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The Platinum Rule: Discover the Four Basic Business Personalities andHow They Can Lead You to Success

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In this entertaining and thought-provoking book, Tony Alessandra and Michael O'Connor argue that the "Golden Rule" is not always the best way to approach people. Rather, they propose the Platinum Rule: "Do unto others as "they'd" like done unto them". In other words, find out what makes people tick and go from there. In this entertaining and thought-provoking book, Tony Alessandra and Michael O'Connor argue that the "Golden Rule" is not always the best way to approach people. Rather, they propose the Platinum Rule: "Do unto others as "they'd" like done unto them". In other words, find out what makes people tick and go from there.


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In this entertaining and thought-provoking book, Tony Alessandra and Michael O'Connor argue that the "Golden Rule" is not always the best way to approach people. Rather, they propose the Platinum Rule: "Do unto others as "they'd" like done unto them". In other words, find out what makes people tick and go from there. In this entertaining and thought-provoking book, Tony Alessandra and Michael O'Connor argue that the "Golden Rule" is not always the best way to approach people. Rather, they propose the Platinum Rule: "Do unto others as "they'd" like done unto them". In other words, find out what makes people tick and go from there.

30 review for The Platinum Rule: Discover the Four Basic Business Personalities andHow They Can Lead You to Success

  1. 5 out of 5

    Heather McC

    Treating others the way that they would like to be treated (as opposed to how you would like to be treated), allows yourself to view the world through different perspectives, make new connections and improve your own outlook.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Bunnell

    I read this for a writing class I'm taking about personality types. The four types of people profiled in this book lined up with some class I took at work (DISC-assessment, maybe) in which people were slotted on a continuum of introversion vs extroversion on one axis, and importance of facts vs. relationships on the other. I'm a socializer, and this wasn't a surprise to me. I'm loud and not all that on task sometimes, and like to have fun and still get things done. At work, I mentioned this book I read this for a writing class I'm taking about personality types. The four types of people profiled in this book lined up with some class I took at work (DISC-assessment, maybe) in which people were slotted on a continuum of introversion vs extroversion on one axis, and importance of facts vs. relationships on the other. I'm a socializer, and this wasn't a surprise to me. I'm loud and not all that on task sometimes, and like to have fun and still get things done. At work, I mentioned this book and these four categories to a coworker. He's a relater, so he probably just went along with me to keep the peace. :) We identified most of the categories of our coworkers. In my writing class, we talked about romantic relationships between the types and speaking to others in the way that resonates best to them (which is why this rule is platinum, rather than gold). I think there is some value to this. None of this was new territory for me, and this book isn't particularly new either.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Danny Hui

    Review: Everyone knows the golden rule, treat other the way you want to be treated, in order to get on their good side. The author Anthony Alessandra, claims that this will only work 1/4 the time, as there are at least 4 other personality types. Treat everyone the way 'they' want to be treated. And you have a potential of influencing 100% of the people you meet. I really enjoyed this books as it reinforced the lessons I learned from "Sales Dogs", another fantastic book, and provided some great ti Review: Everyone knows the golden rule, treat other the way you want to be treated, in order to get on their good side. The author Anthony Alessandra, claims that this will only work 1/4 the time, as there are at least 4 other personality types. Treat everyone the way 'they' want to be treated. And you have a potential of influencing 100% of the people you meet. I really enjoyed this books as it reinforced the lessons I learned from "Sales Dogs", another fantastic book, and provided some great tips and tricks What I remember (Spoilers): The book goes into a lot of detail on the types and talks about how to modify your base type to match the type you are trying to influence. The four basic types are relaters, directors, thinkers, socializers. Everyone has one dominant type and at least dabble in the other to greater or lesser degrees. Relaters tend to focus on relationships. They live to be accepted and are great team player and listeners. They, however, can be overly sensitive, and really can't handle instability. Directors types focus on goals, they seek productivity and control. Go to this type for leadership, and pioneering new ventures. However, directors can be impatient, and insensitive at times. They fear being taken advantage of. Socializers prioritize people, they seek recognition and participation. They are very good at persuading and motivating people. Avoid socializers if you need detail orientation and follow through on a task. They can't stand the loss of social recognition. Thinkers are task oriented, accuracy and precision are their aims in life. Look to the thinker if you are planning and setting up systems. Avoid thinkers if you can't handle perfectionist and critical feedback. Despite all the criticism they can deal, they aren't good at taking criticism. Everyone is a blend of these types, and the book further divides each type into sub types. Such as "the go-getter" in the relaters type, my personal favorite. Comments: Like any art, this style of thinking and matching your interaction with people takes practice. To be honest it was hard to think of the four types off the top of my head with out referring to the outline again. It's also important to remember that no one is one type all the time, they can be all four types depending on the situation.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abbass Maanna

