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"At the very time the need for effective leadership is reaching critical proportions, Michael Fullan's Leading in a Culture of Change provides powerful insights for moving forward. We look forward to sharing it with our grantees." --Tom Vander Ark, executive director, Education, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation "Fullan articulates clearly the core values and practices of "At the very time the need for effective leadership is reaching critical proportions, Michael Fullan's Leading in a Culture of Change provides powerful insights for moving forward. We look forward to sharing it with our grantees." --Tom Vander Ark, executive director, Education, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation "Fullan articulates clearly the core values and practices of leadership required at all levels of the organization. Using specific examples, he convinces us that the key change principles are equally critical for leadership in business and education organizations." --John Evans, chairman, Torstar Corporation "In Leading in a Culture of Change, Michael Fullan deftly combines his expertise in school reform with the latest insights in organizational change and leadership. The result is a compelling and insightful exposition on how leaders in any setting can bring about lasting, positive, systemic change in their organizations." --John Alexander, president, Center for Creative Leadership "Michael Fullan's work is remarkable. He masterfully captures how leaders can significantly improve their learning and performance, even in the uncontrollable, chaotic circumstances in which they practice. A tour de force." --Anthony Alvarado, chancellor of instruction, San Diego City Schools "Too often schools and businesses are seen as separate and foreign places. Michael Fullan blends the best of knowledge from each into an exemplary template for improving leadership in both." --Terrence E. Deal, coauthor of Leading with Soul Business, nonprofit, and public sector leaders are facing new and daunting challenges--rapid-paced developments in technology, sudden shifts in the marketplace, and crisis and contention in the public arena. If they are to survive in this chaotic environment, leaders must develop the skills they need to lead effectively no matter how fast the world around them is changing. Leading in a Culture of Change offers new and seasoned leaders' insights into the dynamics of change and presents a unique and imaginative approach for navigating the intricacies of the change process. Michael Fullan--an internationally acclaimed expert in organizational change--shows how leaders in all types of organizations can accomplish their goals and become exceptional leaders. He draws on the most current ideas and theories on the topic of effective leadership, incorporates case examples of large scale transformation, and reveals a remarkable convergence of powerful themes or, as he calls them, the five core competencies. By integrating the five core competencies--attending to a broader moral purpose, keeping on top of the change process, cultivating relationships, sharing knowledge, and setting a vision and context for creating coherence in organizations--leaders will be empowered to deal with complex change. They will be transformed into exceptional leaders who consistently mobilize their compatriots to do important and difficult work under conditions of constant change.


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"At the very time the need for effective leadership is reaching critical proportions, Michael Fullan's Leading in a Culture of Change provides powerful insights for moving forward. We look forward to sharing it with our grantees." --Tom Vander Ark, executive director, Education, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation "Fullan articulates clearly the core values and practices of "At the very time the need for effective leadership is reaching critical proportions, Michael Fullan's Leading in a Culture of Change provides powerful insights for moving forward. We look forward to sharing it with our grantees." --Tom Vander Ark, executive director, Education, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation "Fullan articulates clearly the core values and practices of leadership required at all levels of the organization. Using specific examples, he convinces us that the key change principles are equally critical for leadership in business and education organizations." --John Evans, chairman, Torstar Corporation "In Leading in a Culture of Change, Michael Fullan deftly combines his expertise in school reform with the latest insights in organizational change and leadership. The result is a compelling and insightful exposition on how leaders in any setting can bring about lasting, positive, systemic change in their organizations." --John Alexander, president, Center for Creative Leadership "Michael Fullan's work is remarkable. He masterfully captures how leaders can significantly improve their learning and performance, even in the uncontrollable, chaotic circumstances in which they practice. A tour de force." --Anthony Alvarado, chancellor of instruction, San Diego City Schools "Too often schools and businesses are seen as separate and foreign places. Michael Fullan blends the best of knowledge from each into an exemplary template for improving leadership in both." --Terrence E. Deal, coauthor of Leading with Soul Business, nonprofit, and public sector leaders are facing new and daunting challenges--rapid-paced developments in technology, sudden shifts in the marketplace, and crisis and contention in the public arena. If they are to survive in this chaotic environment, leaders must develop the skills they need to lead effectively no matter how fast the world around them is changing. Leading in a Culture of Change offers new and seasoned leaders' insights into the dynamics of change and presents a unique and imaginative approach for navigating the intricacies of the change process. Michael Fullan--an internationally acclaimed expert in organizational change--shows how leaders in all types of organizations can accomplish their goals and become exceptional leaders. He draws on the most current ideas and theories on the topic of effective leadership, incorporates case examples of large scale transformation, and reveals a remarkable convergence of powerful themes or, as he calls them, the five core competencies. By integrating the five core competencies--attending to a broader moral purpose, keeping on top of the change process, cultivating relationships, sharing knowledge, and setting a vision and context for creating coherence in organizations--leaders will be empowered to deal with complex change. They will be transformed into exceptional leaders who consistently mobilize their compatriots to do important and difficult work under conditions of constant change.

