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Doctor Who and the Brain of Morbius

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Why do so many spaceships crash-land on Karn, a bleak, lonely and seemingly deserted planet? Are they doomed by the mysterious powers of the strange, black-robed Sisterhood, jealously guarding their secret of eternal life? Or does the mad Dr. Solon, for some evil purpose of his own, need the bodies of the victims — and more especially, the body of Doctor Who?


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Why do so many spaceships crash-land on Karn, a bleak, lonely and seemingly deserted planet? Are they doomed by the mysterious powers of the strange, black-robed Sisterhood, jealously guarding their secret of eternal life? Or does the mad Dr. Solon, for some evil purpose of his own, need the bodies of the victims — and more especially, the body of Doctor Who?

30 review for Doctor Who and the Brain of Morbius

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    For many it's Dick's novelisations that were their first entry point to many Doctor Who serials back in the 70's and 80's. In a weird quirk BBC Audiobooks were also releasing some stories prior to DVD releases, so it was the first time I'd experienced the story too... It's a classic Fourth Doctor and Sarah pairing that uses well known horror tropes in a Sci-Fi setting to brilliant effect. Let's just say Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is perfectly retold. One of the interesting aspects of the production For many it's Dick's novelisations that were their first entry point to many Doctor Who serials back in the 70's and 80's. In a weird quirk BBC Audiobooks were also releasing some stories prior to DVD releases, so it was the first time I'd experienced the story too... It's a classic Fourth Doctor and Sarah pairing that uses well known horror tropes in a Sci-Fi setting to brilliant effect. Let's just say Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is perfectly retold. One of the interesting aspects of the production was Dicks original script was altered so much that he asked for the episodes to air under a bland pseudonym. Robin Bland is an inspired choice! It says something about the man that once it came to writing the Target release, he stuck closely to what viewers would have seen on screen. "Back Doctor, back to your beginnings. To your birth and to your death" The story has become quite infamous for the scene that appears to depict previous incarnations of The Doctor. I got the feeling that Dicks also assumed this in the prose. Doctor Who was at it's peak during this era of the show and this story can sometimes gets overlooked. But with Dicks effective style of bring this gothic tale to life whilst Tom Baker is always a delight to hear, it's a winning combination.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Ah, the Brain of Morbius! I vividly remember seeing this episode of Dr. Who as a rerun on my local PBS station back in the early '80s. It terrified me in the way I hoped it would. I mean, what better reason to tune in? Terrance Dicks' tv-show tie-in book Doctor Who and the Brain of Morbius is an almost shot-for-shot parallel to the mid-'70s television episodes starring Tom Baker, my favorite of all the Doctors. Herein a mad scientist is trying to resurrect an evil genius Frankenstein-style with t Ah, the Brain of Morbius! I vividly remember seeing this episode of Dr. Who as a rerun on my local PBS station back in the early '80s. It terrified me in the way I hoped it would. I mean, what better reason to tune in? Terrance Dicks' tv-show tie-in book Doctor Who and the Brain of Morbius is an almost shot-for-shot parallel to the mid-'70s television episodes starring Tom Baker, my favorite of all the Doctors. Herein a mad scientist is trying to resurrect an evil genius Frankenstein-style with the help of an Igor, while keeping at bay a coven of witches. The Doctor and his sidekick Sarah are plunked down in the middle of all this upon an un-hospitable planet. These crazy bastards need to be straightened out and the Doctor is just the bloke to do it! Movie or TV tie-ins are seldom inspired literature and this is no different. For all I know, Dicks is a perfectly capable writer, but this feels rushed at times. I doubt the author and publisher aspired to anything much higher than pulp fiction with these, so they are what they are and should be enjoyed as brain candy. In defense of these books/this show though, they're more than just the technology and adventure of sci-fi, or even the mystery and horror they'd usually infuse, Dr. Who always tied in psychology, sociology, and philosophy. They shot for excitement and thrills, but there was always something to learn, a moral to be had amidst the heroics. As a kid I loved the action and the scares, but I usually took away some small nugget of wisdom as well.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Back in the days of my obsession with Target novels, the novelization of "The Brain of Morbius" was one of the most sought-after and prized in my collection. It was one of the first "Doctor Who" stories I watched and one of my earliest exposures to Tom Baker as the Doctor. And I loved it. To my young mind, it was one of the classics of "Doctor Who" and I just had to have the novel so I could experience the story again and again (this was in the days before videotapes were as affordable as they l Back in the days of my obsession with Target novels, the novelization of "The Brain of Morbius" was one of the most sought-after and prized in my collection. It was one of the first "Doctor Who" stories I watched and one of my earliest exposures to Tom Baker as the Doctor. And I loved it. To my young mind, it was one of the classics of "Doctor Who" and I just had to have the novel so I could experience the story again and again (this was in the days before videotapes were as affordable as they later became and before the commercial releases on stories). I eventually found the novel and read it once. And I recall thinking that maybe "Morbius" wasn't quite as great as I thought it was when I first saw it. My love for the serial has dimmed a bit since I first saw it over twenty years ago, but for a little while it was easily one of my top ten "Doctor Who" stories of all time. Fast forward twenty plus years and I'm getting ready for a car trip and my local library has Tom Baker's reading of the Terrance Dicks novel of the story on CD. How can I resist it? Listening to the story again, I'm struck by how well Dicks expands the story. It's not up to the work he did in "Auton Invasion" but Dicks is able to smooth over a lot of rough patches in the story and really make the world of Karn seem a lot more bleak and expansive that what we saw on-screen. (Again, the only budget limitation on the printed page is how far we let our imaginations roam.) Dicks even tries to bring some sanity to the never-ending debate of the faces seen during the Deathlock battle between the Doctor and Morbius (if you want to have some fun, just put two "Doctor Who" fans in a room and tell them to debate that scene.) And while the story works well, I have to admit I was a bit disappointed by Tom Baker's reading in spots. His voice for Solon is a bit silly as is the voice he uses for Morbius. Early on, they took me out of the reading, though by the end of disc three I was used to them enough that it ceased to be as big an issue. All in all, a nice trip down memory lane with one of the more interesting stories from one of the classic eras in "Doctor Who." It's not a great, but it's certainly enjoyable.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeanetta Chrystie