    Such an entertaining , thought-provoking book that teaches each one of us how to deal with the different personalities we may face whatever and wherever the workplace is. It informs us what kind of these four personalities : "Director", "Socializer", "Relater" , or "Thinker" are we,discusses each one of them showing each's pros and cons,and how to deal with your partner's personality in order to build rapport and reach success you aim. Written in an easy,direct,and enjoying style,Tony Alessandra Such an entertaining , thought-provoking book that teaches each one of us how to deal with the different personalities we may face whatever and wherever the workplace is. It informs us what kind of these four personalities : "Director", "Socializer", "Relater" , or "Thinker" are we,discusses each one of them showing each's pros and cons,and how to deal with your partner's personality in order to build rapport and reach success you aim. Written in an easy,direct,and enjoying style,Tony Alessandra enlightens the reader about how adaptability occurs and how to adapt in confrontation with any of the previous mentioned personalities, supported with many real-life examples that may occur with any of us. It is mostly recommended for new-to-work persons, and for workers who find some difficulties to adapt with other ones, having opposite personas.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    This is a good book for those who need help in dealing with people. It is recommended for business people. I still receive Tony Allesandra's emails weekly giving more hints on how to deal with different personality types. This book tells us to "treat others as they want to be treated." Then it tells us about the different personality types and how to speak to different people in "their own language". Each type has a different way they want to be communicated with. Knowing which people prefer whic This is a good book for those who need help in dealing with people. It is recommended for business people. I still receive Tony Allesandra's emails weekly giving more hints on how to deal with different personality types. This book tells us to "treat others as they want to be treated." Then it tells us about the different personality types and how to speak to different people in "their own language". Each type has a different way they want to be communicated with. Knowing which people prefer which way helps you to interact with them more positively.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Brilliant. Will keep and refer to this book often ,as it woke me to a major core inauthenticity,that I am now working to correct. Profound.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hudson

    The Platinum Rule argues that you have to adapt your thinking, working and management style to create a diverse team which will create more effective solutions than one with similar thinking styles. The book provides examples of scenarios which can help the reader make better application of selling skills from letting the customer explain the product to themselves to creating a long but simplified run-through of benefits. The author utilizes these scenarios, followed by a teaching to help the re The Platinum Rule argues that you have to adapt your thinking, working and management style to create a diverse team which will create more effective solutions than one with similar thinking styles. The book provides examples of scenarios which can help the reader make better application of selling skills from letting the customer explain the product to themselves to creating a long but simplified run-through of benefits. The author utilizes these scenarios, followed by a teaching to help the reader better understand real world application of the skills they hope to teach in a way text lacking context couldn't. The author creates his argument with several stories in each chapter for 14 chapters. This writing structure, a story followed by a teaching helped me understand the application of the skills taught in this book. I actually ran into an exact scenario taught in the book nearly a week after reading the book almost word for word. I was able to successfully take over an interaction with a dissatisfied customer and sell with the scenario ending positively.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dalen

    It was fine. A lot of what he said he repeated throughout the book so it felt like it went on longer without really saying much. Helpful basic concept though.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sovi Herring

    Has some very unique perspectives, very useful for self correction and guides thought to a new side of cognition.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paul Dormeyer

    Understanding yourself and others Understand yourself first. Understand others to be successful in life. This book helps one to do both. Enjoy people always.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Rothman