30 review for Leading in a Culture of Change

  1. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne Michetti

    Fullan offers a solid, research-based framework for sustainable leadership in all (or any) level of an organisation. Like other Fullan books, some of his ideas and research are recycled here. But his strength, as always, is in providing strong examples of the principles he advocates for. There is much, therefore, to take from this book on both a macro or a micro scale, wherever you might be in your leadership journey. This is a good, short reference book to keep on your shelf and come back to wh Fullan offers a solid, research-based framework for sustainable leadership in all (or any) level of an organisation. Like other Fullan books, some of his ideas and research are recycled here. But his strength, as always, is in providing strong examples of the principles he advocates for. There is much, therefore, to take from this book on both a macro or a micro scale, wherever you might be in your leadership journey. This is a good, short reference book to keep on your shelf and come back to when necessary.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    For such a small book, there is much to learn here. Fullan offers five qualities that effective leaders need to have/engage in: Moral purpose understanding change relationships, relationships, relationships knowledge building coherence making Ah, but there is no checklist to follow because leadership is complex. We need to focus on problems that have not already been solved. This sounds simple, but we tend to fall into the trap of resolving what does not need to be. Fullan cites many reports and studi For such a small book, there is much to learn here. Fullan offers five qualities that effective leaders need to have/engage in: Moral purpose understanding change relationships, relationships, relationships knowledge building coherence making Ah, but there is no checklist to follow because leadership is complex. We need to focus on problems that have not already been solved. This sounds simple, but we tend to fall into the trap of resolving what does not need to be. Fullan cites many reports and studies and uses this data to offer practices that comprise good leadership. So, what about that moral purpose? Fullan says it doesn't matter what motivates us, but we need to create a vested interest in the status quo. We are diverse, but we must agree as well. Interestingly enough, Fullan states that having a moral purpose does not automatically motivate people to do good things. The leader needs to guide the group to focus on the good. Of the five concepts, this is the one that affects all others. I must admit that I found Fullan's example of Monsanto bothersome given their history. I appreciate he was using the company as an example of rebranding because of their moral purpose, but after all that I have learned about the company, their moral purpose is about money! The book was published in 2001, so Monsanto might have had truly good intentions then. a What do we mean by change? We know that it happens at great rapidity and is not linear, but messiness comes with transformation. We need to learn to embrace this instead of fighting it. It can be top-down or bottom-up, but it cannot be changed. It can be led and understood, but Fullan maintains that it cannot be managed. He offers goals to help with this change: 1. don't innovate the most (don't choose everything, make too many changes) 2. it's not enough to have best ideas; need to know how to lead 3. appreciate the implementation dip; stakeholders will feel anxious, confused, fearful, overwhelmed (because they have a moral purpose); we need to be sensitive to this 4. redefine resistance; we learn more from those who don't agree with us than from those who do; be a good listener; deliberately build in differences 5. reculturing is the name of the game; transform the culture (not just the structure!); don't adopt innovations one after the other; seek out, assess, and adopt selective ideas and practices How do we establish relationships? We need to remember that people are individuals and treat them as such, but we also need to focus on the whole group - PLCs! Oh, my goodness. Say that again. PLCs! True PLCs! Here is where emotional intelligence comes into play. Emotional Intelligence consists of personal competence, self awareness, self regulation, social competence, motivation, empathy, and social skills or another way to look at it is intrapersonal, interpersonal, adaptability, stress management, and general mood. What is really exciting about this is that IT CAN BE LEARNED! Most importantly we need to understand (and accept) that with change comes high emotions; we should work toward harnessing this as a positive rather than a negative. How important is knowledge building? I love the point that Fullan makes (he credits others). Information is machines; knowledge is people; it's valuable only in a social context As a school we must reinforce habits that share knowledge; we need to build a process that works for us and not try to control it, just trust in this process. PLCs again?! As a community we need to learn to engage in this and value it. We teachers are good at teaching others and helping them to learn, but we are not always so good at learning from each other! What is coherence making? It's about self organizing and strange attractors (strange because they are not predictable) that prompt commitment. I'm reminded of Gladwell's book The Tipping Point and Heath's book Made to Switch. Fullan maintains that disturbance can be a good thing (Read the book Disrupting Class for more info on this). I've written a lot here, but that's to help me remember these points. With my school's move to CBE, this book is certainly helpful. It may be 17 years old, but it's still relevant today. I really like the idea of us participating in a learning fair to showcase what we have learned!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I read this book for a course I'm taking in my school district. Had the requirement not been there, I wouldn't have finished it. There wasn't much groundbreaking information (perhaps because the book is now 15 years old) and I disliked the writing style. The author spent a lot of time saying "Later I'll be telling you about xyz." or "Remember when I told you about xyz a couple chapters ago?" instead of just getting to the point. I read this book for a course I'm taking in my school district. Had the requirement not been there, I wouldn't have finished it. There wasn't much groundbreaking information (perhaps because the book is now 15 years old) and I disliked the writing style. The author spent a lot of time saying "Later I'll be telling you about xyz." or "Remember when I told you about xyz a couple chapters ago?" instead of just getting to the point.