    Fun read for all sci-fi and Doctor Who fans. This book is a MUST-READ backstory for the online (& on-DVD) mini-episode "The Night of the Doctor" that led up to the 50th Anniversary TV Episode "The Day of the Doctor"! It explains his attitude upon finding himself on planet Karn, and why he had trouble trusting the Sisters at first. The recent 50th Anniversary Special was a hoot, edge-of-the-chair, plot-twisting, saga that including many tip-of-the-hat bits to Classic Doctor Who fans too. If you a Fun read for all sci-fi and Doctor Who fans. This book is a MUST-READ backstory for the online (& on-DVD) mini-episode "The Night of the Doctor" that led up to the 50th Anniversary TV Episode "The Day of the Doctor"! It explains his attitude upon finding himself on planet Karn, and why he had trouble trusting the Sisters at first. The recent 50th Anniversary Special was a hoot, edge-of-the-chair, plot-twisting, saga that including many tip-of-the-hat bits to Classic Doctor Who fans too. If you aren't familiar with Classic Doctor Who (1960's to 1980's) then this is a MUST read for you.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Dicks' adaption of his own script (albeit credited to Robin Bland because he didn't like the Producer's rewrites) for a story featuring the Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) and his companion Sarah Jane Smith. The Doctor and Sarah Jane are unwittingly sent to Karn by the Time Lords where they find themselves caught between the secretive Sisterhood of the Eternal Flame and the deranged scientist Solon, who is attempting to resurrect the warlord Morbius. There's a delightful tone of classic horror/monster Dicks' adaption of his own script (albeit credited to Robin Bland because he didn't like the Producer's rewrites) for a story featuring the Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) and his companion Sarah Jane Smith. The Doctor and Sarah Jane are unwittingly sent to Karn by the Time Lords where they find themselves caught between the secretive Sisterhood of the Eternal Flame and the deranged scientist Solon, who is attempting to resurrect the warlord Morbius. There's a delightful tone of classic horror/monster movies to this story, very deliberately evoking the Universal films of the 1930s and the Hammer films of the 1950s (before Hammer starting making exploitation flicks). This is not least apparent in the Frankenstein parallels with Solon's obsession with his creation of a new body for the titular brain of Morbius. Add to that a largely-deserted planet, a sect of mystical priestesses and a crumbling castle and you've got a really enjoyable gothic adventure for one of the most iconic Doctors and one of the most iconic companions. I've also always enjoyed Who stories which expand a bit on Time Lord lore (with the exception of the Timeless Child thing, which I won't get into here) and here we learn of another renegade Time Lord, but unlike the Doctor or the Master this one became so powerful that the Time Lords raised an army to defeat him (see Dicks' Fifth Doctor novel 'Warmonger' for that tale). This is also the introduction of the Sisterhood of Karn, who've reappeared in modern era Who (helping both the Eighth and Twelfth Doctors) and I enjoyed getting to see their unique perspective on the Time Lords. * More reviews here: https://fsfh-book-review2.webnode.com/ *