    Great read Interesting AND helpful?!?! It's true Amazon is forcing me to write 15 more words but I thought my review was good enough. I see how it is Amazon Great read Interesting AND helpful?!?! It's true Amazon is forcing me to write 15 more words but I thought my review was good enough. I see how it is Amazon

  12. 4 out of 5

    Angga Hadna

    Great book! Explaining about 4 personalities and how to interact with each of them in business — and real life. One thing that I like from this book is : it has sufficient examples in real world problems for every explained theory. This makes me easier to understand, even though I'm not a businessman right now. Great book! Explaining about 4 personalities and how to interact with each of them in business — and real life. One thing that I like from this book is : it has sufficient examples in real world problems for every explained theory. This makes me easier to understand, even though I'm not a businessman right now.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Read

    As the title suggests, this is a twist on "The Golden Rule" which we all remember from elementary school as being: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." Only that's a bit misguided. Because how I want it done unto me might not be at all how you want done unto you. Hence the "Platinum Rule" is about doing unto others as they would choose to have it done. That is a deceptively simple idea. Because how do I know what it is that you want? We have to learn first about our own styles of As the title suggests, this is a twist on "The Golden Rule" which we all remember from elementary school as being: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." Only that's a bit misguided. Because how I want it done unto me might not be at all how you want done unto you. Hence the "Platinum Rule" is about doing unto others as they would choose to have it done. That is a deceptively simple idea. Because how do I know what it is that you want? We have to learn first about our own styles of communication and motivation before we can understand what drives other people and how we must adapt our communication style to deliver what they require. In the very last chapter of the book, the authors point out: "By choosing how we act, we can encourage others to respond more positively. This works not only for adults in the workplace but for people of all ages in all of life's other arena's: home, school, sports, shopping, you name it! . . . Being the best person you can be by treating people the way they want to be treated pays off enormously." Deceptively simple, but you won't believe this until you read the book. This was very life changing for me. Mainly because I had to look at, and then own, the personality type that I am: a Socializer. Or more precisely within the subcategories, a Directing Socializer ("The Enthusiast") on the borderline with a Thinking Socializer ("The Impresser.") After I got over being defensive about this assessment and climbed out of my pit of denial, I could start to understand the fundamental truths of what the book was saying. This is not to say that I agree with all of their broad generalizations about the four personality types, only that I agree they exist, and that learning to adapt to other people's communication styles and ways of thinking is extremely beneficial to everyone involved. This is sensitivity training at it's very best and it's very practical. This is very much a "how to" kind of book: First the what, then the why and finally the how. Not long ago, I was having a conversation with a client who is also a friend. It was not a business related conversation, but in the middle of emphatically stating my opinion, Nancy said: "But it's not about you Catherine. It's just not all about you." And I was stunned, but totally got the message. It was a bulls eye. The center of my universe might be me, but no one else will be joining me there. This book is invaluable. It can open up a whole new world of understanding in why we speak but are not heard, and why we "listen" but do not hear. We need to focus on the needs of other people - not just our own. This book shows us how to recognize what it is that other people need and to adapt our own behaviors to provide that level of communication so that they "win" and so do we. An excellent foundation for good communication skills.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Juergen John Roscher

    I listened to this book on CD. I was looking for a book that I could listen to as I drive back and forth to work that would be educational and might help me communicate better at work and home. I found a CD of “The Platinum Rule: Discover the Four Basic Business Personalities and How They Can Lead You to Success” by Tony Alessandra at the local library and decided to listen to it. I am not well steeped in communication theory or practices and found this book to have several good recommendations i I listened to this book on CD. I was looking for a book that I could listen to as I drive back and forth to work that would be educational and might help me communicate better at work and home. I found a CD of “The Platinum Rule: Discover the Four Basic Business Personalities and How They Can Lead You to Success” by Tony Alessandra at the local library and decided to listen to it. I am not well steeped in communication theory or practices and found this book to have several good recommendations in helping one communicate with different types of people. Alessandra in “The Platinum Rule” describes the four main personality types and there characteristics in the business world - director, socializer, relater, and thinker – and how to best communicate with each type. He also teaches that most people don’t completely fit into one personality type but have some traits from one or more categories even though they can be classified as one of the four basic types. Furthermore, Alessandra gives examples of how to effective communicate with each type of personality. Many of the examples are hokey or corny, but the point that is attempted to be taught usually is learned. The last part of the book deals with how salesman can use the knowledge of the four personality types to better work with customers. Alessandra notes that the communication skills learned in this book are not only applicable to work but in the home, and community. I learned from this book that most individuals fall into one of the four general personality types and to effectively communicate with them that a different approach is required for each personality. I started trying to determine the personality type of my co-workers and found that it was not real difficult to place most of them into one of the four categories. I have tried with some limited success to communicate with them using the recommended approaches given by Alessandra. I have found it difficult to pinpoint my own personality type. In general, I fall under the umbrella of a “Thinker”, but I see occasions where I fall under each of the three other personality types. I work with many thinkers (engineers) and I do not demonstrate some of the hard-core characteristics or depth of the characteristics that “strong” thinkers exhibit. I would guess that I am a “weak” thinker personality type. This book would benefit those who want improve their communication skills with others. I would further recommend to salesmen who have to deal with all personality types when pitching their products.