  4. 5 out of 5

    James Hanbelt

    Philosophically, Fullan touts recognizable maxims such a "change is in all" (the I Ching and the Dao, Christianity), reciprocity (Confucianism, the major religions), people are not intrinsically good (stoicism), and people are capable of good only the leader and the time need to be right (major religions, Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics). What Fullan makes mindful in the reader over all is similar to what Plato wrote in the Republic as "making kings into philosophers and philosophers into kings", Philosophically, Fullan touts recognizable maxims such a "change is in all" (the I Ching and the Dao, Christianity), reciprocity (Confucianism, the major religions), people are not intrinsically good (stoicism), and people are capable of good only the leader and the time need to be right (major religions, Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics). What Fullan makes mindful in the reader over all is similar to what Plato wrote in the Republic as "making kings into philosophers and philosophers into kings", that is, a leader needs to be a learner. There were particular sections that were of great value, such as about people's (employees' and leaders') 5 common fears., and the parallel lists between outcomes of schools that are serious about reform and those that are not. The book also has the answers to questions such as "When do we see the signs of change? What are they? How does a leader prepare employees for change? How to ensure employees keep abreast of change a leader has initiated to keep the goal in focus? How are we sure the goal in the planning stage for change is reasonable? When is training most effective on the community morale? The diagrams and research stories throughout the book help to clarify most of Fullan's ideas toward a more harmonious workplace. One criticism that comes with motivational books of this sort are the made up phrases which take time to decode into simpler language--and in the end are not a revelatory as they first seem. Ideal for teachers who need ideas to effectively principal or superintend or direct districts of schools.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sam Schroder

