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How the Second Grade Got $8,205.50 to Visit the Statue of Liberty

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The class tries to earn money for a field trip. Susan Olson, second-grade treasurer and reporter, here dutifully records the comical details that surround this adventurous tale under the headings, "Expenses" and "Profit." The class tries to earn money for a field trip. Susan Olson, second-grade treasurer and reporter, here dutifully records the comical details that surround this adventurous tale under the headings, "Expenses" and "Profit."


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The class tries to earn money for a field trip. Susan Olson, second-grade treasurer and reporter, here dutifully records the comical details that surround this adventurous tale under the headings, "Expenses" and "Profit." The class tries to earn money for a field trip. Susan Olson, second-grade treasurer and reporter, here dutifully records the comical details that surround this adventurous tale under the headings, "Expenses" and "Profit."

30 review for How the Second Grade Got $8,205.50 to Visit the Statue of Liberty

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is a very funny book about the ups and downs of entrepreneurialship for young children. It discusses the concept of profit and shows how costs can really take away from your bottom line. I love that it shows the children being creative, working together and taking responsibility for raising money for their own trip, even if they got mixed results. Overall, this was a hilarious story and offers a good money lesson, too. We really enjoyed reading this book together.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Nesselroad

    This book is about a class of student that went around trying to do a bunch of things for people or to have lemonade stands to get enough money to go to the Statue of Liberty they did so many things. Then the last thing they did is when they were in the principals car it started to roll and was going straight for 2 robbers that were coming out of the bank and pushed them right into the back and they got arrested and the school got 8,200 dollars just for that. But the officer said it might take a This book is about a class of student that went around trying to do a bunch of things for people or to have lemonade stands to get enough money to go to the Statue of Liberty they did so many things. Then the last thing they did is when they were in the principals car it started to roll and was going straight for 2 robbers that were coming out of the bank and pushed them right into the back and they got arrested and the school got 8,200 dollars just for that. But the officer said it might take a while for them to get the money. So the parents got money together and set the kids off the the statue of liberty. I would read this to show the kids that if you try really hard you might be able to do what you want to do but this in the story was by accident if you really want something that you have to work and work for it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    My favorite thing about this book was all of the possible activities that could be prompted from it. For one, students could write about a monument of some sort that they would like to visit and why. They could also create a budget for a trip, which would practice their math skills along with their imaginations. In addition, the class could collectively come up with a goal (contributing to a charity, helping someone in need) and then fundraise as the children in the book did to meet their goal.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rachael Fluke

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I would not recommend this book to my students, nor have it in my classroom bookshelf. I thought the story as a whole was pointless. There is a bit of humor at the end because the way they get the $8,200 is from robbers. However, in all I think this book was poor and I am surprised it was published.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bell

    It's a humorous, quick read. Great for a good laugh. It's a humorous, quick read. Great for a good laugh.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dulce

    For Ed 230 class only Response as educator This was such a cute book in which students all pitch in together to reach their end goal. Would be great for teaching teamwork and goal setting. Use to motivate students to reach goal and work together. Activity - fundraise for class fieldtrip of own, see what motivates class

  7. 4 out of 5

    Autumn Yoon

    This book is a funny and engaging book that introduces money(bills). A group of children in second grade get together to raise $8,205.50 to go on a gield trip to the Statue of Liberty. This book would go perfectly with a math lesson on money. This book is a bit challenging, concept-wise, so it would be better for older grades, 2nd-4th. This book does an excellent job using real-life examples which would provide text-to-self and text-to-world connections for the students, and it also does a great This book is a funny and engaging book that introduces money(bills). A group of children in second grade get together to raise $8,205.50 to go on a gield trip to the Statue of Liberty. This book would go perfectly with a math lesson on money. This book is a bit challenging, concept-wise, so it would be better for older grades, 2nd-4th. This book does an excellent job using real-life examples which would provide text-to-self and text-to-world connections for the students, and it also does a great job teaching students the hard work behind earning money.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    When reading this book in Social Studies class, this book was an interesting book to read. It talks about how the 2nd graders are trying to raise money and it goes through each activity that they do to raise money and how much money they make (profit) and how much money they have to pay to pay for supplies. The end of the book is not how you expect it to end, but it has a very cute and good ending to it. This is a good book for children to read and to introduce economics to students. I am defini When reading this book in Social Studies class, this book was an interesting book to read. It talks about how the 2nd graders are trying to raise money and it goes through each activity that they do to raise money and how much money they make (profit) and how much money they have to pay to pay for supplies. The end of the book is not how you expect it to end, but it has a very cute and good ending to it. This is a good book for children to read and to introduce economics to students. I am definitly wanting this book on my book shelf.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    Love this book. The kids in second grade has numerous plans to raise the money to visit the Statue of Liberty. But they all go slightly awry and do not net the amount of money intended. A fun way to look at profit and loss. It contains real life lessons that relate to fundraising and running a small business. The hilarity of the book makes the lessons easy to appreciate and the twist at the end gets them to NYC.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jayetta Carter-mcfarlin