  6. 5 out of 5

    OG

    Ah target does it again. I’ve been slowly reading my way through the target Range of books and I have to say that I adore most of them. This is the one of the ones that I think is really really good. The brain of Morbius Is a well written representation of the TV show. Obviously has its roots in Frankenstein, for me it reminds me of Frankenstein and the creature from hell from hammer, which in itself is a true classic. The great thing about target is that you get to imagine how the sets could ha Ah target does it again. I’ve been slowly reading my way through the target Range of books and I have to say that I adore most of them. This is the one of the ones that I think is really really good. The brain of Morbius Is a well written representation of the TV show. Obviously has its roots in Frankenstein, for me it reminds me of Frankenstein and the creature from hell from hammer, which in itself is a true classic. The great thing about target is that you get to imagine how the sets could have been, how will the monsters could have been, if only the budget was large enough to the show and of course the restrictions of the 1960s. This Book allows you to imagine just how gruesome this episode should’ve been. Some of the imagery is truly disturbing I think it’s a shame they weren’t a little braver When filming. I have to say overall the actual creature without a head is pretty much how I imagined it to be in the book re the series. I would suggest reading target books if you want a little more context of the show because they will expand your knowledge of what is going on. I don’t always give five stars to target but this one deserves it, although I have to say I am a bit of a fan of Frankenstein so that might be why. Class. I Apologise now for my grammar but I’m using predictive text. 🤤