  15. 4 out of 5

    JP

    After a couple chapters, I thought this was going to be very good. But then it took a sharp turn into redundancy of very simplistic examples. The overall concept is interesting. The pair have developed yet another two-dimensional assessment of personality. Directors, Socializers, Relaters, and Thinkers are each allocated two of the four quandrants, based on their degree of directness and guardedness. (And of course, each can be further segmented to get a total of 16 styles.) Having given the req After a couple chapters, I thought this was going to be very good. But then it took a sharp turn into redundancy of very simplistic examples. The overall concept is interesting. The pair have developed yet another two-dimensional assessment of personality. Directors, Socializers, Relaters, and Thinkers are each allocated two of the four quandrants, based on their degree of directness and guardedness. (And of course, each can be further segmented to get a total of 16 styles.) Having given the requisite quiz and explained the implications, the authors go on through endless examples to teach the reader how to interpret another's style and apply the Platinum Rule. (It's not an alteration of the Golden Rule, they say, but a refinement.) I chose not to read every page in the last half, as I can pretty much predict what to do, and Hamlet and Novum Organum are sitting by my chair. The Platinum Rule is probably natural for some people and common sense to others. My only other observation regarding all of these self-test personality diagnostics is that the assessment is based on now one behaves, not how one wants to behave.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Velvet Jane

    I admit that I don't "buy in" to many corporate psychological improvement theories or books; The Platinum Rule is a significant exception to that statement. This book was a boon not only to the corporate environment I worked in when I was first given it to read, but also to every social environment that I participate in (school, clubs, volunteerism etc.) This book provides a solid outline on how to mesh the different personality types that constitute professional (and personal) environments. The I admit that I don't "buy in" to many corporate psychological improvement theories or books; The Platinum Rule is a significant exception to that statement. This book was a boon not only to the corporate environment I worked in when I was first given it to read, but also to every social environment that I participate in (school, clubs, volunteerism etc.) This book provides a solid outline on how to mesh the different personality types that constitute professional (and personal) environments. The main concept of "treat others how they want to be treated," versus the old golden rule of "treat others how you want to be treated," is so simple that it is humbling in its genius, and disconcerting that we do not do this instinctively. Although there are no absolutes, I have found this concept to be generally accurate once applied. One should not treat a shy introvert the same as they would a boisterous and highly social extrovert. The book helps people to identify the myriad of social types that sit in between the two aforementioned common ones, as well as how to interface with them in a manner that allows for cohesion and success both personally and as part of a team.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tami Stackelhouse

    For clarification, I'm giving the book 4 stars instead of 5 because the content is great, but the examples are sometimes confusing. I've been to many workshops that cover this material and those have generally been more helpful. So yes, anyone who interacts with people at all should read this. That means you, unless you are reading this review from a lonely mountain top where you live alone. =) We all are different. We don't all speak the same "language" of ideas, thoughts, behaviors, etc. This bo For clarification, I'm giving the book 4 stars instead of 5 because the content is great, but the examples are sometimes confusing. I've been to many workshops that cover this material and those have generally been more helpful. So yes, anyone who interacts with people at all should read this. That means you, unless you are reading this review from a lonely mountain top where you live alone. =) We all are different. We don't all speak the same "language" of ideas, thoughts, behaviors, etc. This book helps you to translate your actions so that they can understand you better.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lana Hillman