    It’s been almost two years since I borrowed this book from my boss. He had just finished reading it and felt it really resonated, so encouraged me to give it a read. It joined my TBR shelf, which consistently holds more than 300 books and there it sat, month in and month out. These past few weeks, I have had to adapt to a very different style of leadership as we teach in (sorry for the cliche, but it’s just too accurate) unprecedented times. Fullan explores the complexities of leading in a schoo It’s been almost two years since I borrowed this book from my boss. He had just finished reading it and felt it really resonated, so encouraged me to give it a read. It joined my TBR shelf, which consistently holds more than 300 books and there it sat, month in and month out. These past few weeks, I have had to adapt to a very different style of leadership as we teach in (sorry for the cliche, but it’s just too accurate) unprecedented times. Fullan explores the complexities of leading in a school where change is no longer an occasional challenge but has instead become a rotational routine. He explores the different styles of leadership, and their strengths and weaknesses, before making the case that moral purpose, developing relationships, building knowledge and actually understanding the why and how of change is all crucial to success. I get why this type of book is appealing to school leaders. I spent a lot of the time nodding and agreeing with the content. Mostly, books like these reassure us about what we do well and confirm what we think other people do badly. I did make some notes. I don’t regret reading it. But this is a twenty year old book with a pretty basic and obvious message so, overall, it’s a meh from me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Mannon

    This book delves into 5 components of effective leadership, including moral purpose, understanding the change process, improving relationships, creating and sharing knowledge, and coherence making (community building). It promotes the idea of a leader as someone who is grounded in a vision and who works on empowering others. Successful change arises from this empowerment by encouraging everyone in an organization to work together towards a common vision. The book distinguishes between leaders an This book delves into 5 components of effective leadership, including moral purpose, understanding the change process, improving relationships, creating and sharing knowledge, and coherence making (community building). It promotes the idea of a leader as someone who is grounded in a vision and who works on empowering others. Successful change arises from this empowerment by encouraging everyone in an organization to work together towards a common vision. The book distinguishes between leaders and managers, with leaders being those who can rally others to be leaders too.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    I had to read and reread this for school. I have sections of it memorized. It's cited in at least 85% of my papers from this semester. For those reasons, I both hate and love this. I love it because I finally "get" Fullan. I heard him speak about a year ago and I have to say, he was a bit underwhelming. Smart, knowledgable, but a bit over the head. Not an engaging speaker. This finally boiled his philosophy down into a digestible tome that was practical and useful. I foresee this won't be the las I had to read and reread this for school. I have sections of it memorized. It's cited in at least 85% of my papers from this semester. For those reasons, I both hate and love this. I love it because I finally "get" Fullan. I heard him speak about a year ago and I have to say, he was a bit underwhelming. Smart, knowledgable, but a bit over the head. Not an engaging speaker. This finally boiled his philosophy down into a digestible tome that was practical and useful. I foresee this won't be the last of this book in my grad school career.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    This book really made me want to dive into leadership. I felt very motivated to shake things up where I work and in my current capacity, but it also made me feel like I maybe am ready to move into a different form of leadership. Fullan lays out five clear components to leading in a culture of change. They were descriptive enough that I understood them, but not so prescriptive that you have to follow a certain formula to be successful. A good read, especially being so short.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Parkinson-Best

    I found this book very difficult to follow. There were some good examples used to demonstrate his points, but I felt Fullan was constantly trying to sell me his other books by always referring to ‘in my other book...’ Given the period I have read this book (Covid19 lockdown) perhaps my mind just isn’t in the right place to read a book like this? I note the range of positive reviews, and will continue to reflect on this for now.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    This was a very interesting read. I learned a lot from the case study examples and it was quite inspiring from an educational perspective.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brian Tague

    Had to read for master's level courses. Had several good rationals but not really the most exciting book in the world. Had to read for master's level courses. Had several good rationals but not really the most exciting book in the world.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This book certainly made me think about change management again. A good book to help any professional focus on the importance of change and I found it especially useful as a librarian.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dimitri

    Information becomes knowledge when it is socially used My Highlights: https://learning.oreilly.com/u/748020... Information becomes knowledge when it is socially used My Highlights: https://learning.oreilly.com/u/748020...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amit Sharma

    Insightful and pragmatic

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is probably closer to 3.5 stars. I've read a lot of Fullan, and I give him credit for not recycling his ideas in his books but following his ideas in related directions and explaining what his ideas look like from different places of implementation. Perhaps what I like most is his understanding that change is difficult, there is no blueprint, and you can't start with a carefully mapped-out plan of implementation. Fullan reinvisions the role of leader as a facilitator of collaboration who we This is probably closer to 3.5 stars. I've read a lot of Fullan, and I give him credit for not recycling his ideas in his books but following his ideas in related directions and explaining what his ideas look like from different places of implementation. Perhaps what I like most is his understanding that change is difficult, there is no blueprint, and you can't start with a carefully mapped-out plan of implementation. Fullan reinvisions the role of leader as a facilitator of collaboration who welcomes dissent and resistance as learning opportunities and as a practitioner who engages in the work expected of others, done publicly, with the expectation for the same feedback that is given to others. Not for the faint of heart. Leaders with thin skins who are afraid of sharing authority and empowering others will not find this book a comfort, even if it is the wave of current leadership expectations in schools.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Scott L.