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jude

    This quarter I read Doctor Who and the Brain of Morbius by Terrance Dicks, an adaptation of the Doctor Who story The Brain of Morbius, also by Terrance Dicks. I had originally seen the first half of the television of this story, back when the Grandview Theatre would show two episodes of old Doctor Who most Saturdays. I was out of town for the second half, so for some time the story was unresolved to me. The Doctor and Sarah Jane Smith are forced by the Time Lords onto the ruined planet Karn. The This quarter I read Doctor Who and the Brain of Morbius by Terrance Dicks, an adaptation of the Doctor Who story The Brain of Morbius, also by Terrance Dicks. I had originally seen the first half of the television of this story, back when the Grandview Theatre would show two episodes of old Doctor Who most Saturdays. I was out of town for the second half, so for some time the story was unresolved to me. The Doctor and Sarah Jane Smith are forced by the Time Lords onto the ruined planet Karn. The Sisterhood of Karn believe they are there to steal their elixir of immorality, and the scientist, Solon, wants The Doctor’s head. That is where this novelisation comes in. What I can remember is true to the show, but it maintains a good pace. Rarely does it feel as if nothing is happening as even when Sarah is rendered temporarily blind, we still focus on her other senses to visualize the world of Karn. We constantly get descriptions of what is happening in the story so we, the audience, can feel informed. I find other things this story does interesting as well. For example, we see The Doctor pretty much lose at the end, unlike his typical victories over evil, the details of which I won’t give away here. I overall very much recommend this book if you can find a copy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    This is a great story, which recreates the feel of the Fourth Doctor episodes and Sarah Jane very well. The plot is very Frankensteinian as the master surgeon Solon attempts to create a body for the Brain of Morbius. I love the Sisterhood of Karn and the bits of Time Lord lore that are introduced in this serial. Terrance Dicks' novelisation is, as usual, accurate and fun to read, feeling just like you're watching the episodes rather than reading them. This is a solid Doctor Who story, and a good This is a great story, which recreates the feel of the Fourth Doctor episodes and Sarah Jane very well. The plot is very Frankensteinian as the master surgeon Solon attempts to create a body for the Brain of Morbius. I love the Sisterhood of Karn and the bits of Time Lord lore that are introduced in this serial. Terrance Dicks' novelisation is, as usual, accurate and fun to read, feeling just like you're watching the episodes rather than reading them. This is a solid Doctor Who story, and a good novelisation.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dan Snyder

    I've been told that this story, novelized or on TV, was a classic, and now I can tell! Indeed, I loved this classic, Fourth Doctor story! Though some events were predictable, as is known from some of the more classic stories, but that did not lessen my enjoyment even a tiny bit. If you want a novel that includes everything you'd expect in a Doctor Who story, this is definitely a good one! I've been told that this story, novelized or on TV, was a classic, and now I can tell! Indeed, I loved this classic, Fourth Doctor story! Though some events were predictable, as is known from some of the more classic stories, but that did not lessen my enjoyment even a tiny bit. If you want a novel that includes everything you'd expect in a Doctor Who story, this is definitely a good one!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Warren Dunham

    I like doctor who i kinda like this book but it doesn't have that something special required for a 4th star. The villains almost meet the so bad their good, the companion is forgettable and that just leaves the doctor who needs something better to play against than what is given in this book too be good. I like doctor who i kinda like this book but it doesn't have that something special required for a 4th star. The villains almost meet the so bad their good, the companion is forgettable and that just leaves the doctor who needs something better to play against than what is given in this book too be good.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Roger Boyes

    I love these old Doctor Who novelizations. Clear writing and to the point.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    AUDIBLE BOOK Doctor Who saves the day again! I'm a WHOVIAN, so i really enjoyed the story. AUDIBLE BOOK Doctor Who saves the day again! I'm a WHOVIAN, so i really enjoyed the story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    Ah, such a delight. One of my favourite Doctor Who stories novelised with ruthless efficiency and style by Terrance Dicks. What more do you need to know.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Damon Habbin

    A good read fairly faithful to the TV show wished that uncle Terrence had made more of the brain battle.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Book collector

