this series! “Avatar the Last Airbender: The Promise Part One” continues from where the TV series ended its run and I have to admit that this was a brilliant continuation of the world-acclaimed TV series! What is this story about? After the events of Introduction: Now, I am a huge fan of the “Avatar: The Last Airbender” TV series and when I heard that there was going to be a comic book series that would continue from where the TV series last ended, I was so excited that I had to pick up this series! “Avatar the Last Airbender: The Promise Part One” continues from where the TV series ended its run and I have to admit that this was a brilliant continuation of the world-acclaimed TV series! What is this story about? After the events of “Avatar the Last Airbender” where Aang finally defeats Fire Lord Ozai and brings peace to the world, Aang along with the new Fire Lord, Prince Zuko, try to bring peace to the world by establishing the Harmony Restoration Movement. Unfortunately, when Zuko goes to visit the Earth Nation, he realizes that there are still tensions from the Fire Nation’s takeover and this might put his friendship with Aang to the test. What’s even worse is that before all this, Zuko asked Aang to kill him if he starts acting like his father and Aang is unsure of doing this, since he is a peaceful person who does not like to kill anyone. Will Aang go through with his promise to kill Zuko if he starts acting like his father? Read this volume to find out! What I loved about this story: Gene Luen Yang’s writing: I never would have thought that I see the day that there would be a comic book adaptation of “Avatar the Last Airbender” and manages to stick faithfully to the spirit of the TV series (unlike a certain movie adaptation of the TV series). Gene Luen Yang’s writing is both intense and hilarious at the same time and it brilliantly captures the spirit of the TV series! I loved the way that Gene Luen Yang wrote each character as they remain faithful to their TV counterparts, such as Sokka still being the comic relief of the group, Aang still retaining his peaceful and child like nature and Zuko still being the troubled son of the former Fire Lord. I loved the way that Gene Luen Yang added more character development to Zuko’s character as now we are seeing that Zuko is worried about becoming just like his father and is also trying to handle the duties of being the new Fire Lord. It really added so much drama and tension to Zuko’s character as we find ourselves wondering whether or not Zuko will become like his father and how he would handle the duties of being the Fire Lord without resorting to the same tyrannical tendencies of his father. I also loved the way that Gene Luen Yang made the stories flow so well with the events that happened in the TV series as it felt like I was watching another episode of “Avatar the Last Airbender” (or in this case, the fourth season that never came) and it makes me feel so delighted to see more development from each of these characters! Gurihiru’s artwork: Gurihiru’s artwork brilliantly captured the designs of the characters from the TV series such as Katara still having her long brown hair and large blue eyes and Aang still having his large blue and innocent eyes, while his bald head still contains the famous blue arrow tattooed on his head. I also loved the way that Gurihiru drew the characters’ clothing and the world they live in as it brilliantly reflects the culture of Asia, making the world truly exotic! Final Thoughts: Overall, “Avatar the Last Airbender: The Promise Part One” is a brilliant volume that superbly reenact the world-acclaim TV series and I am definitely looking forward to reading the second part of this series pretty soon! Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  29. 5 out of 5

    CF Dracarys

    I'm so happy these graphic novels exist. They perfectly continue the story of the show and capture each character flawlessly. I forget I'm reading a graphic novel and feel like I'm still watching the show. Plus, Azula comes back too and she's one of my favorite villains ever!! I'm so happy these graphic novels exist. They perfectly continue the story of the show and capture each character flawlessly. I forget I'm reading a graphic novel and feel like I'm still watching the show. Plus, Azula comes back too and she's one of my favorite villains ever!!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Vee

    So much fun! Loved to see my favorite characters again on a new adventure ❤️.

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