    Not fond of the way the author composed this book. I think the ideas are good, but I feel the author was too dependent upon short-term research and not long-term. Had he looked at some long-term successful leaders, I think he would have made some different conclusions. Also, he tends to quote in length from other people's research instead of developing his own ideas. I think that the book was good, but not great. I would recommend it just as another book in the leadership culture, but not as a m Not fond of the way the author composed this book. I think the ideas are good, but I feel the author was too dependent upon short-term research and not long-term. Had he looked at some long-term successful leaders, I think he would have made some different conclusions. Also, he tends to quote in length from other people's research instead of developing his own ideas. I think that the book was good, but not great. I would recommend it just as another book in the leadership culture, but not as a major development.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    This is an informative read for administrators seeking to bring change to their schools. It is an easy read that describes the change process and how to deal with the fact that change cannot be forced. There is also a workbook available that is worth the price if you are looking for ways to make necessary changes.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tricia

    Even though this book was written only a few years ago, it felt older. As an educator, I didn't learn very much that was new since whole brain thinking is already embraced throughout the school districts with which I work. I did like the exercises and references and plan to explore many of these. Even though this book was written only a few years ago, it felt older. As an educator, I didn't learn very much that was new since whole brain thinking is already embraced throughout the school districts with which I work. I did like the exercises and references and plan to explore many of these.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    Fullan offers insight and practical directions on how to be a leader in the midst of an every changing culture. Helped me understand what leadership is when it seems I am working in an ever changing environment.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    Just started...seems like a quick read that covers much of what has been covered in leadership literature already by people like Senge, Collins, and Argyis. Not a bad thing...these themes that keep emerging just make the literature more solid in my brain. More on it later.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I read this book for a graduate education course. It was very good and reminded me of the importance of leading well. I particularly appreciated the chapter on coherence making -- using the messy process of change to better your organization.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dave Moyer

    This second edition is far from a regurgitation of the first. The same concepts are updated to reflect the evolution of his work, incorporating references to his recent books, case studies and current research. Well worth it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Josiah Aston

    Good book on organizational change in both education and business. I especially appreciated the chapters on knowledge sharing and coherence-making. Leadership is a collective effort and preparation for change is synonymous with leadership development throughout the organization.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Browne

    Change is difficult for most people. It is particularaly challenging when it takes you by surprise and then drags you along at break neck speed. Michael Fullan offers valuablel insights into helping people embrace their new environment... over and over again.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    Also read this in a class. LOVED it. It's really helped me in my job realizing that change has to happen in order for any good organization to move forward. Also read this in a class. LOVED it. It's really helped me in my job realizing that change has to happen in order for any good organization to move forward.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mwcounihan

    Good book on leading schools during change, as education is forever moving and never stagnant. Easy book to read with layman's terms. Good book on leading schools during change, as education is forever moving and never stagnant. Easy book to read with layman's terms.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Len Egan

    Michael Fullan is an expert on the process of change. This book is simple to understand and puts the change process into perspective for those involved in business or education.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anne Marie

    Although I had to re-read this one in preparation for comprehensive exams, Fullan's insights about change are as fresh as ever. Always complexity... Although I had to re-read this one in preparation for comprehensive exams, Fullan's insights about change are as fresh as ever. Always complexity...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Reiterates much of what I have read, but it is still an enjoyable, quick read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I was constantly thinking of connections, examples and to-try items while reading this. If I hadn't borrowed it, I think the margins would be full of notes and thoughts. I was constantly thinking of connections, examples and to-try items while reading this. If I hadn't borrowed it, I think the margins would be full of notes and thoughts.

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