    Feel free to skip this first section as it will be the same on all of his books. Cards on the table... Terrance dicks is not only one of my favourite writers he's also the author who hooked me on reading when I was young. His prose is beautifully simple. He often edited the original stories as he went, fixing little things that didn't quite work, sometimes obviously but often in small subtle ways. I still read his books over 40 years after first reading some of them. This was adapted from the scri Feel free to skip this first section as it will be the same on all of his books. Cards on the table... Terrance dicks is not only one of my favourite writers he's also the author who hooked me on reading when I was young. His prose is beautifully simple. He often edited the original stories as he went, fixing little things that didn't quite work, sometimes obviously but often in small subtle ways. I still read his books over 40 years after first reading some of them. This was adapted from the scripts by Terrance dicks which were rewritten by Robert Holmes. I understand why dicks wasn't too happy about the changes Holmes made. In the original story it's a robot who is recreating a body. The robot has no understanding of ascetics hence the sewn together body. As dicks has said in interviews there's no real reason for solon's actions. In fact all he really has to do is transfer the brain of morbius into a new intact body! However this is still a great story. What's nice about the novel is that dicks doesn't change the plot back, he adapts the scripts as seen on screen. There's the usual tweaks and nice additions as well. Ok here we go. The past doctors. As scripted by the production team of the time this wasn't a joke it was fully intended to show doctor's exsisted before hartnell. (See DVD.) Now obviously a year later the production team contradicts itself and cue 40 odd years of controversy compounded by the latest series reinstating the original intention. Some have argued the faces are past lives of morbius but there is a problem with that. Morbius is winning the mind bending contest. Its difficult to interpret the scene any other way. Morbius forces the doctor back and it's the doctor's faces on the screen. Morbius is winning. He only loses when his brain case malfunctions. The doctor is not responsible for that, he is near death having been beaten by morbius. So I don't have any problem with the timeless child idea. I've watched the show long enough to realise that change is part of it, something some fans have a vitriolic and bizarre objection to. Change is at the heart of the show. As for continuity the show has never hung together. Even in the hartnell era it went from we can't change history to we have to stop history changing and back again several times. And it doesn't matter. It's just fiction. I did the following list for some friends so I'll add here again. The timeless child/doctor. A rough guide. If we assume the first child we see is the original body and if we assume that each child we see tectum (not sure of the spelling!) with is consecutive then the doctor's time line becomes The timeless child - original body The timeless child - 1st regeneration The timeless child - 2nd regeneration The timeless child - 3rd regeneration The timeless child - 4th regeneration The timeless child - 5th regeneration The timeless child - 6th regeneration   The timeless child - 7th regeneration this is the older child who we see joining the division. He is the first division agent doctor Division agent doctor - multiple regenerations ending with: Jo Martin Christopher Barry Robert banks Stewart Chris Baker Philip hinchliffe Douglas camfield Graeme Harper Robert Holmes George gallaccio Two possible ways here. Jo Martin tries to run from division. She is eventually captured, regenerated and continues to work for division until granted retirement with the final face before hartnell which is George. Or jo is the final agent before hartnell, runs, gets captured and is granted retirement under conditions of memory wipe. Either way... The timeless doctor - post division retirement The doctor 1st body post retirement - William hartnell The doctor 1st regeneration post retirement - Patrick troughton The doctor 2nd regeneration post retirement - jon pertwee The doctor 3rd regeneration post retirement - Tom Baker The doctor 4th regeneration post retirement - Peter davison The doctor 5th regeneration post retirement - colin baker The doctor 6th regeneration post retirement - Sylvester mccoy The doctor 7th regeneration post retirement - Paul mcgann The war doctor 8th regeneration post retirement - John hurt The doctor 9th regeneration post retirement - Christopher eccleston The doctor 10th regeneration post retirement - David Tennant The doctor partial 11th regeneration post retirement - David Tennant Metacrisis human doctor remaining 11th regeneration energy - David Tennant The doctor 12th regeneration post retirement - Matt smith The doctor/curator future regeneration post retirement - Tom baker The doctor 13th regeneration post retirement - Peter capaldi The doctor 14th regeneration post retirement - Jodie Whittaker   Don't think of the doctor as their numbers now as it's a moot point and has been since the war doctor/Tennant second regeneration. Just think of their regeneration.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Min