    This book was recommended to my fiancé & I by our pastor in preparation for marriage. Not only did it clarify our different personality styles, but gave practical suggestions for dealing with each other. This book also identified a number of ways to deal with difficult personalities in and out of the work environment & avoiding potential problems in business. I HIGHLY recommend this book to anyone who wants to improve their relationships personally & professionally & increase their business.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Raejean

    If you were raised with the golden rule, it's time to up your game! Instead of treating others the way you want to be treated, we should treat others the way they want to be treated. The Platinum Rule demonstrates different communication styles and how understanding them can increase the effectiveness of working together. You learn your style, how to identify the styles of those you encounter and how to adapt to the best way to communicate. The book focuses on business, sales and customer servic If you were raised with the golden rule, it's time to up your game! Instead of treating others the way you want to be treated, we should treat others the way they want to be treated. The Platinum Rule demonstrates different communication styles and how understanding them can increase the effectiveness of working together. You learn your style, how to identify the styles of those you encounter and how to adapt to the best way to communicate. The book focuses on business, sales and customer service but the knowledge applies to anyone who talks to other humans.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Martha

    This book suffers a bit from the desire to categorize everyone into only four categories. Although the categories may be useful metaphors, very few people are truly in only one or two of the categories. For example, my quiz pegged me as a Director, but I really more often fit the Thinker category better. It's got some use in reminding people that not everyone has the same needs, but it feels too superficial to me. This book suffers a bit from the desire to categorize everyone into only four categories. Although the categories may be useful metaphors, very few people are truly in only one or two of the categories. For example, my quiz pegged me as a Director, but I really more often fit the Thinker category better. It's got some use in reminding people that not everyone has the same needs, but it feels too superficial to me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ben Love

    I usually enjoy Tony Alessandra, especially his “meat and potatoes” shorter works on charisma and presentation skills. However, this one felt like it should have been a shorter work but became very, very stretched out. It took a few pages to be told and for me to understand the platinum rule and I was able to figure out the constructs and consequences of it fairly rapidly too. Not sure if an entire book was needed to reinforce this simple (but valid) principle.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jos dujardin

    the 4 "personality traits" are often used in coaching and sales leadership trainings. This book is a full explication of these 4 personality traits with perspectives on selling, managing complaints, coaching etc. The survey to enable yourself to classify in one of the 4 traits is useful as it also allows for a subcategorization. the 4 "personality traits" are often used in coaching and sales leadership trainings. This book is a full explication of these 4 personality traits with perspectives on selling, managing complaints, coaching etc. The survey to enable yourself to classify in one of the 4 traits is useful as it also allows for a subcategorization.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    While this book had some good points, I think they spent too much time on examples for a salesperson. It just seemed like the second half the book was just repeating the first half, and it wasn't beneficial. While this book had some good points, I think they spent too much time on examples for a salesperson. It just seemed like the second half the book was just repeating the first half, and it wasn't beneficial.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Golden Rule: Treat others that way you want to be treated. Platinum Rule: Treat others the way that they want to be treated. They've taken that admittedly important though somewhat obvious difference and written about 300 pages. Golden Rule: Treat others that way you want to be treated. Platinum Rule: Treat others the way that they want to be treated. They've taken that admittedly important though somewhat obvious difference and written about 300 pages.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Steve C

    A business version of The Color Code. The material is original and I read a shortened version of it. I gather (but am not sure) the author's claims are backed by research. A business version of The Color Code. The material is original and I read a shortened version of it. I gather (but am not sure) the author's claims are backed by research.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Personality types. Always interesting psychology!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kina

    Platinum rule got my attention, it started out recognizing four basic rules. This book is good for big corporate businesses. It's helped to understand some individuals at work. Platinum rule got my attention, it started out recognizing four basic rules. This book is good for big corporate businesses. It's helped to understand some individuals at work.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dean Brophy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Neil Ball

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