    This book should accompany lesson plans to help children connect to the idea of recording profit and expenses. With this book, teachers can show students why adding and subtracting, and solving problems are important to them. This book could also accompany language arts lesson plans to enhance reading and writing, vocabulary, sequencing, organizing and synthesizing. This book will be in my classroom library for use from Pre-K - 5 grades.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    The second grade class tries to raise enough money for a class visit to see the Statue of Liberty. They have really good ideas for how to raise money, but something always happens to make their profits either low or nothing. One wonders toward the end of the book how they'll ever raise the $8,000+ mentioned in the title. But they do--in a very unexpected way. Filled with humor, this book should amuse. The second grade class tries to raise enough money for a class visit to see the Statue of Liberty. They have really good ideas for how to raise money, but something always happens to make their profits either low or nothing. One wonders toward the end of the book how they'll ever raise the $8,000+ mentioned in the title. But they do--in a very unexpected way. Filled with humor, this book should amuse.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Mcclure

    Loved this book. Class going on a field trip to Stature of Liberty. Written from perspective of student bookkeeper. Details expenses and profits. Multiple failed attempts to earn money for class trip. Potential accident with dire results actually ends up earning all of the money for the trip. Great story to teach about expenses and profit and saving money for a reason.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    I love this story and this book would be best used during a mth lesson. This book is filled with math vocabulary words that students could appreciate. I also think this is a great book to explain adding, subtracting and learning how to save money. I would recommend parents and teachers to use this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    Economics Topic: Profit Grade K-3 This book discusses a group of children who imbark on numerous projects to raise money for a second grade field trip. Each project involve expenses, earnings and a profit. This a great story that can teach young children a valueable economics lesson while entertaining them at the same time.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Scherping Moulton

    A class of second graders trying to raise money for a class trip goes through one failed fundraiser after another until something extraordinary happens. The story was interesting if a bit ridiculous!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Unfortunately, I really do not understand the point of this book. Yes, I get that they are trying to make money for a school trip to New York City, but the ending? That would never actually happen. I definitely did not like this book at all! I would never recommend it to anyone.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Chambliss

    This book does a lot of explaining and may be to much for children under third grade. This book discusses expenses, and profits with many different problems... For example profit from a lemonade stand or babysitting and dog-walking! It gives children real life examples!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kiana Sims

    This book could be used to deal with math because it touches on money and counting. It's a community building book because it shows how a grade came together to do something fun. It even touches on economics as it discusses profit and expenses. This book could be used to deal with math because it touches on money and counting. It's a community building book because it shows how a grade came together to do something fun. It even touches on economics as it discusses profit and expenses.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Datoria

    This is a nice informative picture book. I would use it for 3rd-5th grade. I think that this book may be a little challenging for younger age groups, but is just right for the older grades. This book would be great to introduce economic terms.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Groover

    Learn about raising money and the Statue of Liberty.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Laura Meyers

    A comical look at students' attempts at fund raising - great economic connections! A comical look at students' attempts at fund raising - great economic connections!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jasmin Thompson

    Great book to read to second graders. The story is fun but very educational. This book introduces children to the use of money. Children will learn about profit and loss, fundraising, and economics.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ryleigh

    great for math

  24. 4 out of 5

    Acton

    In this book a group of students works to come up with creative (though not always successful) ways to earn money for a school field trip.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jazmen Kearney

    Good way to talk about profits and economics. The class is trying to raise money for a field trip-my students can relate to this.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sara Jones

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erica

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Shreve

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Estrada

  30. 4 out of 5

    Connie

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