    Definitely in my top 10 favorite Doctor Who stories of all time. The combination of creature-feature antics, and the dashing Tom Baker characterization with mental jousting to find justice by defeating a foe, and making peace with former allies makes this practically perfect. Baker's reading, and voice acting elevate a good story into greatness. I don't believe Baker is given enough credit for his vocal skills. One portion that has gotten its own bit of ink, is previous to the 'canon' of 12 live Definitely in my top 10 favorite Doctor Who stories of all time. The combination of creature-feature antics, and the dashing Tom Baker characterization with mental jousting to find justice by defeating a foe, and making peace with former allies makes this practically perfect. Baker's reading, and voice acting elevate a good story into greatness. I don't believe Baker is given enough credit for his vocal skills. One portion that has gotten its own bit of ink, is previous to the 'canon' of 12 lives, when battling Morbius, there is a scan of several faces one is to assume are the previous incarnations of the Doctor. It is a thesis I prefer myself. The Sisterhood is another aspect of this story that delights me knowing that they, too, share immortality, by different means, with the Time Lords. Another aspect that could definitely have been fleshed out further into an interesting off-shoot of the tales we know. Moreso, the willful death of one of the Sisters, She who replaces her, and that the Doctor takes the elixir so that he could recover from the battle with Morbius. That is a story waiting to be told The wicked Time Lord that needs destroying is an delightful way to learn more about the Doctor's people, even if these concepts are muddled between incarnations.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dave Lefevre

    Tom Baker reading the novelization of one of his most classic serials. You can't beat it. An interesting note, "Morbius" continues to controversial in fan circles because of the original "brain bender" sequence at the end. In the serial it shows faces of the Doctor that allegedly came BEFORE the first Doctor. However Terrance Dicks doesn't portray any other alleged Doctor faces in this novelization of his own script, sidestepping the famous controversy. Just an interesting side observation as som Tom Baker reading the novelization of one of his most classic serials. You can't beat it. An interesting note, "Morbius" continues to controversial in fan circles because of the original "brain bender" sequence at the end. In the serial it shows faces of the Doctor that allegedly came BEFORE the first Doctor. However Terrance Dicks doesn't portray any other alleged Doctor faces in this novelization of his own script, sidestepping the famous controversy. Just an interesting side observation as some fans still argue that there are other Doctors before Hartnell based on that episode. Maybe Terrance Dicks didn't intend for the sequence to happen as it did.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    This book is basically an old Hammer films Frankenstien story set on an alien planet. Lots of spooky atmosphere and creepy bad guys. Nice characterization of the Doctor and Sarah. Only problem is that it keeps the TV show feel of it taking place on a small set rather than giving us the feel of a barren planet, despite all the running around and the small cast is annoying. We have mentions that the Sisterhood of Sarn is a big coven, but only seems like two of them ever talk or do anything. Decent, b This book is basically an old Hammer films Frankenstien story set on an alien planet. Lots of spooky atmosphere and creepy bad guys. Nice characterization of the Doctor and Sarah. Only problem is that it keeps the TV show feel of it taking place on a small set rather than giving us the feel of a barren planet, despite all the running around and the small cast is annoying. We have mentions that the Sisterhood of Sarn is a big coven, but only seems like two of them ever talk or do anything. Decent, but flawed story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Whyte

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/1046178.html#cutid4[return][return]For once, Dicks rises to the challenge of adapting one of his own scripts for the printed page (perhaps because it had been substantially rewritten in the meantime). One of the few flaws of the original TV version is that Karn does look every now and then like a TV studio with funny lighting; of course, on the printed page you can depict whole landscapes rather less expensively. The whole thing seemed to me to work rather well. http://nhw.livejournal.com/1046178.html#cutid4[return][return]For once, Dicks rises to the challenge of adapting one of his own scripts for the printed page (perhaps because it had been substantially rewritten in the meantime). One of the few flaws of the original TV version is that Karn does look every now and then like a TV studio with funny lighting; of course, on the printed page you can depict whole landscapes rather less expensively. The whole thing seemed to me to work rather well.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Duckpondwithoutducks

    You have three villains to choose from in this novelisation of an old Doctor Who episode - the mad scientist Dr. Solon, the Sisterhood that guards an eternal flame, and Morbius, a renegade Time Lord who only exists now in a disembodied state - it's an embarassment of riches! Terrance Dicks really does a good job of explaining things that may not be known or understood by readers who aren't already massive Doctor Who fans, so that the novel can be understood by a first time reader of books in thi You have three villains to choose from in this novelisation of an old Doctor Who episode - the mad scientist Dr. Solon, the Sisterhood that guards an eternal flame, and Morbius, a renegade Time Lord who only exists now in a disembodied state - it's an embarassment of riches! Terrance Dicks really does a good job of explaining things that may not be known or understood by readers who aren't already massive Doctor Who fans, so that the novel can be understood by a first time reader of books in this series. As always, there are lots of witty lines from the Doctor, and an awful lot of running!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Debra Manskey

    Three stars for the story and an extra star for the marvelous Tom Baker, whose reading of this book makes it come alive!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tabitha

    I actually listened to this as an audio book read by Tom Baker. He's my favorite, and I got super excited as soon as I heard him. Just like I remember him from when I was a kid! The story itself actually feels like an episode, and on one hand it made me love it, but on the other hand it felt like they should have made the story so much grander. After all, you don't have to design sets for a book. It had a few minor issues, but listening to Baker read made up for them all. I actually listened to this as an audio book read by Tom Baker. He's my favorite, and I got super excited as soon as I heard him. Just like I remember him from when I was a kid! The story itself actually feels like an episode, and on one hand it made me love it, but on the other hand it felt like they should have made the story so much grander. After all, you don't have to design sets for a book. It had a few minor issues, but listening to Baker read made up for them all.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kelli Trei

    I listened to this as an audio-book, read by Tom Baker. Maybe it is because I love the Doctor, maybe it is because Baker read it, or maybe it is because it's almost Halloween, but it was creepy good fun. At least once, alone in the car, I expressed audible delighted disgust at the mad scientist's activities. Good fun! I listened to this as an audio-book, read by Tom Baker. Maybe it is because I love the Doctor, maybe it is because Baker read it, or maybe it is because it's almost Halloween, but it was creepy good fun. At least once, alone in the car, I expressed audible delighted disgust at the mad scientist's activities. Good fun!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ritchie

    This was the novelization by Terrance Dicks of the classic Tom Baker episode of Doctor Who as read by Tom Baker. The story was great but Tom Baker's performance was amazing. He did the Doctor's voice well, of course, but his voicings for the other characters were so good that I actually occasionally forgot it was him reading! Nice one. This was the novelization by Terrance Dicks of the classic Tom Baker episode of Doctor Who as read by Tom Baker. The story was great but Tom Baker's performance was amazing. He did the Doctor's voice well, of course, but his voicings for the other characters were so good that I actually occasionally forgot it was him reading! Nice one.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I'm amazed at the sheer number of lines that Terrance managed to work the title of the book into. It's almost as bad as the "Spock's Brain" episode of Star Trek. But not quite. Nothing's as bad as "Spock's Brain." I'm amazed at the sheer number of lines that Terrance managed to work the title of the book into. It's almost as bad as the "Spock's Brain" episode of Star Trek. But not quite. Nothing's as bad as "Spock's Brain."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Kukwa

    Now this is more like it: a story Terrance Dicks originated on TV, given an enthusiastic & atmospheric expansion. The result in an absorbing read that remains concisely within the Target novelization word count. An archetypal "Doctor Who" novelization. Now this is more like it: a story Terrance Dicks originated on TV, given an enthusiastic & atmospheric expansion. The result in an absorbing read that remains concisely within the Target novelization word count. An archetypal "Doctor Who" novelization.

  27. 4 out of 5

    bluetyson

    isbn,original

  28. 5 out of 5

    Becci

    More Time Lords! And a little background on Gallifrey history

  29. 4 out of 5

    stormhawk

    Thinly veiled Frankenstien story with a madder than average scientist.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Tom Baker is always amazing as the Doctor, but his stories aren't always so great. This audio book was read by the man himself, so that was good. Tom Baker is always amazing as the Doctor, but his stories aren't always so great. This audio book was read by the man himself, so that was good.

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